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Reviving Mainstreet 2012 DOĂ‘A ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES Design + Planning Assistance Center spring 2012 School of Architecture + Planning University of New Mexico

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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credits + Acknowledgements

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


credits Facilitators NM MainStreet Progam Associates Elmo Baca William Powell, WH Studio, LLC Charlie Deans, Community by Design Downtown Las Cruces Partnership Carrie LaTour, Director Village of Doña Ana Heritage + Preservation Committee Daniel Sambrano, President Jenny Carbajal, Vice President Mary Jane Garcia, NM Senator SA+P Faculty Michaele Pride, Professor of Architecture Susan Frye, Lecturer of Landscape Architecture John Barney, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture Mark Childs, Professor of Architecture + Director of Urban Design Certificate Program Claudia Isaac, Associate Professor of Community + Regional Planning Chris Wilson, Professor of Landscape Architecture + Director of Historic Preservation + Regionalism Certificate Program

SA+P Graduate Students Alexandria Leider, MLA Amy Smith, MARCH Brandon Johnson, MLA Christie Green, MLA Christopher Olivas, MARCH David Vesica, MS ARCH Erin Burtch, MLA Hang Ding, MLA Javan Chapple, MARCH Meredith Ellis, MLA Rachel Bakker, MLA Romila Jogdand, MLA Roxie Carpenter, MLA Sida Li, MLA

Acknowledgements The following institutions and people provided invaluable support and assistance to the Doña Ana and Las Cruces Design Projects and DPAC Studio: New Mexico MainStreet UNM School of Architecture + Planning Downtown Las Cruces Partnership Village of Doña Ana Heritage + Preservation Committee

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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Content

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


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Introduction DPAC + NM MainStreet 2012

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Framework Plan

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Site Solutions 001 Wayfinding, Doña Ana 002 Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Doña Ana 003 Illuminating the Hydro-Landscape, Doña Ana 004 El Camino Real Streetscape, Doña Ana 005 Community Kitchen, Doña Ana 006 Community Courtyard, Doña Ana 007 Wayfinding, Las Cruces 008 Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Las Cruces 009 La Llorona Park, Las Cruces 010 The Cyclery Brew Pub + Bike Shop, Las Cruces 011 Illuminating the Hydro-Landscape, Las Cruces 012 Convergence, Las Cruces 013 Las Placitas de Las Cruces, Las Cruces 014 Scents of Color: Art Walk, Las Cruces 015 Downtown Historic Neighborhood, Las Cruces

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Exploratory Framework plans 001 Celebrating Agri-Cultural Heritage 002 Identity, Arts + Culture 003 Intersecting Sustainability 004 Recreation + Revitalization

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Site Analysis

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APPENDIX DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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introduction

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


INTRODUCTION

DPAC + NM MainStreet 2012

While Doña Ana Village and the City of Las Cruces lie within the same Mesilla Valley, emerge from the same history, and share the same watershed, they are very different places.

Las Cruces has experienced a high rate of population growth in recent years, due largely to its attraction for retirees. Nonetheless, the traditional downtown and Main Street still struggle to attract business and visitors, even as they work to correct the long term effects of their urban renewal era pedestrian mall. Can Main Street become home to the City’s celebrations, by developing an Arts and Culture District and new public spaces?

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

In cooperation with the New Mexico Mainstreet Program and local community organizations, DPAC students held conversations with local stakeholders, studied the communities and their larger context (in person and through secondary sources) to identify assets and challenges, and uncover strategies that build upon the region’s history and existing strengths, preserve and restore valuable ecologies, make the most of scarce resources (water), and make places that are safer and more comfortable for residents, business owners, and visitors alike.

Doña Ana Village hosts the most intact stretch of historic El Camino Real, culminating in the cherished historic church, Our Lady of Purification. Since our first DPAC project there in 2001, a central church plaza has been recreated and a cluster of original adobes are being restored for community use. Yet, the village is also one of 37 HUD-designated Colonias in Doña Ana County, reflecting disproportionate levels of poverty, underdeveloped infrastructure, and substandard housing. Can new development in the Village core help support economic development, while still maintaining a quiet charm for residents?

ANALYSIS

This year (2012), the Studio returned to two previous DPAC communities—Doña Ana Village and downtown Las Cruces. Addressing these communities concurrently this time presented the opportunity to consider how they are connected and the context they share.

Doña Ana Village maintains a strong connection to its Spanish colonial past and agricultural traditions. On the other hand, Las Cruces is the urban hub of Southern New Mexico—a crossroads between north and south, east and west, indigenous peoples and pioneers, cowboys and conquistadors. Nevertheless these communities are interconnected and interdependent.

APPENDIX

The DPAC Studio encourages broad-based thinking about urban design and planning. As Landscape Architects and Architects we collaborate in a process of research, community participation, urban and site inventory, analysis, programming, site planning, design and recommendations for project implementation. We tackle the design process at multiple scales as we consider regional trends and characteristics, transportation issues, economic conditions, unique development and architectural patterns, local history, community climate, and community goals via the stakeholders.

