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\bahl~lVERSf-b'W" DF G U E L P H

GUELPH ALUMNUS

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a day in the life of my dog (and others) we8


Guelph's Office of Continuing Education gives courses to thousands of people a year. You could be one of them.

What happens when an institution like the University of Guelph offers a correspondence course? Are the extension and correspondence courses of this university aimed at bored people with time to kill, or is there something important in the lives of people which can be filled by the courses? Well, one course at Guelph is a correspondence course in Horticulture, the Ontario Diploma in Horticulture, a course designed t o take approximately three years of pretty intensive effort. One graduate wrote: "It was the greatest opportunity in my life. I was scared because 32 years had elapsed since I last attended school. My inferiority complex

was overcome by the thought that i n three years, I will still be three years older, whether I do the course or not. Once I made application for the course. I had another panic, which lasted until I was able to think your way or the instructor's way, on doing the lessons." After other comments on the course, the writer concludes: "This course has given me emotional stability because it is the only good thing I did in my life I can prove. 1 have always been nervous and highstrung, but now I am confident. I think I have progressed considerably from the introverted person I was when I took the course." The personal benefits were important to


this man, and many other graduates have pointed this out in much the same words. And, of course, for many of the students, some with only public school education and years away from studying, the work involved was tremendously difficult. Another grad said: "The course itself was tough, demanding and time-consuming. My wife and daughters were damned glad when it was over, since I spent a lot of time on it, and wouldn't tolerate any TV or record-playing while I was humped-up over the kitchen table scribbling for dear life." Another student said: "I must admit that there were evenings when I was tired from working an eight-hour day and the easiest thing to do in the evening would have been to read something light or go out. In spite of my thoughts, my wife's insistence and reminder of good studying habits usually sent me back t o the books for another evening. I probably spent an average of about 10 hours a week in the winter and quite a bit less during the summer months. Without my wife's help, I would certainly have not completed my studies in the three years, i f at all." The pride these men (and women) take in their accomplishment is entirely justified. The Office of Continuing Education, which administers the course, reports that less than 10 percent of those who begin the 15 subjects O.D.H. program, finish it. The course involves a good deal of research, either in libraries, in the offices of professionals in the field, or simply by oneself. One resourceful student wrote: "Part of one assignment dealt with poorlydrained soil, and explained that certain colors in soils were associated with drainage problems. During that assignment, I kept a shovel in the car, and if I passed a bit of ground which seemed poorlydrained, I'd stop and dig around a bit. The question on soil color rated five marks. I figure altogether I dug up about an acre of ground. For five marks. I did plenty of digging." For anyone who wants t o do some digging in almost any other subject imaginable, the University of Guelph is likely t o have a correspondence or evening course. Some programs, like the Ontario Diploma in Horticulture. are intended t o provide recognized qualification in a field which would otherwise require full time university attendance. Reports from ODH graduates indicate that most have achieved promotions or acquired new jobs which would have been impossible t o get without the new knowledge acquired while earning their Diploma. One man

reported a tripling of his income after completing the course. But technically oriented correspondence and campus-based courses are not the only programs offered by the University's busy Office of Continuing Education, under the interim directorship of C. E. 'Ted' McNinch, OAC '49. The administrative assistant for the office is Mrs. Virginia Gray. Almost every day and evening on campus, businessmen, professional people, housewives and students, rounding out their knowledge in almost every conceivable field, are attending courses in university classrooms or facilities in the City of Guelph. There are four major areas of study offered by the Office of Continuing Education. One is under the broad heading, Arts and Social Sciences, co-ordinated by Dr. Louise Colley. In 1970. this continuing education series is called "Learning for Living", and includes such subjects as "Man in Modern Society", another a weekly series of lectures on the great philosophers, from Plato to Hegel, and weekly workshops in vocal literature. There is also an international series, where foreign students at the University present evening programs to illustrate the life and customs of their own countries. The second broad heading is Agricultural and Biological Sciences, under the direction of Dr. Stan Young. OAC '49. Some courses are conducted by the Ontario Agricultural College and are intended to be professional development courses t o update persons who have a science degree, and other courses are offered t o the agricultural and general public. During any one year, thousands of people take these courses, which are held both on and off campus, and which include everything from courses for creamery operators, t o weed control inspectors, t o floral designers. Usually, the student pays only for room and board on campus, as most of the courses are sponsored by the Department of Agriculture and Food. Correspondence courses, organized by C. E. McNinch, make up the third main group of courses offered by the university, and the aforementioned Ontario Diploma in Horticulture is one of these. But there is a total of over 80 courses available in agriculture, horticulture and food science, with an annual enrolment exceeding 1000. Lastly, the Ontario Veterinary College conducts courses in conjunction with the O.V.C. Alumni Association and the Ontario Veterinary Association. Under the overall direction of Dr. Tom Hulland, OVC '54,

courses, lectures, seminars, and clinics of one t o three days duration are presented throughout the year t o graduate veterinarians, with the view t o updating the practice of veterinary medicine. While the courses designed t o update the knowledge of professionals have a fairly obvious "target" in terms of the people who enroll, it is the courses designed for the general public which provide some of the most interesting information on the kinds of people who come t o the University after a busy day in homes and offices. The "Learning for Living" series, offered by the Colleges of Arts and Social Science, has been keeping records of the people who attend their sessions. In the Winter 1970 session, for example, the Office of Continuing Education discovered that 36 percent of the students were between the ages of 40 t o 49, 21 percent were 30 t o 39, 24 percent were 20 t o 29 and 7 percent were under 20. Six percent were over 50 years of age. Professionals, nurses and teachers made up 26 percent of the groups, housewives 17 percent, clerical workers 15 percent, and students at the University made up 13 percent. Fully onequarter of the classes were made up of people with less than high school graduation, although those with university degrees made up a little more than 40 per cent of the classes. And finally, 54 percent of the students were males. 46 percent females. One special program conducted this fall in the "Learning for Living" series was entitled Survival 'TO, which was a series of three meetings held coincident with and following "Survival Day", October 14. Speakers and panelists from all over Canada appeared at the sessions, and Ted McNinch described the reaction of the public as "wonderfu1". No session failed t o attract less than 300 people, and one. led by Dr. David Suauki, a geneticist at the University of British Columbia, had a "turn-away" crowd of over 500. "Most of the people were from the City of Guelph, not just from the University," Mr. McNinch said. So, i f you think that universities exist only for young students, there are thousands o f people from all walks of life ready t o tell you that you are mistaken. Better yet. drop a line t o the Office of Continuing Education at the University: you might just find a way t o continue your education. W JEB


