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Built Environment Undergraduate Guide 2015 Never Stand Still

Built Environment


Message from the Dean

At UNSW Built Environment (UNSW BE) we focus on the architecture, design and delivery of the 21st century city within the disciplines of architectural computing, architecture, construction management and property, industrial design, interior architecture, landscape architecture and planning. Our aim is to contribute to a more valued and sustainable world through our leadership in education and research, relevant to the built environment. We have structured our Faculty to deliver a comprehensive range of professional degrees within the Australian School of Architecture and Design (ASA+D). This structure provides unique opportunities for interdisciplinary learning experiences. We also offer international interdisciplinary design projects to explore global issues of critical significance and help prepare our graduates to become global citizens. Working together in scenario and studio-based assignments, students and Faculty staff engage in collaborative learning and research in pursuit of new knowledge. We enable students to gain independence and ownership of their learning. Our curriculum structure encourages synergy among the disciplines and flexible learning pathways for students. The distinctive educational experience ensures that our graduates are highly sought after by industry and the professions. Studying at UNSW BE provides access to the urban culture of Sydney—Australia’s largest and most cosmopolitan city. Sydney is used as a living laboratory with parameters for study that can also determine real world outcomes from the perspective of each discipline. Studio projects are often formed from major initiatives affecting the future of Sydney and involve key decision makers as part of the educational experience. Students have 24-hour access to state-of-the-art design studios, a digital workshop and materials library as well as dedicated workspaces with computing and internet access. Our students also have opportunities to broaden their experience beyond the Australian context. At UNSW BE we place a high value on international engagement. In recent years, for example, students have studied in China, Hong Kong, India, New Zealand, Spain and Italy. Joint design studios have also been conducted with the Politecnico in Milan, IUAV in Venice, Tsinghua University in Beijing and Dongtan University in Nanjing. At UNSW BE we recognise the significance of the relatively few years students spend with us to further their future career opportunities. Our alumni often comment on how the lasting influence of their student days is manifested through continuing professional relationships and friendships of value. We are committed to establishing a sound platform of knowledge reflected in intellectual and practical skills to underpin a lifelong interest in personal development. Your future success is our contribution to a better designed and managed built environment with a focus on all aspects of more sustainable professional practice. We continue to update our undergraduate curriculum to be relevant, challenging and innovative. Many new and exciting initiatives are planned for 2015 that can be followed on the Faculty website be.unsw.edu.au. I look forward to welcoming you to UNSW BE and will follow your careers with great interest. Professor Alec Tzannes // Dean, UNSW Built Environment


Contents 2

Why BE?

6  Architectural Computing 12  Architectural Studies 18  Construction Management and Property 24  Industrial Design 30  Interior Architecture 36  Landscape Architecture 42 Planning 48  BE Profiles 51  Admissions

Faculty Governance UNSW BE is structured to deliver a comprehensive suite of undergraduate and postgraduate programs relevant to the architecture, design and delivery of the 21st century city. UNSW BE will continue to review and develop its undergraduate programs. Changes will be progressively introduced during 2014 and 2015. Our aim is to deliver enhanced and distinctive student learning experiences reflecting the level and discipline requirements of each program. UNSW and the Faculty have increased opportunities for dual and double degrees, and provided more flexible pathways for students to move across BE degrees. Program changes resulting from these reviews will be announced on the UNSW BE website and progressively communicated to prospective 2015 students.

Keep in touch Facebook: UNSW Built Environment Twitter: UNSW BuiltEnv Instagram: BuiltEnv UNSW Flickr: @unswbe Web: be.unsw.edu.au Email: be@unsw.edu.au


Connected

There are plenty of opportunities to connect with industry during your time at BE. You’ll engage with businesses, government and community on real life projects. You can attend our Utzon Lecture Series, and learn from many nationally and internationally acclaimed speakers. Our strong industry partnerships offer opportunities for work experience, internships, as well as scholarships and awards. From industry dinners and events, to guest lecturers and competitions, BE has a proud history of industry engagement and collaboration. be.unsw.edu.au/BEConnected 2

Global

Expand your perspective and complete part of your degree overseas. Take part in the UNSW exchange program and learn with one of our prestigious partner universities from countries such as USA, Spain, China, United Kingdom, Denmark and others. Many BE degrees also offer national and international design studios and study travel trips, where you can study and travel in other cities and countries as well as interact with students from other universities. be.unsw.edu.au/BEGlobal


Unique Relevant

UNSW BE is the most comprehensive built environment faculty in Australia. We offer a range of built environment electives unmatched by any other Australian university. Our third year interdisciplinary initiative will see you collaborating and working with students from other disciplines within the built environment, preparing you for workplaces that increasingly depend on people who have the capacity to work with others from different professional backgrounds. be.unsw.edu.au/BEUnique

At BE, we produce work ready graduates. Our project-based learning experiences allow you to explore real-world problems and challenges, developed from briefs relevant to and provided by industry. You’ll be involved in national and international competitions. With this type of active and engaged learning, you’ll not only be inspired to obtain a greater depth of understanding of the singular project, but will graduate with the broad knowledge, skills and industry links needed to succeed in the professional world. be.unsw.edu.au/BERelevant


Informed

Our teaching is research driven, ensuring you will learn from experts who are at the forefront of the thinking behind the architecture, design and delivery of the 21st century cities. Our researchers are knowledge leaders, committed to research excellence and are leaders of the Group of Eight universities in research for the Built Environment.* be.unsw.edu.au/BEInformed *Excellence in Research Australia

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Inspired

Learn from award winning academics and be mentored by industry leaders. Our dynamic community of highly acclaimed academic and industry based specialist staff ensure that you will experience the leaders in fields of teaching, research and innovative practice. Their aspiration is to contribute, at the highest level of academic achievement, to the making of valued and sustainable built environments. Our staff are committed to achieving their best and inspiring the best from their students. be.unsw.edu.au/BEInspired


Involved

With so many events, exhibitions and parties you’ll want to make sure you join one of the many UNSW clubs and societies. BE societies include: INTASOC (Interior Architecture), CaPS (Construction and Property), OOPS (Planning) or the Maker Society (for anyone who loves making things). They organise parties, markets, industry nights, workshops and tutoring. There are also competitive sports teams to join, fitness programs held at our state of the art sports facilities, volunteering and community outreach programs. Whatever you’re into, we have something to suit you. be.unsw.edu.au/BEInvolved

Out

There

BEOutThere! is a multidisciplinary program of undergraduate electives in which you will have the opportunity to collaborate with community partners on projects that address social challenges. Core values for the program include: Design for social impact, social and environmental sustainability, social equity and responsibility and interdisciplinarity and collaboration. We make sure that the impact of your work, knowledge and research resonates far beyond the campus gates. be.unsw.edu.au/BEOutThere


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Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

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Architectural visualisation artist

⁄⁄

Program code 3267

⁄⁄

Design technology manager

⁄⁄

UAC code 423100

(in architectural practices)

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 80

⁄⁄

Animation professional

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR Design and Technology

⁄⁄

Gaming environment developer

⁄⁄

Building Information Modelling (BIM) customisation

⁄⁄

Duration 3 years full time (4th year Honours option)

Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

and implementation

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Parametric modeller and designer

⁄⁄

Director Professor Xing Ruan

⁄⁄

Web and multimedia designer

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

Jim Plume Prize for outstanding innovation in the application of digital technology in the built environment: Value $1,500

⁄⁄

Discipline Directors Prize for Architectural Computing: Value $500

⁄⁄

Concrete Masonry Association of Australia Prize: Value $500

⁄⁄

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/ degrees/scholarships-awards

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/architectural-computing

Architectural Computing

Students undertaking this degree explore and innovate with new ways of investigating design and management processes using the latest digital technologies and software. Projects within the built environment are brought to life in real-time virtual environments, through the use of information modelling technologies and the full range of multimedia and augmented technologies. This enables architects, planners, builders, clients and the community to better understand and examine design proposals in their settings. Students graduate with exceptional intellectual and practical skills, and can exercise leadership in the application of computer and digital technologies within the built environment disciplines.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Semester 1

Semester 2

ARCH1101 Architectural Design Studio 1 Introduces the primary concepts and activities of architectural design and its representation through small scale and experimental design projects.

BENV1080 Enabling Skills & Research Practice Introduces skills and knowledge to support both the learning and practice of architecture and related disciplines.

ARCH1390 Digital Representation Studio Draws on the histories and theories of architectural representation and recasts them with the ‘lens’ of computation.

BENV2423 Real-Time Interactive Environments Addresses the leading edge of spatial and environmental design by engaging with real-time interactive environments within a rigorous academic framework.

BENV1042 WWW in Presentation and Communication Introduces webpage and website design, with a particular focus on interactivity and the representation of designs using the web.

BENV2428 Modelling and Visualisation Introduces the techniques and practice of computer-based building, modelling and visualisation.

COMP1400 Programming for Designers Introduction to the concepts and techniques of object-oriented programming, with a focus on the construction of interactive multimedia applications.

ARCH1162 Structures & Construction 1 Focuses on the ability to analyse the built environment architecturally through an understanding of structure and construction.

Core Skills At the end of first year, students will have developed foundation knowledge, plus essential study and practice skills across the major aspects of architectural computing. ARCH1201 Architectural Design Studio 3 Study of modern concepts and architectural devices through projects of moderate programmatic, spatial and material complexity in an urban context.

BENV2425 Building Information Modelling Introduction to the use of computerbased information-rich 3D models of buildings to support design processes.

ARCH1391 Digital Computation Studio Explores a range of design problems where computation is used to generate, enhance and analyse possible solutions.

BENV2427 Design Information Management Focuses on the processes involved in communicating and collaborating throughout the building development lifecycle, using a multidisciplinary building model database server.

BENV2426 Experimental Modelling Engage with cutting edge digital modelling applications to produce innovative geometries that shape the form, space and detail of architectural environments.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

ARCH1222 Architectural History & Theory 2 Overview of key architects and movements from the advent of modernism in the early 20th century to the present.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

Core Skills At the end of second year, students will have well-developed computing skills and knowledge, informed by a sound understanding of architectural processes and current developments in digital technologies. ARCH1392 Digital Collaboration Studio Develops a framework for architectural computing research via a critique of ‘collaboration’, exploring ethics, professionalism, academic rigour, communication and representation.

SDES2116 Design Practice Students investigate the moral and philosophical contexts for professional activity, ethics, legal aspects of design practice, project finance, budget management and reporting.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

ARCH1393 Graduation Project (12 UoC) As the culmination of the architectural computing studios, each student will seek out a client and then develop and produce a project that investigates any technology or issue that relates to the use of computers in the built environment disciplines.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

Core Skills At the end of third year, students will have developed a comprehensive set of skills and knowledge of architectural computing, preparing them to either pursue research in their discipline through the Honours year or to pursue a professional career. ARCH1394 Honours Studio (18 UoC) Explores the idea of research as it relates to a series of built environment design requirements, developing an understanding of the research process within the design discipline as students engage with specific research topics that extend their understanding and capability in the architectural computing field.

BENV1384 Design Research Methods Aims to inform students of the range of research methods appropriate to the understanding and design of the built environment.