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Michaele Pride, Professor of Architecture

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Research + analysis

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

Alexandria Leider, MLA Rachel Bakker, MLA

002 Civic Services Roxie Carpenter, MLA Sida Li, MLA

003 Zones

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

001 Settlement Patterns + Demographics

ANALYSIS

Javan Chapple, MARCH Christopher Olivas, MARCH

004 Agriculture Christie Green, MLA

005 Ecology

APPENDIX

Brandon Johnson, MLA Romila Jogdand, MLA

006 Movement

David Vesica, MS ARCH Hang Ding, MLA

007 Recreation + Events Amy Smith, MARCH Erin Burtch, MLA

DOĂ‘A ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

ANALYSIS

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

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DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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001

SETTLEMENT PATTERNS + DEMOGRAPHICS LEIDER, MLA BAKKER, MLA


Civic Places of Las Cruces INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS

extention office

Library

Community Centre

Federal Courthouse

County/Women Infant Children (WIC)

Community & Recreation Centre

Plaza

Post Office

City Government

Shopping Mall

School Dona Ana Community Centre

SOLUTIONS US Post Office

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

The Ups Store

Bridge Dublicate Centre

Henry R. Benavidez Centre

City of Las Cruces-Recreation Las Cruces City Government Housing Authority

City Hall

New Mexico State University Post Office

Dona Ana County Extension Services Las Cruces Post Office

The Ups Store

US Post Office

Monte Vista Shopping Centre

ANALYSIS

Munson Senior Centre

Brazito Plaza The Ups Store Solano Square Centrez

APPENDIX

Convention Centre

Mesilla Park Post Office US Post Office Mesilla Post Office

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

US Post Office

Masilla Valley Mall


youth

young women adults

working migrant adults workers retired

senior disabled

food distribution young children women adults youth meals

working migrant adults workers retired

senior disabled

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food distribution social interaction meals social interaction health services in home care

CIVIC SERVICES CARPENTER, MLA LI, MLA

children Village of Dona Ana - services

health services in home care recreation fitness

Laseducation Cruces - services

recreation fitness

gathering space

education

Las Cruces - services gathering space

young children women adults youth

working migrant adults workers retired

senior disabled

food distribution young children meals youth women adults

working migrant adults workers retired

senior disabled

food social distribution interaction meals

health services

social interaction in home care health services recreation fitness in home care education recreationgathering fitness space education DOĂ‘A ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

gathering

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INTRODUCTION

Do単a Ana

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Do単a Ana Historic District

Do単a Ana Village

ANALYSIS APPENDIX 16

Agricultural Area

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


003

ZONES CHAPPLE, MARCH OLIVAS, MARCH

Las Cruces

Downtown Las Cruces

Mesquite District

Alameda Depot District

Industrial Development

Suburban Development

DOĂ‘A ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

ANALYSIS

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

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004

AGRICULTURE GREEN, MLA DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

ANALYSIS

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

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005

ECOLOGY JOHNSON, MLA JOGDAND, MLA DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Transportation: Bus System Public transit service in the region operates in the central portion of Do単a Ana County in the Las Cruces area. Roadrunner Transit is a fixed bus route service with nine local routes. In addition, there are three routes serving the NMSU and DACC main campus and shuttle service from the Mesilla Valley Mall to the DACC East Mesa campus. The New Mexico Department of Transportation provides two regional Park & Ride routes.The Silver route provides service from central Las Cruces and NMSU to White Sands Missile Range. The

Gold route provides service from downtown Las Cruces, NMSU, and Anthony to El Paso, Texas Sun Metro public transit system. Roadrunner Transit also offers curbto-curb service via Dial-A-Ride for persons with eligible disabilities and for eligible senior citizens. Other private and specialized transit services operate in the Las Cruces area.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX Source: City of Las Cruces

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


006

MOVEMENT VESICA, MS ARCH DING, MLA

Transportation: Bicycle System IN-ROAD BICYCLE FACILITES NETWORK Building Complete Streets is an important part of developing a safe and well-connected bicycle network. A tiered bicycle network has been proposed in order to better establish priorities for selecting new bicycle projects and improvements to existing streets. All new thoroughfares should be constructed with in-road bicycle facilities.

Source: City of Las Cruces

DOĂ‘A ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

ANALYSIS

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

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DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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007

RECREATION + EVENTS SMITH, MARCH BURTCH, MLA


schematic frameworks

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


Both communities were very receptive to the ideas that the students brought forward from the community meetings and their research.

001 Celebrating Agri-Cultural Heritage Christie Green, MLA Christopher Olivas, MARCH Meredith Ellis, MLA Roxie Carpenter, MLA

INTRODUCTION ANALYSIS

002 Identity, Arts + Culture

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

The topics explored were Agriculture, Community Identity, Sustainability, and Recreation + Revitalization. Each group looked at ways to enhance the two communities but also how to connect them to the greater valley region.

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

The schematic frameworks were presented to both the Doña Ana and Las Cruces communities on March 23 and 24. During the presentations the community members that attended were given comment sheets and stickers to give feedback and let the students know what schematic projects should be further explored and fully designed.

David Vesica, MS ARCH Rachel Bakker, MLA Romila Jogdand, MLA Sida Li, MLA

APPENDIX

003 Intersecting Sustainability Brandon Johnson, MLA Hang Ding, MLA Javan Chapple, MARCH

004 Recreation + Revitalization Alexandria Leider, MLA Amy Smith, MARCH Erin Burtch, MLA

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

Celebrating Agri-Cultural Heritage

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

The vision of reintroducing traditional agricultural practices as ecological and cultural backbone to the valley, provide the opportunity to proclaim, celebrate and educate about the agri-cultural heritage of Dona Ana and Las Cruces. The celebrations would occur daily and seasonally, participated in by locals and tourists via smalland large scale “Celebration Centers” located in central Dona Ana, along the Dona Ana-Las Cruces country corridor, in downtown Las Cruces and in peripheral connective areas. These agritourism themed connective celebration centers provide opportunities for celebrating pecans, chiles, cotton and heritage vegetables, acequias, New Mexico’s seasonal bounty and agricultural wisdom through model traditional farming methods, harvest festivals, trolley rides, horse-drawn cart rides, heritage crop stands, community kitchen and outdoor cooking plaza, historic El Camino Real Promenade, urban infill gardens, heritage crop food bistros and interactive crop labryinths. Food and traditional food-growing practices are honored and celebrated explicity, visually and actively as proud proclamation of La Mesilla Valley’s rich heritage.