Guelph Student Survey

What freshmen hope Indications are that the majority of freshmen entering the University of Guelph feel that the main purpose of a university is t o facilitate the self-development of the student as an individual, and t o broaden one's general knowledge. In a survey of 1969's freshmen class conducted by graduate students for the Department of Extension Education, it was found that only 17 percent of those interviewed thought that a university's main purpose is to train students for a career. The graduate students interviewed 156 freshmen; 69 in the BA program, 33 B.Sc.. 3 4 B.Sc.(Agr.), and 2 0 B.H.Sc. The students in the random sample represented 16 percent of the freshman class that completed grade 13 in the '68-'69 school year. None of the students interviewed were married. The survey was divided into three sections: the student and the university, the distribution of students according t o academic program and family background, and the effect of recruitment and public relations programs upon the students' decision to enrol at Guelph. Students and Univenity Although the majority of the freshmen said they thought a university's function was anything but training students for a career, some of them reversed their assessment in their own cases as 27 percent said they came t o Guelph to get career training. Another 35 percent said they enrolled t o get a degree, while approximately 3 0 percent maintained their selection of Guelph was based primarily upon broadening their personal knowledge. The majority of students in the B.Sc., B.H.Sc., and B.Sc.(Agr.) programs selected Guelph for the programs offered and because of the academic reputation enjoyed by the University. A majority of the BA students selected Guelph because of the flexibility of the trimester system. After obtaining their degrees, 44 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students expect to work in agriculture. Many were undecided as t o the future and the remainder were divided between working for government, research, teaching, and business. Fiftynine percent of the BA students expect t o teach school; 4 2 percent of the B.Sc. students expect to either teach or do

research; and 7 0 percent of the B.H.Sc. students expect t o either teach, work in the business world or else be involved with medicine and dietetics. Only 12 percent of the BA students expect to obtain advance degrees as compared t o 27 percent of the B.Sc. students. Ninety percent of the B.H.Sc. students expect t o obtain only their undergraduate degree.

gram reported that: 55 percent of their fathers completed high school; 3 5 percent had completed university; 6 5 percent held professional or managerial positions and that the net family income for 1968 was between $8,000 and $15,000. None of the other groups of students indicated similar backgrounds, except that B.Sc. students said their family's net income in 1968 was between $8,000 and $15,000.

Distribution The B.Sc.(Agr.) program had the highest proportion of students with a rural background (56 percent). This is consistent with previous enrolments in 1967 (55 percent) and 1968 (56 percent). Thirty percent of the arts freshmen listed a rural background, which surprised some university officials involved with promotional programs. Mike Jenkinson. OAC '63, assistant to the Dean of OAC, told the Alumnus that the average figure for universities he had contacted was only five to seven percent. He added that although some rural students had enrolled in an arts program, they may have been influenced to select Guelph by graduates of or by persons connected with OAC. More than one-half of the arts and science freshmen interviewed (69 percent and 51 percent respectively) came from southern and western counties of Ontario while B.Sc.(Agr.) and B.H.Sc. students ranged from throughout the province except for the northern counties. Fortytwo percent of the BA students said they enrolled at Guelph because of the proximity of the University t o their home. "The origin of students," the survey report says. "indicates that there is more of a geographic influence on a student's selection of a university if he or she is entering an arts or science program." "The unique character of the B.Sc.(Agr.) and B.H.Sc. programs explains the more uniform distribution of the origin of these students." The proportion of female students enrolled in the B.Sc.(Agr.) program (18 percent was more than double 1968 figures (8 percent). The report says that the figure may be explained, in part, by the increase in the proportion of pre-vet students entering the B.Sc.(Agr.) program (27 percent as compared with the B.Sc. program (3 percent). Students enrolled in the B.H.Sc. pro-

Recruitment The students were asked a number of questions regarding their decision t o enrol at Guelph and the manner in which they received information about the Univenity. The survey shows that B.H.Sc. and B.Sc.(Agr.) students started t o think about attending Guelph and decided finally t o enrol at Guelph in their high school years earlier than did BA and B.Sc. students. By the end of grade 11. (June, 1967) 40 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students and 60 percent of the B.H.Sc. students had considered taking classes at Guelph as compared with 20 percent and 27 percent of the BA and B.Sc. students. By the middle of grade 1 2 (December, 1967) 58 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students and 70 percent of the B.H.Sc. had decided to enrol at Guelph as compared with only 2 0 percent of the BA students and 46 percent of the B.Sc. students. More than one-half of the BA students and approximately one third of the B.Sc. students did not decide t o enrol at Guelph until after April 1, 1969, five months before the September registration. In their search for a university t o attend, 4 4 percent of the students indicated they first received information about the University from their high school guidance office. Another 37 percent said they attended University Night Programs held in or near their high school and the vast majority found these programs to be helpful in selecting a university to attend. Brian Cook, the Secondary School Liaison officer at Guelph, feels these programs are quite beneficial to high school students as the students get an opportunity to relate directly t o someone from a particular institution and get information firsthand. Mr. Cook's assessment of


Guelph Student Survey

What freshmen hope Indications are that the majority of freshmen entering the University of Guelph feel that the main purpose of a university is t o facilitate the self-development of the student as an individual, and t o broaden one's general knowledge. In a survey of 1969's freshmen class conducted by graduate students for the Department of Extension Education, it was found that only 17 percent of those interviewed thought that a university's main purpose is to train students for a career. The graduate students interviewed 156 freshmen; 69 in the BA program, 33 B.Sc., 3 4 B.Sc.(Agr.), and 2 0 B.H.Sc. The students in the random sample represented 16 percent of the freshman class that completed grade 13 in the '68-'69 school year. None of the students interviewed were married. The survey was divided into three sections: the student and the university. the distribution of students according to academic program and family background, and the effect of recruitment and public relations programs upon the students' decision to enrol at Guelph. Students and University Although the majority of the freshmen said they thought a university's function was anything but training students for a career, some of them reversed their assessment in their own cases as 27 percent said they came to Guelph to get career training. Another 35 percent said they enrolled to get a degree, while approximately 3 0 percent maintained their selection of Guelph was based primarily upon broadening their personal knowledge. The majority of students in the B.Sc., B.H.Sc., and B.Sc.(Agr.) programs selected Guelph for the programs offered and because of the academic reputation enjoyed by the University. A majority of the BA students selected Guelph because of the flexibility of the trimester system. After obtaining their degrees, 4 4 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students expect t o work in agriculture. Many were undecided as to the future and the remainder were divided between working for government, research, teaching. and business. Fiftynine percent of the BA students expect to teach school; 42 percent of the B.Sc. students expect to either teach or do

research; and 70 percent of the B.H.Sc. students expect to either teach, work in the business world or else be involved with medicine and dietetics. Only 1 2 percent of the BA students expect t o obtain advance degrees as compared to 27 percent of the B.Sc. students. Ninety percent of the B.H.Sc. students expect to obtain only their undergraduate degree.

gram reported that: 55 percent of their fathers completed high school; 35 percent had completed university; 65 percent held professional or managerial positions and that the net family income for 1968 was between $8.000 and $15,000. None of the other groups of students indicated similar backgrounds, except that B.Sc. students said their family's net income in 1968 was between $8.000 and $15,000.

