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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE & ENGINEERING

INNOVATION LIVES HERE YEAR IN REVIEW 2015


TABLE OF CONTENTS

MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

1

CENTRE FOR ENGINEERING INNOVATION & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

2

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

4

GRADUATE STUDIES

6

RESEARCH

8

LOOKING AHEAD

10

INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

12

BY THE NUMBERS

14

AWARDS AND HONOURS

15

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

16


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN U of T Engineering had a most impressive year of accomplishments in 2014–15. Our unwavering pursuit of excellence has positioned us as the premier engineering school in Canada and earned us a place as one of the very best in the world. Construction is underway for the Centre for Engineering Innovation & Entrepreneurship (CEIE), which is planned to open in 2017. This new building will usher in a new era of exceptional research and experiential learning at U of T Engineering, housing interactive spaces for students and faculty, as well as a number of multidisciplinary research centres and institutes. We continue to pioneer leading research and enhance cross-disciplinary collaborations to address some of the most pressing global challenges and improve people’s lives. The Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, a joint initiative among U of T Engineering, the Faculty of Medicine, the Hospital for Sick Children and the University Health Network will bring together research, education and innovation in personalized genomic medicine, stem cell research, bioengineering for cardiovascular treatment and tissue engineering for the regulation of heart muscles, valves and coronary vessels. Targeted outreach and recruitment efforts earned the largest number of undergraduate applications in our Faculty’s history. Women made up nearly one-third of our first-year undergraduate class (30.6%) — the highest of any entering engineering class in Canada. Engineering demands innovation and creativity, which can only be achieved through diverse perspectives. In 2014–15, one in four undergraduate students came from outside of Canada, bringing international perspectives to the campus environment. While we are tremendously proud of these achievements, there is more work to be done to improve gender balance and to attract the best and brightest students from new corners of the world. Our fundraising efforts continue to thrive. We set a new record this past year with nearly $28 million raised towards our $200-million Boundless campaign goal. Support from our generous donors enables us to further drive innovation, foster entrepreneurship and cultivate global engineering leaders. Engineering is ever-changing and has never been more influential. Our researchers, educators, students and alumni play a vital role in transforming the engineering profession and the world around us. Together, we are leading the way to a future that is very bright.

“The Centre for Engineering Innovation & Entrepreneurship will usher in a new era of exceptional research and interactive, experiental learning at U of T Engineering”

CRISTINA AMON Dean

FACULTY LEADERSHIP 2014–15 DEAN Cristina Amon VICE-DEAN, GRADUATE STUDIES Markus Bussmann VICE-DEAN, RESEARCH Edward (Ted) H. Sargent VICE-DEAN, UNDERGRADUATE Susan McCahan

ASSOCIATE DEAN, CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS Bryan Karney

CHAIR, MECHANICAL & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Jean Zu

CHAIR, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING & APPLIED CHEMISTRY Grant Allen

CHAIR, ENGINEERING SCIENCE Mark Kortschot

DIRECTOR, INSTITUTE OF BIOMATERIALS & BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Christopher Yip

CHAIR, THE EDWARD S. ROGERS SR. DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Farid Najm

DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO INSTITUTE FOR AEROSPACE STUDIES David Zingg

CHAIR, CIVIL ENGINEERING Brent Sleep CHAIR, MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING Jun Nogami

CHAIR, FIRST YEAR Micah Stickel

Year in Review 2015 1


CENTRE FOR ENGINEERING INNOVATION & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

GROUNDBREAKING OPPORTUNITIES IN RESEARCH AND EDUCATION The Centre for Engineering Innovation & Entrepreneurship (CEIE) is the beginning of a new era for exceptional research and experiential learning at U of T Engineering. The Centre, which will total 15,000 gross square metres, will combine smart building design with leading engineering education practices. The CEIE will provide inspiring, collaborative spaces for students, researchers, alumni and industry partners to work together on innovative ideas in one of the finest teaching and research environments in the world. Global philanthropic support has enabled us to raise our sights and reimagine engineering education.