ANALYSIS APPENDIX 28

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Goals • Increase vitality and profitability of Dona Ana and Las Cruces economies through resilient farming practices and agritourism opportunities. • Attract visitors to Dona Ana County with diverse experiences and products offered year round. • Decrease consumption from aquifer as primary water source for development and agriculture while increasing aquifer replenishment opportunities. • Develop construction codes and ordinances requiring use of grey water to flush toilets and harvest precipitation. • Incorporate traditional cultivation techniques as resource conservation strategy and agricultural practice model for arid communities. • Celebrate local culture and agricultural heritage through food, water, fecundity, and festivity.


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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001

CELEBRATING AGRI-CULTURE HERITAGE GREEN, MLA OLIVAS, MARCH ELLIS, MLA CARPENTER, MLA


INTRODUCTION

Identity, Arts + Culture

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

A strong and unique sense of identity is crucial in perceived and economic value of a place to both its citizens, visitors, and business owners. Creating a point of destination must be done with a clear vision, culture, and image. These objectives allow a person to identify with a place’s physical setting, activities, and meaning. The benefit of this approach is an increase in investment and tourism, as well as community development that reinforces local identity and identification of citizens with their city.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 30

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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002

IDENTITY, ARTS + CULTURE VESICA, MS ARCH BAKKER, MLA LI, MLA JOGDAND, MLA


INTRODUCTION

Intersecting Sustainability

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

The city of Las Cruces and the Village of Do単a Ana have both asked for designers to compose plans for the revitalization of their urban cores, in order to do so one must consider the environmental and social impacts of design interventions. The Intersecting Sustainability design seeks to achieve the goals outlined by both Las Cruces and Do単a Ana while putting the cities in sync with their surrounding environments in order to reduce their environmental impacts. In order to do so, 4 primary systems were considered in this design process in order to help the region achieve a sustainable future. -Hydrology + Geomorphology -Climate + Energy -Regional Ecology -Human + Fauna, Health + Access

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 32

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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003

INTERSECTING SUSTAINABILITY JOHNSON, MLA DING, MLA CHAPPLE, MARCH


INTRODUCTION

Recreation + Revitalization

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

By focusing on the creation of trails and nodes, we hope to provide enhanced connections between individual communities in the Mesilla Valley; between communities and the Rio Grande River; between Doña Ana and Las Cruces; between Las Cruces’ historic neighborhoods; and between Main Street Las Cruces and New Mexico State University. We hope to create clearer pathways to these resources while recommending growing the industry to support recreation through the creation of retail stores, bike sheds, bike rentals and places for refreshment and entertainment along walkable and bikeable trails. Downtown Las Cruces will provide bike and trail resources as well as restaurant and entertainment venues along Main Street and in the proposed Plaza space. The block that currently holds the

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 34

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Old City Hall will be redeveloped into a multiuse park. These recreational and entertainment spaces aim to provide reasons for tourists, college students and people of all ages and abilities in the local communities to come to the Historic District of Doña Ana and Main Street Downtown of Las Cruces, and increase the vitality of these spaces. Doña Ana’s Historic District and Main Street Las Cruces will serve as two nodes/destinations along a trail based on El Camino Real and a second trail based along the regional acequia system. The historic buildings in Doña Ana will be developed as a café in conjunction with its community kitchen, a bike and trail resource and an entertainment space for passersby and the local community.


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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004

RECREATION + REVITALIZATION LEIDER, MLA SMITH, MARCH BURTCH, MLA


Framework Plan

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


La Llorona Park, Las Cruces Roxie Carpenter, MLA

INTRODUCTION APPENDIX

ANALYSIS

Las Cruces Projects Page 13

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

This strategic plan for Doña Ana and Las Cruces encourages economic development and tourism and supports community building by celebrating local agriculture, lifestyles, history, and traditions. By using sustainable methods in design we are encouraging and practicing environmental and cultural stewardship and responsibility, and ultimately providing comfortable places that cater to residents and visitors of all ages and backgrounds.

SOLUTIONS

Framework Goals + Strategies

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Doña Ana Projects Page 12

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 38

Wayfinding, Doña Ana Alexandria Leider, MLA + Rachel Bakker, MLA Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Doña Ana Christie Green, MLA Illuminating the HydroLandscape, Doña Ana Brandon Johnson, MLA + Hang Ding, MLA El Camino Real Streetscape, Doña Ana David Vesica, MS ARCH Community Kitchen, Doña Ana Christopher Olivas, MARCH Community Courtyard, Doña Ana Meredith Ellis, MLA

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Proposed Doña Ana - Las Cruces Trolley Route Proposed Doña Ana - Las Cruces Trolley Stops


The Cyclery Brew Pub + Bike Shop, Las Cruces Amy Smith, MARCH Illuminating the HydroLandscape, Las Cruces Brandon Johnson, MLA + Hang Ding, MLA

Proposed Doña Ana - Las Cruces Trolley Route Proposed Doña Ana - Las Cruces Trolley Stops

FF

Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Las Cruces Christie Green, MLA

Proposed Bike Trail

FINAL FRAMEWORKS LEIDER, MLA, BAKKER, MLA

Wayfinding, Las Cruces Alexandria Leider, MLA + Rachel Bakker, MLA

Convergence, Las Cruces Javan Chapple, MARCH Las Placitas de Las Cruces, Las Cruces Erin Burtch, MLA Scents of Color: Art Walk, Las Cruces Sida Li, MLA Downtown Historic Neighborhood Corridor, Las Cruces Romila Jogdand, MLA

