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Travel with UCalgary 2018 – 19 Travel Study Programs

conted.ucalgary.ca/travelprograms


Travel with us in

2018 –19

Do you love to learn? Do you love to travel? Experience both with UCalgary Continuing Education! Every year UCalgary Continuing Education, in association with other academic departments, offers a series of amazing travel programs. The educational component that is part of every program is what sets these trips apart from any other holiday you will ever take. Travel worry-free, knowing a Continuing Education travel program coordinator has handled all of the logistics. You will be guided throughout the program by your accompanying instructor — someone who has a passion for your destination. All of the travel programs begin with orientation classes in Calgary. Everyone is welcome in the University of Calgary Educational Travel Study Program, where every trip is the trip of a lifetime!

Fees Cost includes: tuition, orientation course, accommodation, transfers, all surface travel, and meals as listed in the itinerary. A $500 non-refundable deposit is required with the registration form. Fees are based on the information available at the time of print and are subject to change to reflect any changes in currency rates, airfares, or land costs. There are possibilities of decreases or increases, and any changes will be reflected on the final payment and passed on to the participant. All fees are based on double occupancy and a minimum of 16 participants. Fees in all programs exclude airport taxes; passport and visa fees; cancellation, medical and other personal insurance; gratuities for local guides; wine, liquor, and other items not specifically mentioned as included; and other personal services.

Single Supplement The single supplement fee is listed in each program description. Every effort is made to find a suitable roommate for those who wish to share, however, if this is not possible, a single supplement charge will be applied.


 South India with Optional 3 Extension to Sri Lanka JAN. 15 – FEB. 5, 2018

Southeast Asia: Cambodia 5 and Myanmar (Burma) FEB. 16 – MARCH 10, 2018

Discover Cuba 7

FEB. 17 – 24, 2018

Best of Baja Mexico 9

FEB. 17 – MARCH 3, 2018 MARCH 3 – 17, 2018

A Culinary Tour of Maui 11

MARCH 29 – APRIL 8, 2018

Lyon and Strasbourg 13 APRIL 14 – 27, 2018

Liability and Responsibility

Insurance

University of Calgary and its travel agents will exercise all reasonable care in making arrangements for conducting the tour. They are, however, acting only in the capacity of an agent and do not assume liability for any damage to persons or property resulting from or arising out of any act or inadvertence of any hotel, carrier, restaurant, or other company or persons rendering any of the services included in the tour or for any damage caused by other factors beyond their control. The passage contract in use by the airlines concerned when issued shall constitute the sole contract between the airlines and passengers. All prices are based on current international exchange rates and airfare prices at the time of planning the tours, and are subject to change. In the event that it becomes necessary or advisable to alter the itinerary or arrangements for any reason whatsoever, such alterations may be made. Additional expenses, if any, shall be borne by the participants; conversely refunds will be made to participants if any savings are affected thereby. The right is reserved to decline, accept, or retain any participant or tour member at any time.

We highly recommend cancellation and medical insurance. Information will be sent out at the time of final payment.

Refund Policy Please call 403.220.2866 if you need to cancel your trip. Your $500 deposit is not refundable. After the final payment date, the amount of refund will depend on the amount recoverable from the tour operators.

Contact Information Educational Travel Study Program UCalgary Continuing Education 2500 University Drive NW Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 Phone 403.220.2866 Fax 403.284.9242 conted.ucalgary.ca/travelprograms Heather Richards Manager | Travel Study Program 403.220.4632 heather.richards@ucalgary.ca

Roots of the Blues Tour 15 APRIL 26 – MAY 7, 2018

Urban and Scenic 17 China Adventure Tour MAY 5 – 25, 2018

Namibia: Deserts 19 and Wildlife AUG. 15 – SEPT. 1, 2018

The Samurai Trail 21 SEPT. 1 – 16, 2018

The Country of the Firebird: 25 Architectural, Artistic and Religious Traditions of Russia SEPT. 28 – OCT. 14, 2018

Tanzania and the 27 Serengeti Plains FEB. 25 – MARCH 13, 2019


Orientation

South India with Optional Extension to Sri Lanka JAN.15 – FEB. 5, 2018

The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, Dec. 6 and 13, 7 – 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, Jan. 6, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. The classes will provide an introduction to the history and cultural development of Indian society. The itinerary, travel arrangements, health matters and insurance coverage will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Three meals daily throughout this trip.

This study tour covers the major states of South India including Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Karnataka; as well as a new destination, Sri Lanka — one of the most colourful islands on the planet. We will explore a great variety of historical places and architectural sites including Hindu seashore temples, famous Buddhist shrines, historic Christian and Jewish places of worship, colonial forts, rock fortresses, and yoga ashrams. World-class museums will reveal their treasures to us, and spectacular dance performances like the legendary Kathakali dance in Kerala and the graceful Kandyan dance in Sri Lanka will be a vibrant display of religious importance and elaborate symbolism. The boat ride in the backwaters of Kerala and our visits to national parks in both countries promise to be soulinspiring experiences. Also, there will be opportunities to browse the spice-filled markets and relax on the palm-fringed seashores.

JAN. 15 – 16 Depart Calgary for the overnight journey to India. Arrive in Chennai, the capital city of Tamilnadu. Welcome ceremony in a local hotel. JAN. 17 After breakfast, our tour of Chennai begins with a visit to the Fort Museum followed by the beautiful Marina Beach, Kapaleeshwar Temple, St. Thomas Basilica and the National Art Gallery and Museum, which contains a superb collection of Chola bronze sculptures. JAN. 18 Depart Chennai and travel to Mahabalipuram, which is famous for its stone carvings and shore temples — a relic of Pallava art. Visit Arjuna’s Penance, Krishna Mandapam, Varaha Mandapam, Pancha Rathas (five chariot-shaped monolithic shrines), Mahishasuramardini Temple and shore temples. We also visit the famous School of Art and Sculptures. Overnight in Mahabalipuram. JAN. 19 After breakfast, we drive to Pondicherry, the former French Colonial city located on the Coromandal Coast to visit the ashram at Auroville. It was built by followers of Sri Aurobindo, a philosopher-prophet born in 1870 and famous for his Integral Yoga and philosophical literary works. In this international town we also find the Matrimandir (Temple of The Great Mother), the famous monument built by the Auroville Society representing a lotus flower. We will visit the 400-year-old Manakula Vinayagar Temple, which has several frescos telling the life story of a half human and half animal lord; the French Quarter; the French Memorial; the Eglise de Notre Dame des Anges; the Immaculate Conception Cathedral; and Botanical Garden. JAN. 20 After breakfast, we drive to Thanjavur (formerly Tanjore). In the afternoon, we explore the Brihadisvara Temple, one of the Great Living Chola Temples. The temple, set in spacious grounds, has several pillared halls and shrines. Inscriptions record the names of dancers, musicians and poets reminding us of the significance of this area to the development of the arts in the 11th century. We will visit the palace and the museum, which has an eclectic collection of regal memorabilia, most of it from the early 19th century.

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JAN. 21 Today, we drive to Madurai, the second largest city in Tamil Nadu. The city revolves around the Meenakshi Amman Temple, a structure in the Dravidian style of architecture. The complex houses 14 gopurams (gateway towers) ranging from 45-50 metres in height — the tallest being the southern tower, 51.9 metres high — and two golden sculptured shrines over sanctum of the main deities. The temple is a significant symbol for the Tamil people, and has been mentioned since antiquity in Tamil literature. The present structure was built from 1623 to 1655. There are an estimated 33,000 sculptures in the temple and among the highlights are the Hall of a Thousand Pillars, the Tirumala Nayaka Temple and the Temple Art Museum. In the evening, we enjoy the night closing ceremony of the Temple. JAN. 22 After breakfast, we travel to Thekkady, a district in Kerala, famous for the Periyar National Park. After lunch we visit a spice plantation, where cardamon, pepper, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, allspice, and tea are grown. We also see Ayurvedic medicinal plants and have an opportunity to buy some garden fresh spices. JAN. 23 We start our day with a early jungle walk at the Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary. Spread across 777 square kilometres, it was declared a Tiger Reserve in 1978. In the afternoon, we enjoy a boat ride on Lake Periyar to watch animals in their natural habitat by the water’s edge. We may see boars, Sambars, wild dogs, Langur monkeys and wild elephants. The sanctuary is also a haven for water birds. We will see plenty of darters, grey herons, egrets and kingfishers. The evening is free to explore the local bazaar. JAN. 24 We continue our journey to Kochi (formerly Cochin). Known as the Queen of the Arabian Sea, it is one of the principal seaports of the country. In the evening, we enjoy a Kathakali Dance Performance. This dramatized presentation, typically based on the Hindu epic poems Ramayana, and Mahabharata, is a unique combination of music, dance, acting, elaborate makeup and colourful costumes. JAN. 25 We spend the day exploring Kochi, Kerala’s commercial capital with one of the finest natural harbours in the world. We will visit St. Francis Church, the oldest European Church in India, where Vasco De Gama’s remains were buried before being taken back to Portugal. Next we visit the Roman Catholic Santa Cruz Cathedral built by the Portuguese in the 16th century, which is famous for beautiful paintings on its ceiling. We continue to the Jewish Quarter with its Old Synagogue and the Dutch Palace, built by the Portuguese. Later we take a boat cruise to visit Bolghatty Palace and observe the fascinating Chinese fishing nets in action.

JAN. 26 After breakfast, we will drive to Alleppey (Alappuzha), a city with picturesque canals, beaches, and lagoons. We board a houseboat to begin our cruise along the backwaters to the town of Kumarakom. On our journey, we will observe the traditional way of life and activities of the local people. JAN. 27 Morning drive to Trivandrum, the capital of the state of Kerala located on the west coast of India near the extreme south of the mainland. Traders have been coming to this area as far back as 190 AD for spices, sandalwood, and ivory. After lunch, we begin touring Trivandrum and visit the Napier Museum, Kuthiramalika Palace, Shree Padmanabhaswamy Temple, and Sri Chitra Art Gallery with its vast collection of paintings from India, as well as Japan, China and Indonesia. We overnight in Kovalam, a beach town by the Arabian Sea 16 km from Trivandrum. JAN. 28 We take an excursion to the southernmost tip of India, Kanyakumari, where the waters of the Arabian Sea, the Bay of Bengal and the Indian Ocean meet. This important pilgrim centre of India is famous for the Amman Temples — symbolic of unity and sanctity — dedicated to Kanya Kumari, the Virgin Goddess. To its southeast, lies the famous Vivekananda Rock Memorial, a blend of all the architectural styles of India. After lunch we return back to Kovalam.