Distribution The B.Sc.(Agr.) program had the highest proportion of students with a rural background (56 percent). This is consistent with previous enrolments in 1967 (55 percent) and 1968 (56 percent). Thirty percent of the arts freshmen listed a rural background, which surprised some university officials involved with promotional programs. Mike Jenkinson, OAC '63. assistant to the Dean of OAC, told the Alumnus that the average figure for universities he had contacted was only five to seven percent. He added that although some rural students had enrolled in an arts program, they may have been influenced t o select Guelph by graduates of or by persons connected with OAC. More than one-half of the arts and science freshmen interviewed (69 percent and 5 1 percent respectively) came from southern and western counties of Ontario while B.Sc.(Agr.) and B.H.Sc. students ranged from throughout the province except for the northern counties. Fortytwo percent of the BA students said they enrolled at Guelph because of the proximity of the University to their home. "The origin of students," the survey report says, "indicates that there is more of a geographic influence on a student's selection of a university if he or she is entering an arts or science program." "The unique character of the B.Sc.(Agr.) and B.H.Sc. programs explains the more uniform distribution of the origin of these students." The proportion of female students enrolled in the B.Sc.(Agr.) program (18 percent was more than double 1968 figures (8 percent). The report says that the figure may be explained, in part, by the increase in the proportion of pre-vet students entering the B.Sc.(Agr.) program (27 percent as compared with the B.Sc. program (3 percent). Students enrolled in the B.H.Sc. pro-

Recruitment The students were asked a number of questions regarding their decision to enrol at Guelph and the manner in which they received information about the University. The survey shows that B.H.Sc. and B.Sc.(Agr.) students started to think about attending Guelph and decided finally t o enrol at Guelph in their high school years earlier than did BA and B.Sc. students. By the end of grade 11. (June, 1967) 40 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students and 60 percent of the B.H.Sc. students had considered taking classes at Guelph as compared with 20 percent and 27 percent of the BA and B.Sc. students. By the middle of grade 1 2 (December, 1967) 58 percent of the B.Sc.(Agr.) students and 70 percent of the B.H.Sc. had decided to enrol at Guelph as compared with only 20 percent of the BA students and 46 percent of the B.Sc. students. More than one-half of the BA students and approximately one third of the B.Sc. students did not decide t o enrol at Guelph until after April 1. 1969, five months before the September registration. In their search for a university to attend, 44 percent of the students indicated they first received information about the University from their high school guidance office. Another 37 percent said they attended University Night Programs held in or near their high school and the vast majority found these programs t o be helpful in selecting a university to attend. Brian Cook, the Secondary School Liaison officer at Guelph, feels these programs are quite beneficial to high school students as the students get an opportunity to relate directly to someone from a particular institution and get information firsthand. Mr. Cook's assessment of


from University

this need for personal contact is borne out by the statistic that 73 percent of the freshmen interviewed spoke t o a Guelph student before deciding t o enrol. Mr. Cook added that one of the major reasons these "fall-enrolling" students did not consider enrolling for the spring semester was that many wanted t o obtain their Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma. The survey shows that the major reason these freshmen gave for not enrolling in April, 1969. was that they

wanted to complete grade 13. In addition, only 29 percent said they read the Spring Admissions Bulletin produced by the University as compared t o the 8 6 percent and 64 percent who said they read the University Calendar and the Admissions Information Bulletin, respectively. Finally, questions about student's reactions to their courses and to university life at Guelph showed a high rate of satisfaction with this University. Asked i f their impressions after two months of

by Dave Bates

life on campus differed from their initial reactions on arriving on the campus, only eight percent said that their impressions were worse after the two months of living on campus. Averaging the reactions of students in all programs of study, 78 percent said they were satisfied or very satisfied with their courses of study, only 22 percent said they were dissatisfied. The Department of Extension Education is now hard at work on another survey of this year's freshman class.


A day in the life of me. my dad. my dog, and other people.


Penny Downing is an undergraduate student in marine biology, Department of Zoology. This essay won second prize in the Stephen Leacock Humorous Writing contest for university students, sponsored by Thomson Newspapers under the supervision of Stephen Franklin. lllustration by Jim Manley.

Have you ever noticed that man is the only animal that hibernates in summer? Some people go for months and never get above 2.57 m.p.h. -the exact speed of melted ice cream running down the outside of the cone. I t has something to do with Newton's Law of inertia, the one where he explains why it is not only pleasant but logical to lie in the orchard and wait for an apple to fall. Therefore, I gravitate towards the ice cream truck when it reaches our street in the cool of the evening. A bell rings a high point in the ritual elevation of dusk. I go inside to get a dime. The light from the TV set nearly dazzles me. Sergeant Friday is questioning a sobbing lady, while his partner checks for fingerprints on the doorknobs. "I left my purse on the kitchen table." Nicky and I race for Mother's purse, mostly because he is closer to the kitchen, and is sure to beat me. If he were reading in his room, he wouldn't even get up. "If I ever got my hands on that idiot, I'll kill him." "Just the facts please, ma'am." Mother opens her purse and takes out her wallet. "Get two drumsticks for your dad and me, Nicky." "And get me a chocolate sundae. or strawberry if they don't have chocolate." I add. "Get your own ice cream, Bone Idle." "You know, it's funny. Sergeant." "What's that, ma'am?" "If I could get my hands on that idiot, I'd kill him." Mother gives me a dime, and I go to the door. "Look, Joe. There are ten fingerprints on the doorknob." "Figure he used both hands?" "Yeah, it looks that way. He's probably hurt pretty bad." I grasp the doorknob carefully with a handful of my T-shirt and open the door. It has gone quite black outside, but there is an oasis of music, light and human voices -the ice cream truck. I have decided to get a Mystery Surprise -you lick away the Ice cream and there's a toy left on the stick. I have four clowns, two cars, two ballerinas and only one horse. If I get a horse tonight, I can reduce my margin to fifty cents. I t is too dark to see. I take my Ice cream and swim home through thick, sweet air like honey. "I know I took her car, Sergeant, but I had to get away. If she'd got her hands on me, she would have killed me." "You are under arrest. It is my duty to inform you of your rights. You have the r ~ g h to t remain silent. If you relinquish this right, anything you say may be used as evidence against you." My tongue has located a point on the toy. It could be the horse's ears. I will find a better light and check it out. "On August 7, trial was held in district court for the county of Los Angeles. In a moment, the results of that trial." No, ~t can't be the horse, unless that's his knee. But at least i t doesn't look like a clown either. "Lionel Flanagan was convicted of grand theft. Grand theft carries a maximum penalty of ten years in federal, or seven years in state penitentiary."