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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Site Solutions

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS

001 Wayfinding, Doña Ana Alexandria Leider, MLA + Rachel Bakker, MLA 002 Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Doña Ana Christie Green, MLA

004 El Camino Real Streetscape, Doña Ana David Vesica, MS ARCH 005 Community Kitchen, Doña Ana Christopher Olivas, MARCH 006 Community Courtyard, Doña Ana Meredith Ellis, MLA 007 Wayfinding, Las Cruces Alexandria Leider, MLA + Rachel Bakker, MLA 008 Comun: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad, Las Cruces Christie Green, MLA 009 La Llorona Park, Las Cruces Roxie Carpenter, MLA

ANALYSIS

010 The Cyclery Brew Pub + Bike Shop, Las Cruces Amy Smith, MARCH

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

003 Illuminating the Hydro-Landscape, Doña Ana Brandon Johnson, MLA + Hang Ding, MLA

011 Illuminating the Hydro-Landscape, Las Cruces Brandon Johnson, MLA + Hang Ding, MLA

APPENDIX

012 Convergence, Las Cruces Javan Chapple, MARCH 013 Las Placitas de Las Cruces, Las Cruces Erin Burtch, MLA 014 Scents of Color: Art Walk, Las Cruces Sida Li, MLA 015 Downtown Historic Neighborhood Corridor, Las Cruces Romila Jogdand, MLA DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

wayfinding

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Wayfinding is an important tool to increase the accessibility of a place to both its residents and visitors. Landmarks, signage, pathways, and environmental cues help people navigate their surroundings by situating them in the larger whole. These cues will become a coherent system that seamlessly connects the destination points, and is aesthetically appropriate to the identity of the area. This system will create a positive impression and sense of security, comfort, and well-being.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Areas of Opportunity • Identify corridors to access Doña Ana within the Mesilla Valley and from the interstate, by identifying crucial signage points to direct and inform the user. • Showcase destination points and places within the historic district through a series of historic informational signage. • Identify recreational routes along the acequia and develop a signing program to inform and direct. • Identify needs for lighting to identify corridors and increase safety. • Using wayfinding devices to make the historic district accessible to multilingual and handicapped persons through contrasting colors pictorial imagery, and a scaled high relief map of the El Camino Real historic area.

ANALYSIS APPENDIX Jumpstart Project - Billboard Marketing

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DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


Recreational Signage

Acequia Promenade

1 10 mi

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Info

001

Lightpole Banner

WAYFINDING ALEXANDRIA LEIDER, MLA + RACHEL BAKKER, MLA DOÑA ANA

Historic Destination Information Signs

Doña Ana Historic District Interactive Map

Vehicle Directional Signage

Lightpole Banners + Pedestrian Directional Signs

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Com炭n: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad Un Cuento de Como las Acequias Se Alimentan La Vida Communal: Headgates, Food and Community A Story of How Acequias Nourish Life

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Acequias, the historic lifeline of communities and agricultural production in New Mexico, persist as meandering elements in our landscape that supply water, sustenance and cultural connection to times and lifestyles past. Common respect for and replenishment of this precious water resource shaped traditional landscapes and communities. Spanish language, crops, cultivation practices and traditional food dishes coevolved in relationship with the acequia. Words spoken, rows tilled and irrigated, crops harvested, prepared, cooked and shared at celebratory fiestas were borne from the acequia.

ANALYSIS

Do単a Ana, New Mexico, the oldest traditional village in southern New Mexico, embraces the acequia as source of sustenance and community connector. Do単a Ana residents communicate in Spanish, grow food, share recipes and celebratory feasts, continuing cultivation and culinary traditions of centuries past. The agri-cultural heritage lives and breathes in the homes and fields along the acequia. Typical Entrada

APPENDIX 44

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

With the intention of preserving, educating, and celebrating these traditions centered around the acequia, an edible acequia paseo with small nicho gardens along the way, offers demonstration gardens for locals and visitors. These gardens, situated in connective areas between Do単a Ana and Las Cruces, are organized according to traditional recipes and stories of traditional food and agricultural methods, practices, ingredients and lore. The voice and vehicle for expressing, sharing and celebrating these stories is food grown with acequia water. Visitors may listen to and read Spanish-spoken stories and recipes at the Entradas where shady respite offers a glimpse into local heritage. Here, you are invited to stroll, taste, listen, learn and rejoice in sustenance and story!

Acequia Paseo


Doña Ana

Entrada Capulin

Downtown Las Cruces

002

COMUN: COMPUERTAS, COMIDA Y COMMUNIDAD CHRISTIE GREEN, MLA DOÑA ANA

Rural Pathway

Entrada de La Joya y Jardin de Chicos

La Joya

Jardin de Chicos

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

illuminating the hydro-landscape

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

In southern New Mexico, the combination of infrequent and intense precipitation leads to an abundance of water quality issues within the region. The Village of Doña Ana and the City of Las Cruces are uniquely positioned to address issues regarding water quality and management in the region. By studying and analyzing regional agents, a creative and effective management plan can be implemented to reduce the environmental impact of development in the region. The plan detailed in this project explores a variety of strategies for addressing water quality issues within the corridor.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Watershed Management Doña Ana’s rural context lends itself to a restorative approach management plan. Because the village is sited along the Doña Ana Arroyo, the village suffers from serious erosion issues that contribute to the rapid incising of tributary and soil loss. The proposed management plan seeks to reduce the effects of

intense runoff throughout the site with a plan that strategically uses vegetation and other natural mediums to reduce the waters velocity, allow suspended sediment to drop from the tributaries load, allow water infiltration, and remove any pollutants that may have entered the flow of water from upstream. Circulating Infrastructure The site located to the north-west of the church and plaza has potential far beyond its current use as a detention pond and overflow parking area for events and festivities within the village. The design proposal seeks to remediate some of the issues the community has stated while acknowledging the function of the site and creating a pleasurable experience for the community and visitors.