Extension JAN. 29 Optional Extension to Sri Lanka begins, or return to Calgary. Those continuing to Sri Lanka will have a one-hour flight to Colombo. On arrival, we will drive to Negombo, which is a famous port city located only 30 kilometers away. The remainder of the day is free for your own discovery. We will visit the fish market on the beach and have a peaceful stroll around this beautiful town. JAN. 30 Today we spend the full day visiting Colombo, the capital of the country. It is a beautiful city with modern high-rises and old colonial buildings making it a picturesque location. We will visit the National Museum, Zoological Garden, Viharamaha Devi Park and finally make a stop at the famous Pettah market. JAN. 31 After breakfast, we will drive to Dambulla, the largest and best preserved cave temple complex of Sri Lanka. In the surrounding area are more than 80 caves used by the monks for meditation. The major temple, which is 2,000 years old, is decorated by delicate wall paintings and carved stone statues. The Iron Wood Forest (Namal Uyana), an ancient garden built in the 10th century, and the Rose Quartz Mountain range, 500 million years old, cannot be missed while in Dambulla.

FEB. 1 Our first visit is the Sigiriya Rock Fortress in the Central Province of Sri Lanka, close to Dambulla. A UNESCO World Heritage site, it is one of the most treasured historical monuments in Sri Lanka. Features of the fortress are the frescoes, and its mirror. After lunch, we visit Polonnaruwa, the second largest city in the province, famous for its clean and beautiful environment, amazing ancient constructions and Lake Parakrama Samudra, which was built in 1200 and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site. FEB. 2 After breakfast we drive to Kandy, the cultural centre of the island and a UNESCO heritage city. En route we will stop at a spice garden in Matale. The sacred tooth relic of Lord Buddha is enshrined at the Dalada Maligawa, the temple of the tooth. The Royal Botanical Gardens is a must see with more than 4,000 species of plants. Also, we will visit the arts and crafts centre in Kandy and the main Buddhist monasteries, Malwatta and Asgiriya Monasteries. In the evening we will see a cultural show. FEB. 3 – 4 Today, we return to Negombo. En route we will visit a tea plantation and the tea factory in Giragama and the Pinnawala Elephant Orphanage, which is a nursery and captive breeding ground for wild Asian elephants. After lunch, return to Negombo for our farewell dinner. FEB. 5 Return flight from Colombo to home.

Accompanying Instructor Valery Efimenko was born in Russia but lived in Ukraine the first 18 years of his life. He graduated from the Oriental Department of St. Petersburg State University where he studied Indian languages, history and culture. Valery has taught religion, philosophy and Russian history for Continuing Education at the University of Calgary since 2004, and this is his 5th travel study trip.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$6,100 $60 $6,160 $1,900

Estimated Air Travel

$2,400

Extension to Sri Lanka Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$3,800 $25 $3,825 $1,400

Estimated Air Travel

$335

Full payment is due at registration. For fee details, withdrawal/ refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

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Southeast Asia: Cambodia and Myanmar (Burma) FEB. 16 – MARCH 10, 2018 Southeast Asia is one of the most exotic, and most popular regions of the world to visit for a North American traveller. It is a region of spectacular natural landscapes and abundant and varied wildlife, but it is also a fascinating blend of numerous cultures. It is a region steeped in rich history going back to early medieval times and at the same time reminds us of the not-so-distant colonial past. An example is the colonial French architecture of Phnom Penh in Cambodia, and British architectural heritage in Yangon, Myanmar. Cambodia and Myanmar are arguably the most exotic countries in that part of the world. We will be travelling though an astonishing variety of natural and cultural landscapes: lush tropical rainforest areas in the Mekong lowland, mountainous regions in Myanmar, large freshwater lakes such as the Tonle Sap in Cambodia, and the Inle Lake in Myanmar. From a cultural and historical perspective, the Angkor area in Cambodia, and the Buddhist temple region in Bagan in Myanmar, are among the most spectacular locales in the world. This fascinating journey will take place in midwinter, the most comfortable time of the year to visit this part of the world. Throughout the journey, we will be staying in comfortable hotels or lodges. In short, be prepared for the trip of a lifetime!

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, Jan. 31 and Feb. 7, 7 – 9:30 p.m., held at the University of Calgary campus. These classes will provide participants with the overview of the program. Discussion topics will focus on the historical background of Cambodia and Myanmar, as well as the physical, human and economic geography of Southeast Asia in general, and these two countries in particular. The itinerary, travel arrangements, and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Three meals daily are included throughout the trip.

FEB. 27 We will explore the world famous Shwedagon Pagoda, Bogyoke Market, Sule Paya and other spectacular locations.

MARCH 9 Today, we transfer by plane back to Yangon. After our morning arrival, we can further explore this city at leisure.

FEB. 28 We take a short morning flight to Bagan, and depart for a spectacular tour of thousands of pagodas and temples, many up to 1000 years old.

MARCH 10 We depart in the morning for home.

MARCH 1 Today’s tour of the main temples and pagodas of Bagan will be a highlight of our trip. MARCH 2 Today we visit the summit of Mount Popa and its famous Buddhist Monastery. Along the way, we observe the rural environment of this still predominantly peasant, underdeveloped country.

FEB. 16 – 18 Travel to Phnom Penh, Cambodia FEB. 19 We begin our Southeast Asian journey in this city of two million, the capital of Cambodia and a fascinating blend of historical and modern cityscapes. We visit the Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda, two of the premier historical sites in the city. FEB. 20 We continue to explore Phnom Penh with a half-day visit to the city’s large central market, Psah Thom Thmey. The afternoon is at leisure, for more exploration of the city. FEB. 21 Our full-day tour includes the Tuong Sleng Museum and a visit to the Killing Fields, a legacy of the Khmer Rouge rule of the late 1970s. Located 15 km from the city, the regime’s main extermination camp will undoubtedly be one of the most sobering places that anyone can visit. FEB. 22 We will transfer by plane to Siem Reap, gateway to one of the most spectacular cultural heritage sites on earth: the temples of Angkor. After lunch in our hotel we will explore Angkor Thom, Bayon Temple and Ba Poon, as well as a part of the main temple of Angkor Wat.

MARCH 3 We will take a morning transfer to Mandalay, the former royal capital of Burma. An evening visit to Mandalay Hill should provide a spectacular sunset from a high point above the city. MARCH 4 We will depart early for a full-day tour of Amarapura, the Bagaya Monastery and the famous U Bein Wooden Bridge in the Mandalay region. MARCH 5 We spend the full day visiting the many pagodas for which Mandalay is famous. The trip will include a boat ride on the Irrawady River, one of the longest rivers in Southeast Asia.

Accompanying Instructor Peter Slezak is an instructor in the Geography Department at the University of Calgary, recently retired from full-time teaching duties. His interest and areas of expertise are cultural and historical geography of various world cultures and regions. He has extensively researched different economic and political systems, including those of Southeast Asia. He has traveled extensively throughout the world, including three different times to Southeast Asia.

Costs Land and tuition Domestic air GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$7,300 $1,300 $75 $8,675 $1,900

Estimated Air Travel

$1,700

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Oct. 13, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

MARCH 6 A short flight from Mandalay will take us to the famous Inle Lake. This large lake is famous for its indigenous Intha culture, known for many colourful fishing villages, leg-rowing fishermen and its floating vegetation. MARCH 7 A full-day boat tour allows for excursions to surrounding villages and pagodas. MARCH 8 We visit Kakku to see a spectacular concentration of 500 stupas in an area that was closed to visitors until recently.

FEB. 23 A full-day excursion is devoted to the most spectacular and largest temple Angkor Wat — the largest religious building in the world. FEB. 24 We tour the surrounding region of Siem Reap: Koh Ker Mountain Temple and the Rolous Temple group. These are all spectacular historical monuments from the Khmer Empire period. FEB. 25 Today, we take a full-day boat excursion to one of the largest lakes in the region, Tonle Sap, to see its floating villages and flooded forest. FEB. 26 We transfer by plane to Yangon and our hotel. The rest of the day will be at leisure to explore the city, the former political, and still commercial capital of Myanmar (formerly Burma). 6


Discover Cuba FEB. 17 – 24, 2018

Discover Cuba’s storied music scene, from traditional “guajiro” and “trova” musicians to the world-renowned Tropicana show, the Buena Vista Social Club, and hot Cuban jazz. Along the way uncover the remarkable charms of old Havana, the UNESCO World Heritage site town of Trinidadde-Cuba, and the lovely southern port city of Cienfuegos. Rural and urban landscapes will be explored. Cuba is a tropical paradise with a history steeped in Spanish and Afro-American cultures. Since the 1959 revolution, direct American influence has been removed while the Castro government placed a heavy emphasis on developing the country’s artistic scene (as well as sports, education, and health care). The result has been a highly developed musical culture that is respected all over the world and has come to particular prominence since the release of the Buena Vista Social Club Grammy-winning CD and well-known film in the late 1990s. Cuban music is at the heart of salsa music (which we will hear), but Cubans also have a special taste for jazz, which we will also hear at the Jazz Café and Zorra y Cuervo jazz clubs in Havana.

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, Feb. 7 and 14, 7 – 9:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. These classes will provide participants with the overview of the program. Topics will include a look at the places we will visit, such as Varadero, Trinidad-de-Cuba, Cienfuegos, Santa Clara, Havana and the UNESCO world heritage sites in those places; the history and politics of Cuba; and, an examination of Cuba’s substantial music scene. The itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Included meals are shown following the daily itinerary. B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner

FEB. 17 Depart Calgary for Varadero. (D) FEB. 18 Drive to Trinidad. Enjoy a tour of the city, the best-maintained colonial city of Cuba and a UNESCO World Heritage site. Founded in 1514, this charming and relaxing old town, with its cobblestone streets, colonial mansions, museums, and great beaches, is also home to the largest church in the country, Iglesia de la Santisima Trinidad. We’ll spend the evening at Casa de la Trova. (B, L, D)

FEB. 19 After breakfast, we travel to Cienfuegos, a port city and unique cultural destination on the Caribbean coast of southern-central Cuba. We will have a tour of the city, another UNESCO World Heritage site, and admire its mixture of architectural influences and examples of early urban planning. The afternoon is free to explore on our own. (B, L, D)

FEB. 23 After breakfast, we visit the Revolutionary Museum and the craft market. After lunch we enjoy Havana on our own. Our farewell dinner is at the Tropicana Night Club. (B, L, D)

FEB. 20 Depart Trinidad for Santa Clara. Visit the city of the revolution and arrive in Havana in the late afternoon. Enjoy evening dinner and a show at the Jazz Café. (B, L, D)

John Reid plays the saxophone, flute, and clarinet, and has been leading his own jazz groups since 1974, recording three CDs. He works with composers full time at the Canadian Music Centre and has been teaching at the University of Calgary since 1984. Course topics include jazz history, New York City Broadway musicals, history of funk music, salsa music, the African Effect in Music, and life and music of James Brown.