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I hurry back to see if names were changed to protect the innocent, because there used to be a Lionel Flanagan on our street, but he moved away. A good movie is coming on next. If I stay, I'll find myself watching it, so I go to my room. The dog follows me. I've never known a dog to watch TV, except for a minute when it's a puppy and doesn't know any better. Tick always follows me anyway, because she's my dog. Whenever I want to go anywhere, I have to stop and decide if it's worth getting her up. I sit on the bed to keep her nose away from my ice cream. Then I scoop some off in my fingers and offer it humbly to the proud jungle beast. After she has licked it off. I retain the right to wipe my hand on her coat. It's only fair, and she has enough hair. We think her hair is part collie and part cocker spaniel, but that doesn't account for her shape. "People who think a dog equals the sum of its parts are stupid," I tell her. On this subject alone I am erudite. I am studying to be an expert. It is much like saving up to be a millionaire. "It's not as if the world started off with purebred dogs, and they bred them to get mongrels. There have always been mutts. 'A mutt is a dog w ~ t ha tail full of wag and a heart full of love to make it go.' This last quote is to show her proper respect. I have become devious through talking with God about my sins. I am going to be a saint when I grow up or maybe a criminal trial lawyer. Revering the mutt, I get down my Dumpy Pocket Book of Champion Dogs to try and decide on the purebred dog I have been promised when I graduate to high school. The Mystery Surprise has developed a dog of its own, a collie. Now that 1 have made up a little of my investment, maybe I can stop getting Mystery Surprises. They don't come in chocolate. Nicky comes in with the comic books he got trading with Pedro and Sandro. "Here, you haven't read these yet." Nicky has taste in comic books, and he is a much better trader than I will ever be. He has a sharp eye for torn covers and missing pages, remembers the relative values of the regular issues, giant annuals and abridged classics, given an inch. At the bargaining table, he assumes heroic proportions. I show him my new dog on its stick. He has been laughing at me for being such a sucker with all the crummy prizes I've been getting in my Mystery Surprises. Now he'll see who's laughing. "Ha. They could make a hundred of those things for a nickle and you've spent a dollar getting one." I don't care. He's spent his money too, and he doesn't have anything to show for it. He takes my library book on bloodhounds and goes back to his room, punctuat~nghis passage with laughter indicative of scorn for all suckers. I don't care. At least he left the comic books.


For a long while I devote my full attention t o duplicating rays, robots, rockets, outer-space aliens and deadly Kryptonite radiation. Sometimes i t is hard to remember that I know Superman isn't real. There are letter pages in Superman family comics, and most of the letters are from people who have spotted mistakes anything from a green Lois Lane to Superin the stories man saying, "Ouch". I would like to write a letter, but the stories are so exciting that I always forget to look for mistakes. Tick gets up with a great scratching of claws on the floor, and clatters down the hall. Father speaks to her, and she answers like the ghost of Cock Lane, who scratched the woodwork in code.

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FATHER: Why should I take you for a walk? TICK: (Sound of furious scratching) FATHER: Give me one good reason. TICK: (Noise of dog landing on floor) FATHER: Oh, because you're a dog. Don't you know I hate dogs? I got up half an hour early this morning just so I could have more time to hate dogs. (Dogs make perfect straight men). Father and Nicky and Tick and I set out on our walk. We go t o the Peterborough Avenue end of the street. (At its other end, it's just Peterboro Avenue). "Beep". "Listen. I heard a beep." "I didn't". "Beep". "Wait, I heard it that time. A night hawk". "Beep". Father has told us that a beep is a nighthawk, but he hasn't told us a nighthawk isn't a hawk at all but only a goatsucker. We have reached a happy equilibrium of knowledge and ignorance. "Beep". The talk turns to worms. Father picked worms during the Depression. and made observations which he later presented to a club of scientists at the museum. It is one of my favourite stories. I always look forward to the first worm of spring. Father tells us about the giant worms of the Andes, which you can wear as belts. Our father is the only person who can lead a nature walk in the heart of Toronto. I bet he could lead one in the auditorium on Academy Awards night. "Zsa Zsa's mink has fluffier fur with fewer guard hairs than Raquel's beaver stole because the beaver is an aquatic mammal." "Beep". "We are at the top of the hill -Toronto is at the bottom. "Think of all the people down there, people getting born, and people dying, and eating and sleeping, and blowing their noses," Father says. "And watching television." "Beep".

The most efficient way to love our fellow man is to get them a million at a time, and invisible. I'd never get through them one by one. A streetcar goes by below, fighting for every breath. I t carries so much light and makes such a noise, that I think it must be afraid of the dark. I love the dark. We head for home. There are stars in the sky, but never constellations. I don't believe in constellations. You can pick out any group of stars and join them up to make a picture, so why make such a fuss about a few particular groups? A glance at the sky confirms it: there are stars, but no constellations. I would like to talk about it, but Father and Nicky are talking about guns. Nicky is the expert, although Father has the advantage of having used a gun. When we get home, Mother is ironing, and watching the news out of the corner of her eye. "The pile on the chair is yours, she tells me. I take my clean laundry. My favourite Round-up T-shirt with the cowboys on tne front is on the top of the pile. They are faded, but you can still see them if you remember where they were. "I didn't throw that old thing out, but don't wear it when you're going out with me." I kiss her good night, and go off to bed. Now I can get down to prayers and dreaming, the really serious business of life.


Coaxing cash from alumni of any institution is hard but rewarding work. During any campaign alumni volunteers appeal to fellow alumni of varying degrees of financial stability: from young graduates who are presently discovering the ins and outs of mortgages t o older alumni who've read in the press about one too many campus disruptions. During most campaigns, many letters are received; some serious, some not, which touch on subjects ranging from long hair, alleged wasteful spending and revolution in the classroom, t o apologies for a srnall gift, promises for a larger contribution next year, and delight for the projects supported. Happily, most letters are accompanied by a cheque. The following excerpts from letters received at Alumni House demonstrate some of the wonderful, weird or woeful reactions of University of Guelph alumni to the 1970 Alma Mater Fund campaign. Letters marked "confidential" or "personal" were not used and any comments appearing were selected only for their subject matter with no intent to embarrass anyone. Many alumni were impressed by the winning personal letter they received from their class agent: "In our family, we now get alumni requests from seven different sources but none could match yours in pure eloquence and what might be called, the touching touch." "I must admit that if the letter had not had your personal touch . . ." On the other hand some replies were touching in another way: "I am sorry that I will not be able to contribute to these worthy causes at this time. I am unemployed and I consider myself a worthy cause. If the alumni can render any assistance, I will be grateful." Continuing on the financially embarrassed side some other heartwarming replies indicated several reasons why gifts would be either srnall or else not forthcoming this year: "I hope you will forgive me if I do not contribute to the Alma Mater Fund. I sent $100 for the University Building Fund a year ago, and with four at university, I feel that this is as much as I can afford at the present time." "Because I am attending university again this year, I am unable t o contribute