BUILDING HIGHLIGHTS

RESEARCH CENTRES AND INSTITUTES

THE ENTREPRENEURSHIP HATCHERY

DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PROTOTYPE FACILITIES

Multidisciplinary research space in the CEIE will enable faculty, students and industry partners to work together and address some of the world’s most significant challenges. The building will feature such centres and institutes as the Centre for Global Engineering, Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering, Institute for Robotics & Mechatronics, Institute for Sustainable Energy and Institute for Water Innovation.

Since its inception in 2012, The Entrepreneurship Hatchery has supported student ventures from concept to prototype. In its new home, the Hatchery will expand this support by providing workspace, equipment, mentoring and opportunities to connect with investors.

Reconfigurable spaces for planning and executing group projects will surround prototyping, fabrication and visualization facilities that will allow students to move from light machinery back to their study areas.

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TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED ACTIVE LEARNING (TEAL) ROOMS

INTERACTIVE AUDITORIUM

VERSATILE, HIGHLY ENGAGING STUDENT CLUB SPACE

TEAL rooms will be critical to supporting blended modalities of teaching and the design work that has become integral to U of T Engineering courses. Many of these spaces will be open 24 hours a day, featuring moveable chairs and group tables serviced by multiple flat-panel screens that allow for a variety of configurations.

A 500-seat auditorium designed to optimize audience engagement will include data communication systems, a stadium-style video wall and flexible spaces to facilitate student group activities.

The lower level will house flexible facilities with essential and convenient storage for student clubs, which involve approximately 1,700 students.

Toronto-based Montgomery Sisam Architects and U.K.-based Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios were chosen as the architects for the Centre for Engineering Innovation & Entrepreneurship. (Rendering courtesy of Montgomery Sisam Architects + Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios)

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES:

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, LEADERSHIP AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP U of T Engineering’s strong programs, diverse, highly engaged community and international reputation continue to draw the brightest students and most promising engineers from around the globe. Our Faculty enriches the undergraduate experience by offering programs that empower students to achieve academic excellence, foster entrepreneurial inspiration and develop leadership competencies. We nurture the next generation of makers through hands-on, experiential opportunities, cross-disciplinary programs, minors and certificates.

ENGINEERING DESIGN First-year engineering students can experience Engineering Strategies and Practices (ESP) and Praxis (for engineering science) courses. These innovative courses introduce design methodologies and foster excitement for engineering through design projects that combine team-based, hands-on creativity and logical methodology. Through ESP, students are assigned to local industry clients where they put their engineering learning to work. In the past, students have taken on projects such as designing safer scaffolding for construction sites, making a house more dog-accessible and devising a new process that makes it easier to package dried foods. The Multidisciplinary Capstone Design Projects (MCP) course, facilitated by the University of Toronto Institute for Multidisciplinary Design & Innovation (UT-IMDI), embodies our Faculty’s commitment to nurture the maker and innovator within the next generation of engineers. The MCP is a full-year course that provides fourth-year students with an experience in multidisciplinary engineering practice through significant, client-driven, open-ended design projects. Students from across the Faculty work in teams to address challenges identified by industry partners. Since 2012, nearly 150 students have participated in the MCP course, with 37 projects completed for 23 partners. One of the projects has already evolved into a startup company.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR Between third and fourth year, undergraduate students have the option to participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program — one of the most highly regarded paid internships in the country. Placements are available across Canada and abroad for 12 to 16 months. Students apply their knowledge beyond the campus environment and gain professional experience during their PEY terms. Major organizations such as Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC), Deloitte, IBM, Imperial Oil and Apple routinely hire PEY students,

as do startup and medium-sized companies such as Uken Games, Colibri Technologies Inc. and Wattpad, among others. “Working as a process analyst at CIBC was an amazing experience,” said industrial engineering student Dimpho Radebe. “PEY not only helped me launch my professional career with confidence, it also enabled me to improve my communication and networking skills.”