1

ANALYSIS

Watershed Management Strategies - Weirs and baffles are used to cause the tributaries to meander that flow through the site. - Detention ponds are used to reduce the water’s velocity, allow it to stop and pool in specific locations. - Additionally, the detention ponds allow the water to infiltrate the soil. - The detention pond also serves as a waterfall to celebrate the rare rainfall events and when inactive, serve as murals and a climbing wall to provide an aesthetic and recreational experience for the community.

APPENDIX 46

2

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


ILLUMINATING THE HYDRO-LANDSCAPE BRANDON JOHNSON, MLA HANG DING, MLA DOÑA ANA

003

Open Space - Watershed Management

Circulation Diagram

Circulating Infrastructure Plan + Sections

1

2

Parking Diagram

B

B’

C

C’

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

El Camino Real Streetscape

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Opportunity • To increase the accessibilty of Doña Ana’s rich cultural and architectural heritage for visitors and local residents to enjoy and experience. • To further enhance the historic architectural narrative. • To promote local economic development and employment opportunities for the village residents.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Design Strategies • Strengthen the historical experience and physical identity of the Camino Real route along Cristo Ray Road by implementing historically sensitive streetscape elements. Fostering historic infrastructure and economic development. • Construct a community kitchen as part of the Cultural Heritage complex to promote locally produced food products, agri business, cultural

identity and local economic opportunities. The producers can pay for kitchen use by producing food products to be sold in the cafe and gift shop. Renovate the historic Wertheim (pink buildings) buildings, one to house a cafe that promotes local traditional food and its culture, and the other to continue its historic use as a retail store to sell locally produced arts and crafts and food products. Both functions supporting the community kitchen food production use, and stimulate local economic development and cultural awareness.

Jumpstart Project-Historic Village Entry Marquee

ANALYSIS APPENDIX trellis with grape vines

48

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

proposed cafe

proposed gift shop

existing cultrural heritage center


004

DAVID VESICA, MS ARCH DOÑA ANA

EL CAMINO REAL STREETSCAPE

Proposed Tree Lined Entry + Historic Village Marquee

Proposed Streetscape Design

existing historic adobe residences

new adobe wall historic street edge

trellis with grape vines

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

Community Kitchen

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

The Doùa Ana Community Kitchen and Cafe fuses architecture with landscape. Heritage and culture are used to create an experiential architecture that unfolds for visitors, through each individual’s movement through space and time. The new Community Kitchen and Cafe will engage the existing De La O Visitor Center buildings. As visitors move through the historic site they will experience both 17th and 21st century architecture and landscape, with different views into the new green courtyard. Rather than an addition of a mass, the new elements exist in complementary contrast with the original 1800s architecture.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

The Design As you enter the first courtyard from Cristo del Rey Rd, visitors will pass between two of the existing buildings. Over the entrance will be a wooden trellis that extends into the green courtyard, from there visitors will see the community kitchen; as you walk through this greenscape you will also see the cafe that serves and sells local food made in the kitchen. At night the courtyards will be lighted, drawing visitors to the events and activities going on in these courtyards.

Jumpstart Project-Pergola ANALYSIS APPENDIX 50

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Cafe and Community Kitchen with Planted Courtyard

Courtyard from Beneath Jumpstart Pergola Project

Cafe Courtyard


005

COMMUNITY KITCHEN CHRISTOPHER OLIVAS, MARCH DOÑA ANA

Community Kitchen Interior

Community Kitchen + Cafe Floor Plan

Environmental Diagram/Site Section

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

51


INTRODUCTION

Community Courtyard

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Community is the most fundamental aspect of Doña Ana. It is the life and vitality of the town. The heart of Doña Ana is a sacred place, containing historic buildings, traditions, and relics along El Camino Reál. With the changing of technology, and new behaviors, there is a sense of disconnect with the old traditions and with family. There is a disconnect with our roots. I propose a place that is designed for community member to come together.

SOLUTIONS

The space behind the historic buildings presents the perfect place for a traditional courtyard that can hold community gatherings and celebrations. It will provide a sense of place for the people of Dona Ana, and give purpose to the surrounding buildings. There should be a sense of comfort, happiness and food; there should be family and friends. The community courtyard is designed to serve this function in a basic way and a traditional way.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Jumpstart Project - Banco With Community Made Tiles

ANALYSIS APPENDIX 52

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


Church Parking Lot on Sunday Morning

Saturday Flea Market in Church Parking Lot

Celebration on the low stage

Community Garden + Seating Area

006

COMMUNITY COURTYARD MEREDITH ELLIS, MLA DOÑA ANA

Community Courtyard, Church Parking Lot, + Community Garden Aerial View

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

53


INTRODUCTION

Wayfinding

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Wayfinding is an important tool to increase the accessibility of a city to both its residents and visitors. Landmarks, signage, pathways, and environmental cues help people navigate their surroundings by situating them in the larger whole. These cues will become a coherent system that seamlessly connects the destination points, and is aesthetically appropriate to the identity of the area. This system will create a positive impression and sense of security, comfort, and well-being.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Areas of Opportunity • Identify corridors to access downtown Las Cruces and the Mesilla Valley, and crucial signage points to direct and inform the user. • Within the downtown and historic district, identify destination points and a network of routes between those points. • Identify critical wayfinding points along the interstate and introduce elements to direct visitors to downtown • Identify recreational routes and develop a signing program to inform and direct • Identify needs for lighting to identify corridors and increase safety. • Create gateways/celebrated entries into downtown and historic district. • Using wayfinding devices to make the downtown and historic district accessible to multilingual and handicapped persons through contrasting colors and pictorial imagery.