FEB. 21 We start the day with a panoramic tour around modern Havana, then old Havana in the afternoon. Revolutionary Square and a special focus on Old Havana will provide us with an orientation to the area and give us ideas on what parts of the city to explore later in the week. Lunch is at Café Taberna at the Old Square. In the evening, we visit Buena Vista Social Club, with dinner at the Hotel Nacional. (B, L, D) FEB. 22 We tour the historic El Morro fortress at the gateway to the Havana harbour and visit the market at the Plaza de Armas in the afternoon. After dinner we enjoy the evening at La Zorro y Cuervo Jazz Club. (B, L, D)

FEB. 24 Return home (B)

Accompanying Instructor

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$3,700 $40 $3,740 $700

Estimated Air Travel

$1,225

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Oct. 13, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

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Best of Baja Mexico FEB. 17 – MARCH 3, 2018 MARCH 3 – 17, 2018

Imagine yourself afloat on the quiet waters of a sheltered coastal lagoon, under a warm desert sun, surrounded by dozens, if not hundreds, of 36-tonne whales breaching, spyhopping, and frolicking; many times close enough to touch. These are the “friendly” gray whales of the eastern Pacific that winter and give birth to their calves in the protected lagoons of Mexico’s Baja Peninsula. If you are enchanted by whales, then this is the ultimate destination for you. On the trip we visit the two most important nursery lagoons of the Pacific gray whale, as well as an important wintering area for magnificent 150-tonne blue whales, the largest creatures to have ever lived. Add to that, the chance to see fin whales, breaching humpback whales and pods of common dolphins and pilot whales and you have a true cetacean bonanza. While enjoying a sunny, whale-filled winter getaway, visit historic Spanish missions, 3,000-year-old rock paintings and petroglyphs, towering sand dunes, the cactus-filled Sonoran Desert, and the azure waters of the Sea of Cortez.

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evening evenings, Feb. 7 and 14, 7 – 9:30 p.m., held at the University of Calgary campus. Topics for discussion will include: the geography and natural history of the Baja Peninsula and the Sea of Cortez and the ecology and biology of the gray whales and the importance of the nursery lagoons. The itinerary, travel arrangements, health matters, and insurance coverage will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary

Virgins Volcanoes — a testament to the peninsula’s fiery volcanic history. Overnight in San Ignacio.

Included meals are breakfast daily and two dinners.

DAY 1 Depart from Calgary on the direct, non-stop flight to Loreto, Mexico and then settle into our hotel. Three nights in Loreto. DAY 2 Enjoy an all-day boat trip exploring the quiet waters of Bahia de Loreto National Park searching for pilot, humpback, fin and blue whales. Stop at Carmen Island for a chance to learn about the island’s history and discover the hidden beauty of this cactus desert. DAY 3 After breakfast, we begin with a visit to a local ranch where we learn about cheese making and other farming methods learned from the Jesuit missionaries and still practised today by peninsula inhabitants. Later we visit the famous San Javier Mission built in 1744, considered by many to be the most beautiful mission in the entire peninsula because of its magnificent art, elaborate altar pieces, and wood and stone sculptures. In the afternoon we visit Rancho Santo Domingo where we climb to a hillside cave to view 5,000-year-old rock paintings depicting a spouting whale, an armadillo, a snake, and a child’s hand print. DAY 4 We travel north along the peninsula by private van to the town of Mulege, making stops to enjoy the desert scenery. The quest this morning is to reach another petroglyph location, Piedras Pinturas, before the desert sun flushes the rocks of their early morning texture and colour. The rock paintings in the Baja Peninsula are among some of the finest in the world. In the afternoon we stroll a quiet, deserted beach along the shore of the Sea of Cortez and enjoy the pelicans diving for their dinner and herons and egrets stalking the shallows. Overnight in Mulege. DAY 5 Continue driving north along the peninsula to the town of Santa Rosalia where we visit the local church, town hall, historic French hotel and the mining museum. The Sonoran Desert in this area of the peninsula is especially beautiful, and if brief winter rains have dampened the land the ground may be carpeted in yellow, purple, and blue spring flowers. After Santa Rosalia we stop at the Three

DAY 6 Today we visit San Ignacio Lagoon to see our first mother grey whales and their newborn calves. Afterwards lunch (on your own). We will stop at a local seafood restaurant with some leisure time for birdwatching along the shore of the lagoon. In the late afternoon we return to San Ignacio town to visit the colourful village square and local mission — another Jesuit church built in the 1700s and beautifully restored. Overnight in San Ignacio. DAY 7 We travel north to the salt mining town of Guerrero Negro and the most famous grey whale nursery of them all, Scammon’s Lagoon. En route we stop in the San Francisco Mountains to enjoy the Cueva de Raton rock paintings. The thick yucca forests that parallel this section of the Trans-Baja Highway are an added visual bonus. Four nights in Guerrero Negro. DAYS 8, 9 and 10 Begin each day with an early morning whale-watching tour where “friendly” mother whales routinely bring their curious calves alongside the tourist boats. In the afternoons we visit the famous salt mine, climb and photograph the towering golden dunes of San Miguelito and stroll the trails of the local bird sanctuary — a refuge for thousands of wintering waterfowl and shorebirds, as well as the local ospreys, pelicans, egrets and herons. On the final afternoon we drive back to San Ignacio. DAY 11 This is a day of travel as we make our way back to Loreto. Stop en route for desert scenery and wildflowers as well as a walking tour of Mulege and its historic Mission. Four nights in Loreto. DAY 12 Today, we enjoy an all-day boat trip to Isla Coronado, one of the picturesque desert islands in Bahia de Loreto National Park. We visit a colony of loquacious California sea lions, perhaps take a swim, and have a picnic lunch on the best beach on the island. As always, we search for pods of common dolphins and whales whenever we are on the water. DAY 13 An early morning nature hike into the Sierra de la Gigante Mountains near. Loreto has us searching for desert plants and wildlife with a picnic breakfast

among the giant cardon cactuses. We visit the Loreto Mission in the afternoon, the first Jesuit mission built on the Peninsula. The town of Loreto was the original capital of the state and we take time to stroll its many quaint shaded streets and curio shops. DAY 14 Mirador Frida is an elevated lookout overlooking the quiet waters and multiple desert islands of Bahia de Loreto national Park. An early morning start guarantees a spectacular sunrise view. Return to the hotel for breakfast and a leisurely morning on your own swimming, kayaking, paddleboarding, hiking or bird-watching (which ever activity strikes your fancy). In the late afternoon we make a final trip onto the waters of the national park for a sunset cruise around Danzante Island. DAY 15 Afternoon flight home.

Accompanying Instructor Dr. Wayne Lynch is an internationally-recognized naturalist, science writer and professional wildlife photographer. He is the author and photographer of over 60 natural history books for adults, children, and young adults. He is also an elected fellow of the Explorers Club and the Arctic Institute of North America, and his biography has been included in the Canadian Who’s Who, published by the University of Toronto, since 1996. Wayne has travelled in Baja multiple times, beginning more than 40 years ago and most recently this past winter. Wayne has planned and accompanied trips for Continuing Education to Antarctica, Borneo, Brazil, Namibia, Arctic Norway, Kenya, Tanzania, Boreal Canada and Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement is not available Estimated Air Travel

$6,300 $75 $6,375

$850

Full payment is due at registration. For fee details, withdrawal/ refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2. Photos courtesy of Dr. Wayne Lynch

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A Culinary Tour of Maui MARCH 29 – APRIL 8, 2018

Would you like to eat the freshest fish, the juiciest fruits and the most cutting-edge dishes of Maui? On this culinary tour of the island, you will drink pineapple vodka, island-brewed beer, and coffee where it grows. You will discover surprising ingredients, innovative agriculture and the Aloha spirit. You will learn the culture, what the locals eat, and how they cook. Due to Maui’s unique growing climate, an abundance of fresh and exciting ingredients can be grown year-round. At the aromatic peak of the island’s agricultural season, we will meet the farmers who grow pineapples, breadfruits and Taro. We will visit farms and production plants, and will even do some picking! The trip will culminate at the famous Maui AgFest where we will be guest judges charged with determining the best chef on Maui. There will be ample sampling of delicious foods from local restaurants including a dish at Maui’s ‘Top Chef’ Sheldon Simeon’s restaurant, Tin Roof. We will sample roadside treats such as Ululani’s Hawaiian Shave Ice, voted the ‘best shave ice on Maui’ by Hawaii Magazine. In addition, you will learn cooking techniques from local chefs and your own chef guide. We also take time to enjoy the ocean, the sun and the gorgeous landscape.