INSTITUTE FOR LEADERSHIP EDUCATION IN ENGINEERING Undergraduate students can develop effective leadership competencies throughout their degree at our award-winning Institute for Leadership Education in Engineering (ILead). The first institute of its kind in Canada, ILead offers courses, emphases and co-curricular activities to help students excel as emerging leaders. This year, ILead launched an initiative called The Game, a year-long co-curricular competition that emphasizes societal leadership. Students worked in small teams to frame and design solutions to complex social problems. The top team received a $5,000 prize. Chemical engineering student Bowen Jiawei Le was part of this year’s winning team, which developed canact, a unique, web-based platform that combines the best features of Kickstarter, LinkedIn and Facebook to enable social change around the world. “The Game taught me to realize my dream and develop the drive and skills to chase it,” Le said.

STUDENT CLUBS With nearly 90 U of T Engineering clubs to choose from, it’s hard for undergraduate students not to become involved. Clubs give students opportunities for experiential learning while developing talents, having fun and forming friendships that will last a lifetime.

Engineering Business Minor Our popular Engineering Business Minor is a powerful collaborative effort between U of T Engineering and the Rotman School of Management. The first of its kind in Canada, it is specifically designed for students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and marketing to management, leadership and entrepreneurship. Students are required to take a minimum of six semester-long courses to complete the minor.

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The University of Toronto Supermileage team won the 2015 Shell Eco-marathon Americas in Detroit, with an efficiency of 3,421 miles per gallon — the equivalent of 6.82 millilitres of gasoline per 10 kilometres. (Inset Photo: Rick Osentoski AP Images for Shell)

Year in Review 2015 5


GRADUATE STUDIES:

COLLABORATIVE AND INTEGRATED APPROACHES TO ADVANCED LEARNING The future depends on engineers’ abilities to innovate creative solutions to complex challenges that reach across disciplinary boundaries. U of T Engineering’s outstanding research reputation and leading-edge labs offer unmatched opportunities for graduate students to learn advanced critical thinking and develop research competencies. CENTRE FOR GLOBAL ENGINEERING

REMEDIATION EDUCATION NETWORK

Last year, U of T’s Centre for Global Engineering (CGEN) brought together graduate students from across campus to explore ways to fight childhood hunger in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The students travelled to Dhaka to examine the city’s cultural, business and political frameworks, while evaluating the success of recent technical approaches.

In 2014, civil engineering professor Brent Sleep established the Remediation Education Network (RENEW), a consortium that supports graduate student and postdoctoral fellow training and research in environmental remediation. The network also includes co-investigators Elizabeth Edwards and Edgar Acosta, both professors in the Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, and professor Barbara Sherwood Lollar of Earth Sciences.

One group proposed Mother’s Milk, a new method of ensuring that working mothers can provide their infants with the immense health benefits of breast milk. The team — which includes Scott Genin, a chemical engineering PhD candidate — designed a sand-based heating device that can pasteurize the milk, allowing it to be stored longer without refrigeration. This reduces mothers’ reliance on formula. The team received a Grand Challenges Canada grant to implement its innovative product. “Our goal is to lower the rate of infant malnutrition,” said Genin. “As a side benefit, we anticipate that factories with this system will also have lower worker turnover, as this will be an attractive benefit for workers.”

MASTER OF ENGINEERING In 2015, U of T Engineering launched two new areas of emphasis for graduate students pursuing a Master of Engineering (MEng): one in sustainable energy and another in advanced manufacturing. These will further enable U of T engineers to tackle the industrial and societal challenges of the 21st century, developing both specialized technical competencies and the ability to collaborate across disciplines.

Research is conducted into the hydrogeology, chemistry and microbiology of contaminated industrial sites, rail yards and abandoned gas stations, and into processes that might be used to remove the contaminants or transform them into harmless compounds. Students spend 20 per cent of their time working with industry partners. RENEW has secured partnerships with seven environmental remediation companies, which will provide internships for the students, giving them practical experience in site assessment and cleanup. Michael Previdsa, a civil engineering Master of Applied Science (MASc) candidate who is contributing to Sleep’s RENEW group, is researching ways to improve the removal process for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. “I work in collaboration with Pinchin Ltd., an industry leader in environmental consulting and remediation services,” Previdsa said. “Pinchin has provided me the opportunity to gain practical field experience in Phase I and II environmental site assessments and remediation projects.”