ANALYSIS APPENDIX Jumpstart Project - Billboard Marketing

54

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Museums / Theatres Branigan Cultural Center Museum of Art

Sites / Architecture Cemetery Churches

Museum of Natural History

Historic Churches/ Historic Church Sites

Railroad Museum

Historic Buildings/ Historic Sites

Black Box Theater Community Theater Rio Grande Theater

Transportation Bike Lockers Bus Stop

Civic Amenities United States Post Office

Transportation Center Bus and Trolley Stop Trolley Stop

Library Federal Courthouse

Parking

Las Cruces City Hall

Information Kiosk

Police Department

Public Restrooms


Bicycle Route Signage

007

Recreational Signage

WAYFINDING ALEXANDRIA LEIDER, MLA + RACHEL BAKKER, MLA LAS CRUCES

Lightpole Signage

Vehicle Directional Signage

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Pica

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Klein Park

Pioneer Women’s Park

Gateway

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Amad

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Street Legend Symbols Legend+ Destinations Map Main Street Downtown Districts

Doña Ana

Thorpe

Mesquite Street Historic District

Historic Churches/ Historic Church Sites

Commercial District

hor Tels iz Triv

Historic Buildings/ Historic Sites Acequia Promenade Trolley Line

Transportation Picacho

10

2

Bike Lockers

3 Bus Stop

5

an Lohm

11

Amador

Telshor

9

6

Missouri

Pas

Transportation Center Bus and Trolley Stop

El eo

United States Post Office

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Civic Amenities

70

unner adr Ro

Ma in

Alameda Depot District

Churches

Ana

Rio Grande Theater

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Dona

Cemetery

Black Box Theater Community Theater

Hig

Real

Railroad Museum

Sites / Architecture

I-25

Museum of Natural History

Sign Family

amino El C

Museum of Art

Rey

Branigan Cultural Center

Del

Museums / Theatres

1

Mai

I-10

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Trolley Stop Library

University

8 7

Federal Courthouse Las Cruces City Hall

M

4 Mesilla

Information Kiosk

M way

Public Restrooms

28

Police Department

New Mexico State University

High

M

M

Parking

Las Cruces City Hall

8 min

12

Transportation Center Branigan Cultural Center Community Theater

Parking

5 min

3 min

5 min

Parking

uce

Spr

Rio Grande Theater Public Restrooms

o

Picach

Bike Lockers Espina

Lions Park

Parking s

Las Cruce

Information Kiosk

da

Alame

Main

Griggs

Klein Park

Pioneer Women’s Park

Amador Lohman

Doña Ana Thorpe

1 Del Rey

Sites / Architecture

way High

Ana

Alameda Depot District Mesquite Street Historic District Commercial District

Museums / Theatres

Roadrunner

Main

Churches Historic Churches/ Historic Church Sites

Telshor Triviz

Historic Buildings/ Historic Sites Acequia Promenade

Branigan Cultural Center

Trolley Line

Museum of Art

Transportation

Sites / Architecture Cemetery

Alameda Depot District

Churches

Mesquite Street Historic District

Historic Churches/ Historic Church Sites

Commercial District

Picacho

10

2

Bike Lockers

3 Bus Stop

El

Valley

Paseo

Museum of Natural History

5

Missouri

Railroad Museum 6

Library

University

Community Theater

8 7

Information Kiosk Public Restrooms

4 Mesilla

New Mexico State University

Rio Grande Theater

Civic Amenities 12

Acequia Promenade Trolley Line

Transportation Bike Lockers Bus Stop

28

Parking

Las Cruces City Hall Police Department

Highway

Federal Courthouse

Historic Buildings/ Historic Sites

Black Box Theater

n Mai

I-10

Trolley Stop

Lohman

11

Amador

9

Transportation Center Bus and Trolley Stop

r Telsho

United States Post Office

70

Dona

Cemetery

Real

Railroad Museum Black Box Theater Community Theater Rio Grande Theater

I-25

Branigan Cultural Center Museum of Art Museum of Natural History

El Camino

Museums / Theatres

Civic Amenities

United States Post Office

Transportation Center Bus and Trolley Stop Trolley Stop

Library Federal Courthouse

Parking

Las Cruces City Hall

Information Kiosk

Police Department

Public Restrooms

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

55


INTRODUCTION FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Com炭n: Compuertas, Comida y Communidad Un Cuento de Como las Acequias Se Alimentan La Vida Communal: Headgates, Food and Community A Story of How Acequias Nourish Life

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Acequias, the historic lifeline of communities and agricultural production in New Mexico, persist as meandering hydrating elements in our landscape that supply water, sustenance and cultural connection to times and lifestyles past. Common respect for and replenishment of this precious water resource shaped traditional landscapes and communities. Spanish language, crops, cultivation practices and traditional food dishes coevolved in relationship with the acequia. Words spoken, rows tilled and irrigated, crops harvested, prepared, cooked and shared at celebratory fiestas were borne from the acequia.