ARCH1395 Honours Research Project (18 UoC) A major research-based investigation into a subject related to the student’s area of specialisation, representing an original contribution to work in that area that demonstrates a high level of scholarship and an understanding of good research methods.

Core Skills At the end of the Honours year, students will have developed a solid foundation for the pursuit of further research through doctoral studies or a solid base from which to pursue a specialised professional career.

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Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

(Hons)


Josh Jung Current Student Prizes and awards: Architectural Computing Student Representative—2012 Architecture United Student Society Reward—2012 International Skyscraper Mock Firm Competition Entry—2013 UNSW / Australia Ambassador at Lund University, Sweden—2013 UNSW Chief Aussie Mate Volunteering Certificate—2013

Career I am currently the Lead Design Adventurer at Freelancer.com (my official title is Web Design Team Leader). I am responsible for leading innovation, creativity and managing the Freelancer.com in-house design team. Prior to Freelancer.com I was a Web / UI (User Interface) designer at Fairfax Media working on brands such as SMH.com.au, MyCareer. com.au, Domain.com.au and Drive.com.au. Before working at Fairfax Media, I was a Front-End Developer at The BlueArc Group, working on brands including Sensis, Sydney Cricket Ground, Royal Flying Doctors and the NSW Institute of Teachers. My first professional role in the industry was Web Designer at The Photolibrary Group (now Getty Images), where I eventually led the small Web Design team.

Achievements In 2011 The Domain iPhone App won an AIMIA (Australian Interactive Media Industry Association) award. I worked closely with a talented team of UX (User Experience) designers on this project where I was responsible for a major phase of the UI design. The AIMIA awards are often referred to as the pinnacle of awards for the Digital industry in Australia, so naturally, I am particularly proud of this one!

“The Faculty of Built Environment is renowned for its academic reputation and producing highly employable graduates.”

Why did you enrol? The Bachelor of Architectural Computing offered by UNSW absolutely fascinated me. The degree covers emerging technologies and developing innovative ideas from complex data, and that was what I was looking for. UNSW also has an excellent reputation in both education and research. I found out UNSW offers a broad range of captivating electives (electives can be chosen from other faculties or interdisciplinary courses within BE) that students can select to personalise their studies. What are the benefits? UNSW offers not only academic courses but a great student life through campus facilities, social activities and volunteering programs. I gained leadership skills and collaboration skills by getting involved in student activities and studying electives at other faculties with students from different degrees. What have been the highlights? I was privileged to lead a student society for architecture and design students in 2012. It was a great opportunity to increase student voice. Under my lead, the society organised student magazines, workshops, exhibitions and social events that helped improve student life in at BE, academically and socially. What sets UNSW Architectural Computing apart from other university degrees? UNSW and BE are well known for advanced technology and research. They have an extensive range of resources and information students can access.

Architectural Computing Profiles

Craig Henneberry 2003 Graduate


The early techniques of using computers to visualise buildings and situations not yet existing have developed into a field where students test a host of concerns using digital environments. During their third and final year, students are required to undertake a major project. The project begins with each student writing three project proposals; then choosing the project they wish to continue. Students spend the rest of the semester investigating their chosen area and producing a project showcasing their understanding and mastery of the topic. The student projects fall into five broad categories: Experimental modelling, Building information modelling, Interaction, Real-time environments and Visualisation. A

Matthew Kruik

Virtual Prototyping Environment

B

As computers become more powerful, our ability to create and explore new ideas and designs within them is increasing exponentially. We can create highly detailed geometries, invent completely new ways of interacting with the world, and analyse how a new structure will perform without anything leaving our hard-drive. Despite the incredible power we’re utilising, we limit ourselves to viewing everything on a flat, two-dimensional screen, and to interacting with it using a keyboard and a mouse. The world is not two-dimensional, and we don’t use a mouse to interact with it, so why do we restrict ourselves to these outdated systems? In this project, I explored the possibilities of using new display and interactive technologies, in this case, the Oculus Rift display and the Microsoft Kinect sensor, to develop and test a virtual prototyping environment.

C

I developed two prototypes. The first is an interactive cupboard system, where cupboards are kept up out of reach and the user can move them around using gestures. This system tests the capability of a virtual environment to design and test new interactive products. The second prototype is a basic modelling environment, which allows users to select a face on a model, then use pushing and pulling gestures to move that face. While basic, this system demonstrates how a virtual environment can be used as a design tool, as well as a testing one. A B C

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A small demo to demonstrate the Kinects power The basic modelling environment in action A user interacting with the virtual cupboard system


Virtual Climate Change My project undertook a new approach to representing sea level rise in Sydney. Previous attempts to communicate climate change have only been through the use of 2D maps, available online. These maps don’t evoke emotion and have no sense of realism. I have created a 3D animation of Manly, representing the problematic topic of sea level rise in an entirely new way. I chose Manly as it is a site already under threat of inundation in the future. Modelling a coastal area in 3D that is both detailed and open for accurate analysis was challenging. Highly accurate mapping of the ground surface topography was essential to highlight low-lying areas that are at risk of inundation.

D

Using complex 3D technologies, my project involved using the data created from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which is currently the most accurate form of topographic mapping. The technology uses laser pulses to scan and record millions of elevation points with high accuracy. A LiDAR instrument builds up a complex ‘picture’ of the terrain and all of its characteristics.

E

The points can then be converted into a triangulated mesh for three dimensional visualisation. The data is brought to life by texturing the surface mesh with high resolution satellite imagery and using game engine physics to animate rising sea levels. Visualising scenarios of high sea level rise for Manly beach has given new meaning to what was once raw data of our environment. D E F

F

See video of Daniel’s project

See video of Matthew’s project

LiDAR scan of Manly beach and lagoon Arial view of textured 3D environment Textured 3D environment looking west

Architectural Computing Projects

Daniel Pantelas


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Students complete a three-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies plus a two-year Master of Architecture to meet the educational requirements for registration as an architect.

Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

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Consulting architect in private practice

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Program code 3261

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Specialist architect e.g. heritage

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UAC code 423000

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Multidisciplinary design practice

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 95

⁄⁄

Government Architect’s office

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR Design and Technology,

⁄⁄

Large commercial practice architectural firms

Visual Arts, English Advanced Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

Ronald Lu Travelling Scholarship in Architecture: Value $6,000

⁄⁄

Cox Richardson Architecture Award: Value $5,000

⁄⁄

Woodhead Prize in Architectural Communication:

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Duration 3 years full time (4th year Honours option)

⁄⁄

Academic Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of 65 = entry into Master of Architecture

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Professional recognition The Bachelor of Architectural Studies degree is the undergraduate pathway degree to the

Value $1,000 ⁄⁄

professionally accredited postgraduate Master

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/

of Architecture degree which has professional

degrees/scholarships-awards

recognition from the NSW Architects Registration Board and Architects Accreditation Council of Australia (AACA). ⁄⁄

Director Professor Xing Ruan

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/architectural-studies

Architectural Studies

Behind almost every building—from modest and intimate rooms to spaces accommodating complex needs and those that are extraordinary and iconic—lies the disciplined creativity of architecture. An architect designs buildings and their settings to meet the needs of people who use the building, of clients and the broader community. In their design practice, architects are mindful of sustainability, cultural and economic considerations. It is an exciting and dynamic profession that works closely with other built environment professionals, and is the only one responsible for considering the building in its entirety.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Semester 1

Semester 2

ARCH1101 Architectural Design Studio 1 Introduces the primary concepts and activities of architectural design and its representation through small scale and experimental design projects.

BENV1080 Enabling Skills & Research Practice Introduces skills and knowledge to support both the learning and practice of architecture and related disciplines.

ARCH1102 Architectural Design Studio 2 Study of architectural space through precedents and configuration, material and structural tectonics.

ARCH1121 Architectural History & Theory 1 The history of Western architecture, extending from antiquity to the 19th century.

ARCH1161 Environment 1 Theories and practical knowledge in ecological and bioclimatic design, developing a capacity for life-cycle and systems thinking in architectural design.

ARCH1142 Architectural Communications Develops capabilities in manual 2D and 3D graphics, physical modelmaking and verbal communication.

ARCH1162 Structures & Construction 1 Ability to analyse the built environment architecturally through an understanding of structure and construction.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

Core Skills At the end of first year, students will have developed foundation knowledge, plus essential study and practice skills across the major streams of study in architecture. ARCH1201 Architectural Design Studio 3 Study of modern concepts and architectural devices through projects of moderate programmatic, spatial and material complexity in an urban context.

BENV2425 Building Information Modelling Introduction to the use of computerbased information-rich 3D models of buildings to support design processes.

ARCH1202 Architectural Design Studio 4 Analytical capacities and skills developed through a complex site and an institutional program situated in a particular sociocultural context.

ARCH1222 Architectural History & Theory 2 Overview of key architects and movements from the advent of modernism in the early 20th century to the present.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

ARCH1261 Structures & Construction 2 Introduces construction industry practice—who’s involved, who’s in charge, the role of architects and how strategic decisions are made.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

Core Skills At the end of second year, students will have capable design skills, informed by a sound knowledge of relevant digital technologies, current construction practice and contemporary architectural thought. ARCH1301 Architectural Design Studio 5 (12 UoC) Using a mixed brief incorporating more than one function or building type, students explore contextual design, including urban patterns, as well as building design with detailed consideration of the technical resolution of an aspect of the building to a high level of resolution.

ARCH1361 Environment 2 Explores integrated environmental design, addressing the quantitative and standards-based treatment of lighting and acoustics, using manual and digital analysis, modelling and simulation.

ARCH1302 Architectural Design Studio 6 (12 UoC) One architecture project is developed to a detailed level of programmatic, spatial and material resolution, with emphasis placed on environmental and technological factors and their potential to impact on architectural thinking and production.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

ARCH1322 Architectural History & Theory 3 Critical analysis of architecture in Australia, examining themes that situate developments from the early 20th century to the present.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

Opportunity for alternate off-campus Exchange Program with the approval of the Program Director.

Core Skills At the end of third year, students will have developed a comprehensive set of skills and knowledge of architecture, preparing academically—capable students to pursue research in their discipline through the Honours year or move into the Masters Program, preferably after a substantive period of practical experience in an architect’s office. ARCH1495 Honours Research Thesis 1 (18 UoC) This is major research-based investigation into a subject related to the student’s area of specialisation, representing an original contribution to work in that area that demonstrates a high level of scholarship and an understanding of good research methods (normally linked to ARCH1496).

BENV1384 Design Research Methods Aims to inform students of the range of research methods appropriate to the understanding and design of the built environment.

ARCH1496 Honours Research Thesis 2 (18 UoC) A major research-based investigation into a subject related to the student’s area of specialisation, representing an original contribution to work in that area that demonstrates a high level of scholarship and an understanding of good research methods (normally linked to ARCH1495).

Core Skills At the end of the Honours year, students will have developed a solid foundation for the pursuit of further research through doctoral studies or to resume their professional studies through the Masters Program.

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Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

(Hons)


Niloofar Meshgini Current Student

Master Architecture, Bachelor of Architectural Studies

Why did you enrol? The Faculty of Built Environment has one of the best schools of Architecture, with many experienced and inspiring academic staff. UNSW is always ranked for employer reputation, meaning that my chance of getting employed after graduation would be very high.