“Through these new areas of emphasis, graduate students can further define their curricular path,” said Markus Bussmann, vice-dean, graduate studies. “They connect students with similar interests both to each other and to the Faculty in a more meaningful way.”

Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Innovation and Technology in Engineering (ELITE) Certificate The first of its kind in Canada, the ELITE certificate is targeted at engineers seeking to develop a well-rounded set of competencies — technical as well as leadership, entrepreneurship, management, finance and innovation. The certificate can be integrated into MEng programs offered by any of six departments in the Faculty: ChemE, CivE, ECE, MIE, MSE and UTIAS.

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Civil engineering master’s students Michael Previdsa, Ertiana Rokaj and Paul Furbacher work with Professor Brent Sleep in his lab.

Year in Review 2015 7


RESEARCH:

ADVANCING ENGINEERING EXCELLENCE AND INNOVATION U of T Engineering is home to some of the finest researchers, entrepreneurs and industry experts from around the world. Our faculty members earn more than 25 per cent of major awards given to Canadian engineering professors. From human health to global energy and sustainable technology, our researchers create solutions to critical problems through a collaborative environment that fosters remarkable innovation and boundless possibility. TEACHING DRONES TO LEARN

READING THE HUMAN GENOME

Thanks to autonomous algorithms developed by Professor Angela Schoellig of the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), researchers are able to use drones to photograph algae growth along the shores of Boston’s Charles River. Her algorithms are also used in the unmanned aerial vehicles that many farmers employ to monitor plant health and soil moisture.

A Canadian research team, led by electrical and computer engineering professor Brendan Frey, developed the first method for ranking genetic mutations. It is based on how living cells read DNA and reveals how likely any given alteration is to cause disease. Frey’s team — which includes researchers from U of T Engineering, the Faculty of Medicine, the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Microsoft Research and the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory — uses a new technology called deep learning to teach a computer system to scan a piece of DNA, read the genetic instructions that specify how to splice together sections that code for proteins, and determine which proteins will be produced. Unlike other machine learning methods, deep learning can make sense of incredibly complex relationships, such as those found in living systems in biology and medicine. “Over the past decade, a huge amount of effort has been invested into searching for mutations in the genome that cause disease, without a rational approach to understanding why they cause disease,” Frey said. “This is because scientists didn’t have the means to understand the text of the genome and how mutations in it can change the meaning of that text.”

OIL-SPILL SPONGES AND A FUTURE MANUFACTURING LEADER

In her research, Schoellig applies mathematics to engineering systems to develop the algorithms that systems need to regulate themselves and move autonomously. Schoellig’s current work looks broadly at robotics, trying to understand how robots can learn from experience, collaborate and share information. “I really like that, when using robotics, you can make a machine that extends human capabilities and the possibilities that we have,” she said. “They can give us a view on things that we would never have otherwise.”

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Mechanical engineering PhD candidate Ali Rizvi, under the supervision of Chul Park, Distinguished Professor of microcellular engineered plastics, has designed a cost-effective commercial sponge, similar to the one you would find in your kitchen sink, which can be used to clean up disastrous oil spills. Using light foam, it absorbs 24 times its weight per gram in oil, and doesn’t absorb water. Rizvi’s sponge technology involves a manufacturing method that is inexpensive and easy to scale. “I pursued manufacturing engineering to facilitate the commercialization of scientific breakthroughs,” Rizvi said. “If a product cannot be mass manufactured in a cost-effective way, it will fail.” The Society of Manufacturing Engineers recently named Rizvi as one of the “Top 30 Under 30 Future Leaders in Manufacturing.”