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, March 14 and 21, 7 – 9:30 p.m., Discussion topics include food, culture, activities and weather considerations about the region, background information about the locations we will be visiting and the activities we will be participating in. The itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Included meals are shown following the daily itinerary B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner

MARCH 29 Welcome to Maui! Once we’ve transferred to the hotel, we’ll unpack and relax. We’ll get into the swing of Aloha at sunset when we gather for a traditional Hawaiian Welcome and Reception with a “Sense of Place” presentation by the Hawaiian Cultural Advisor. (D) MARCH 30 Today we go traditional Hawaiian. We’ll meet two farmers who grow taro, breadfruit and sweet potato — foods brought to Maui when the first settlers arrived. We’ll visit a Central Maui farm for taro and poi tasting. And we’ll meet a Maui resident, who makes gluten-free, vegan pies with taro and breadfruit. From the farm we’ll go to a traditional Hawaiian restaurant for lunch, then return to the hotel for a free evening. (B, L) MARCH 31 Our focus is Plantation Era Hawai’i. The day will begin with a guided tour of the Upcountry Farmers Market, followed by a quick stop at one of Chef Pierre’s favorite mom-and-pop bakeries for some delicious sweets. From there, we tour Hawaii’s last pineapple plantation and a distillery that makes spirits from pineapple and enjoy a late lunch at one of Maui’s top restaurants in Hali’imaile. (B, L) APRIL 1 We meet mid-morning and head to a favorite local eatery in Kihei. Following brunch we visit the Maui Brewing Company for a brewery experience including a tour and tasting. We’ll have free time in the afternoon and end our day with dinner at a favorite restaurant in Kihei. (B, D) APRIL 2 A tasty travel day is in store. We visit Surfing Goat Dairy Farm and Ocean Vodka, have lunch at Tin Roof, followed by a taste of shaved ice at a popular Maui spot. Dinner is at the Chef’s table at our new hotel. (B, L, D) APRIL 3 Pack and prepare for a day out to Hana, in East Maui. Wear your bathing suit. Bring sunscreen, mosquito repellent, a hat, towel, water bottle and a change of clothes. The excursion includes several places where you can enjoy fresh, flavourful and

locally grown food. The evening is for relaxing or exploring nearby towns — Pa’ia, Haiku and Makawao — at your leisure. Each town is 10 minutes from your hotel. (B, L) APRIL 4 Sunrise at Haleakala. Meet Paniolo, a local cowboy, and learn about ranching history and livestock. Visit MauiWine for a behind-the-scenes tour and wine tasting. Beef, elk, lamb or venison burgers for lunch. Then, we head to West Maui for a restful afternoon. That evening, enjoy a sunset BBQ prepared by Chef Pierre and chefs from Maui. (B, L, D) APRIL 5 Today, we begin our discovery of resort life on Maui’s west side with Poke 101, followed by a progressive lunch by a few of Ka’anapali’s independent restaurants. Our evening is at the Grown on Maui Chefs Collaboration Dinner featuring five of Maui’s top chefs and visiting chefs. (B, L, D) APRIL 6 Today is yours to sleep in or have your own adventure. Breakfast is at the hotel. Spend the day snorkeling in the ocean, hiking the Haleakala volcano or taking a surfing lesson (Optional, $). Spend the day working up an appetite or resting so you can stay up late to enjoy some sweet beats and eats at the late-night spot of your choice. (B)

Accompanying Instructor Pierre Lamielle is a Calgary chef, cookbook author and culinary instructor. He competed on Top Chef Canada and Chopped Canada and currently works as a chef instructor. On his last trip to Maui, he discovered farms, chefs and unmatched hospitality. He documented his culinary odyssey in several publications and is looking forward to sharing his love of the island first-hand with a similarly food-minded group.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$4,800 $50 $4,850 $1,475

Estimated Air Travel

$800

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Oct. 27, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

APRIL 7 The Maui County Agricultural Festival keeps us busy today. We’ll attend Maui’s largest AgFest and meet the farmers, ranchers, chefs and food producers. We’ll check out the Grown on Maui Farmers Market, food trucks, and food booths and enjoy the Live Chefs’ Challenge where nine chefs, including Chef Pierre, split into three teams and compete. We end the day at the Grand Taste where we can enjoy 12 tastings prepared by Maui’s top locavore chefs. (B, L) APRIL 8 Depart Maui. Enjoy your last day in paradise sleeping in or enjoying a little swim or light breakfast at your leisure. Then, after a direct flight back home, we begin the food withdrawal. (B)

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Lyon and Strasbourg APRIL 14 – 27, 2018

Roman history, exquisite French cuisine, historic silk weavers, Alsatian and Rhone wines, the European parliament, great art plus a few cathedrals and castles to top it all off — that’s Lyon and Strasbourg. These are our destinations for our cultural and culinary tour of eastern France. We’ll spend a week in each of the cities, exploring the history and culture and taking day trips to nearby villages and cities. We’ll walk through Roman amphitheatres, vineyards, covered walkways and along cobblestone streets. We’ll even take a side trip to one of Europe’s oldest universities and spend some time in a cooking school.

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, March 28 and April 4, 7 – 9:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. These classes will provide participants with an overview of the program including the history of both cities from Roman times to the current day. We’ll discuss the culinary and cultural background of each city and the areas around them, delve into the wines of the regions and look at the cultural similarities and differences of the two. The itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Included meals are shown following the daily itinerary. B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner

APRIL 14 – 15 We travel from Calgary to Lyon in the Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes region of east-central France. At the confluence of the Rhone and Saone rivers, Lyon is France’s third largest city. Founded in 43 BC as a refuge for Roman followers of the assassinated Julius Caesar, Lyon became the capital of Roman Gaul and the centre for much trade and communication. Later a bustling Renaissance city, it became France’s key city for the silk trade. Today it is considered to be the culinary capital of France. After arrival we’ll take an orientation walking tour of the city and then dine at a typical bouchon on traditional Lyonnaise cuisine. (D) APRIL 16 After breakfast, a walking tour takes us to the Colline de la Croix-Russe, an historic neighbourhood famous for its weaving since the early 19th Century. We’ll stroll the “traboulles” (covered walkways) on the hillside and visit the Maison des Canuts (House of Silk Workers) to view silk-weaving demonstrations on traditional looms. Our tour will also take us to the Mural of Famous People from Lyon and to Lyon’s many public squares and buildings. (B, D) APRIL 17 A cooking class this morning shows us the depth of Lyonnaise cuisine. We’ll start with a visit to a market and then head to a culinary school where we’ll whip up a fine French lunch for ourselves. The rest of the day will be on our own to explore Lyon. (Or take a nap.) (B, L)

APRIL 19 Today we’ll step into the past at France’s oldest Roman ruins. Dating to 15 BC, Lyon’s archaeological site includes two Roman theatres, a temple and a collection of statues, mosaics, marble bath pieces, coins and ceramics now housed in the Museum of Archaeology. The rest of the day will be on our own to explore Lyon. (B, D) APRIL 20 We’ll head north of Lyon today to the city of Macon and its surrounding wine region. We’ll visit Pouilly and its twin, Fuisse, on a wine sampling tour of the region, tasting the lovely chardonnays and gamays of the region. (B, L) APRIL 21 Time to head north to Strasbourg with a four-hour train ride. Strasbourg’s city centre — La Grande Ile — has been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Situated on The Rhine River, it has been the site of many French-German disputes and has changed hands many times over the centuries. It has also become the symbol of cooperation between the two countries. After arriving in Strasbourg and settling in to our hotel, we’ll take an orientation walk around the city. Then we’ll dine on Alsatian cuisine. ( B, D) APRIL 22 A walking tour of Strasbourg takes us to the immense Strasbourg Cathedral, the tallest building in the world from 1647 to 1874, the halftimbered houses and narrow streets of Petite France, the central Place Gutenberg, the 1427-built Maison Kammerzell and other local highlights. After lunch, we’re on our own to explore Strasbourg. (B, L) APRIL 23 We’ll head north of Strasbourg today to the Maginot Line Museum at Schoenenberg where we’ll tour the barracks, the command centre, the gun positions and the kitchens. Built to protect France from a German attack between the World Wars, the Maginot line crumbled quickly. Then on to Haguenau for lunch on our own. Founded in the 12th Century, Haguenau has been held by both Germany and France many times over the years. We’ll have time to stroll the Old Town and absorb its history. (B, D)

APRIL 24 We’ll start the day with a tour of the European Parliament, which holds 785 Euro MPs who represent 27 countries. After lunch we’ll visit either the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art or the Musee de Beaux Arts, depending on the exhibitions available. (B, D) APRIL 25 We’ll take a day trip to Heidelberg in Germany’s Baden-Wurttemberg state where will visit the historic Heidelberg castle, the Baroque Old Town and Heidelberg University (dating to 1386). We’ll enjoy some German cuisine – and perhaps a good beer – before heading back to Strasbourg. (B, L ) APRIL 26 A wine tour takes us to Colmar, the capital of Alsatian wine. We tour the charming Old Town of Colmar with its canals and historic sites and sip a little wine along the way. After a late lunch, we’ll return to Strasbourg for some time on our own and then a final dinner. (B, D) APRIL 27 Time to pack our bags and head home. (B)

Accompanying Instructor John Gilchrist is Calgary’s foremost food writer and restaurant critic. John has reviewed restaurants for CBC Radio, written about food for the Calgary Herald, and taught Food and Culture programs for the University of Calgary for over 20 years. He has led cultural and culinary tours to Paris, Rome, Bangkok, Bali, New York and many other destinations around the world.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$6,350 $60 $6,410 $1,200

Estimated Air Travel

$1,600

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Oct. 27, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

APRIL 18 Today we’ll visit Vienne, a city of 30,000 that was a major centre during the Roman era. Situated on the east banks of the Rhone, it became the capital of Provence in the Middle Ages. There are many historic sites to visit in Vienne and beautiful walks along the Rhone. (B, L)

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Roots of the Blues Tour APRIL 26 – MAY 7, 2018

The Blues was born in the Yazoo River Basin of the Mississippi Delta. At its heart is Clarksdale, home to the award winning Delta Blues Museum — a famed destination for blues lovers worldwide. In the words of renowned blues harmonica player, Charlie Musselwhite, “The blues seeps up through the pavement in Clarksdale. Go to Clarksdale!” The museum houses the remains of the cabin from Stovall Farms where Muddy Waters lived during his days as a sharecropper. Best known for electrifying the blues in Chicago, Muddy is represented by posters, photographs and a wax statue. This tour combines visits to the Delta Blues Museum, the Mississippi Blues Trail, and the crossroads of Highways 61 and 49 (where Robert Johnson is said to have sold his soul to the devil for his skill to play the blues guitar) with a pilgrimage to the world’s greatest music festival — the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. “Jazzfest” features three huge 2,500-seat tents — the Blues Tent, the Jazz Tent and the Gospel Tent — plus stages spotlighting some of the biggest acts in show business. The lineup includes national and international touring acts as well as New Orleans and regional favourites representing pop, rock, gospel, jazz, rap, funk and R & B. The 2017 edition wrapped on May 7 and drew some 425,000 people!