Career In 2009 I established Petty Projects, a small design and construction company, which designed and built small residential projects in-house. This allowed exploration of design ideas developed through university studies as well as exposure to practical site issues and creativity of construction detailing. In 2011 I spent 12 months working as a Project Manager for Steele Associates, to which I brought a number of projects designed under Petty Projects. I managed a $1.5m new residential Architectural Project screened on Grand Designs, which gave me experience in dealing with the coordination and execution of larger projects as well as contract administration exposure. However, I could not escape a love of being ‘on-the-tools’ and in 2012 I decided to move to Melbourne to develop a company which specialised in realising architectural projects. I am currently the Director of Grenville Architectural Construction, a construction company dedicated to building architecturally designed projects which require a high level of finish and detailing. This role requires a broad range of skills, from project management, to contract negotiation, site supervision and project carpenter. The company employs a small team dedicated to quality, project commitment and a philosophy to constantly keep honing skills.

“UNSW is an energised institution which encourages proactivity, involvement and environmental consciousness.”

How has UNSW Architectural Studies helped you achieve your goals? I have applied for an exchange short course program in Germany through the UNSW Exchange Office. This course runs in January-February 2014. I will be attending the University of Stuttgart for six weeks to gain some educational, cultural and social experiences and get familiar with architecture in a different country. What are the benefits? The well-organised class timetables allow students to work part-time while studying full-time. For instance, during the final semester of my studies, I was able to work three days a week, attend university two days a week, and spend my weekend studying. What have been the highlights? I joined the Student Organised Network for Architecture (SONA) and Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) in my second year of studies. This gave me the opportunity to meet many people in the industry, attend different lectures and keep up-to-date on global architectural news. Another highlight was the graduation exhibition, which runs after the end of the final semester. This was a great opportunity for me to show my work to industry professionals. What sets UNSW Architectural Studies apart from other university degrees? UNSW is a top 100 world university, employers prefer UNSW graduates; there are world-class facilities and high technology devices in the faculty; there are over 300 partner universities that UNSW has connections with; there are many experienced staff working in the faculty; and, the faculty is open 24/7, which allows students to use computer labs at any time of the day. What advice would you give to future students? The course I am studying takes lots of effort, so get ready to work! It is very rewarding though; I would highly recommend UNSW to anyone, as they will definitely enjoy their time studying here.

Architectural Studies Profiles

Tom Petty 2009 Graduate


Students choose to select an urban project, or one sited in a rural landscape with traces of inhabitation for their third year studio. The rural or regional studio is led by distinguished alumnus and Pritzker Prize winner, Professor Glenn Murcutt. Students who selected this studio had the opportunity to visit and study ‘Ganguddy’ or Dunn’s Swamp, a constructed waterway created in the late 1920s. Students were required to design a recreational facility with accommodation for 32 visitors plus two researchers that was able to generate and store its own power. Students’ direct physical and aesthetic experience of a particular landscape, offering a more complex understanding of conditions such as temperature, wind patterns, local flora and fauna and visual qualities, is used in this studio, in conjunction with traditional scientific and cultural research including recent and aboriginal history. The urban studio, led by Sydney Architect Mark Szczerbicki, gave students the opportunity to explore a new type of hybrid building known as a Design Hub, on a vibrant but underdeveloped site on George Street Sydney. The main aim of the function of the Design Hub was to facilitate the interaction of designers and researchers with the public and the city in an open and flexible forum. Crucial to the project was a series of tasks exploring the built environment of the site and its surrounds, the history of the formation of the city, as well as current directions in fine-grained urban interventions to allow more porosity in existing city blocks. D

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Multisensory Interpretation Exploring multisensory interpretation of architecture, this project examines nature’s scale and density with specific regard to the visitor’s experience. Programmatic design, detail and materiality are intended to seamlessly manipulate the visitor’s engagement between the perceived envelope and surrounding natural fabric.

B

A B C

C

Site position and building form Facade fenestration and layering Eastern elevation and perceived continuity

Architectural Studies Projects

Benjamin Knowles

A

Niloofar Meshgini

Design Hub This project interprets aspects of the urban surroundings in the creation of the Design Hub. The design considers hidden and exposed qualities, solid and void patterns and materiality. The aim is to create a public domain which serves to amplify social and educational connections between people.

D E

Exterior perspective George Street section

E


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Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

⁄⁄

Builder

⁄⁄

Program code 3331

⁄⁄

Property developer

⁄⁄

UAC code 423200

⁄⁄

Construction manager

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 80

⁄⁄

Project manager

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR English Advanced,

⁄⁄

Quantity surveyor

Mathematics, Mathematics Ext 2

⁄⁄

Facilities manager

Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

⁄⁄

Construction planner

⁄⁄

Construction consultant

⁄⁄

Specialist legal advisor

⁄⁄

time option ⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Professional recognition (Dependent on the completion of specific units): The Royal Institution

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

UNSW Co-op Scholarships coop.unsw.edu.au 

⁄⁄

Intrec Scholarship in Construction Management: Value $7,500

⁄⁄

Insight Projects Construction Management Award:

Duration 4 years full time, or equivalent with part

of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), The Australian Institute of Building (AIB), The Australian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (AIQS), The Australian Property Institute (API) ⁄⁄

Director Dr Cynthia Wang

Value $3,000 ⁄⁄

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/ degrees/scholarships-awards

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/ construction-management-and-property

Construction Management and Property

The Bachelor of Construction Management and Property (BCMP) provides education and training in the management of property development, construction and design work, construction site and facility operation. There is a strong emphasis on building economics and management skills, including human resources, organisational behaviour and risk management. Over the course of this degree students can choose to specialise in building construction, property development, facilities management or quantity surveying.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Semester 1

Semester 2

BENV1181 Construction & Property Introduces the scope, nature and dynamics of the construction and property industries.

BLDG1121 Construction Materials Introduces the properties, manufacture and application of key construction materials e.g. timber, concrete, masonry and brick etc.

BENV1192 Project Management Introduces the key construction project management concepts, principles, techniques and application of relevant tools.

BLDG1050 Building Structures Introduces the key principles of building structure design and assessment.

BLDG1211 Domestic Construction Introduces the functional requirements and construction methods of singlestorey domestic construction.

BLDG1260 Construction Management Introduces the generic management principles relevant to the construction and property industries.

BLDG1212 Low Rise Residential Construction An extended overview of building construction, looking at the functional requirements and construction processes of multi-storey buildings.

BLDG1302 Construction & Property Economics An extended overview of the construction and property industries, looking at the economics of the built environment.

Core Skills At the end of first year, BCMP students should have: (1) gained an appreciation of the characteristics of the construction and property industries and their contributions to a nation’s economic and social development; (2) recognised the important roles of construction and property professions within the respective industry; (3) learned the fundamental concepts, principles, processes and technology for building and construction management and; (4) developed their abilities to work collaboratively in a multidisciplinary environment, while undertaking scholarly inquiry and engaging in independent and reflective learning. BLDG1281 Construction Law Introduces the specifics of construction law, with particular reference to the sources of law in New South Wales and the system of judicial precedent.

BLDG2101 Industrial Building Construction Introduces framed industrial buildings with particular emphasis on the relevant construction systems and processes.

BLDG3101 Tall Building Construction An extended overview of building construction, looking at the functional requirements, processes and techniques of tall building construction.

BLDG3281 Construction Contract Administration Introduces the principles of contract management, different contract forms and project delivery systems.

BCMP Electives eg. BLDG2332 Building Documentation BLDG2482 ICT Applications BLDG2212 Building Services.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses. Additional BCMP Elective may be selected.

BCMP Electives eg. BENV2817 Risk Management GMAT1110 Surveying and GIS BLDG4306 Strategic FM.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the faculty.

Core Skills At the end of second year, BCMP students should have: (1) gained an appreciation of different construction project types, delivery systems and contract forms; (2) developed their abilities to recognise and solve problems systematically, formulating innovative responses to different contexts; (3) learned the systems, processes and technology for industrial and tall building construction and; (4) developed their communication and leadership skills. BLDG2280 OHS in the Built Environment Introduces the important regulations pertaining to Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) on construction sites within the context of a broader industrial relations regulatory framework.

BLDG3284 Scheduling Techniques in Construction Introduces various programming and scheduling techniques for construction project planning and landscape planning.

BENV1382 Social Responsibility & Professional Ethics Introduces social responsibility and professional ethics issues in the construction and property industries.

BLDG3102 Construction Techniques Integrates more advanced and civil-related construction techniques, systems, plant and process issues.

BCMP Electives eg. BENV2816 Organisational Behaviour BLDG2282 HR Management BLDG3332 Estimating and Bidding.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

BCMP Electives eg. BENV2986 Property Management BENV2814 Real Property Law BENV2815 Design Management.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

Core Skills At the end of third year, BCMP students should have: (1) gained an appreciation of different construction project OHS regulations and specialised operational and planning techniques; (2) gained an appreciation of relevant knowledge and skills including the code of ethics of respective professional bodies for a construction profession; (3) furthered their problem-solving and collaboration abilities, and be able to take the lead in project-oriented tasks and; (4) further developed generic and technical skills. BLDG4501 Thesis Foundation       or (12 UoC) Introduces research formulation, development and processes, and research design.

BLDG4501 Thesis Foundation (12 UoC) Introduces research formulation, development and processes, and research design.

BLDG4502 Thesis (12 UoC)            or An extended overview of research development, looking at research methods and tools, data collection and analysis.

BCMP Electives (12 UoC) eg. BENV2813 Business Practice BENV 2719 Housing Industry.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the faculty.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses. Additional BCMP Elective may be selected.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

Core Skills At the end of fourth year, BCMP students should have: (1) gained an appreciation of research development and formulation processes and; (2) furthered their written and oral communication skills, and more importantly, their abilities to innovate and challenge conventional thinking.

20


Sebastian Reid Current Student Prizes and awards: Co-op Scholarship for Construction Management & Property—2012

Career I started with ISIS as a building cadet in early 2011 and am now a Project Coordinator. I have gained invaluable industry experience that has involved both site and office based work. It has been very satisfying to be able to utilise what I have learnt through my degree in my current job. The degree is highly regarded in the industry and therefore it is usually relatively easy for BCMP students to transition into the workplace. The fact that it is so flexible allows students to balance a job whilst studying full time. I found that being employed whilst studying enabled me to directly relate my current studies with my work, assisting me with projects such as case studies.

My goal was to get experience in the construction industry as soon as possible. The flexibility of my course makes it possible to maintain a parttime cadetship in the construction industry whilst studying full-time. The course offers night classes for some subjects, whilst the Construction and Property Society (CAPS) is always sharing available opportunities for undergraduate students with local organisations.