Professor Brendan Frey and his team developed a system that teaches computers to read the human genome and rate the likelihood of mutations causing disease

Year in Review 2015 9


LOOKING AHEAD:

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERS BRING NEW APPROACHES TO CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH CARE Researchers from the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) continue to build on the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering’s unparalleled strengths in biomedical engineering with the establishment of a lab exclusively focused on discovery and clinical translation in the area of cardiovascular disease. The Translational Biology and Engineering Program (TBEP) — a key component of the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research (TRCHR) — will occupy an entire floor of the MaRS Phase 2 building in Toronto’s Discovery District beginning in fall 2015. It will be a powerful addition to the network of researchers and educators aiming to accelerate treatment development and reduce the estimated $2.3-billion cost of managing moderate and severe heart failure in Canada. Ten U of T researchers and their graduate students from U of T Engineering, the Faculty of Dentistry and the Faculty of Medicine will work side-by-side in the open and collaborative research space to advance clinical applications in genomic medicine, regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and advanced cardiac care. Peter Zandstra, interim scientific director at the TRCHR, has been organizing the start up of the TBEP component. Zandstra is also the Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Bioengineering and a professor at IBBME and the Donnelly Centre for Cellular & Biomolecular Research.

U OF T ENGINEERING RESEARCHERS AT TBEP TBEP’s roster of U of T Engineering faculty includes award-winning researchers Margaret Hai-Ling Cheng, Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalez, Paul Santerre and Craig Simmons, who will combine stem cell technology with new approaches in biomaterials, cellular and tissue engineering for the regeneration of heart muscle, coronary vessels and heart valves. Santerre’s research will focus on developing polymer technologies that reduce inflammation around life-saving devices such as stents and stem cell delivery systems, allowing heart cells to repair themselves and preventing longer-term complications such as blood clots and fibrosis.

“If you can reduce some of the long-term management elements by allowing these cells to repair themselves, we are reducing the burden on the health-care system in the most phenomenal way,” Santerre said. Simmons, the Canada Research Chair in Microbiology, is collaborating with The Hospital for Sick Children to develop treatments for babies born with congenital heart defects. The work involves growing tissue from stem cells taken from the baby’s umbilical cord and putting it on a bio-scaffold that degrades away, leaving a valve made of the baby’s own cells. The end goal is to develop a living tissue valve that restores normal heart function and doesn’t have to be replaced as the child grows. “We’re going to be embedded on the same floor with people from the Faculty of Medicine and within a hospital research complex, so our students will be working side-by-side, exchanging ideas with one another,” Simmons said. “The interaction that will occur just because we’re physically in the same place is bound to result in new ideas, approaches and innovations that wouldn’t have happened otherwise.” Fernandez-Gonzalez applauds the Centre’s embrace of fundamental discovery research — such as his study of fruit fly embryos to gain a better understanding of how heart cells develop or how they could be stimulated to repair themselves. He said about 70 to 80 per cent of genes implicated in human diseases are found in fruit flies, so if researchers know which genes are key for cell repair in a fruit fly embryo, they can also start to understand which genes may be important to repair the human heart. Cheng will combine electrical and computer engineering with biomedical training to provide expertise in tissue imaging at TBEP.

About the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research (TRCHR) The University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children and the University Health Network announced the creation of the TRCHR in November 2014, funded by an unprecedented donation of $130 million from the Rogers family — the largest monetary gift ever made to a Canadian health-care initiative. The Centre will bring together expert clinicians and researchers from across the three partner institutions, as well as graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and clinical fellows who represent the future of the field. The TRCHR will also establish a competitive innovation fund to drive discovery and the development of next-generation therapies for heart failure, and an education fund to attract the best and brightest students and postgraduates to ensure a deep pool of talent in Canada for cardiac care and research. Photo courtesy of MaRS Discovery District

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Professors Craig Simmons and Peter Zandstra are leading new bioengineering research to improve heart health. Pictured with PhD student Jennifer Ma.

Year in Review 2015 11


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS:

BUILDING INNOVATION FROM THE GROUND UP There has never been a more exciting time to partner with U of T Engineering. Industry partners come here because of the Faculty’s world-class researchers and students, exceptional infrastructure of laboratories and matching funds from federal and provincial governments.

THE FUTURE OF ADVANCED MATERIALS Last summer, U of T Engineering unveiled the Ontario Centre for Characterization of Advanced Materials (OCCAM). Partly funded by industry partner Hitachi High-Technologies Canada, the $20-million facility features state-of-the-art electron microscopes that allow researchers in energy, transportation, health care and more to develop safer, cleaner and more sustainable materials for a brighter future. The facility is a joint initiative between the Departments of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry and Materials Science & Engineering.