as much as I would like t o the Alma Mater Fund. However, please accept this srnall gift and next time I hope I will be in a better financial position t o support the University." The mailing with the leaflet on Alumni Stadium created various reactions. One graduate of a few years indicated "I am glad t o hear that the football field now has a good seating area. I can remember that i t was a growing necessity back in my undergraduate days." One donor lamented the size of his gift for the stadium, saying: "Sorry t o let the team down with a small one, but I am still working on the Guelph development fund. When (it) is over I will probably be able t o support the Alma Mater Fund more generously." "I'm Another was terse in refusing sorry team but I am for farmers and against educational frills and also uncontrolled growth." Humour was evident in many replies. One alumnus preferred his gift t o be used for "haircuts for hippies" while another gift was earmarked for anything but a "hippie shelter." In reply t o a class agent letter which read in part "Don't give until it hurts, give until it feels good", one alumnus replied: "With my Scots background even a dollar hurts." Campus unrest, however remote from Guelph, was used by some as a reason for withholding support. Some alumni described their feelings about it: "One thing is certain, 1 am not going to assist the revolting, destructive left wing students in promoting social compulsion and undermining proven values and freedom Another wrote: "You have t o do the following before I can contribute: Get rid of the radical professors . . . (and) students . . on your campus." But often such remarks were tempered with affection, viz: ". . . I am not going to contribute at this time. I still love Guelph and am still sending students there with love and inspiration, but I am just not satisfied with much of the university life, administration and extra-curricular activities on all campuses. Our institutions are in a very critical time and I'm sure Guelph is handling the changing society as well as any."

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Some respondents seem t o feel strongly opposed to charitable giving: "I was angry at first because all that Guelph seems t o do is ask for ." money "You have my deepest sympathy in trying t o panhandle money for the Alma Mater Fund." Reaction was perplexingly hostile in a few cases: "Frankly, i f the 'instructional laboratory' arboretum planned produces and anti-pesticide "nuts". promotes I certainly want no part of supporting it." But in others, the sentiments were entirely positive: "I believe that people who derive most from education should contribute the most "I wish I could contribute $500.00, or better, $5,000.00 as no one knows better than I how much I owe to OAC and not only because of this realization, but because I believe that the State should have little or nothing t o do with education beyond making sure that certain minimum standards are provided Last, but not least, are those letters that warm the cockles of every heart, and fortunately for our alumni fund raisers and for campaigns everywhere, these letters represent the majority of opinion expressed. "From the plan of the arboretum, it is going t o be quite extensive. I would like to see it say 2 0 years from now," said on OAC '20 grad. "Things have changed mightily in the past few years and I am sure the proposed new stadium will add greatly t o the look of the old college. A most necessary addition, most will agree. I have already mailed in a $25 contribution and will forward a similar amount early in the new year. I feel that most of we alumni would never repay the benefits enjoyed both financially and socially, accruing from our graduation from the old college. I trust the response from the class will be one of the best." "1 wish the college every success in its endeavours t o collect money, am looking forward to coming back one of these days and seeing the changes that are being made."

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Campus Highlights LOWER GRADUATE STUDENT ENROLLMENT PREDICTED IN GUELPH BRIEF The University's annual brief to the Committee on University Affairs, recently approved by Senate and the Board of Governors, predicts lower graduate enrolments at Guelph than had been previously forecast. This reflects the University's assessment of the needs of society and how these needs will be interpreted by students in making decisions with regard to graduate studies. The re-assessment was stimulated in part by discussions with graduate students. The Brief is primarily a response t o a number of specific questions posed by the Committee on University Affairs of the provincial government. Each university in the province is asked to submit a report. The information sought relates to graduate enrolment, class size data, budget shifts, faculty hiring policy, and research policy. One result of the change in enrolment predictions will be t o delay by one year buildings other than the University Centre. It is hoped to have the Centre ready for occupancy in the 1973-74 year. With regard to OVC, the Brief points out that the question of whether projected enrolment figures will be met or not depends on whether funds will be made available for renovations and construction of new facilities. The possibility of federal support, in view of the wider area outside the province which the OVC serves, is being actively studied, said Dr. Winegard. president of the University. Dr. Winegard also outlined his concern about the need for better space by the School of Engineering. Discussions with the Committee on University Affairs have indicated the possibility of providing new space equal in area t o the present School facilities without interfering with other building entitlements. It is hoped to have some of this new accommodation for Engineering by 1973. In reviewing the budget situation for the current year, the President emphasized that adjustments would be made to compensate for the unexpected drop in income without cancellation of any teaching contracts. The shortfall will be met

in part by use of a reserve fund established to meet just such an emergency, and partly by certain reductions in expenditures. Part of the needed savings will come from leaving unfilled established positions now vacant.

NEW DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SCIENCE TO BE FORMED The University of Guelph will form a Department of Computing and Information Science on July l.1971, President W. C. Winegard has announced. The new department will operate a distinctive teaching and research program with a major emphasis on information processing systems in business and industry. The emphasis on studies of large information systems is a significant departure from normal University offerings, says Dr. E. 6. MacNaughton, Dean of the College of Physical Science, (the College responsible for the program). "The program is being designed to meet one of the major needs of the new profession of Computing Science." he states. Most computer installations in Canada (which have quadrupled in the past six years) will employ significantly more professional computing analysts for business and administrative purposes than for scientific applications. The education for information systems analysts provided by the University of Guelph will have a s~gnificantimpact on the computer industry, Dr. MacNaughton predicts. The program has been developed from the results of the thorough study made by the Association for Computing Machinery in 1968. It will provide students wlth basic training in most aspects of Computing Science and the honors B.A. and B.Sc. degrees meet requirements for entrance to graduate studies. Moreover, the program at the University of Guelph provides a unique opportunity for students t o combine courses in computer information processing systems and business administration. The key subjects are systems analysis and design, computer communications and planning. Emphasis will be given t o team projects with potentially real application. Graduates from this option of the program will have a broad competence. be capable of working as senior analysts

and supervisors, and be capable of becoming managers after some working experience. The chairman of the new department in the College of Physical Science at Guelph will be appointed during the coming year. It is anticipated that some instructors with extensive industrial experience will be added to the present faculty. The new programs of study are available in full to students who registered as freshmen in May 1970 and subsequently. Under the accelerated program of studies made possible by Guelph's three-semester system the first graduates of the honors programs (8 semesters) may obtain degrees as early as May 1973. These new programs are expected t o be popular; they will include an examination of the role of the computer in our society as well as studies related to the use of the computer as a tool for solving problems.