Why did you enrol? I chose UNSW because it was superior to other Australian universities that offered my course. Friends who were studying at UNSW loved the social atmosphere on campus and it had the broadest network of foreign universities for exchange programs. My research on the course itself revealed it was held in high regard in the Australian construction industry, was flexible and would create numerous career paths for me upon completion. What are the benefits? So far I have loved my time at UNSW. I have found the course content interesting, the lecturers and tutors knowledgeable and I appreciate that it has been possible to maintain cadetships and other commitments whilst I study full-time. I feel it is preparing me well for opportunities in the workplace, but more importantly, I have made friends and contacts through this course that I will have for life. What have been the highlights? My major highlight was when I was awarded the Co-op Scholarship for Construction Management and Property. The Co-op program is unique as it not only reduces the financial burdens of uni life, but it also provides recipients with guaranteed work placements at relevant and exciting businesses. What sets UNSW Construction Management and Property apart from other university degrees? Interdisciplinary courses are now compulsory, which not only allows students to develop a broader range of design related skills, but also encourages us to expand our social network at university beyond our course. I have also found the Utzon Lecture Series very interesting and a great way to network and learn about topics related to the built environment but not covered by courses run by UNSW. What advice would you give to future students? I think it is important to consider what you want to get out of your time at university and then choose the most appropriate university for you and your course. UNSW is a great university with a modern campus and facilities that continue to be improved. It has a great social life with lots of events and student societies to get involved in. However, it is also important to research your course and how it is run and tested.

BCMP Profiles

Robert Close 2012 Graduate


In the fourth and final year of the Bachelor of Construction Management and Property, a select group of students are invited to undertake a thesis program. Students in the thesis program pursue a diverse range of thesis topics across important contemporary issues in architectural, engineering, construction and property industries. They include: construction innovation, construction cost management, workplace productivity and performance, construction safety, sustainability management, information technology and disaster management.

Erin Doyle

Design Management Skills in the Australian Construction Industry Due to increased popularity of procurement methods such as Design & Construct, there is an increased design responsibility being placed on Contractors, and as such, an increased need for Design Managers. However, this role is poorly defined, poorly understood and lacking clarity regarding required skills. The aim of this thesis was to further streamline the skillset of Design Managers whilst also providing clarity regarding the definition and identification of new skills perceived to be important by industry members. A Likert scale was used to obtain importance rankings of skills, which were split into Hard/Technical Skills and Soft/ Managerial Skills. Of these, the top 3 skills were determined to be Communication Skills, Collaboration & Client Briefing/ Requirements Capture. Experience, when analysed concurrently with all other skills, was ranked 5th, demonstrating the need for multiple years industry involvement for a successful Design Manager. The disparity regarding the understanding and clarity of Design management was also verified and additional definitions obtained. The research recommends that further studies into reasoning behind respondent choices be conducted. Furthermore, the results provide a benchmark for research into potential education and training programmes for Design Management, with a specific focus on the possible methods of replacing ‘Experience’ with taught skills. 22


The roles of clients in construction safety Although research has been done to investigate construction safety and its importance, most has focused on construction organisations and workplace safety. There is still a need to investigate this issue by looking at stakeholders higher in the supply chain, particularly the ones who have the economic power to facilitate safety implementation. As such, this research has investigated the roles of construction clients on influencing safety performance. Data was collected using questionnaire surveys from employees in the construction industry who work or have worked for a client. From the literature collated, it can be noted that clients’ roles in construction safety do play a major role whereby most respondents agreed to their client implementing safety schemes. The findings of the research not only confirmed the importance of the client in implementing safety, but also determined specific client roles that influence the development of a safety climate in construction projects. This provides guidance to construction practitioners, particularly clients, so that they know key areas to focus on if they would like to improve safety. However, there was still a small portion of clients who may not consider safety as important as other traditional objectives, such as time, cost, environment and quality. As such, they need to understand the economic benefit of safety, thus safety can be integrated into day-to-day business decisions.

Construction Management and Property Projects

Simon Votano


24


Students considering industrial design should be curious and inventive, able to work with technology and materials, and ready to enhance their understanding of the social, environmental and commercial contexts in which they work.

Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

⁄⁄

Product designer within a design consultancy

⁄⁄

Program code 3385

⁄⁄

Product designer within a multi-disciplinary design

⁄⁄

UAC code 423300

team (architectural and engineering consultancies)

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 80

Product designer within the manufacturing sector

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR Design and Technology,

⁄⁄

(consumer and public access products—electrical,

Visual Arts, Mathematics, Mathematics Ext 2

transport, scientific, medical, retail, furniture,

Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

telecommunications)

⁄⁄

Duration 4 years full time

⁄⁄

Digital multimedia designer

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Product branding and marketing

⁄⁄

Professional recognition Entitled to membership

⁄⁄

Packaging designer

⁄⁄

Exhibition designer

⁄⁄

Graphic designer

to the Design Institute of Australia ⁄⁄

Director Stephen Ward

Industry Prizes ⁄⁄

James Dyson Award: Value $3,000

⁄⁄

Red Dot Award: Value $2,000, promotion of product through Red Dot

⁄⁄

Cormack Packaging Award: Value $2,500, 3 month internship with Cormack Packaging

⁄⁄

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/ degrees/scholarships-awards

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/industrial-design

Industrial Design

Industrial designers help shape the way we live through the design of products and systems we use at home, at work and in the public domain. The job demands imagination, creative thinking, technical knowledge and a keen awareness of new possibilities. Designers consider not just the physical objects they design but the way those things are experienced and used by people in diverse settings


Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 IDES1201 Design Studio 1: Fundamentals (12 UOC) Introducing the basic elements of 2D and 3D design, this studio-based course allows exploration of the elements of design and techniques of representation used in a creative process. Also included is consideration of philosophical, historical, social and environmental influences on design thinking and practice.

IDES1261 Communication 1: Technical Drawing Fundamentals Technical drawing systems are learned in this practical course employing manual drawing methods as well as computer applications.

IDES1071 Physical Principles for Designers An introduction to engineering principles encountered in industrial design—physics, mechanics, material properties and energy systems.

IDES1202 Design Studio 2: Materials (12 UOC) Students will apply a design process to conceive, plan, specify and present complete product designs in projects in this studio course, employing techniques of sketching, illustration, model making and technical drawing. Qualities of materials, including form, aesthetics, performance and design possibilities are explored.

IDES2171 Communication 2: 3D Digital Modelling Introduction to computer modelling and drafting for product design. Includes modelling of components and product assemblies.

IDES2072 Manufacturing Technology Develops ability to specify materials and manufacturing methods, with a focus on metals, alloys, fasteners and assembly techniques.

Core Skills At the end of first year, IDES students will have developed basic proficiency and understanding of industrial design practices, processes and contexts.

IDES2101 Design Studio 3: Production (12 UOC) Projects emphasise material selection and technical considerations when designing for high volume production with plastics and other materials. Also included are illustration techniques for persuasive communication of design intent, and accurate technical documentation for manufacture.

IDES2201 Ergonomics Introduction to human-use implications in design, including usability, comfort, efficiency and safety.

MARK1012 Marketing Fundamentals Introduces students to major concepts and theories, reflecting the breadth and diversity of marketing.

IDES2102 Design Studio 4: People (12 UOC) Consolidates learning from prior courses to explore the challenges of designing for diverse groups of people. Methods of user-research and concurrent user-testing will be applied in design projects. Principles of inclusive design and participatory design are addressed.

IDES2021 Thinking Products Theories and processes of design are considered to gain understanding of the designer’s role in society.

MARK2051 Consumer Behaviour Equips students with knowledge of consumer behaviour, drawing upon psychological and sociological viewpoints.

Core Skills At the end of second year, IDES students will have developed competency in applying a design process and also presentation techniques to design projects.

IDES3101 Design Studio 5: Complexity (12 UOC) Highlights the need for a refined design process with technical resolution and documentation to a professional standard. A rigorous approach to is fostered by working on projects with “real-world” consumer, environmental, commercial, and technical considerations.

BE Interdisciplinary Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the Faculty.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the Faculty.

IDES3102 Design Studio 6: Sustainability (12 UOC) Enables students to develop competence beyond purely commercial objectives by highlighting ecological and social issues that are seen as opportunities for design intervention. Projects expand empathy for those who are typically underserved by mainstream design.

BE Interdisciplinary Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the Faculty.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the Faculty.

Core Skills At the end of third year, IDES students will have developed a range of skills and knowledge to enable them to complete design products of moderate complexity.

IDES4101 Design Studio 7: Enquiry (12 UOC) Capacity for rigorous design research is developed in this course through a series of projects leading to a substantive research report and a comprehensive brief to define a design project to be completed in the final semester (in Design Studio 8).

Open Elective Choice of any course available with the university, except denoted General Education courses.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

IDES4102 Design Studio 8: Integration (12 UOC) A major design project is undertaken, integrating skills and knowledge gained throughout the BID program. The project will consolidate and ‘showcase’ each student’s capabilities as an emerging design professional.

Core Skills At the end of fourth year, IDES students will have developed professional design skills and knowledge to independently research and design appropriate solutions to design problems.

26

Open Elective Choice of any course available with the university, except denoted General Education courses.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.


Marcus Lee Current Student Prizes and awards: Undergraduate Dean’s Merit List—2012 Undergraduate Scholar—2012 1st Prize—Student Design Competition 2013 for Watermark Products Won Silver—Southern Cross Packaging Design Award Highly Commended—Street Furniture Australia Design Competition 2013

Career Currently I am a Junior Industrial Designer at a design consultancy in New York, USA. After graduation, I did freelance work for North and South Sydney, an agency focusing on ‘idea-led innovation’. I also worked part-time at Chunk Design, a creative manufacturer specialising in product design and digital manufacturing.

My achievements During my degree, we received a LENS Honourable Mention award for our group project, MumMyCare. I was involved in the Redback Racing car ergonomics re-design and I represented UNSW at uni games for athletics in Melbourne and skiing and snowboarding at Mt. Buller. Finishing the Bachelor of Industrial Design with a major work that represented me, and had real world potential, is an achievement I am especially proud of. I am also proud of being able to work on very cool projects in my first year out, such as electric drift trikes (which also led to an appearance on an Audi advertisement) and making it to New York.

“UNSW always came across as a very upbeat university, providing an environment looking to balance education with student life. I chose to study here because of the facilities and easily accessible sporting/ social amenities. Industrial Design students have access to studio space, computers rooms and a modern workshop with 3D printers and laser cutters.”

Why did you enrol? UNSW is one of the top universities in Australia, with generous student facilities and strong international links. I knew UNSW was the place that I wanted to be. How has UNSW Industrial Design given you a competitive edge? I’ve been able to unleash my creative talent in a professional environment. I appreciate the stimulating briefs and constructive criticism given by tutors. They have pushed me to achieve things I never could have imagined. I’ve had the opportunity to present to two amazing companies and converse with potential employers, which has helped me understand what is expected in the industry. We also have the opportunity to enter competitions. I’ve won several design awards, which I can now use to boost my portfolio and give me a head start in the industry. What are the benefits? The course has really refined my way of thinking and provided me with the skills and knowledge to begin actualising my ideas. The friendly environment and courteous peers make every day a pleasure. My eyes have been opened to so many different aspects of product design, helping me to appreciate the depth and sophistication of my chosen field. The journey my degree has been taking me on has been challenging, stimulating and highly rewarding. What have been the highlights? I’ve been selected to present to real companies, entered numerous competitions and won awards, but nothing compares to the sheer amount of knowledge, skills and confidence my degree has given me to continue to reach success in the professional world. What sets UNSW Industrial Design apart from other university degrees? UNSW has a very modern approach to education. It is dynamic and quick to embrace new things, which is what appeals to me and suits my forward-looking nature. UNSW’s strong international links allow students to expand their opportunities beyond this country. Another aspect I love about UNSW Built Environment is the generous amount of working space and facilities that students are able to use on demand.