U of T ENGINEERING

SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES Today’s power grid is strained more than ever before. Hydro One turned to three researchers from The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering for smart grid technologies that will help keep us all plugged in. Professors Reza Iravani, Zeb Tate and Josh Taylor are collaborating with Hydro One on a project that will improve power-system stability and monitoring, use of energy storage, and integration of distributed energy resources, including intermittent renewable generation such as wind and solar power.

ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSTAINABLE AIRCRAFT The Centre for Research in Sustainable Aviation (CRSA) at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) was established to develop future generations of environmentally sustainable aircraft. The CRSA takes advantage of the technical and professional expertise within UTIAS, its partner institutions and industry. The CRSA works directly with Bombardier Aerospace and Pratt & Whitney, the largest employers of aeronautical engineers and researchers in Canada.

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MANUFACTURING FOR A 21ST-CENTURY ECONOMY The Toronto Institute of Advanced Manufacturing (TIAM) is a new collaborative multidisciplinary initiative to enable technology in the 21st century. Headed by mechanical and industrial engineering professor Hani Naguib, the Canada Research Chair in Smart and Functional Materials, TIAM provides the expertise and infrastructure to turn great ideas into better products and processes. Through commercialization partnerships in Ontario and Canada, TIAM explores the cuttingedge technologies, materials and methods in advanced manufacturing that will help companies compete in the global marketplace. The Institute brings together more than 17 faculty members and their laboratories across six departments, supporting multidisciplinary research. Current industry partners include Celestica, GE Digital Energy and BlackBerry.

G

TECHNOLOGIES FOR FRESH, CLEAN WATER Civil engineering professors Robert Andrews, NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Source Water Quality Monitoring and Advanced/Emerging Technologies for Drinking Water Treatment, and Ron Hofmann, NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Technologies for Drinking Water Treatment, are working with industry on technologies that reduce both the financial cost and environmental impact of water treatment. This unique program involves the City of Toronto, the Region of Peel, the Region of Durham and other major providers of drinking water to the five million residents of the Greater Toronto Area. It also includes industry partners such as General Electric Water and Process Technologies. The partnership provides both a key avenue for technological applications and a fruitful source of new research.

7 Industrial Research Chairs ROBERT ANDREWS NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Source Water Quality Monitoring and Advanced/ Emerging Technologies for Drinking Water Treatment KAMRAN BEHDINAN NSERC Chair in Multidisciplinary Engineering Design

VAUGHN BETZ NSERC/Altera Industrial Research Chair in Programmable Silicon RON HOFMANN NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Technologies for Drinking Water Treatment DOUG HOOTON NSERC/Cement Association of Canada Industrial Research in Concrete Durability and Sustainability

ROGER NEWMAN NSERC/UNENE Industrial Research Chair in Corrosion Control and Materials Performance in Nuclear Power Systems SAM SAMPATH NSERC/P&WC Industrial Research Chair in Aviation Gas Turbine Combustion/Emissions Research and Design System Optimization

Year in Review 2015 13


BY THE NUMBERS Our highly regarded undergraduate and graduate programs attract academically strong and culturally diverse students from across Canada and the world. U of T Engineering fosters a vibrant research environment in Canada’s most research-intensive university. The data below reflects our continued pursuit of engineering excellence. UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

GRADUATE STUDIES

» 10,989: Highest number of undergraduate applications in our

» 107%: Total growth in MEng student enrolment from 2008 to 2014

Faculty’s history received in 2014; 1 place for every 10 applicants

» 92.4%*: 2014 entering average of incoming Ontario secondary school students

» 3 in 10: Ratio of women to men in first year, the highest

» 45%: Total growth in PhD student enrolment from 2008 to 2014 » More than 650 graduate degrees awarded in 2013–14 » $10.2M in scholarships received by graduate students in 2013–14

proportion (30.6%) in Canada Graduate Students by Degree, 2014–15

» 1 in 4: Ratio of international to domestic undergraduate students

» 724: Total number of PEY placements in 2014–15

Doctoral (PhD) (39.9%) Professional Masters (MEng & MHSc) (32.5%)