ANALYSIS

Do単a Ana, New Mexico, the oldest traditional village in southern New Mexico embraces the acequia as source of sustenance and community connector. Do単a Ana residents communicate in Spanish, grow food, share recipes and celebratory feasts, continuing cultivation and culinary traditions of centuries past. The agri-cultural heritage lives and breathes in the homes and fields along the acequia. Jardin del Agua

APPENDIX 56

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

With the intention of preserving, educating, and celebrating these traditions centered around the acequia, an edible acequia paseo with small nicho gardens along the way, offers demonstration gardens for locals and residents. These gardens, situated in connective areas between Do単a Ana and Las Cruces, are organized according to traditional recipes and stories of traditional food and agricultural methods, practices, ingredients and lore. The voice and vehicle for expressing, sharing and celebrating these stories is food grown with acequia water. Visitors may listen to and read Spanish-spoken stories and recipes at the Entradas where shady respite offers a glimpse into local heritage. Here, you are invited to stroll, taste, listen, learn and rejoice in sustenance and story! Urban Pathways


COMUN: COMPUERTAS, COMIDA Y COMMUNIDAD CHRISTIE GREEN, MLA LAS CRUCES

Jardin del Agua

008

Doña Ana

Downtown Las Cruces

Jardin del Coración Doña Ana

Downtown Las Cruces

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

57


INTRODUCTION

LA LLORONA PARK

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Concept - Deceleration La Llorona Park is uniquely situated as one of the few riverfront parks on the legendary Rio Grande. It is a place where one can quietly contemplate the mesmerizing flow that brings life to the surrounding Chihuahuan Desert. As the slowing currents of a gradually dwindling Rio Grande allow sediments to settle out, they also support a higher density of species in and along its banks.

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Strategy The density of species will be increased by providing a variety of habitats including: playa (areas of periodic inundation), permanent wetland, and Chihuahuan Desert. It is especially important to provide a corridor of habitat for the many species that migrate through this region, their numbers have dwindled as it has been extensively developed for urban and agricultural uses. The proposed design will provide shade, amenities for human travelers, who use a variety of transportation methods, activities for children and the young at heart, and habitat educational opportunities. Access to the Rio Grande will be preserved, and sustainable practices will be employed.

Interactive Wetland Model

Jumpstart Project - Native Plantings Large Shrubs (10’x10’) Whitethorn Acacia - Acacia constrica Southern Chokecherry - Prunus serotina

ANALYSIS

Medium Shrubs (5’x5’) Four Wing Saltbush - Atriplex canescens Sand Sage - Artemisia filifolia Mormon Tea - Ephedra aspera Rock Sage - Salvia pinquifolia

APPENDIX 58

Gabion Maze

Small Shrubs (2’x2’) Turpentine Bush - Ericameria laricifolia Scrub Live Oak - Quercus turbinella Broomweed - Gutierrezia sarothrae Desert Four O’ Clock - Mirabilis multiflora

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

59

009

LA LLORONA PARK ROXIE CARPENTER, MLA LAS CRUCES


INTRODUCTION

The Cyclery Brew Pub + Bike Shop

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

There is a unique opportunity in Las Cruces to draw the community together over recreation activities, and enjoyment of the beautiful natural environment. Downtown Las Cruces is in the center of these activities and will be a focal point for the existing and proposed trail systems. The project will welcome the community and create a gathering place that was lost after urban renewal as well as provide much needed connections.

Jumpstart Project

Bike Station Bike Lockers

SOLUTIONS EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

The Cyclery is designed as a retrofit for a cityowned building that will become a hub for existing and proposed trails. The principle design concept is to provide downtown a place where families and trail users can gather, a rooftop view to the Organ Mountains, bike and canoe rentals, and a place that can house events such as weekend workshops, special festivities, summer movie nights, and races.

Organ Mountain Bike Locker 74.5”

74.5” 40.0”

Proposed Bike Route from Downtown Las Cruces to La Llorona Park Main

Bike Racks

ho Picac

Church

Water

s Griggs

da

2

ey Vall

Park

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

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49.0”

40.0”

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ANALYSIS 60

Bike Racks Water Fountain

The proposed bike trail from downtown to the Rio Grande will enhance downtown’s connection to the rest of the city. The trail goes through the historic Alameda Depot Neighborhood, to Hadley Street, and on to the river.

####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### ####### Bike Shop (Parking Lot) Facade ####### ####### ####### ####### #######

Map Storage

r Amado

Brew Pub (Main Street) Facade


010

View From Water Street

THE CYCLERY BREW PUB + BIKE SHOP AMY SMITH, MARCH LAS CRUCES

View From Main Street

2nd Floor Plan

1st Floor Plan

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

61


INTRODUCTION

illuminating the hydro-landscape

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

In southern New Mexico, the combination of infrequent and intense precipitation leads to an abundance of water quality issues within the region. The village of Doña Ana and the city of Las Cruces are uniquely positioned to address issues regarding water quality and management in the region. By studying and analyzing regional agents, a creative and effective management plan can be developed and implemented to reduce the environmental impact of development in the region. The plan detailed in this project explores a variety of strategies for addressing water quality issues within the corridor established.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Streetscape Intervention Because of Las Cruces urban context, the development of large swaths of land for the purpose of remediating and filtering the water is unfeasable. Downtown Las Cruces is also noted as a non-point source pollutant area. Thus, the most practical design strategy is to use the existing street corridors to interrupt the flow of water, and serve as a living filter between urban surfaces and natural systems that flow through the region. As water moves off roofs, parking lots, and streets, sidewalks could be designed to allow the water to be filtered by phyto-remediating plants.