Industrial Design Profiles

Joshua Cope-Summerfield 2012 Graduate


A

B

In year 4 of the Bachelor of Industrial Design, students consolidate their learning with a substantial research/design project shaped by their own interests. Students focus on a project territory that becomes the basis of their final project, such as: needs in the home, workplaces, sport, medical, transport and social/environment. A complete design intervention is developed in response to the needs identified. In the process, students prepare themselves for the transition to professional design work. A degree awarded with honours after four years is also an open door to future higher levels of study. Aryetta Pazpinis

C

Wheelaccess Wheelaccess is a design proposal for a wheelchair train access system which provides wheelchair users with better independent access to Sydney’s Train system. It eliminates the need for users to depend on staff assistance or the need to give advanced notice of their intention to board a train.

D

Wheelaccess has a four part system that includes an interface panel, available on and off the platform, a permanently strapped access band, a warning usage panel and an automated inclining ramp that allows immediate access to users through Radio Frequency Identification Technology. The hands free system requires users to simply interact with the two interface panels, activating the automated inclining ramp to board or disembark the train independently and efficiently. Wheelaccess is a simple hands free system that does not interfere with other train users but enhances disabled accessibility to Sydney trains. It can also be easily used by people with injuries or elderly users that require assistance when travelling on a train.

E

28

A B C D E

Wheelaccess System for boarding Sydney Train User Chooses Train to use ramp to board Exterior Interface Panel Exploded View Interior Interface Access and Warning Panels RFID access band activates system interface.


Anastasie Panagopoulos

Split Vision Split Vision is a design proposal for an automotive crash avoidance system designed to help learner drivers and their instructors.

G

H

The retrofit system brings modern safety technology into older cars, providing simple alerts when entering a potentially dangerous driving situation. The system consists of two blind spot sensors as well as front and rear mounted cameras, which monitor the surroundings of the car. These components connect to a heads up display unit so the driver can easily see what is happening around them without taking their eyes off the road. The system also supports wireless smartphone connection so the instructor can automatically record the drive in a virtual logbook. It can also access traffic information and map data through the 4G network. F G H I

I

Mounted heads up display unit Diagram of sensor and camera reach Split vision smartphone app Exploded view of heads up display unit

Industrial Design Projects

F


30


Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

⁄⁄

Private consulting interior designer specialising in

⁄⁄

Program code 3255

residential, retail, workplace or hospitality design

⁄⁄

UAC code 423400

Corporate interior designer specialising in multi-

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 80

story residential, retail, hospitality, medical, hotel,

⁄⁄

Alternative Admission Australian students

⁄⁄

workplace or exhibition design

completing their high school studies have the opportunity to submit a portfolio of their work to

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

SIDA Foundation-Mary White Memorial Award:

support their ATAR (or equivalent). Go to be.unsw.edu.au/biaportfolio ⁄⁄

Textiles and Design, English Advanced

Value $2000 ⁄⁄

Davenport Campbell Prize: Value $1000

⁄⁄

Taste of Living Prize: Value Sydney Milan return flights + three nights accommodation and entry to the Milan Furniture Fair

⁄⁄

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/ degrees/scholarships-awards

Bonus ATAR Design and Technology, Visual Arts, Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

⁄⁄

Duration 4 years full time

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Professional recognition International Federation of Interior Architects (IFI)

⁄⁄

Director Bruce Watson

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/interior-architecture

Interior Architecture

Interior Architecture is a design discipline that focuses specifically on interior environments and all aspects of their structural, spatial, social and material assembly. Interior architecture and interior design share a common ground, but they differ in the scale of the intervention in the interior. Interior architecture works at the scale of architecture, including the manipulation of structural elements such as walls, floors and staircases while interior design generally engages at the scale of individual rooms. As an interior architect/ designer you will develop creative solutions that respond to functional and aesthetic problems in the built environment—spaces that may be permanent or temporary, from the scale of rooms to the scale of cities. The UNSW Bachelor of Interior Architecture was the first degree of its kind in Australia.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Semester 1

INTA2101 Design Practice 1: Enquire (12UoC) The Design component introduces students to the processes, materiality and elements of interior architecture. The Communication component introduces students to a range of techniques and applications for representing space, including basic analogue and digital drawing and model making.

Semester 2

INTA2171 Interior Technics 1: Assemblage introduction to the people, processes, principles and primary building elements surrounding built space

INTA3121 Critical Perspectives 1: Interiority Introduces the historical, cultural and theoretical context of interior architecture.

INTA2102 Design Practice 2: Articulate (12UoC) The Design component introduces students to languages and elements of spatial enclosure and definition, including issues of materiality and assemblage, human scale and form, in relation to simple forms of occupation. The Communication component introduces students to a range of techniques and applications for representing spatial atmosphere and effect, including advanced analogue and digital drawing and model making.

INTA2172 Interior Technics 2: Materiality Introduces materiality and interior detailing.

INTA3122 Critical Perspectives 2: Dwelling Introduces historical, cultural and theoretical perspectives on the concept of dwelling and it’s material construction

Core Skills At the end of first year, IA students will have developed the fundamental technical and critical thinking skills to conceptualise a design response and organise spatial and material relationships underpinned by an understanding of the theoretical and historical context of IA.

INTA2201 Design Practice 3: Translate (12UoC) The Design component focuses on the language and elements of spatial dynamics, including issues of spatial and material relationships and sequence in relation to multiple forms of occupation, including retail and hospitality typologies. The Communication component focuses on a range of techniques and applications for representing spatial thinking, including generative, illustrative, observational and analytical tools.

INTA3271 Interior Technics 3: Detail Focuses on advanced interior detailing.

INTA3222 Critical Perspective 3: Consumption The role of interior architecture as a strategy of communication, mediation and engagement will be explored through an historical, cultural and theoretical investigation of a range of typologies including retail and hospitality.

INTA2202 Design Practice 4: Experiment (12UoC) The Design component focuses on the languages and elements of spatial organisation, from idea to material detail in relation to complex forms and patterns of occupation including workplace and institutional typologies. The Communication component focuses on a range of techniques and applications for representing spatial experimentation, including innovative digital technologies.

INTA3272 Interior Technics 4: Systems Introduces systems of interior environmental control including, lighting, acoustics, thermalcomfort and building services.

INTA3222 Critical Perspectives 4: Identity Explores the role of interior architecture in codifying and reproducing social identities.

Core Skills At the end of second year, IA students will have developed the skills to explore design responses that integrate materiality, interior detailing, building services and systems through a process of informed inquiry, analysis and reflection.

INTA2301 Design Practice 5: Narrate (12UoC) This course focuses on the development and realization of interior spatial narratives through researchled design practice. Emphasis is placed on the integration of design and professional practice through projects focussed on complex forms and patterns of occupation in small to medium scale buildings.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

INTA2302 Design Practice 6: Speculate (12UoC) This course focuses on the development and realization of interior spatial transformations through researchled design practice. Emphasis is placed on the integration of design and professional practice through projects focussed on complex forms and patterns of occupation in medium to large scale buildings.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

Core Skills At the end of third year, IA students will have developed the skills to resolve complex design responses from conceptualisation to detailing, underpinned by an understanding of the practices, processes and procedures relevant to professional design practice.

INTA2401 Design Practice 7: Propose (12UoC) This course focuses on first phase of the detailed design and resolution of the final design project, culminating in a cohesive and comprehensive design outcome. Projects focus on civic or cultural interiors that have agency at the scale of the city.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the Faculty.

INTA2402 Design Practice 8: Resolve (12 UoC) This course focuses on the second phase of detailed design and resolution of the final design project, culminating in a cohesive and comprehensive design response. This studio builds on the design propositions developed in Design Practice 7: Propose

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

BE Elective Choice of any elective course available within the Faculty.

Core Skills At the end of final year, IA students will have developed a comprehensive understanding of the structural, spatial, social and material assembly of interior environments, informed by an appreciation of the physical, cultural, theoretical, historical and professional contexts of interior architecture and design.

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Luis Zaldy Gito Current Student Prizes and awards: Insight Projects Prize in Interior Architecture—2013 Undergraduate Dean’s Merit List Semester 1 and 2—2012 Undergraduate Scholar—2012 Outstanding Achievement Design Studio 6—2012 Outstanding Achievement Design Studio 5—2012 Outstanding Achievement Design Studio 4—2011

Career I am an Interior Designer working at HASSELL studio in Sydney. Next year I am moving to the HASSELL studio in London. Whilst studying I interned with Siren Design for two months over my university holidays. Shortly after this, I started working as a Student Designer at HASSELL. I have been working for HASSELL for three years now.

My achievements I am proud to see work that I have contributed to, published in magazines and blogs. It’s great to put hard work into something and see it recognised by others. That is the best feeling. Also seeing something you have designed actually built is a great feeling. I have had the opportunity to see a few built projects over my two years of work. Getting the opportunity to work overseas and move to another studio is also a great achievement for me. Working internationally is a dream. My graduation project was published on the Barangaroo Delivery Authority website. I won the Artichoke design award for my graduation work and my work was published in Artichoke magazine.

“The university has a great reputation in the design field.” “BE really considers “life after university” and opens many doors into the professional world for their graduates, whether it be referring us directly to the industry or simply equipping us with all the skills to make us as relevant and valuable to the industry as possible.”

Why did you enrol? UNSW supports not only academic and professional growth and development but also opportunities to build social skills that are just as important. The numerous events and activities supported by the university encourage a wholesome, healthy, university experience. How has UNSW Interior Architecture helped you achieve your professional goals? The strong connections between teaching staff and the industry mean students are exposed to opportunities and perspectives that are closely tied with the current face of the industry. I was fortunate to come by an opportunity referred to me by teaching staff, to apply for an undergraduate position with a leading interior firm. This made the transition into the industry all the more simple, as well as adding another perspective to enrich my final year of the degree. What are the benefits? The course is continually evolving to ensure graduates are always a step ahead of the rest. The learning environment also encourages dialogue between students for a richer and more integrated learning experience. Big picture thinking and allowing limitless exploration of ideas and concepts while at the same time always being grounded with the technology and history of the profession are also benefits of the degree. What have been the highlights? One of the biggest highlights would be participating in the graduate committee which itself became a side studio project. This allowed early insight into the workings of a design project from concept to construction. What sets UNSW Interior Architecture apart from other university degrees? The Faculty really considers “life after university” and opens many doors into the professional world for their graduates, whether it be referring us directly to industry or simply equipping us with skills to make us as relevant and valuable to the industry as possible. What advice would you give to future students? Come onto campus to see the energy of the studio environments and attend any exhibitions to see the work and projects you could be a part of.

Interior Architecture Profiles

Nasim Eshraghi 2012 Graduate


Sitting on the eastern edge of Sydney, as well as the edge of the habitable continent, is the Bondi Pavilion. Together with the Opera House and the Harbour Bridge it forms a triumvirate of sea-straddling structures that define the built environment of our city as well as that of our national identity. However, unlike its famed and manicured counterparts, the symbolic and spatial significance of the Bondi Pavilion has been underappreciated. Given the significance of the Bondi Pavilion, and the urgent need for its revitalisation, this project challenged students to envision a new future for the interior of the Pavilion within the contexts of 21st century Sydney as a mass destination for tourism, leisure and pleasure, whilst simultaneously addressing the needs of local community and heritage.