NEW STUDENT GOVERNMENT DISCOVERS: IT'S HARD WORK! A new university-wide student governing body has taken over from the 24-year old Union Council, (later the University of Guelph Students' Union Inc.) -the highest ranking student government on campus -which relinquished power late last summer because of financial difficulties. The new organization is the Committee of College Presidents -a loosely structured committee composed of the presidents of the college student governments. the top student officials elected at the college level. The presidents, Jane Boyd (Macdonald Institute, now the College of Family and Consumer Studies, Students Administrative Council), Art Needles (Student Federation of the Ontario Agricultural College). Bob Jack (Canadian Veterinary Students Association), Pat Quinn (College of Arts), Dave Truman (College of Physical Science) and Mike Van Dusen (College of Social Science), have discovered early in their first term of office that replacing the Union will be troublesome and possibly even more than they bargained for. The work load is staggering. In addition to their college duties, the six students are attempting to carry out many of the former responsibilities of the 30 - 4 0 member Students' Union. Shaking his head in disbelief, Arts College President.


Pat Quinn said that he was "now beginning to appreciate what Union presidents had gone through." Restricting itself to a purely administrative role has left the CCP open to much criticism concerning the apparent abandonment of the Union's educational and political programs. One student described the CCP as "artificial" and several students have expressed concern over its limited aims. But an equal number of students appear willing to give the CCP a chance to prove itself. Mac SAC President, Jane Boyd echoed the sentiments of some students when she said that the political future of the CCP may rest in its financial support of "issue groups". However, the major problem now facing the CCP is to convince the University that it has the support of the student body which the CCP must have if the compulsory three dollar fee and other college fees are to be collected from students in January. The CCP recently decided to hold a campus-wide referendum on the question asking the students for support of both the CCP and its three dollar fee. The question of compulsory fees is now almost two years old, dating back to a Board of Governors decision not to collect a fee for the old Students' Union until it had clarified certain membership clauses in the Union's letters patent. the legality of which had been questioned by the Provincial Secretary. Union officials decided to collect its fee from students on a voluntary membership basis for two semesters and then opened membership free of charge until the question was resolved. Anticipated reserve funds disappeared quickly and last July a tally placed the Union's debt at approximately $40,000. The college presidents met over the summer and presented to the Board of Governors a brief dealing with the necessity to maintain some sort of central student body. The Board accepted their proposal contingent upon the students' approval during the fall semester 1970 for the continued collection of the fees. The CCP has spent much of this semester administering the monies collected and in doing so has apparently won some support. Even a spokesman for a student publication, the Ontarion, which has been highly critical of student politicians in the past, described the CCP as "reasonable and approachable."

FOOTBALL HOPES DASHED All hope for a football championship at Guelph was lost October 3 1 when the University of Ottawa Gee-Gees defeated the Guelph Gryphons 29-24 in Ottawa, in the game to decide which team would win the league title. The Gee-Gees did most of the damage with their passing attack, which produced two touchdowns in the final minute of the first half which all but erased a Gryphon lead of 17-0. The half ended 17-14 and the Gee-Gees added enough points in the third quarter to win both the game and the championship. "It seems incredible that we let them get away with those passes," said Bill Mitchell, director of athletics. "We beat them everywhere but on the scoreboard." Following an earlier 23-15 loss to the Carleton University Ravens, the OttawaGuelph game marked the second consecutive year that Ottawa-based teams have ruined otherwise perfect seasons for the Gryphons. The two losses were even more bitter as Guelph led in both games but was unable to hang on. Against Carleton, the Gryphons led 15-8 midway through the fourth quarter and against Ottawa watched helplessly as the Gee-Gees scored 29 points after appearing to be headed for defeat. "We're jinxed in Ottawa," said Mitchell. Last year, following an exhibition win over the University of Toronto Blues. 15-14, the Gryphons lost their next two games to both Ottawa-based opponents before going on to win the last four regular season games. They continued their winning ways this year until meeting Carleton and ended the season with a four-two won-lost record, identical to last year's performance. The Gryphons wound up tied for third spot with the Carleton team but will drop into fourth position by virtue of their loss t o the Ravens.

WINEGARD AND SMITH HONORED Both Dr. W. C. Winegard, president of the University of Guelph, and Dr. J. Percy Smith, vice-president, academic, received recent honors. Dr. Winegard, a former vice-chairman

of the Ontario Chapter of the American Society for Metals, was elected a Fellow of the Society at the Inaugural Convocation of Fellows held October 18 at Metal Parks, Ohio. Dr. Smith. a noted lecturer and authority on the works of George Bernard Shaw, received an honorary Doctor of Literature degree at the Carleton University Convocation in November.

Appointments Dr. Douglas Odegard was appointed chairman of the De~artmentof Philoso~hv. College of ~umanities,on July 1, 19?0'. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, Professor Odegard received his doctorate from the University of London in 1963. He has taught at Bedford College, University of London as well as Memorial University. St. John's. Newfoundland. McMaster Univenity and Lakehead University. He came to the University of Guelph in 1967. Professor Odegard's major professional interests are in modern philosophy, philosophy of mind and philosophy of language. He has published a large number of papers on topics related to these areas of interest. Dr. Odegard is married and the father of two children.

Alumni News ALMA MATER FUNDS FOR ART The Art Acquisition Committee of the University of Guelph has used its grant from the 1969 Alma Mater Fund to purchase a mixed-media graphic by England's Richard Hamilton. The silk screened, hand painted collage is one of a series of Hamilton's works entitled, "Fashion Plate," in which he uses a common background while changing the fragmented facial features of a fashion model who appears to be more of a commodity than a woman. Hamilton is one of England's leading


Pat Quinn said that he was "now beginning to appreciate what Union presidents had gone through." Restricting itself to a purely administrative role has left the CCP open to much criticism concerning the apparent abandonment of the Union's educational and political programs. One student described the CCP as "artificial" and several students have expressed concern over its limited aims. But an equal number of students appear willing to give the CCP a chance to prove itself. Mac SAC President. Jane Boyd echoed the sentiments of some students when she said that the political future of the CCP may rest in its financial support of "issue groups". However, the major problem now facing the CCP is to convince the University that it has the support of the student body which the CCP must have if the compulsory three dollar fee and other college fees are to be collected from students i n January. The CCP recently decided to hold a campus-wide referendum on the question asking the students for support of both the CCP and its three dollar fee. The question of compulsory fees is now almost two years old, dating back to a Board of Governors decision not to collect a fee for the old Students' Union until it had clarified certain membership clauses in the Union's letters patent, the legality of which had been questioned by the Provincial Secretary. Union officials decided to collect its fee from students on a voluntary membership basis for two semesters and then opened membership free of charge until the question was resolved. Anticipated reserve funds dis. appeared quickly and last July a tally placed the Union's debt at approximately $40.000. The college presidents met over the summer and presented to the Board of Governors a brief dealing with the necessity to maintain some sort of central student body. The Board accepted their proposal contingent upon the students' approval during the fall semester 1970 for the continued collection of the fees. The CCP has spent much of this semester administering the monies collected and in doing so has apparently won some support. Even a spokesman for a student publication, the Ontarion, which has been highly critical of student politicians in the past, described the CCP as "reasonable and approachable."