ANALYSIS

Remeidating - Parking

APPENDIX 62

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Design Strategies • Use curb cuts to allow street surface water to enter swales along the streets, to be cleaned of non-organic pollutants and hydrocarbons that have built up on the roads surface. • Partitioning a portion of the sidewalk, digging swales into the sidewalks, and covering them with metal grates to allow surface water from roofs and other surfaces on city blocks to be cleaned, with the potential for infiltration before moving further down stream. • Using different types of vegetation on the primary slope direction of the east-west axis to help with soil stabilization and hydraulic control. • Using vegetation on the north-south axis as a buffer to remove pollutants from the streets, before it has the chance to move further downstream with a suspended load of pollutants.


011

ILLUMINATING THE HYDRO-LANDSCAPE BRANDON JOHNSON, MLA HANG DING, MLA LAS CRUCES

Remeidiating - Parking

Retaining What’s Urban

Retaining What’s Urban

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

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INTRODUCTION

Convergence

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

The Parking Lot Dilemma Parking is an essential requirement for a successful commercial space to thrive; however its common implementation is extremely detrimental to the environment and consumes excessive amounts of real estate. A parking structure should provide adequate parking while reversing its environmental impacts to that of a positive influence. The goal of this project is to rethink the demand of highdensity parking and find a better solution, one that will promote positive environmental conditions and atmosphere while simultaneously promoting economic development.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

Project Direction Short-term project direction is to revisit existing parking lots and transform them into green spaces; in order to counteract the current negative environmental impacts and create enjoyable spaces for increased downtown usage. The repurposing of existing parking lots will be impossible without addressing the need of parking, which will be done by multi-level parking structures strategically positioned around downtown. They will be situated strategically to retain parking convenience while fueling further economic development downtown. Long-term direction is the eventual redevelopment of these now available green spaces into mixeduse commercial/retail space, greatly aiding the revitalization efforts of downtown Las Cruces.

ANALYSIS APPENDIX 64

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Jumpstart Project - Parking Lot Redesign


012

CONVERGENCE JAVAN CHAPPLE, MARCH LAS CRUCES Southeast Corner Isometric View

Central Plaza

Section Looking North

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

65


INTRODUCTION

Las Placitas de Las Cruces

FINAL FRAMEWORKS SOLUTIONS

Vision The creation of several small plazas will help downtown to become a center for community gatherings and celebrations, as well as a companion destination to events happening all over the Las Cruces region. Events can happen anywhere. The development of several small Placitas within the Las Cruces Downtown Mall will provide creative permanent spaces and fluctuating larger spaces that can facilitate events of varying sizes. A placita can host a singular event or be one of a series of venues spread throughout downtown, allowing the entire mall to function as a plaza. Jumpstart Project - Folding Stages for Fluctuating Spaces

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 66

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


013

LAS PLACITAS DE LAS CRUCES ERIN BURTCH, MLA LAS CRUCES Permanent Placitas

St Genevieve’s Placita

The Actor’s Placita

Musician’s Placita

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

67


INTRODUCTION

Sense of Color: Art Walk

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Color represents the diverse culture of Las Cruces. The iridescent color is an important identity marker of Las Cruces, and the design is intended to address it. Color is carefully used to create a visual connection and continuity between the two historic neighborhoods.

SOLUTIONS

The Art Walk itself would become an attraction to mingle with people from different cultures. By trying to preserve and utilize the existing structures, the potential of the space is discovered. Sustainability is the discipline of the design, and light structures are prioritized to pay respect to the site. Interactivity is promoted to create a fun place for people to go, and create a vivid indoor atmosphere.

Jumpstart Project - Shades EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS ANALYSIS APPENDIX 68

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Crosswalk


014

SCENTS OF COLOR: ART WALK SIDA LI, MLA LAS CRUCES

Outdoor Gallery

Rainbow Wall

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

69


INTRODUCTION

Downtown Historic Neighborhood Corridor

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

The walking tour is like a treasure hunt that starts at the Rio Grande Theatre and continues along Griggs Ave. The “game” leads players from historic building to historic building, providing information about the buildings along the way. This corridor creates a connection between the two historic neighborhoods, enhancing the vernacular, cultural, and historic identity of the neighborhoods as they merge together in downtown, where they become more contemporary.

SOLUTIONS

Design Elements • Pedestrian friendly streets.

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

• Grower’s Market Encourage Grower’s Market along east-west corridor. • Plaza street Include the surrounding open spaces into the street. Jumpstart Project - Electronic Walking Tour Signs

ANALYSIS APPENDIX 70

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

Corridor Enhancements of the Mesquite District


015

DOWNTOWN HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD CORRIDOR ROMILA JOGDAND, MLA LAS CRUCES

Griggs Ave Between Main St + Church St

Typical Section of Griggs Ave

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

71


APPENDIX

72

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


APPENDIX

ANALYSIS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

USGS Maps Las Cruces Visitor’s Guide Google Earth

INTRODUCTION

Doña Ana Plaza Plan, DPAC 2001 Doña Ana Visioning Process, Resource Center for Raza Planning 2001 Downtown Las Cruces, Metropolitan Redevelopment Area (MRA) Plan, New Mexico Mainstreet + Community by Design 2007 Las Cruces Downtown Revitalization, Comprehensive Urban Design and Planning Services, Sites Southwest 2007 Design Principles For Downtown Revitalization: Las Cruces, NM, DPAC 2008

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

Resources

DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

73


INTRODUCTION

FINAL FRAMEWORKS

SOLUTIONS

EXPLORATORY FRAMEWORKS

ANALYSIS

APPENDIX

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012

74


DOÑA ANA + LAS CRUCES COMMUNITIES

75


Book Designed by: Rachel Bakker + Alexandria Leider

76

DPAC STUDIO SPRING 2012


DPAC Las Cruces Doña Ana