A

Ellen Ferrier

KAIA—Pavilion for Personal Rejuvenation & Renewal

B

Water holds a certain magnetism for us. People all over the world flock to rivers, lakes and beaches—just as the water itself seeks its inevitable return to the ocean. Bondi is an iconic example of this convergence—a point at which the urban environment and the ocean meet. Yet Bondi, in its aesthetic, embodies none of water’s intrinsic quality. It has come to represent our superficial relationship to water; the water to which we are drawn, the water we misunderstand. KAIA is a pavilion for personal rejuvenation through the observation of, and our simple interaction with water. KAIA promises to offer visitors to Bondi Beach a holistic exploration of the psychological, physical and spiritual properties of water.

C

My desire to create a space that fosters a sense of reverence and calm, ran parallel to my research into phenomenological architecture. Inspired by the physical and energetic behaviour of water, I sought to devise a pathway through space which would mirror water’s cyclical nature. From this path, the spatial arrangement and form grew quite organically. Aesthetically, visitors are immersed in the elemental and geometric symbology of water—guided over reflective water beds, past waterfalls and led through stages of interaction with water in all of its states. The completion of this cycle, leaves the patron calm, reflective and refreshed. A Reception B Communal Pool C Wash Room

34


BONSAI

D

The Bondi Sculpture and Art Institute (BONSAI) was conceived as a response to the growing presence of creative industries and programs at Bondi. The proposal seeks to rebirth the pavilion into an art gallery come sculpture garden at which both micro and macro community bonds can be fostered and nurtured. The research phase collected both physical and abstract qualities present on site, anchored by an extensive look into civic scaled programs like Sculptures by the Sea and the Festival of the Winds. These programs were identified as a common thread between the local, seeking ownership of the site as a community centre and the visitor or tourist, who is merely borrowing the for their experience at Bondi.

E

The interior is composed by an arch matrix that divides the courtyard into a series of volumes that can be likened to the incidental spaces that occur under a grove of trees. These large voluminous spaces are punctuated by an intricate glass ceiling above, that mimics the dappled lighting effect inherent to a tree canopy. To compliment these large sculpture halls is a subterranean level that responds much more intimately to the human scale. This level seeks a more intimate dialogue with the art and reinforces the civic nature of the building with a series of studios and spaces for social gatherings. BONSAI is the result of a continually evolving creative process and presents a milestone in my conceptual thinking and development as a designer. D E F G

F

G

Sacro Bosco + Subterranean Gallery Tree canopy + dappled lighting Looking into Sculpture Atrium XS Gallery

Interior Architecture Projects

Luis Zaldy Gito


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Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

⁄⁄

Design consultant in private practice

⁄⁄

Program code 3380

⁄⁄

Project manager or technical officer or designer in

⁄⁄

UAC code 423500

local government

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2014 ATAR 80

Landscape planner in state government agency

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Bonus ATAR Design and Technology,

⁄⁄

or authority

Geography, Visual Arts

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Landscape planning and management specialist

Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus

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Designer with landscape construction company

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Duration 4 years full time (including mandatory 4 months work experience)

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

HASSELL Traveling Scholarship: Value $5000

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Harry Howard Prize in Landscape Architecture:

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Prerequisites None

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Professional recognition Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA)

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Director Associate Professor Linda Corkery

Value $2,000 ⁄⁄

Peter Kollar Memorial Prize: Value $1,500

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More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/ degrees/scholarships-awards

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/landscape-architecture

Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture is a design profession with a long tradition and increasing relevance in meeting the challenge of creating sustainable and beautiful environments in urban and rural settings. Landscape architects combine knowledge of art and science to plan, design and manage natural and built environments in Australia and internationally, which conserve and celebrate ecological relationships, cultural values and symbolic associations.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Semester 1

Semester 2

LAND2101 Landscape Studio 1—Design Fundamentals Introduces design elements, principles and skills for thinking and action in landscape architecture through studio projects and assignments.

LAND1141 Design Communication 1 Introduces a variety of drawing and model-making techniques and the graphic conventions used to communicate design ideas.

LAND2102 Landscape Studio 2—Design Process Introduces the process of generating, testing and expressing design ideas on a number of small-scale site design projects.

LAND2142 Design Communication 2 Introduces Computer Aided Design (CAD) in 2D and 3D along with other essential software for communicating design ideas.

LAND2121 Introduction to Landscape Architecture Provides an overview of landscape architecture as a design field and creative force in shaping the built environment.

LAND2151 Landscape Analysis Introduces techniques of inventory, interpretation, mapping and reporting of environments using concepts of ecology, sustainability, biodiversity, etc.

LAND2152 Plants, Ecology & Design Focuses on the aesthetic, ecological and cultural aspects of plants used in a design context, building on knowledge of plant communities learned in LAND2151.

LAND2122 History of Landscape Architecture Provides a critical analysis of cultural landscapes and human-modified environments through the ages in the Eastern and Western traditions.

Core Skills At the end of first year, LArch students will have gained: (1) an overview of the profession, its history and development over time; (2) ability to generate and communicate design ideas and; (3) foundational knowledge about plants, ecosystems and landscape types and the skills for analysing and designing their modification. LAND2201 Landscape Studio 3—Landform and Planting Design projects focus on projects that modify topography and arrange plant compositions for aesthetic and/or functional purposes.

LAND2271 Landscape Documentation Assignments focus on principles of documentation that communicate the construction of landscape designs, including grading, material selection and detailing.

LAND2202 Landscape Studio 4—Design & Documentation Focuses on resolving a landscape design project beyond the concept phase and preparing working drawings for its construction using CAD.

LAND2272 Landscape Engineering Principles Focuses on understanding and applying structural design and landscape construction techniques. Completion of industry work experience is required to pass this course.

General Education Courses as required. Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

LAND2251 Planting Design at the Landscape Scale Focuses plants as components of ecological landscape patterns to undertake large scale planting and design, working from site to metropolitan and/or regional scales.

General Education Courses as required. Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

LAND Elective Selected from the current list of Landscape Architecture Program offerings, as advised by the Program.

Core Skills At the end of second year, LArch students will have developed an understanding of the key landscape architectural materials, especially plants and landforms, and understanding technical aspects of implementing landscape architectural design using the basic materials and communicating construction intentions through technical drawings. They will also have taken elective and General Education subjects to supplement their BLArch studies. LAND2301 Landscape Studio 5—Site Planning (12 UoC) Extends students’ site analysis and design capabilities by preparing master plans for medium-scale sites, integrating ecological, social and aesthetic issues.

LAND1351 Landscape Management Provides an overview of legislation and policy framework within which landscape architects practise, establishing relationships between landscape architecture and landscape planning. BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

LAND2302 Landscape Studio 6—Design with a Complex Program (12 UoC) Extends students’ abilities to generate a design brief, integrate multiple elements such as buildings, infrastructure, public art, community services and create a design response. May be an interdisciplinary studio taught with studios from other BE programs.

LAND1322 Urban Landscape Design Seminar Introduces planning and design of the urban environment with landscape and ecological conditions and processes as key drivers in urban form and settlement patterns.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

Core Skills At the end of third year, LArch students will have undertaken complex design studio projects, working in group and individual modes. They will be familiar with issues of broad-scale landscape management including relevant environmental legislation, and understand the relationship between landscape and urban form. They will have also completed two interdisciplinary electives alongside colleagues from other Degrees in the Faculty LAND2401 Landscape Studio 7—Urban Design (12 UoC) Introduces landscape master planning and site planning in the urban environment and generates the urban design context for the Graduating Project in LAND2402.

LAND2421 Contemporary Theory & Research Extends knowledge of contemporary landscape design through detailed review of current projects, built works and writings.

LAND2402 Landscape Studio 8—Graduating Studio (12 UoC) Employs all the knowledge, skills and understanding students have gained in previous studios to investigate a question and generate a design response of personal interest within the context of the urban precinct studied in LAND2401.

LAND1482 Professional Practice Introduction to the scope of practice in landscape architecture, including legal issues, contracts, ethics, tendering, etc. Completion of design-office work experience is required to pass this course.

LAND1421 Landscape      or Thesis Foundation Individual study project on an aspect of landscape architecture selected by the student.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

LAND 1422 Landscape Thesis   or Individual study project on an aspect of landscape architecture selected by the student.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

Core Skills At the end of final year, LArch students will have developed high level design thinking and communication skills necessary to enter the profession as a graduate Landscape Architect.

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Karen Ruthven Current Student Prizes and awards: Deans List 2011 (Semester 1 and 2) Deans List 2012 (Semester 1 and 2) Deans Scholar Award 2011 Lindsay Robertson Memorial Prize 2012 Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture Top First Year Student 2011 Otte Linne Prize Hamburg Horn 2013—Honorable Mention (Group Project)

Career I am a Landscape Architect at the NSW Government Architect’s Office practicing both landscape architecture and urban design. I began work in this office as a student and have worked here for the last five years since graduation. My role has changed dramatically over the past few years as I have moved from small landscape design projects through to larger public domain design and documentation and into large scale urban design master planning and strategic design proposals.

My achievements Completing the Walsh Bay Master Plan and beginning to see this develop into a new public domain project for Sydney. Also, winning the 2010 Street Works competition with our entry Beerline, a temporary exhibit we built and installed. Working on the 2013 Circular Quay strategic design framework and participating in the design workshop for the White Bay Powerstation have also been great achievements.

“The cross-disciplinary courses I was involved in at university have been invaluable for establishing the friendships that are so important to me now and will be into the future.” “Signing up to the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Philippines trip in second year was an amazing experience. Travelling to Manilla, Irriga City and Bohol, we stayed and worked with extremely disadvantaged communities, building houses, making bricks, digging sewer pits and getting hands-on experience of the challenges being faced by others.”

Why did you enrol? Before starting my degree, I was working at a large garden centre. A requirement of the UNSW Landscape Architecture degree is to gain practical work experience both in the landscape industry and in landscape architecture practices. The garden centre had several UNSW Landscape Architecture students there for work experience. They all said positive things about the degree and that inspired me to enrol. How has UNSW Landscape Architecture helped you achieve your professional goals? The faculty recently held workshops to help us with our portfolios and to prepare us for employment before we finish our degree. What are the benefits? Socially I have been introduced to a group of both peers and teachers who have similar interests to me, and I have made many great friends. BE graduation exhibitions and review nights are also great for meeting people. This is where we get to see work from other years and other disciplines. Studying has also given me a great work ethic and broadened my skills immensely. What have been the highlights? On completing the first year of my degree, I was chosen as a Built Environment Undergraduate Scholar. Being recognised by the Faculty really motivated me to continue to try my best. There are a lot of national and international competitions in which my landscape architecture work has been recognised. What sets UNSW Landscape Architecture apart from other university degrees? BE provides lots of encouragement and support to gain employment in the industry before you finish your degree. The Faculty gives students great opportunities to engage with industry professionals through tutors, guest lectures, judging panels and encouraging us to partake in industry events outside of university, such as conferences and workshops. What advice would you give to future students? Consider what interests you. If you are doing something you enjoy, you become passionate about it, giving you a great starting path to be happy in your future career.