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, April 11 and 18, 7 – 9:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. This class will provide participants with the overview of the program. Discussion topics include: Roots of the Blues, the Mississippi Delta, the 12-bar blues, the Delta Blues Museum at Clarksdale, the Mississippi Blues Trail, and New Orleans: geography, architecture, music, food, culture, and festival. The itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Included meals are shown following the daily itinerary. B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner

APRIL 26 Arrive in New Orleans. After checking in, we begin with an historic walking tour of the French Quarter, and a welcome dinner at Tujague’s Restaurant, the second oldest restaurant in New Orleans! Located in the heart of the French Quarter, facing the historic French Market, Tujague’s is renowned for providing an unforgettable dining experience in the original Creole tradition. (D) APRIL 27 Today’s historical New Orleans city tour includes the Garden District, Charles Avenue, Audubon Park, and a tour of the cemetery, famously known as “The City of the Dead.” Then, we make our first visit to the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival – Jazzfest – the best music festival and cultural experience in the world! (B) APRIL 28 At the Cajun Pride Bayou and Swamp Tour, we’ll come within feet of jumping gators as we learn about the Louisiana Wetlands. Then, we visit the Cajun town of Frenier with its unique history before venturing again to Jazzfest. (B) APRIL 29 It’s Sunday, and we begin with a morning service at the Franklin Avenue Baptist Church. Hailed by some past participants as the best feature of our New Orleans trip. This experience will give us a window and ear into some of the most genuine, swinging gospel music and preaching on the planet! Then once again, Jazzfest! (B) APRIL 30 We leave New Orleans to journey through the Louisiana and Mississippi countryside for Clarksdale, the “Home of the Blues.” In the evening, you’re free to explore the bars and restaurants and feel “the Blues seeping up through the pavement.” (Charlie Musselwhite). (B) MAY 1 We visit the Delta Blues Museum, housed in the Clarksdale freight depot, built in 1918 for the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad. The former freight area and the adjacent Muddy Waters expansion is a destination for blues lovers

worldwide. This includes the cabin from the Stovall Farms Plantation where Muddy Waters lived during his days as a sharecropper and tractor driver. (B) MAY 2 We spend a full day touring the Mississippi Blues Trail, not only in honour of individual artists, clubs, record companies, radio stations, and historic events, but also in celebration of plantations (like the Dockery Plantation), streets, cities, and counties that were centres of blues activity. This includes the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman, where folklorists recorded blues by inmates (most notably Bukka White) on several occasions dating back to the 1930s. We will visit “The Crossroads” of Hwy 61 and US 49 where Robert Johnson is said to have sold his soul to the devil for his skill at blues guitar playing. We’ll investigate significant sites in the careers of artists like: B.B. King, Charley Patton, Bo Diddley, Elvis Presley, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker, Son House, Tommy Johnson, Magic Sam, Willie Dixon, W.C. Handy, Sonny Boy Williamson, Otis Rush, Albert King, and others. (B) MAY 3 We say goodbye to Clarksdale and drive back to New Orleans, with plenty of time to make another visit to Jazzfest. (B) MAY 4 Today’s tour is acclaimed by Lonely Planet Travel as the best history tour in the United States. We’ll visit the Laura Plantation and experience the Louisiana Creole world via an historic sugar plantation. The one-hour guided visit, entitled The Creole Family Saga, is based upon 5,000 pages of documents found in the French National Archives and upon Laura’s Memories of the Old Plantation Home, dramatically detailing 250 years of true-life stories of Creole women, slaves, and children. Later, Jazzfest. (B)

Accompanying Instructor John Reid plays the saxophone, flute, and clarinet, and has been leading his own jazz groups since 1974, recording three CDs. He works with composers full time at the Canadian Music Centre and has been teaching at the University of Calgary since 1984. Course topics include jazz history, New York City Broadway musicals, history of funk music, salsa music, the African Effect in Music, and life and music of James Brown.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$5,900 $50 $5,950 $1,500

Estimated Air Travel

$900

MAY 5 Jazzfest! (B) MAY 6 Today is our last chance to enjoy the festival before our farewell dinner at Arnaud’s restaurant which has been operating in the heart of the French Quarter since 1918. Arnaud’s has remained true to its traditions serving classic Creole Cuisine and offering live Dixieland Jazz. (B, D)

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Nov. 10, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

MAY 7 Depart New Orleans for home. (B) 16


Urban and Scenic China Adventure Tour MAY 5 – 25, 2018

Join us on a journey through China to experience the thriving and throbbing energy of China’s three greatest cities: Beijing, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. In and around Beijing, see the Great Wall of China (Juyongguan site), the Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, the Old and New Summer Palaces, and the Ming Tombs. In Xi’an (historical Chang’an) and environs, stand in awe of the terra cotta soldier burial complex surrounding the still-unexcavated Tomb of the First Emperor of China. In Shanghai, stroll the world-famous Bund, visit the Yuyuan Bazaar, and people watch at the Nanjing Pedestrian Street. Then, escape the urban bustle for the spectacular natural scenery of Mt. Emei in Sichuan Province and the Panda Research and Breeding Centre. Here, enjoy delicious Sichuan cuisine, which (in Dr. Wright’s opinion) is the very best in China. In Guilin, cruise the Li River and visit the spectacular terraced rice fields of Longji. Finally, travel to the third great city of the tour to experience for yourself the differences between mainland China and Hong Kong, formerly a British colony and now once again part of China. Enjoy a brief trip by ferry from Hong Kong to Macau, formerly a Portuguese colony.

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Orientation The orientation course will consist of five Wednesday evenings, March 28 – April 25, 7 – 9:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. Topics will include the history and culture of China and background information on the historical sites we will be visiting. The itinerary, travel arrangements, and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Three meals daily throughout this trip.

MAY 5 – 6 Our trip begins in Beijing, China’s capital, with a visit to the Temple of Heaven. MAY 7 On this first full day of the tour we visit Tiananmen Square, the mausoleum of Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), and the National Museum of China. We will lunch with a family in a traditional and historical part of the city (a hutong alleyway) and visit the Forbidden City, where the emperors of the last two dynasties lived and ruled over China. MAY 8 Today’s excursion is to the Great Wall of China (Juyongguan site) and the Ming Tombs, where several Ming dynasty emperors are buried. MAY 9 We visit the Old Summer Palace and the New Summer Palace (Yuanmingyuan and Yiheyuan). MAY 10 We take the morning express train for a 51/2-hour journey from Beijing to Xi’an, known historically as Chang’an, the capital of China’s two greatest dynasties: Han (202 BCE – 220 CE) and Tang (618-907 CE). This city was either the beginning or the end of the famous Silk Road — depending on which direction the camel caravan trader was travelling. We’ll also visit the site of the Silk Road Terminus and tour the city’s Muslim mosque and market. MAY 11 Today, we’ll stop at the world-famous terra cotta soldier complex dating back to the Qin (221206 CE) dynasty and the reign of the First Emperor of China. Afterwards, we tour the Huaqing Hot Springs site where Yang Guifei, China’s most famous femme fatale, first entranced a Tang emperor with her beauty, later meeting an untimely and tragic end at the hands of jealous and vengeful courtiers. We’ll attend the splendid outdoor play, Song of Everlasting Sorrow, which depicts the tragic story.

MAY 13 En route to the Xi’an airport, we’ll take in the Hanyangling Museum. Then, we board our plane for Shanghai. We’ll stroll on the Bund, Shanghai’s worldfamous downtown waterfront, and enjoy an evening cruise on the Huangpu River to take in the lights of Shanghai’s magnificent night-time cityscape. MAY 14 Our day includes a visit the Yuyuan Bazaar and the Pudong New District and some free time on the Nanjing Pedestrian Road. We’ll take in a dazzling acrobatics show in the evening. MAY 15 Visits to the First Congress Site of the Communist Party of China, the former French Concession area of Shanghai, and the Shikumen Museum fill our day. MAY 16 We are in the air for three and a half hours as we fly from Shanghai to Chengdu, Sichuan Province. There, we visit the city’s historical streets and the Wenshu Monastery before enjoying Sichuan cuisine that evening. MAY 17 Today begins with the Panda Research and Breeding Centre and then the giant Leshan Buddha. From there, we travel to China’s famous Mt. Emei, a major symbol of Sichuan province, and take in a Chinese martial arts show in the evening. MAY 18 We’ll travel up and down Mt. Emei and enjoy a Sichuan hotpot dinner in the evening. MAY 19 First, a visit the Dujiangyan Irrigation System, 70 km from Chengdu. Then, we travel to Pixian County to visit the Sichuan Cuisine Museum, where there will be a cooking class. MAY 20 We relax on a two-hour flight from Chengdu to Guilin where we visit the spectacularly beautiful terraced rice fields of Longji. MAY 21 We take a beautiful river cruise on the Li River from Guilin to Yangshuo. Then, visit a traditional farmhouse in the countryside and watch a breathtaking light show that tells the story of Liu Sanjie against the scenic karst topography.

MAY 22 Fly from Guilin to Hong Kong (1.5 hours). MAY 23 We enjoy a full-day tour of Victoria Peak with tram; Central-Mid-Levels Escalators and walkway system, the longest outdoor covered escalator system in the world; Man Mo Temple; Hollywood Road with its antique shops; Stanley Market; and the floating village of Aberdeen. Our dinner is at a restaurant with a Harbour view. MAY 24 We ferry from Hong Kong to Macau, a former Portuguese colony and now once again part of China and see for ourselves how much more Macau is Portuguese than Hong Kong is British. We briefly visit the St. Paul Ruins; Senator Square; and if you’re so inclined, Macau’s casinos. Macau is the largest casino city in the world. Four times more money flows through Macau than through Las Vegas. MAY 25 We ferry back from Macau to the Hong Kong airport to board our flight for home.

Accompanying Instructor David Curtis Wright took his PhD in East Asian Studies at Princeton University in 1993 and is a history professor at the University of Calgary. A fluent speaker of Mandarin Chinese, he is the author of five books and dozens of articles on Chinese history, with more on the way. In 2002 he received a Distinguished Teacher Award from the Faculty of Social Sciences. This will be David’s third Continuing Education travel study trip to China.

Costs Land, tuition and domestic air GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$6,350 $75 $6,425 $1,400

Estimated Air Travel

$1,400

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Nov. 17, 2017. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

MAY 12 Today’s highlights include the Shaanxi History Museum, the Wild Goose Pagoda, and the headquarters of the Eighth Route Army, where we hear the story of Canada’s own Norman Bethune (1890-1939), a major hero to the Chinese people.