Undergraduates by Program of Study, 2014–15

Research Masters (MASc) (27.6%) 712

226

208

Chemical Engineering (11%)

609

Total: 2,194

876

Civil Engineering (9.7%)

433

Computer Engineering (9.7%)

530

Electrical Engineering (17.2%) 136

Total: 5,489

876

532

Engineering Sciences (18.1%)

606

1st Year General Engineering (3.8%) (TrackOne) Industrial Engineering (7.9) Lassonde Mineral Engineering (2.5%)

995

944

Mechanical Engineering (16%) Materials Science & Engineering (4.1%)

*Admission is based on an assessment of not only student grades, but also community involvement, volunteerism and leadership experience.

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Funding, 2004–05 to present 2013–14 – $27.4M 2012–13 – $26.1M

RESEARCH » 65 Research Chairs in 2014–15, including 28 Canada Research Chairs

» 42% of invention disclosures at U of T over the past five years originate with U of T Engineering

» $81.5M: External research expenditures in 2013–14, a 50% increase over the last 5 years

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2011–12 – $22.9M 2010–11 – $21.4M 2009–10 – $20.5M 2008–09 – $17.8M 2007–08 – $18.7M 2006–07 – $16.8M 2005–06 – $17.4M 2004–05 – $15.3M


AWARDS AND HONOURS U of T Engineering is home to some of the top researchers, brightest students and most accomplished alumni from across Canada and around the world, and continues to outperform all other Canadian engineering schools by a wide margin in terms of percentage of awards won by our faculty members. This recognition strengthens our international reputation and enhances our ability to attract renowned academics and students. U of T Engineering researchers received 25 per cent of the major awards won by Canadian engineering professors in 2014. Our researchers account for less than 6 per cent of the total number of engineering professors in Canada. AWARD HIGHLIGHTS

SELECTED FACULTY AWARDS

Natalie Enright Jerger (ECE)

Canadian Academy of Engineering: Fellow

Enright Jerger was just one of eight recipients from Canadian universities to receive a Sloan Research Fellowship in 2015.

Uwe Erb (MSE) Edward (Ted) H. Sargent (ECE) Yu Sun (MIE)

David Yao (IndE MASc 8T1, PhD 8T3)

Engineers Canada: Gold Medal Award

David He (ElecE 0T5)

Michael Sefton (ChemE, IBBME)

Ontario Professional Engineers: Citizenship Award

Andreas Mandelis (MIE) Mandelis received the 2014 Killam Prize in Engineering, the most prestigious engineering award in Canada. Only one, $100,000 prize is awarded nationwide each year.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers: Control Systems Award

Paul Santerre (IBBME, Dentistry)

Bruce Francis (ECE)

Santerre received the Principal Award from the Ernest C. Manning Awards Foundation for his technology to reduce blood clotting from medical devices.

NSERC: E.W.R. Steacie Fellowship Wei Yu (ECE)

Michael Sefton (ChemE, IBBME)

Ontario Professional Engineers Awards: Young Engineer Award

Sefton was invited to join the United States Institute of Medicine (IOM) this year — a rare honour bestowed upon few Canadian scientists and engineers.

Natalie Enright Jerger (ECE)

Royal Society of Canada: Fellow

Molly Shoichet (ChemE, IBBME) Shoichet was named the 2015 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science North American laureate, the third Canadian to receive this honour.

Edward (Ted) H. Sargent (ECE) Peter Zandstra (IBBME)

Frank Vecchio (CivE) Vecchio received a Research and Development Medal at the Ontario Professional Engineers Awards for his extensive work in developing and understanding longer-lasting concrete.