Landscape Architecture Profiles

Luke Wolstencroft 2009 Graduate


In their fourth and final year, Landscape Architecture students engaged in a year long investigation of Gosford central business district and its environs. During the first half of the year, students were introduced to the complex environmental, social and economic challenges facing this Central Coast city. Working in small teams, these initial investigations generated detailed regional site analyses along with an understanding of contemporary urban design theory. This led to master plan proposals and detailed precinct plans for selected areas of Gosford. In Semester 2, the group projects provided the framework within which students selected a site, formulated design questions and project briefs for an individual design investigation. Professionals from two leading practices—Oculus Landscape Architects and CLOUSTON Associates—guided students in studio as they advanced their individual projects. This unique arrangement also gave students the opportunity to experience tutorial sessions in those two offices. A

Matthew Drury

Urban Landscape Heterarchy Gosford has lost its significance as a regional hub and turned its back on the unique landscape setting for too long. Gosford should take full advantage of its waterfront and connect the city core with its natural environment. Cities such as Gosford, must embody a higher order of complexity and richness; understanding and responding to all aspects of the surrounding environment. B

The Urban Landscape Heterarchy project, is a system of organisation that allows for multiple overlaps to occur. It has no formal hierarchy, but coexistent patterns of relation with all elements of design considered equally. Christopher Alexander’s 1965 article ‘A City is Not a Tree’; argues that the current hierarchy or ‘tree structure’ applied to ‘artificial cities’ is too simplistic. As a result of this heterarchy overlapping structure, a key axis, Baker Street, has been conceptualised as a layering of green spaces, roadways, bike lanes, pedestrian connections, ecological links and social interactions. This in turn has been accomplished through three major principles:

C

1  Improving connections to the waterfront by realigning the major axes, establishing a shared street and re-routing key roadways. 2  Creating greater social interaction and utilising forgotten spaces by creating a network of laneways, removing key abandoned buildings and transforming car parks into green spaces. 3  B  ringing ecology and green infrastructure into Gosford through a network of street trees, recognising the original creek location and the creation of pocket parks.

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A B C

Open air cinema montage Forgotten space transformation perspective Shared street concept montage


Bhavna Arumugam, Chloe Bristow, Katie Rudowsky, Brigitta Schyns

Urban Eco-Tourism E

F

The regional city of Gosford currently features a disconnection between the city centre, the waterfront, recreational spaces, residential housing, and is dissected by the Central Coast Highway and the Regional train line. These characteristics of Gosford have resulted in the city being dysfunctional and segregated. This study analysed the potential for an increase in population by reassessing the connectivity of spaces within the extremity of Gosford’s city landscape, injecting new ecotourism opportunities and revitalizing the built form. The natural setting of Gosford offers topographical challenges however through new infrastructure and urban development we aim to reconnect the city systems for pedestrians, vehicles and cyclists. Creating a continuous green/urban belt that runs throughout Gosford is our proposal for reconnecting the city. This green way scheme will simultaneously provide new tourism opportunities, in the form of camping areas along Narara Creek, a revitalised urban waterfront and new opportunities for active and passive engagement with Gosford’s natural setting. Establishing and enhancing the existing natural settings of Gosford, through ecotourism practices, will bring new economic benefits and raise the profile of Gosford as a regional city. This boom in tourism will allow for the new development and the increase of the city density. D E F G

G

Proposed Urban Civic ‘hub’ connecting with Brisbane Water Gosford Waterfront Proposal Gosford Urban Eco-Tourism Masterplan Narara Creek Pedestrian and Cycle Track Proposal

Landscape Architecture Projects

D


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Degree Information Career Opportunities

Facts in Brief

⁄⁄

Strategic planner

⁄⁄

Program code 3360

⁄⁄

Social planner

⁄⁄

UAC code 423600

⁄⁄

Environmental planner

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 80

⁄⁄

Urban policy + research

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR Design and Technology,

⁄⁄

Urban consultant

Geography, English Advanced

⁄⁄

Development assessment planner

Go to unsw.edu.au/HSCPlus ⁄⁄

Prizes and Scholarships ⁄⁄

John Shaw Memorial Award: Value $2,600

⁄⁄

Railcorp Award in Transport Planning: Value $2,500

⁄⁄

Easson Geha Planning Award: Value $2,400

⁄⁄

More prizes and scholarships at be.unsw.edu.au/

Duration 5 years full time (including mandatory 1 year of paid work experience)

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Professional recognition Planning Institute of Australia (PIA)

⁄⁄

Director Associate Professor Simon Pinnegar

degrees/scholarships-awards

Dual Degree Planning/Law This dual degree combines principles paramount to planning, such as design, delivery and management with extensive knowledge of Australian law, legal process, land law and environmental law. The program allows you to obtain two professionally accredited degrees and provides excellent preparation for careers in large law firms specialising in planning law, in addition to the above mentioned career opportunities.

Facts in Brief ⁄⁄

Program code 4707

⁄⁄

UAC code 426000

⁄⁄

2014 ATAR 99.70

⁄⁄

Bonus ATAR This program is not included in HSC Plus. Selection is on the basis of ATAR or equivalent only

⁄⁄

Duration 7 years full time (including mandatory 1 year of paid work experience)

⁄⁄

Prerequisites None

⁄⁄

Professional recognition Planning Institute of Australia (PIA)

⁄⁄

Accredited by the Legal Profession Admission Board (NSW)

More info be.unsw.edu.au/undergraduate-degrees/planning

Planning

Planning the lived environment is a complex, dynamic activity. It requires a broad-ranging understanding of political, economic, cultural, design, environmental and legal issues. For cities, suburbs and regions, planning encompasses the development, improvement, conservation and general management of the environment.


Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Semester 1

Semester 2

PLAN1241 Planning Theory and Practice Introduces students commencing their planning studies to the principles which underlie planning as a profession.

PLAN1101 Understanding Design Introduces urban design principles and basic design skills which are needed by all planners.

PLAN1042 Local Planning Introduces local planning processes, focusing on theoretical understandings and practical knowledge needed by planners working on local issues.

PLAN1122 Development Processes Introduces the processes involved in property development in market economies in the context of government regulatory and approval processes.

PLAN1011 Urban Society Encourages students to critically consider their understanding of the society in which they live.

GEOS1701 Environmental Systems and Processes Introduces the environmental processes that shape physical environmental patterns and the operation of global environmental systems.

PLAN2801 GIS for Built Environment Introduces Geographical Information Systems and their applications in urban planning, public management, public health and environmental planning contexts.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University except denoted General Education courses.

Core Skills At the end of first year, PLAN students will have developed an understanding of the basic principles and concepts underpinning planning. PLAN2041 Integrated Planning 1—Communication in Planning Targets a range of communication skills required of planners in practice.

PLAN2032 Urban Design Aims to reunite planning and design to help improve the quality and sustainability of the built environment.

PLAN2111 Economics of Planning and Development Examines how planning objectives are influenced by the aggregate impacts of uneven economic growth processes and economic behaviour.

PLAN2122 History, Heritage and the Built Environment Injects an explicitly historical dimension into planning studies and the assessment of heritage values.

PLAN2152 Resources, Planning and the Natural Environment Examines the interrelationships between urbanisation, planning and the sustainable management of environmental systems.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

PLAN1052 Quantitative Methods Provides an introduction to basic techniques of data collection and analysis, introductory statistics and survey research.

General Education Choice of course in accordance with the University’s General Education rules.

Core Skills At the end of second year, PLAN students will have developed skills in the areas of urban design, heritage, environmental management, urban economics and information analysis and communication. PLAN3031 Integrated Planning 2—Strategic Planning Provides instruction in the theory and practice of strategic planning as an integrated activity.

PLAN3041 Planning Law and Administration Provides an overview of the legal system and environmental planning law with particular reference to the Australian experience.

PLAN3051 Development Assessment Introduces students to the implementation of planning objectives via the (NSW) statutory development control system.

PLAN3671 Transport, Land Use and Environment Introduces the complex interactions between transport, land use and the environment in urban areas.

PLAN0081 Work experience (24 UoC) The first half of the 48 weeks of employment in a planning office that students must undertake in their Planning degree.

Core Skills At the end of third year, PLAN students will have developed an understanding of the strategic, statutory and land use transport frameworks of planning and gained experience in planning practice. PLAN0082 Work experience (24 UoC) The second half of the 48 weeks of employment in a planning office that students must undertake in their Planning degree.

PLAN3032 Integrated Planning 3—Master Planning Focuses on Master Planning techniques for the delivery of quality urban outcomes on complex major development sites.

PLAN3015 Social Planning Provides students with a deeper understanding of the social and cultural issues central to contemporary urban planning.

PLAN3052 Qualitative Methods Focuses on the importance of interpersonal relationship skills in planning and interviewing techniques for successful qualitative research in planning practice.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

Core Skills At the end of fourth year, PLAN students would have accrued the benefits of 12 months’ work experience and gained skills in community engagement and project management.

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PLAN4031 Research Design Consolidates and advances an engagement in research issues in planning studies, in preparation for the substantive final-year research project.

PLAN4142 Professionalism, Ethics and Politics Final year of the Planning degree addresses vital issues surrounding professional planning practice.

Open Elective Choice of any course available within the University.

BEIL—Interdisciplinary Learning Course Selected from a specified pool of interdisciplinary courses offered by the faculty.

PLAN4132 Thesis Project (18 UoC) A major research project— conventionally in the form of a written thesis—is the culmination of the undergraduate Planning degree.

Core Skills At the end of fifth year, PLAN students would have gained an understanding of the professional and ethical framework of planning practice and undertaken a major piece of research in a contemporary planning topic or issue.

PLANNING Elective Selected from the current list of Planning electives, as advised by the Program.


Chris Forrester Current Student Prizes and awards: The Elisas Duek-Cohen Prize for Urban Design UNSW Faculty of Built Environment Dean’s List UNSW Exchange Scholarship

Career I am currently working at the City of Sydney Council in a graduate planning program. The first rotation of the program was in the Strategic Planning and Urban Design Unit, where I gained an understanding of the processes through which planning policies are researched, prepared and implemented. More recently, I have been working in the Planning Assessments Unit where I have been assessing a diverse range of development applications and preparing statements for the NSW Land and Environment Court. Before working at the City of Sydney I worked at Urbis, a multidisciplinary consulting firm, as part of the Social Policy Unit. My time at Urbis provided me with many opportunities to contribute to significant social planning and social research projects. A career highlight was my contribution to a Social Impact Assessment and Community Consultation process for the Royal Randwick Racecourse redevelopment. It was a wonderful opportunity to liaise with a variety of stakeholders and contribute to the planning process of a high profile proposal.