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Orientation

Namibia: Deserts and Wildlife AUG. 15 – SEPT. 1, 2018

Namibia Orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, Aug. 1 and 8, 2018 7 – 9:30 p.m., held at the University of Calgary campus. Discussion topics include: ecology of the Namib Desert, desert adaptations, the natural history of Etosha National Park with emphasis on elephants, lions, gazelles and ostriches.

Itinerary Three meals daily are included throughout this trip

AUG. 15 – 17 Arrive in Windhoek AUG. 18 After a late breakfast we will have a half day tour in Windhoek

Namibia is possibly one of the best kept secrets on the African continent. The country offers a surprising blend of stunning desert landscapes, remarkable arid-adapted vegetation, noisy fur seal colonies, plus all of the large charismatic mammals for which Africa is justifiably famous: lions, elephants, truculent black rhinos, elegant giraffes, spiral-horned kudus and impalas, and fleet-footed zebras. Namibia is one of the most sparsely populated countries in Africa, and therefore in better environmental condition than most other nations on the continent. The two greatest attractions in the country are Etosha National Park and the Namib Desert, our visit revolves around these two key areas. The Namib Desert, with its spectacular red dunes, stretches for nearly 2000 kilometres as a narrow strip along the entire western coast of the country. Here there are wind-sculpted fields of dunes, some over 200 metres high, ancient welwitschia plants that have lived for millennia, arid-adapted insects, lizards, sand grouse, and ostriches, and saberhorned gemsbok whose lithesome beauty embodies the magnetic lure of the desert. Etosha National Park, one of the largest parks in Africa, owes its unique landscape to the Etosha Pan, a vast shallow depression covering roughly a quarter of the park. A series of waterholes along the southern edge of the pan guarantees rewarding and often spectacular game viewing. We spend six days in Etosha moving between a dozen different waterholes, watching the continuous parade of wildlife drawn to the life-giving waters. We conclude the tour with a memorable stay at Victoria Falls along the legendary Zambezi River. 19

AUG. 19 After breakfast, we travel west into the heart of the Namibia Desert. En route we descend nearly 400 meters from the cool heights of the central plateau to the picturesque coastal sea of sand, making several stops along the way to investigate the interesting vegetation and landscapes. AUG. 20 Today we drive into Namib-Naufluft Park to explore the varied desert landscapes and dune fields that have made the Namib, the most photographed desert in Africa. The area has lost none of the allure it once held for its early Bushman inhabitants. We set our sights on the sensuous curves of the dunes, and the varied life forms large and small. The smaller and more inconspicuous the object under scrutiny, the more intriguing and perfect will be the treasure you discover. AUG. 21 This morning we fly by chartered aircraft over the sea of sand to the coastal city of Swakopmund. On the one and a half hour scenic flight we get a chance to appreciate the geometric beauty of the dunes in their timeless march towards the cold waters of the Skeleton Coast. From the air we also see the remains of abandoned diamond mines, the iron skeletons of ship wrecks, and several crowded colonies of Cape fur seals. Our midday arrival in Swakopmund allows us to settle early into our hotel. The afternoon is at leisure to wander the local museum, palm-lined streets, and shops of this delightful city that feels more Teutonic than African. AUG. 22 Our day is filled with several activities, depending upon the weather. Coastal fog that provides vital moisture to the arid dunes may sometimes cloak the city for several hours in the morning and this determines, in part, how to best spend the time. The nearby dunes south of the city can be an exciting introduction to the importance of fog to the intriguing creatures of the Namib. Farther south is the community of Walvis Bay, southern Africa’s single most important coastal wetland for migratory birds. The lagoon southwest of town


attracts up to 150,000 avian visitors every year, including half the flamingo population in southern Africa. Also in the area is a commercial salt works where the salt from seawater is concentrated in vast shallow pans. The complex produces nearly 90 per cent of South Africa’s salt. AUG. 23 Today we slowly wend our way north from Swakopmund to Cape Cross. Our route hugs the coastline and we arrive at Cape Cross Lodge in time for an early afternoon lunch. The dining room of the lodge overlooks the cold south Atlantic and it’s not uncommon to see a black-backed jackal wandering the beach, searching for edibles washed ashore. After lunch we visit the nearby seal reserve, home to the largest breeding colony of Cape fur seals in the world. A visit to such a colony is a memorable mix of barking bulls, whimpering females, and bleating black pups, all combining to create an unforgettable spectacle of animal behaviour. AUG. 24 Our travels today take us inland from the dunes to Damaraland, an area of Namibia noted for its wildlife: mountain zebra, desert elephants and rhinos, gemsbok, springbok, giraffes and ostriches. The wildlife is thinly distributed over this vast arid area, so sightings, being a challenge, are especially rewarding. En route we stop for a closer look at the legendary welwitschia, one of the great botanical oddities of Africa. The ground-hugging endemic welwitschias grow at an exceptionally slow rate and scientists believe that the largest ones whose tangled mass of leaves can measure two metres across, may have been growing for up to 2,000 years. We end the day at Doro Nawas, a tented accommodation surrounded by breathtaking desert scenery and savouring the rainbow hues of the sunset from a lofty boulder perch overlooking the surrounding desert plains. AUG. 25 After breakfast we have a short drive to Twyfelfontein, the largest known collection of rock engravings in Africa. In 2007, UNESCO approved the petroglyphs as Namibia’s first World Heritage Site. Several loop trails wind through the site allowing visitors to enjoy many of the 2500 engravings that depict rhinos, elephants, lions, giraffes, animal tracks and geometric designs, most of which date back at least 6000 years to the ancient San hunters of the early Stone Age. AUG. 26 – 27 Today we journey to Etosha National Park, arriving in mid-afternoon in time for a short game drive to introduce us to this wildlife-rich sanctuary. We spend two nights in the western end of the park where we have easy access to nearby waterholes visited by a steady procession of 30 wildlife.

AUG. 28 Our travels today take us farther east along the southern edge of the central pan of Etosha, giving us a chance to sample a new selection of waterholes. The waterholes of Etosha offer a different wildlife viewing experience than is typical in the plains of Kenya and Tanzania. In East Africa, visitors drive around more or less continuously, hoping to intercept wildlife as they move about. In Etosha, the wildlife comes to the visitors who position themselves near waterholes. With patience, you may see a varied parade of parched animals coming and going — herds of playful elephants, clusters of nervous kudu, impala and springbok, a sounder of jumpy warthogs, or a lanky giraffe struggling to bend its lengthy legs. AUG. 29 Morning and afternoon game drives focus on the eastern end of the park where another cluster of waterholes awaits us. Although grazing animals are the most common visitors to the waterholes during the day, predators are also seen, especially lions in the early hours after sunrise and in the waning light before sunset. Leopards, jackals, and hyenas visit less frequently in the daytime, but add excitement whenever they do. AUG. 30 Our drive today takes us back to Windhoek for an overnight. As on all travel days during the trip, we stop now and then to enjoy the surrounding landscapes or whenever wildlife presents us with an interesting viewing opportunity.

Accompanying Instructor Dr. Wayne Lynch is an internationally-recognized naturalist, science writer and professional wildlife photographer. His photo credits include hundreds of magazine covers, thousands of calendar shots, and tens of thousands of images published in over four dozen countries. He is also a popular guest speaker, and audiences worldwide applaud his practical and entertaining approach to natural history. As well, he is the author and photographer of nearly 50 natural history books for children, young adults and adults. He is an elected fellow of the Explorers Club and the Arctic Institute of North America, and his biography has been included in the Canadian Who’s Who, published by the University of Toronto, since 1996. He has made over thirty trips to Africa, and recently began exploring Namibia which he finds refreshingly uncrowded and rich in natural history.

Costs Land, tuition and domestic air GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$8,400 $75 $8,475 $1,600

Estimated Air Travel

$3,000

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Feb. 16, 2018. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2. Photos courtesy of Dr. Wayne Lynch

AUG. 31 – SEPT. 1 Depart Windhoek and travel home. 20


Orientation

The Samurai Trail SEPT. 1 – 16, 2018

The orientation course will be held Aug. 25, 2018, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the University of Calgary campus. Discussion topics will include the history and culture of Japan, as well as background information on the historical sites we will be visiting. A highlight will be Japanese artifacts from Norman Leach’s personal collection. Itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Included meals are shown following the daily itinerary. B: Breakfast, L: Lunch, D: Dinner

During the Tokugawa period in Japan, local lords were required to travel to Edo (Tokyo) each year to pay homage to the Shogun. With limited time to travel, the lords learned to make the most of the trip, stopping at famous shrines, temples and castles along the way; visiting natural landmarks; eating at the best restaurants, and staying at the most comfortable inns. As they travelled, the Lord and his retinue would take in the local arts and sports. On this travel study, we will follow, for two weeks in the footsteps of the lords and samurai of the Tokugawa period. Led by a guide who speaks fluent Japanese and English, we will explore the arts and sights of the ancient city of Tokyo. In Kyoto, famous for its shrines and temples, we will be immersed in the culture of Japan and discover the local crafts. On the journey between the two famous cities, we will taste the food, visit towering castles and see for ourselves how ancient and modern Japan have come together.