FOOTBALL HOPES DASHED All hope for a football championship at Guelph was lost October 3 1 when the University of Ottawa Gee-Gees defeated the Guelph Gryphons 29-24 in Ottawa, in the game to decide which team would win the league title. The Gee-Gees did most of the damage with their passing attack, which produced two touchdowns in the final minute of the first half which all but erased a Gryphon lead of 17-0. The half ended 17-14 and the Gee-Gees added enough points in the third quarter to win both the game and the championship. "It seems incredible that we let them get away with those passes." said Bill Mitchell, director of athletics. "We beat them everywhere but on the scoreboard." Following an earlier 23-15 loss to the Carleton University Ravens, the OttawaGuelph game marked the second consecutive year that Ottawa-based teams have ruined otherwise perfect seasons for the Gryphons. The two losses were even more bitter as Guelph led in both games but was unable to hang on. Against Carleton, the Gryphons led 15-8 midway through the fourth quarter and against Ottawa watched helplessly as the Gee-Gees scored 29 points after appearing to be headed for defeat. "We're jinxed in Ottawa." said Mitchell. Last year, following an exhibition win over the University of Toronto Blues, 15-14, the Gryphons lost their next two games to both Ottawa-based opponents before going on to win the last four regular season games. They continued their winning ways this year until meeting Carleton and ended the season with a four-two won-lost record, identical to last year's performance. The Gryphons wound up tied for third spot with the Carleton team but will drop into fourth position by virtue of their loss to the Ravens.

WINEGARD AND SMITH HONORED Both Dr. W. C. Winegard, president of the University of Guelph, and Dr. J. Percy Smith, vice-president, academic. received recent honors. Dr. Winegard, a former vice-chairman

of the Ontario Chapter of the American Society for Metals. was elected a Fellow of the Society at the Inaugural Convocation of Fellows held October 18 at Metal Parks, Ohio. Dr. Smith, a noted lecturer and authority on the works of George Bernard Shaw, received an honorary Doctor of Literature degree at the Carleton University Convocation in November.

Appointments Dr. Douglas Odegard was appointed chairman of the De~artmentof Philosophy, College of ~umanities,on July 1, 1970. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, Professor Odegard received his doctorate from the University of London in 1963. He has taught at Bedford College, University of London as well as Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, McMaster University and Lakehead University. He came t o the University of Guelph in 1967. Professor Odegard's major professional interests are in modern philosophy, philosophy of mind and philosophy of language. He has published a large number of papers on topics related to these areas of interest. Dr. Odegard is married and the father of two children.

Alumni News ALMA MATER FUNDS FOR ART The Art Acquisition Committee of the University of Guelph has used its grant from the 1969 Alma Mater Fund to purchase a mixed-media graphic by England's Richard Hamilton. The silk screened, hand painted collage is one of a series of Hamilton's works entitled. "Fashion Plate," in which he uses a common background while changing the fragmented facial features of a fashion model who appears to be more of a commodity than a woman. Hamilton is one of England's leading


Herb Schneider, 1970 Alma Mater Fund Campaign Chairman, and Dorothy James, 1970 President of University of Guelph Alumni Association, admire new art purchase.

artists and has gained an international reputation for his paintings, which hang in major galleries around the world. "We were very fortunate t o have been able to purchase this exceptional graphic," said Mrs. Judy Nasby, Curator of Art at Guelph. "Many people feel that Fashion Plate is one of Hamilton's best graphic works to date." The portrait, which will be added to

the University's collection, is believed to be the only one belonging to any public collection in Canada. The University's collection consists mainly of traditional Canadian paintings dating from 1890 to 1960. The decision t o purchase Fashion Plate was influenced by the lack of contemporary "pop art" in the collection, and Mrs. Nasby feels that an important gap has been filled with the addition of Hamilton's work.

HOMECOMING FEATURES STADIUM

Alumni Stadium was officially opened at Homecoming. October 17, when Mrs. Dorothy James. Mac '34, president of the University of Guelph Alumni Association. promised t o outkick the Right Honorable Pierre Trudeau. Mrs. James lofted a ceremonial kickoff football approximately 12 - 15 yards, which was unfortunately some 30 yards shorter than the Prime Minister's kick at last year's Grey Cup game. Other Homecoming '70 highlights included: -the presentation of the first Alumnus of Honour Award to Dr. Frank Palmer, OAC '13, former director of the Horticultural Research Station at Vineland. Ont.; -the Guelph Gryphons 22-0 win over the highly rated Waterloo Lutheran University Golden Hawks; -the annual meetings of the University of Guelph Alumni Association and the Wellington College Alumni Association. The Homecoming program began with the annual float parade through downtown Guelph. At the university of Guelph Alumni Association Annual Meeting, Mr. Paul Couse, OAC '46, succeeded Mrs. James as president. Other officers elected are listed on the inside back cover of this issue of the Guelph Alumnus. Mr. Herb Schneider, OAC '48. Alma Mater Fund Campaign Chairman, reported that both the number of gifts and total amount received were ahead of last year's campaign. He expressed optimism that the 1970 objective of $80,000 would be reached. Following the meeting, alumni, friends and relatives enjoyed a seafood luncheon formerly the at the Wharf Restaurant Physical Education Building Cafeteria where Dr. Palmer received his award and a c~tationtestifying to his achievements and his contributions to the advancement of horticultural science.

Douglas Headrick, former chairman of Athletic Advisory Council, Dorothy James, Steve Stewart, chairman of AAC, and Bill Mitchell officiate at ribbon cutting ceremony to open stadium.

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Doug Headrick holds as Dorothy James kicks off.