“The Planning degree at UNSW has prepared me well for diversity in my career. It equipped me with a broad knowledge of the built environment and over a year of practical work place experience, really helped kick-start my career.�

Why did you enrol? The reputation of UNSW Planning was my main motivation for enrolling. The location of the campus and the opportunity to move to Sydney from my hometown of Tamworth made it an enticing choice to pursue my academic goals. How has UNSW Planning given you the competitive edge? The degree is closely tied with industry and is relevant to the current needs of the planning profession. It provides a supportive transition from study to the workforce through a work experience component. I was fortunate to continue working part-time with the NSW Department of Planning & Infrastructure during my final year of study. What are the benefits? A high quality learning environment; attentive lecturers; a close-knit program with students and faculty; the development of wide-ranging skills necessary for the industry, the chance to interact with those currently in the industry; and, the opportunity to participate in planning events and other related programs such as exchange. What have been the highlights? My exchange semester in Montreal, Canada; exchange semester in Seoul, Korea; receiving awards and honours; and, the recent completion of my graduating thesis. What sets UNSW Planning apart from other university degrees? UNSW is well recognised in the planning industry and is one of the longest running accredited courses. The lecturers are dedicated to teaching and often have a rich history in their respective area of planning. The network of alumni and the opportunities to engage with key employers throughout the degree is very beneficial to establishing a career in planning. What advice would you give to future students? Do your research and apply for any scholarships and programs assisting your study. An exchange semester is a lot of fun and a great way to broaden your knowledge and experience on an international basis. Get involved in the Organisation of Planning Students (OOPS) and attend the events they hold. The Faculty also hosts regular public lectures (Utzon Lecture Series) by leading local and international guests that are very worthwhile.

Planning Profiles

Lucinda Molloy 2012 Graduate


Students in the final year of the Bachelor of Planning, undertake a thesis in the form of a substantive individual research project. Each student is assigned an adviser from qualified BE faculty members. Students have the opportunity to explore a specific planning topic in considerable detail. Included were a number of issues of contemporary policy relevance in areas such as planning legislation and reform, land use, transport, urban design, housing, greening cities, social justice, and community planning. Angela Lazaridis

Planning for the Dead: Addressing critical shortage of burial space in NSW cemeteries In a growing but ageing urban society the land use consequences of death have to be confronted. As the population of New South Wales increases, existing cemeteries come under great pressure to provide additional burial space. Estimations indicate that available burial space will be exhausted within the next 30-40 years and much sooner for older cemeteries closer to central Sydney. Despite the increasing inclination towards cremation, the demand for ground interments is likely to remain reasonably high for the conceivable future, particularly in a city such as Sydney with its diverse multicultural society. The State Government’s ability to address the critical shortage of burial space in the past has been characterised by short-term fixes and reactive policy. This thesis investigates challenges and opportunities presented by recent historic cemetery reforms in managing NSW’s interment industry. A mixed-method approach has been adopted involving literature and policy review, in-depth interviews, surveys and field observation. A case study was undertaken of Eastern Suburbs Memorial Park Cemetery and Crematorium. This thesis makes recommendations for future policy makers in planning for the disposal of the deceased. Strong linkages need to be built between government and stakeholders to ensure that the burial needs for all communities are met.

46

Nathan Stringer

From Shab to Chic: The adaptive reuse of industrial buildings Australia’s economy is continually evolving, transitioning from a manufacturing based economy to one based on mining and services. Increasingly, since the latter half of the twentieth century, former industrial sites across Australian cities have become areas of urban decay. Many of these sit on important tracts of land, occupying sites of strategic importance within close proximity to waterways and commercial business centres. Consequently, planners, developers and architects have turned to the process of adaptive reuse to transform these buildings into functional and productive spaces. The often highly specialised nature of older industrial buildings with vast spaces originally housing massive machinery can limit the potential for successful and functional redevelopment. In Sydney, how the derelict and historic White Bay Power Station can be reused and for what purposes, has been the topic of public debate for a number of years. This thesis explores the process of adaptive reuse, how it has been applied to industrial buildings across Australia and the world, and identifies the opportunities presented by reuse of the White Bay Power Station. With the successful adaptation of the power station, Sydneysiders will have a new place to live, work and play entrenched deep within the maritime industrial heritage of the city.


Planning Projects


48


“Nothing inspires me more than working with students,” says Heleana Genaus, course convener and tutor of a number of architectural communications based subjects and electives. “BE students are brave, bold and up for a challenge. Watching them surprise themselves of their own abilities is so rewarding.” Whilst a BE student herself, Heleana juggled her studies with working for Healthabitat and Paul Pholeros Architects on community based initiatives. Combining her skills as an architect, graphic designer and photographer led Heleana on a professional career path that involves architectural design and communications. These skills were put to the test when Heleana provided design solutions for Dhulikhel Hospital, a hospital for women in Nepal. “The biggest challenge was not in the design, it was in communicating the design aspirations of the brief to the nurses, surgeons and doctors who were my clients. Aside from language barriers, most had never been able to read architectural drawings and thus I had to alter my communication technique”. Heleana found through training and experience, she became an agile and empathetic communicator which, to this day, helps resolve similar dilemmas with new clients. A professional highlight for Heleana was being part of the Healthabitat team who won the United Nations World Habitat Award in 2011 for their Housing for Health program. The project aims to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by ensuring they have access to a safe and well-functioning house, and an improved living environment. The Built Environment faculty has always had strong links to the community and actively promotes collaborative projects. With Heleana’s skill set and experience in social equity and responsible projects, working at BE was appealing. Heleana joined other BE staff to lead a multidisciplinary team of 23 architecture and construction students at the Powerhouse Museum’s Sydney Design 2013 exhibition. In collaboration with Healthabitat, the team met the theme brief ‘Can Design Save the World?’ and created the installation Housing for Health—the luxury of a wash to engage visitors in how design and its practice can improve the health of people living in poverty. Heleana encourages students to take control of their learning abilities and to be aware of their role as global citizens. “My advice to anyone considering studying at BE would be to go for it. They have dedicated, high-calibre, full-time staff who care about your education and can support you to become a great student and professional. One of the reasons I chose to work for BE is because I’m now working with the people who inspired me as a student.”

More about our staff here be.unsw.edu.au /department-staff/teaching Photography by James Brickwood

Staff Profile

Heleana Genaus


Industry Profile

Donor

Andreasens Green Darren Mason Chief Operations Officer I began working for Andreasens Green in 1983, the same year I completed a course in Landscape Design at Ryde School of Horticulture. I am now Chief Operations Officer at Andreasens Green looking after the operations of all sites with our team of managers. Andreasens Green is well-known as the leader in pre-grow contracts and have supplied many iconic sites including One Central Park Broadway, Wet’n’Wild, and Taronga Zoo. Today, we are managing the plant supply for a new era of iconic Sydney projects including supplying the world’s largest vertical garden at One Central Park on Broadway and producing the stock for Headland Park at Barangaroo. We share this industry experience and knowledge with landscape architecture students. Throughout the years I have presented talks to students on specification standards for assessing tree quality at the Kensington Campus. Each year we open our Kemps Creek Nursery for UNSW Built Environment Landscape Architecture students providing information sessions and demonstrations and giving them an insight into large scale wholesale nursery production. We also provide BE students with nursery operation work experience opportunities. In 2012, Andreasens Green teamed with BE’s Landscape Architecture Program and created five $1000 prizes for excellence in planting design. We are very pleased to be supporting the future of landscape architecture and the education of students in this way.

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My advice to anyone considering a career in landscape architecture would be: be aware that plants are a valuable asset to the landscape and that you need total understanding of their growth, performance, usage, limitations and availability; be willing to work within a nursery and landscape company to gain basic skills on each facet of the physical landscape processes; gain an understanding of the industry standards; and know what to look for, how to look and how to manage trees in the landscape. This knowledge is always advantageous.


Mid year entry

If you are a domestic student*, apply through the University Admissions Centre (UAC) or contact UNSW Admissions Office for more information

Are you thinking of taking 6 months off? BE does not have mid year/ semester 2 entry*, so make sure you enrol for semester 1.

UAC: uac.edu.au UNSW Admissions: unsw.edu.au/futurestudents Email: admissions@unsw.edu.au Phone: +61 (2) 9385 3656 * Domestic students are Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents or New Zealand (NZ) citizens.

International Applicants If you are an international applicant studying for an Australian HSC or equivalent (in Australia or off-shore), the International Baccalaureate (IB) in Australia or the NZ National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) qualification, please apply through UAC International. Applicants currently undertaking the IB offshore may apply via UAC International or Apply Online. All other international applicants should apply directly to the University, via myUNSW. Visit: apply.unsw.edu.au Enquiries can be made to the Direct Admissions Office Email: admissions@unsw.edu.au Phone: +61 (2) 9385 3656

Entry requirements Entry into UNSW is based on your academic performance in senior secondary school or tertiary qualifications, including equivalent overseas qualifications. Alternative entry qualifications may also apply.

Alternative entry If you don’t meet the entry requirements, there are other entry avenues available depending on your situation. Refer to the UNSW website unsw.edu.au/future-students or contact the BE Student Centre for more information.

*Unless you are transferring from another Australian university and have completed the first six months of an equivalent degree. See Transferring from another university or degree for more information.

Bonus Points HSC Plus HSC Plus automatically awards up to five bonus points to your Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) for achievements in subjects relevant to BE degrees. Find out which subjects are relevant and the number of points awarded. Visit: unsw.edu.au/hscplus

Elite Athletes and Performers Program (EAP) The EAP program supports students with a flexible entry process that considers both academic and elite achievements and recognises these through bonus points. If you excel in sport, academia, performance, leadership, and/or music at an elite level, find out if you’re eligible and how to apply. Visit: unsw.edu.au/eap

Educational Disadvantage The ACCESS Scheme is provided for students new to higher education who have experienced long-term educational disadvantage. The ACCESS Scheme allows UNSW to take the circumstances of individual applicants into account when allocating places in undergraduate programs. Visit: unsw.edu.au/access-scheme

Fees and Costs Course fees are charged by the units of credit. Most domestic undergraduate students are Commonwealth Supported, which means the government makes a contribution towards the cost of your education. You also pay a contribution amount, which will vary depending on the course undertaken.

Email: be@unsw.edu.au Phone: +61 (2) 9385 4799

If eligible, you may be able to pay or defer fees through the Higher Education Contribution Scheme HECS-HELP or FEE-HELP.

Transferring from another university or degree

Visit: www.fees.unsw.edu.au or studyassist.gov.au

You can apply for transfer into a UNSW degree after studying at a different university. If you are transferring between universities lodge an application through UAC. Applications are assessed on your overall academic record of study including secondary and post-secondary/university results. To have your university studies considered for admission, you must complete at least one year of full-time study (minimum 0.75 full-time equivalent load) within one degree at your university. UNSW students can apply for another UNSW program through UAC or via the UNSW Internal Program Transfer program (ITP). Visit: unsw.edu.au/ipt

Advanced standing or exemptions on the basis of previous tertiary study will not be determined until an offer of admission has been made.

Depending on what course you choose, you may also have additional costs, such as textbooks, equipment and materials.

Scholarships A wide variety of scholarships and awards are available to support you when you’re starting and throughout your degree. Whether it’s academic, sporting, equity, indigenous rural, degree specific or travel and exchange you can find a scholarship that suits you. Visit: scholarships.unsw.edu.au or be.unsw.edu.au/degrees/scholarships-awards

Admissions

Local Applicants


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Notes


Built Environment The University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052 Australia T: +61 (2) 9385 4799 E: be@unsw.edu.au be.unsw.edu.au

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The UNSW Undergraduate Guide 2015 is printed on environmentally responsible paper stock using environmentally friendly inks.


Undergraduate Guide 2015