SEPT. 1 – 2 Welcome to Japan. Today we arrive at Tokyo’s Narita Airport and are escorted to our hotel by coach. After checking in, we enjoy a welcome dinner at a nearby restaurant. (D) SEPT. 3 Tokyo is a unique mix of new and old. Next to soaring skyscrapers are gardens and temples hundreds of years old. Our first stop Is Hama-Rikyu Teien, a former private garden of an Edo Period lord. We cruise the Sumida river followed by a visit to the oldest Buddhist temple in Tokyo — Senso-ji Temple in Asakusa — in the city’s oldest geisha district. After lunch, we head to the Meiji Jingu, perhaps Tokyo’s most famous shrine and a favoured site for weddings. A short walk takes us to Omotesando or Tokyo’s Champs-Elyseee. A broad tree-lined street, Omotesando features great architecture and even better shopping. (B, L) SEPT. 4 After breakfast, we head to the Edo-Tokyo Museum which showcases over 400 years of Japanese history from the Tokugawa Era to modern day. After lunch at a local restaurant, we head to the Imperial Palace and its world famous East Gardens. Later, you are free to enjoy dinner at one of the many restaurants near the hotel. (B, L) SEPT. 5 The cuisine of Japan is dependent on fish. Fittingly, we visit the Tsukiji Fish Market where we will see the catch of the day being unloaded from fishing boats and sold to the best restaurants in Tokyo. Once we have seen how the pros do it we will learn how to make sushi under the tutelage of one of Japan’s master chefs. Lunch is what we make. After lunch, we visit Sengaku-ji — the temple that commemorates the famous 47 Ronin.This evening will be a highlight of the trip. We visit the Kabukiza theatre. While eating dinner, we will be entertained by actors of the Japanese Kabuki Theater. (B, L, D) SEPT. 6 Today, we head out of Tokyo by private bus to Hakone where, about two hours later, we will ride the second longest cable car in the world to the top of Mt. Owakudani. During the journey, we will travel

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over some of the most active volcano sites in Japan. A short boat ride across Lake Ashinoko brings us to the Hakone Open Air Museum, all in the shadow of Mt. Fuji. Before we head back to Tokyo, you will have the chance to relax in one of Hakones’ famous hot springs (optional, $) before heading to our hotel – a traditional Japanese Ryokan or inn. Sleeping on futons is part of the experience. (B, D) SEPT. 7 Today, we say goodbye to Hakone and head to the small city of Okazaki in Aichi Prefecture. Okazaki is famous for being the birthplace of the great samurai and the first leader to unify Japan – Tokugawa Ieyasu. While the original castle was destroyed in the Second World War, the three-storey stronghold was rebuilt and now hosts a well-known museum. After lunch in Okazaki, we head to Nagoya to visit its castle – one of the largest in the country. Built by the Tokugawa family, it is known around the world for its architecture. Dinner is on our own after we check in at our hotel. (B, L) SEPT. 8 The Japanese sword, the katana, is said to be the soul of Japan. Using traditional methods, the sword makers of Seki City still make katanas using centuries-old traditions. Today, we visit Seki City and the Seki Traditional Swordsmith Museum to watch 700 years of tradition come to life. From there, we head to the battlefield of Sekigahara. It was here in 1600 that Tokugawa Ieyasu defeated the Western Army and unified Japan. The government he established lasted almost 250 years. After the battlefield, we enjoy a unique dinner. In Gifu, we observe traditional ukai fishing, where fishermen use cormorant birds to capture live fish while we travel downriver in traditional fishing boats. (B, D) SEPT. 9 We explore a unique part of Japan’s history with a visit to the Koka Ninja House; not the ninja of movies and TV, but the ninja of history. The Koka museum brings reality to the myths surrounding the ninja. From Koka, we board a coach and head to perhaps the most beautiful city in Japan — Kyoto. We have the rest of the day to explore the city on our own. (B, L) SEPT. 10 Explore Kyoto — one of the few cities in all of Japan not bombed in the Second World War. By bus, we visit Nijo Castle, a palace built in 1603; from there, we go to Kinkaku-ji, the Golden Pavilion; then to Ginkaku-ji, the Silver Pavilion. We end our tour at the spectacular Kiyomizu-dera. Dinner tonight is on our own, but don’t worry, Kyoto is known for its incredible variety of restaurants. (B) SEPT. 11 Kyoto is the perfect city to explore. This morning we have an opportunity to travel back in time visiting the sites of the ancient city before

meeting for lunch at a local restaurant. From there, we move on to one of the most unique experiences of the trip. We will put on the traditional Japanese kimono and join a Zen tea master at the centuriesold serving of Japan’s national drink. We retire to the Gion District — Kyoto’s famous geisha district where we join the Geisha at a show featuring the traditional arts of Japan’s professional performing arts: kyogen classical comedy, kyomai dance, gagaku music of the imperial court, koto harp, bunraku puppet theatre, the tea ceremony, and flower arrangement. (B, L) SEPT. 12 We travel to the ancient city of Nara. We visit the Kofuku-ji temple, built in 710; and the Todai-ji Temple and its giant Buddha. Our day ends in Kasuga Taisha and Nara Park known for its herd of tame deer. (B, D) SEPT. 13 We leave Kyoto for Japan’s spectacular castle — Himeji-jo — in Himeji. Nicknamed the White Heron, because the main castle and its surrounding buildings resemble a heron in flight, it is a must see. After lunch, we head for our hotel in Hiroshima. (B, L) SEPT. 14 Visiting Hiroshima is always poignant. As one of only two cities struck by a nuclear bomb, the city is a symbol to the world. Our first stop after breakfast is the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park and Museum. Once we leave the Peace Park, we go to Miyajimaguchi and then, by ferry, to the island of Miyajima. After lunch, there will be time to explore the island and its many shrines before heading back to Hiroshima. (B, L) SEPT. 15 We are near the end of tour and travel on the Bullet Train to finish our day in Tokyo watching the most traditional of all Japanese sports — Sumo at the September Basho. We will have dinner watching the giants of Japanese Wrestling (optional, $, subject to availability). (B, D) SEPT. 16 Today we say goodbye to Tokyo and Japan — and head home. (B)

Accompanying Instructor Norman Leach, historian and author, is an old Japanese hand. He lived and worked in the country for two years and travelled extensively during his time there. He speaks Japanese well and was a finalist in the National Japanese Speech Contest for Foreigners. On his return to Canada he taught about Japanese business and culture at the Universities of Manitoba. Lethbridge and Alberta. Norman is a published author, has contributed to several documentaries and travels extensively. With a deep love and understanding of Japan, its history, culture and people Norman blends storytelling and fact to bring the story of Japan to life.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$8,500 $75 $8,575 $1,600

Estimated Air Travel

$1,500

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on March 2, 2018. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

22


The Country of the Firebird: Architectural, Artistic and Religious Traditions of Russia SEPT. 28 – OCT. 14, 2018

This journey will take you to Russia’s two magnificent capitals, Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as most of the significant places around them. See the mighty towers of the Moscow Kremlin, blue and golden domes of ancient cathedrals of Suzdal and Vladimir, the priceless treasures of the Tretyakov Gallery and the Hermitage Museum. Visit lavish summer residences of Russian tsars in Pushkin and Petrodvorets, charming provincial towns and villages of the Golden Ring — all this and much more will take you to the long, rich and colourful traditions of Russian culture and history.

Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Monday evenings, Sept. 17 and 24, 7 – 9:30 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 22, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., at the University of Calgary campus. This course introduces students to the best traditions of Russian culture in architecture, music, ballet and literature. The architectural masterpieces of Moscow, St. Petersburgh and other important cities will be discussed in the light of imperial ambitions of the great rulers from Ivan the Terrible to Josef Stalin. We will explore the rich and colourful painting tradition from the icons of Andrei Rublev to the “Black Square” of Kazimir Malevich. Special focus will be on religious traditions. The itinerary, travel arrangements, health matters, and insurance coverage will be discussed in detail.

Itinerary Three meals daily are included throughout this trip.

SEPT. 29 Arrive in Moscow. SEPT. 30 A tour of Moscow includes an overview of its history and architecture. We will start from the most famous city square in the world – the Red Square – and enjoy the sights of the Kremlin, with its impressive walls and towers, St. Basil Cathedral, Lenin’s Mausoleum, and the Alexandrovsky Park, with the Memorial dedicated to the Second World War. After lunch we will explore the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts. OCT. 1 Most of the day is dedicated to the Moscow Kremlin, the oldest part of Moscow and the official residence of the Russian President. The guided tour around the Kremlin grounds will take us to the ancient Cathedral Square, the Armory Chamber, the treasure-house of Russia that contains some of the rarest and most precious items of the Russian Crown, as well as to Diamond Fund displaying precious diamonds and jewellery, including several of the famous Faberge Easter Eggs. Then we will explore the Tretyakov Gallery, containing icons, paintings, sculptures and graphics from the 11th to 20th century. OCT. 2 We depart early to the medieval town of Sergiyev Posad which is famous for its TroitseSergiev Monastery, the spiritual home of the Russian Orthodox Church. Pereslavl-Zalesskiy and RostovVeliky are proud to stand among the oldest of cities in Russia. They feature many beautiful cathedrals, monasteries, and museums demonstrating local, often really unique, traditions of applied arts. OCT. 3 Yaroslavl and Kostroma, founded in 11-12th centuries, are famous for their churches and monasteries, known for their beautiful frescoes related to Russian history.

23


OCT. 4 Suzdal is often referred to as an open-air museum. The major attractions here are Suzdal Kremlin and the Museum of Wooden Architecture. The small villages, Kideksha and Bogolyubovo, on the Nerl River are famous for beautiful landscapes and small churches which are real jewels of preMongolian architecture. Vladimir is the former capital of mediaeval Russia, famous for such masterpieces of ancient architecture as the City Golden Gates, the St Demetrius’ and Dormition Cathedrals. Back to Moscow. OCT. 5 Today our chief destination is the Kolomenskoye estate — a beloved place for the grand princes of Moscow where many of them grew up. The Church of the Ascension, built in 1532, is one of the earliest examples of a traditional wooden tent-roofed church. Here we enjoy a folklore program and Russian samovar tea party. After dinner, an opera or ballet (Optional, $). OCT. 6 We will visit the Novodevichy Convent, one of the most beautiful monasteries in Russia, founded in 1524. The Novodevichy Cemetery located next to the southern wall of the Convent is the most famous cemetery in Moscow. Here lie many famous writers, artists, and politicians, including Gogol, Chekhov, Stanislavsky, Shostakovich, Eisenstein, and Nikita Khrushchev. After lunch we will explore the Stalin Classicism, an architectural style characterized by their rich decorations with Soviet symbolism, such as the Moscow University, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Moscow Metro, the largest subway system in Russia. We have a late evening departure to St. Petersburg by comfortable overnight train. OCT. 7 Early morning arrival in St.Petersburg for a guided city tour covering the Palace Square, Winter Palace, the Nevsky Prospect, main street in the city, as well as magnificent bridges and embankments of the Neva River. Then we will explore the Peter and Paul Fortress, where the central attraction is the Peter and Paul Cathedral, the official burial place of the Romanov monarchs from Peter I to Nicholas II.

OCT. 8 We will visit one of the most sumptuous orthodox churches in the world — the St. Isaac’s Cathedral, built in 19th century decorated with huge columns and mosaics of marble, malachite and lapis-lazuri. Then we proceed to Senate Square to see the legendary Bronze Horseman, a monument to Peter the Great, and take a boat tour of the local waterways.

by a vast park with innumerable Rococo style grottoes, pavilions, lakes, canals, and bridges. The palace is famous for the exquisite Amber Room, decorated in amber panels backed with gold leaf and mirrors. There is dinner and a folklore show in the Restaurant Podvorye, which serves an outstanding variety of Russian cuisine. OCT. 14 Return home.