U of T Distinguished Professor of Microcellular Engineered Plastics

Frank Kschischang (ECE)

Chul Park (MIE)

U of T Inventor of the Year Award Parham Aarabi (ECE) Richard Cobbold (IBBME ECE) Hugh Liu (UTIAS)

ChemE – Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry CivE – Department of Civil Engineering ECE – The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering EngSci – Division of Engineering Science IBBME – Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering MIE – Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering MSE – Department of Materials Science & Engineering

MIT Technology Review: Top 35 Innovators Under 35

Marta Ecsedi (CivE 7T6)

SELECTED UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS John W. Senders Award: Imaginative Design

Qian (Linda) Liu (Year 4 EngSci + PEY) Kaiyin (Cathy) Zhu (Year 4 EngSci + PEY)

Minerva Canada: 2014 James Ham Safe Design Engineering Student Award Larissa Rodo (Year 4 ChemE + PEY)

Schulich Leader Scholarship U of T Distinguished Professor of Digital Communications

LEGEND

U.S. National Academy of Engineering: Member

SELECTED ALUMNI AWARDS

Quinton Lowe (Year 1 EngSci)

SELECTED GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDS

2014 James Dyson Award Arianna McAllister (BioMedE MASc Candidate) Lian Leng (MechE MASc 1T0, PhD Candidate)

Vanier-Banting Secretariat: Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships Miles Montgomery (BioMedE PhD Candidate) Cameron Ritchie (CivE PhD Candidate) Shrey Sindhwani (BioMedE PhD Candidate) Lorraine Sugar (CivE PhD Candidate)

Engineers Canada: Award for the Support of Women in the Engineering Profession Samantha Espley (MinE 8T8)

UTIAS – University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

Year in Review 2015 15


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW We strive to use all our resources, including funding, space, infrastructure and personnel, efficiently and strategically to achieve our ambitious education and research goals. We continued to take a proactive approach to investing in the future through the Dean’s Strategic Fund, increasing student support and upgrading infrastructure in 2014–15, while generating total revenues of more than $197 million — a 7.5 per cent increase over last year.

The generosity of our donors, supporters and collaborators continues to make a remarkable impact on our financial standing and our unwavering pursuit of excellence that is reshaping research and education for generations to come.

We also celebrated our most successful philanthropic fundraising year, with a record number of major donors supporting all aspects of Boundless: The Campaign for the University of Toronto. To date, the Engineering Campaign has raised in excess of $152 million toward our goal of $200 million.

The Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship has been a core Boundless campaign priority for the Faculty. Collectively, thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends, along with Faculty and University commitments, we have raised more than $70 million toward this transformative project — an unprecedented 75 per cent of total costs before breaking ground.

PHILANTHROPIC FUNDRAISING, 2014–15

GIFT DESIGNATION, 2014–15

$0.6M

$0.6M

$0.5M $0.2M $0.5M

Major Gifts (94%)

Infrastructure (59%)

$3.1M $4.4M

Realized Planned Gifts (2%)

Research (11%) Student Experience and Programs (12%)

Skule Society (2%) Annual Fund (2%)

Total: $27.9M

Other Gifts (1%)

Student Scholarship and Awards (16%)

Total: $27.9M

$3.3M

Planned Gifts (2%)

$16.5M

$26.1M

REVENUE SOURCES, 2014–15

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: BREAKDOWN BY EXPENSE, 2014–15

(NET OF CENTRAL COSTS) $3.9M $2.6M

$5.9M

$9.4M Undergraduate Student Tuition and Provincial Grants (60%)

$6.9M

Academic Salaries (36%) $21M

Administrative Salaries (16%)

Graduate Student Tuition and Provincial Grants (26%)

Commitments to Departments (5%)

Short-Term Investments (3%)

Total: $197.6M

Scholarships and Student Aid Funds (5%) Endowed Chairs Expendable Earnings (1%)

$50.5M

$45M

$8M

$5.8M

Total: $124.2M

Employee Benefits (13%) Student Support (7%) Operating (17%) Teaching Assistant Wages (6%)

$118.4M

Canada Research Chairs (2%) Research Grants and Contract Overhead (3%)

$16.4M

$7.9M

16 University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering

$20.1M


Details correct at time of printing. Building design and features subject to change. For more information on the CEIE, please visit uoft.me/CEIE


UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE & ENGINEERING OFFICE OF THE DEAN 44 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2E4 Canada www.engineering.utoronto.ca

Year in Review 2015  
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