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The 79-year-old scientist spent 4 0 years at Vineland and from 1934 to 1946 was also the head of the Ontario Agricultural College's Department of Horticulture. He retired in 1956. The award will be presented annually at Homecoming. A crowd estimated at 7000 persons jammed the stadium and hillside bleachers to watch the opening ceremonies and the football game. Prior t o the opening kickoff, Dr. Winegard spoke briefly and Mrs. James, Mr. Doug Headrick, pastpresident of the Athletic Advisory Council and Mr. Steve Stewart, president of the AAC, cut a ribbon to open the $550,000 stad~um. The Wellington College Alumni Association elected its new executive at an informal get-together held in the Faculty Club following the football game. The membership also approved a name change for the organization to accommodate alumni graduating from the new colleges. formed when Wellington College was dissolved earlier this year. Three new vice-presidential positions were created to represent these alumni in the new association. The Association is now the Arts and Sciences Alumni Association of the University of Guelph. Ron Beveridge, '67, succeeded Paul Matthews, '68, as president. Other officers are: Miriam Oster, '68, vice-president, arts; Douglas Windsor, '69, vice-president, physical science; John Flegg, '68, vicepresident, social sciences; Tom Bassett. '68, treasurer; (Mrs.) Susanne Bassett, '71, secretary; (Mrs.) Kathy Duncan, '68, Alumni News editor and Pat Rafferty, '67, director. Ex-officio directors named are: Paul Matthews, immediate past-president; Paul Ferguson, '67. University of Guelph Alumni Association vice-president and the presidents of the three new college stuPat Quinn (Arts), dent governments Mike Van Dusen (Social Science) and David Truman (Physical Science).

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Letters NOMINATIONS FOR CHANCELLOR On July 1, 1971, the Hon. G. A. Drew will complete his second term of o f f i ~ eas Chancellor of the University. The Senate Committee on Graduation Ceremonrals is presently seeking nominations for a successor, and has set January 31, 1971, as the official deadline to receive nominations. Final selection of the Chancellor will be made by Senate on March 16, 1971. Any member of the University Community - Alumni. Faculty, Students, and Administration is eligible to nominate or second a nomination. Official nomination forms can be obtained from the undersigned. To avoid embarrassment nominees should be unaware of their nomination. Yours truly, Mr. M. D. E. Brown, Secretary of Senate. Room 368, McLaughlin Library, University of Guelph.

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Gerald Grant is second from left in the picture. Others, left to right: John Steckle '20, George Lindala '22, Art Musgrave '20, and Cecil Eidt '21. My sincere thanks for your kindness in forwarding to me the photos I had requested. They are excellent copies. I am forwarding the pictures to Art Musgrave, John Steckle and Cecil Eidt, other members of the team. As you probably know, George Lindala died some months ago. We thoroughly enjoyed our visit to the university two weeks ago and the oppor-

tunity to meet you and Mr. Babcock. who kindly took us on a wonderful guided tour. As you can readily guess, we noticed a great many changes. Thanks again. Yours sincerely, Gerald S. Grant, OAC '19 P.S.: My grandson quite sincerely asked me: "Grandpa, what did you study in the olden times?" Nerve!

UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH ALUMNI ASSOCIATION HONORARY PRESIDENT: Dr. W. C. Winegard. PRESIDENT: P. W. COUSE, OAC '46. SENIOR VICE-PRESIDENT: P. C. Matthews, Well '68. VICE-PRESIDENTS: Mrs. J. D. (Virginia Shortt) Bandeen, Mac '57; P. D. Ferguson, Well '68; T. R. Hilliard, OAC '40; Dr. V. C. R. Walker, OVC '47. SECRETARY: Mrs. D. J. (Jean Kellough) King, Mac '52.

Doidge, OVC '52; Mrs. G. M. (Joan Anderson) Jenkinson, Mac '66; Mrs. M. S. (Linda Sully) Keith, Well '67; P. M. Lindley. OAC '57; Dr. D. S. Macdonald, OVC '57; D. W. McDonell. OAC '70; T. B. Radford. Well '67; C. G. Trivers, OAC '67.

TREASURER: J. J. Elmslie, Development Officer, University of Guelph. DIRECTORS: Dr. C. R. Buck, OVC '46; Mrs. B. L. (Pat Lumley) Carswell, Well '68; Miss Jean Dewar, Mac '28; Dr. G. R.

EX-OFFICIO DIRECTORS: R. D. Beveridge, Well '67, President, Arts and Sciences Alumni Association; M. G. Greer, OAC '41, President. OAC Alumni Association; Dr. T. L. Jones. OVC 34, President, OVC Alumni Association; Miss Frances Lampman, Mac '54, President, Macdonald Institute Alumnae Association; J. K. Babcock, OAC '54, Director, Alumni Affairs and Development.

The Guelph Alumnus is published by the Department of Alumni Affairs and Development. University of Guelph. The Editorial Committee is comprised of Editor-J. E. Bates, OAC '60, Alumni Officer; Art Director-Prof. K. E. Chamberlain; J. K. Babcock, OAC '54, Director of Alumni Affairs and Development; D. L. Waterston, Director of Information; D. W. Jose. OAC '49, Assistant Director of Information; Editorial Assistant-D. A. Bates, OAC '69, Assistant Alumni Officer.

The Editorial Advisory Board of the University of Guelph Alumni Association: Glenn Powell, OAC '62, Chairman; Dr. A. E. Austin, Dept. of English; Mrs. G. M. Jenkinson. Mac '66; Mrs. J. M. (Kay Murdock) Little, Mac '59. Ex-officio: J. K. Babcock, OAC '54 and P. W. Couse, OAC '46. Correspond~ngmembers: D. R. Baron. OAC '49 and H. G. Dodds, OAC '58. Undelivered copies should be returned to Alumni House, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.


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Conversat

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University of Guelph invites you back to Conversat '71, a festive evening full of Mexican spirit: This traditional event is being held on one night. Saturday, February 6, 1971. rather than the usual two. Three groups, spread throughout four rooms (including games room and a pub) will provide non-stop music from 9 p.m. until 2 a.m. For your enjoyment we have the big band sound of Warren Covington and his 1 6 piece orchestra, Godfrey Craig and the New Society (7 pieces) and for a quiet moment in the pub, a Mexican guitar duo. At Tequila '71, tuxedoes are optional and a meal will not be served. Tickets, available at Alumni House, for $9.00, contain a raffle ticket, which when drawn entitles the holder to a free evening of dining as well as dancing at Tequila '71. Hoping you will join us on this festive evening, Saturday, February 6, 1971 in the Physical Education Building for Tequila '71. OLE

Coming Events

>

January 4 - 7

AGRICULTURAL CONFERENCE

January 27

O.V.C. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING AND LUNCHEON Skyline Hotel, Toronto

January 29

WINTER CONVOCATION

February 6

CONVERSAT

March 6

COLLEGE ROYAL, Grand show day

Guelph Alumnus Magazine, November 1970  

University of Guelph Alumnus Magazine, November 1970

Guelph Alumnus Magazine, November 1970  

University of Guelph Alumnus Magazine, November 1970

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