OCT. 9 A guided tour of the Winter Palace and the Hermitage Museum will surely be a higlight of St. Petersburg. After lunch, visit the General Staff Building, a neoclassical masterpiece housing the art of the impressionists and post-impressionists. OCT. 10 We visit the Yusupov Palace, a sumptuous residence of the Yusupov princes, the richest and most aristocratic family in Russia. The building was the site of Grigori Rasputin’s murder in December 1916. After lunch we will visit the Kuznechny food market, popular with locals and tourists alike. OCT. 11 The major destination today is the Russian Museum established in 1895. It houses the world’s largest collection of Russian art from the 10th century to the present day. The Church of Saviour on Spilled Blood stands just two steps away from the Russian museum which was built to mark the spot where Alexander II was assassinated in 1879. OCT. 12 We will take a speed-boat to reach Petrodvorets, a glorious summer residence of the Romanov royal family on the southern shore of the Gulf of Finland. The main attraction here is the Palace of Peter the Great surrounded by small palaces, now converted to museums, and vast parks famous for their amazing fountains and cascades. OCT. 13 Today’s all day excursion is to the town of Pushkin, also known as Tsarskoe Selo (Tsar’s Village), another former residence of the Russian tzars. The main attraction is the impressive Baroque style Palace of Catherine II, with superbly decorated interiors, surrounded

Accompanying Instructor Valery Efimenko, PhD, was born in Russia and graduated from the Oriental Department of St. Petersburg State University where he studied Indian languages, history and culture. He has taught such courses as Comparative Religion, and Indian Cultural Traditions at the Institute of Social Sciences in Moscow, and the Moscow University Touro, the first American university in Russia. Since 2004 he has taught Comparative Religion, The Soul and Afterlife in World Religions, and The Dance of Shiva: Introduction to Indian Culture for Continuing Education at the University of Calgary. His course, The Land of the Firebird: Introduction to Russian Culture, introduced in 2007, was greatly appreciated by the students. He has conducted many of Continuing Education study tours to India, Nepal, Tibet, Central Asia and Russia.

Costs Land, tuition GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement

$7,200 $75 $7,275 $1,500

Estimated Air Travel

$1,800

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on March 16, 2018. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2.

24


Tanzania and the Serengeti Plains FEB. 25 – MARCH 13, 2019 The Serengeti ecosystem is arguably one of the greatest wildlife areas in the world. Here, in an annual spectacle unmatched on the planet, 1.5 million wildebeests, 200,000 plains zebras and 250,000 Thomson’s gazelles drift back and forth across the African savannah in search of the vital green flush of grass that follows the seasonal rains. In February each year, these life-giving rains transform the southern Serengeti in Tanzania into verdant grassland and the great herds gather there to give birth to a new generation. In the short span of a few weeks, half a million wobbly wildebeest calves struggle to gain their balance in the tenuous first minutes of life. We will be there to witness this breathtaking natural wonder. With the newborns come the uninvited dinner guests: lithe tawny lions, fleet-footed cheetahs, rapacious hyenas, cunning jackals and hungry vultures. Add to this wilderness marvel scores of multi-coloured birds, silhouettes of umbrella acacia trees, the boisterous bellowing of waterloving hippos, and the star-littered night skies and you have the ingredients for a life-altering experience. In this extraordinary setting, it feels as if little has changed since humankind’s distant ancestors strode across a fresh field of volcanic ash leaving us a fossilized signature of their passage. When you travel these wild African plains you discover a state of being where glorious nature can rejuvenate and inspire the hungriest of human souls.

25


Orientation The orientation course will consist of two Wednesday evenings, Feb. 13 and 20, 7 – 9:30 p.m., held at the University of Calgary campus. Topics for discussion will include the ecology of the Serengeti Ecosystem where migratory wildebeests, plains zebras and Thomson’s gazelles shuttle back and forth over a vast savannah in response to changes in the lushness of the grass. Subjects of special interest to the instructor include the comparative natural history of the large carnivores: lions, leopards, cheetahs and spotted hyenas, and the ecology of rhinos, elephants, vultures, and gazelles. Photography can enhance any travel experience, and a segment of the orientation will be spent discussing digital camera choices and how to make better travel photographs. The itinerary, travel arrangements and health matters will also be discussed.

Itinerary Three meals daily are included throughout the trip.

FEB. 25 – 27 Depart Calgary for the overnight journey to Tanzania. Arrive in the lush, green city of Arusha, Tanzania at a comfortable altitude of 1300 meters, slightly higher than that of Calgary. FEB. 28 After breakfast we will travel to Arusha, National Park. We spend our day at leisure to recover from jet lag and savor the easy pace of the pleasant surroundings. Explore the beautiful hotel grounds, bird watch or take a relaxing dip in the pool, all while you enjoy great views of Mount Meru, it is Tanzania’s second-highest mountain after Kilimanjaro. MARCH 1 – 2 We travel west in private safari vehicles to beautiful baobab studded Tarangire National Park. Explore this wildlife-rich preserve in morning and afternoon game drives. In the dry season the shrunken Tarangire River is the only water for many kilometers around. The promise of moisture lures a multitude of wildlife to the river’s edge. Clusters of elephants, buffalo, kudu, oryx, and eland crowd the shrinking pools. The park is the one place in Tanzania where dry-country antelope such as the fringe-eared oryx and the elegant long-necked gerenuk are regularly seen. As well, Tarangire’s famous lions climb trees as do its leopards, lounging in the branches of a sausage tree, their presence only betrayed by the nervous twitch of a tail. Some say Tarangire is the best bird watching destination in the country with over 550 species reported including colorful hornbills, kingfishers, rollers, and dazzling flocks of yellowcollared lovebirds. MARCH 3 – 5 Explore Ngorongoro Crater. Stay in a luxury lodge on the crater’s rim and each day descend 600 meters to the floor of the caldera. During the descent green candelabra trees give

way to the familiar acacias of the African plains. The relatively small crater, just 260 square kilometers, is a wildlife Garden of Eden packed with 30,000 animals. Unlike wildlife in the neighboring Serengeti, the animals in Ngorongoro do not migrate because water is plentiful in the crater year-round. Enjoy large herds of buffalo and sizeable numbers of hartebeest, eland and waterbuck. Ngorongoro is one of the few places in Africa where black rhinos can still be seen. Among the predators, there are prides of black-maned lions, as well as cheetahs, leopards, hyenas and jackals. Lake Magadi in the center of the crater is home to flamingos feeding on the algae-rich waters and elegant crowned cranes as well as a multitude of other bird species. MARCH 6 – 9 We enjoy morning and evening game drives to savour the abundance of wildlife in the Ndutu area of the Serengeti ecosystem. Ndutu is in the heart of the short grassy plains where the great herds gather to give birth. The wildebeest birthing season is hard to describe—the numbers, the noise, the smells, the commotion—that combine to imbue the experience with the enthralling drama and gravity of life on the African savannah. On one of the days, travel to Olduvai Gorge where the legendary archeologists, Drs. Mary and Louis Leakey, found hominid remains of Homo habilis, and Homo erectus. The gorge is described as one of the most important paleoanthropological sites in the world and has been instrumental in understanding early human evolution. MARCH 10 – 11 Travel deeper into the Serengeti ecosystem to explore Serengeti National Park. Unlike the open grassy plains of the Ndutu area, here the savannah is dotted with acacia woodlands. In morning and afternoon game drives, continue to discover the differing niches of the grass-eaters and those that prey upon them. The Serengeti is second to none in providing visitors with intimate views of wild Africa, and as Tennyson aptly described “Nature, red in tooth and claw.” Capture the sorts of African images, with your memory and your camera that documentaries are made of. MARCH 12 Return to Arusha for the return flight home.

Accompanying Instructor Dr. Wayne Lynch is an internationally-recognized naturalist, science writer and professional wildlife photographer. His photo credits include hundreds of magazine covers, thousands of calendar shots, and tens of thousands of images published in over 60 countries. He is also a popular guest speaker, and audiences worldwide applaud his practical and entertaining approach to natural history. As well, he is the author and photographer of over 50 natural history books for children, young adults and adults. He is an elected fellow of the Explorers Club and the Arctic Institute of North America, and his biography has been included in the Canadian Who’s Who, published by the University of Toronto, since 1996. Wayne has made over two dozen trips to the Serengeti. He has planned and accompanied trips for Continuing Education to Brazil, Namibia, Arctic Norway, Kenya, Boreal Canada and Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands.

Costs Land, tuition and domestic air GST on tuition TOTAL Single Supplement Estimated Air Travel

$12,700 $100 $12,800 $2,300+ $2,200

A deposit of $500 is required at registration. Final payment is due on Sept. 14, 2018. For fee details, withdrawal/refund procedures and liabilities please see page 2. Photos courtesy of Dr. Wayne Lynch

MARCH 13 Arrive home. 26


Choose your Adventure 2018 – 19 Travel Study Programs  outh India with Optional S Extension to Sri Lanka

Roots of the Blues Tour April 26 – May 7, 2018 with John Reid

Jan. 15 – Feb. 5, 2018 with Valery Efimenko

Southeast Asia: Cambodia and Myanmar (Burma)

Urban and Scenic China Adventure Tour May 5 – 25, 2018 with David Curtis Wright

Feb. 16 – March 10, 2018 with Peter Slezak

Discover Cuba

Namibia: Deserts and Wildlife Aug. 15 – Sept. 1, 2018 with Dr. Wayne Lynch

Feb. 17 – 24, 2018 with John Reid

Best of Baja Mexico Feb. 17 – March 3, 2018 with Dr. Wayne Lynch March 3 – 17, 2018 with Dr. Wayne Lynch

University of Calgary Continuing Education 2500 University Drive NW Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4

The Samurai Trail Sept. 1 – 16, 2018 with Norman Leach

A Culinary Tour of Maui

The Country of the Firebird: Architectural, Artistic and Religious Traditions of Russia

March 29 – April 8, 2018 with Pierre Lamielle

Sept. 28 – Oct. 14, 2018 with Valery Efimenko

Lyon and Strasbourg

Tanzania and the Serengeti Plains

April 14 – 27, 2018 with John Gilchrist

Feb. 25 – March 13, 2019 with Dr. Wayne Lynch

2538016

University of Calgary Travel Study 2018  

Travel the world with University of Calgary Continuing Education.

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