__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

1


Cover: (Detail) Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke Crow, b. 1981), Rez Car 2, 2010, two-color lithograph, 22.5” x 30” On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Collaborating printer: Frank Janzen.

2


Indelible Ink : Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration University of New Mexico Art Museum February 7 - May 8, 2020

Curated by Mary Statzer, Ph.D. UNMAM Curator of Prints and Photographs Curatorial assistance and design by Jackson Larson

3


4


Contents: I. The Artists Julie Buffalohead Andrea Carlson Dyani White Hawk Ramona Sakiestewa Sara Siestreem Juane Quick-to-See Smith Wendy Red Star Marie Watt Emmi Whitehorse II. The Collaborators Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Fourth Dimension Studio Highpoint Editions Sister Black Press Tamarind Institute III. The Exhibition Checklist

5


In 2019, Native women artists received long overdue recognition for their contributions both regionally and nationally. Joy Harjo was appointed the US Poet Laureate, the 99th Annual Indian Market in Santa Fe honored the resilience of Native women, and a major exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists, demonstrated that women “have been at the forefront of Native art from the beginning of remembered time.â€? Indelible Ink: Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration continues to celebrate Native women artists and acknowledges their impact on printmaking and creative partnerships. The women in this exhibition embrace traditional and contemporary approaches to their life and artwork. They explore the dualities of their existence such as being biracial and bicultural as well as confronting racism and prejudice with unflinching honesty and humor. Many of them directly address the long and violent histories Indigenous people in the United States have endured. Overall, this multi-generational group of women boldly reveals their personal truths and, in the process, offers insight into the complexities of our shared world. ⎯ Mary Statzer

6


1. The Artists

7


8


9


Julie Buffalohead

Julie Buffalohead (Ponca, b. 1972), Fox Tussle, 2015, two-color lithograph, 23” x 35” Courtesy of Highpoint Center for Printmaking and the Artist. Collaborating printers: Zac Adams-Bliss, Cole Rogers, Megan Anderson, Kate Goyette.

Julie Buffalohead on storytelling and narrative: I started out making large figurative works in oil paint. As I progressed over the years, different things influenced me and I spent a lot of time doing research on Native storytelling. I was interested in my own tribal stories and I was fascinated with how Native people saw animals. They weren’t things. They were beings that were on equal standing

with humans, as well as plants, rocks, and other things. I always thought about those stories, what they mean and what they reflect about Native life and culture. I started exploring that more in the last ten years, but my fascination with the figure still exists. It comes and goes in the work. Sometimes I can bring a human figure into the work and it changes the storyline significantly enough for me to keep it there, and then

10

sometimes the story is more about the presence of animals and what they’re trying to describe. Basically, my work is all narrative.

“It’s this idea that the two figures represent two sides of myself – the two cultures that I come from and the intermixing of the two cultures.” -JULIE BUFFALOHEAD


Julie Buffalohead (Ponca, b. 1972), The Trickster Showdown, 2015, lithograph and screenprinting, 27.5” x 56” Courtesy of Highpoint Center for Printmaking and the Artist. Collaborating printers: Zac Adams-Bliss, Cole Rogers, Megan Anderson, Nuno Nuñez, Kate Goyette.

Buffalohead on The Trickster Showdown: I made nine prints at Highpoint Center for Printmaking. The Trickster Showdown was probably the one I spent the longest time on. I had been thinking a lot at that time in my life about issues of being biracial, being from my father’s Native side and my mother’s European side. I was thinking a lot about how people who come from two different cultures never really feel like they’re a part of either one. At least that’s how I felt. I grew up Native

and that’s the culture that my parents raised me in, but I was always aware that I didn’t look like my father and, in some ways, I didn’t fit in. There was this pain in me that there were always two things battling within me. As a teenager, I rejected my culture and then came back to it. I think The Trickster Showdown is sort of about that. It’s this idea that the two figures represent two sides of myself – the two cultures that I come from and the intermixing of the two cultures. I have a tendency to represent dichotomies in my work, one

11

side or the other side, things sort of against each other. I compare that to Native philosophy and how we don’t really see things like good and evil or black and white. There is grey that exists. I use this idea that you are not just one or the other, rather you are a mixture of all these things, and it’s okay to have faults, and okay to want to be perfect. My work ends up being about recognizing different parallels and then blending them in one piece so that they harmonize in some way.


Andrea Carlson

Andrea Carlson (Ojibwe, b. 1979), Exit, 2019, screenprint, 33� x 47.75.� Courtesy of Highpoint Center for Printmaking and the Artist. Collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson, Josh Bindewald.

Andrea Carlson on the advantages and challenges of working with a collaborating printer: It was a generous gift. Cole Rogers, who is the founding director and master printer at Highpoint Center for Printmaking, is an excellent communicator. I explained my painting process and some of the effects I liked, and he reverse-engineered

and translated how some of these effects could be accomplished with screen printing. I could trust that my work was in excellent hands, and I wanted to make something that would impress and challenge them. The biggest challenge was knowing that I had made a bad color choice, or something like that, and asking them to change it. They were more than happy

12

to accommodate this when we were proofing, but I felt bad about the lost labor. They were constantly reassuring me that this process was normal and that the expectations of this process was to make changes. I couldn’t help but think of all the labor and material costs associated with making the prints. It was such an enormous gift.


Andrea Carlson (Ojibwe, b. 1979), Anti-Retro, 2018, screenprint, 33” x 47.75.” Courtesy of Highpoint Center for Printmaking and the Artist. Collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson, Josh Bindewald.

Carlson speaks to how the prints in this exhibition are in dialogue with her other work:

I wanted the content to reflect that resilience of propagation. I made them to be sigils that work against loss and scarcity, using the multiple to promote the idea of a robust and plentiful culture. There is an Indigenous fear of losing our things and cultures. These prints address that fear.

Anti-Retro and Exit are related to my other works because they pick up on themes of land and impositions of colonial narratives and erasures. I took on some different content for the prints because they are made in multiples, so they have the ability to be displayed in more than one place at a time. There is something resilient about that, whereas, painting seems more vulnerable. Since one of these images can be in more than one place at a time,

“There is an Indigenous fear of losing our things and cultures. These prints address that fear.” -ANDREA CARLSON

13


Dyani White Hawk Dyani White Hawk explains the meaning of the print suite Takes Care of Them:

create, nurture, protect, and lead in ways that have taught me what it means to be a good relative.

Inspired by Plains style women’s dentalium dresses, the set speaks to the ways in which Native women collectively care for our communities. Through acts of creation, nurturing, leadership, love, and protection carried out in infinite forms, our grandmothers, aunties, sisters, cousins, nieces, and friends collectively care for our communities. As a suite, these works speak to the importance of kinship roles and tribal structures that emphasize the necessity of extended family, tribal and communal ties as meaningful and significant relationships necessary for the rearing of healthy and happy individuals and communities.

White Hawk discusses collaboration and being in conversation with family and friends about her work: When I’m trying to relate a specific concept that is rooted in cultural knowledge or understanding, I speak with friends and family to make sure I am communicating clearly and adhering to communal understandings of Lakota world-views. Sometimes I use Lakota language for titles to really get at what I’m trying to express. When doing so, I often seek guidance. For the Takes Care of Them suite, I visited with three different relatives to discuss and select the right titles for the works. Even when it is only my hands creating a piece, it is not solo work. My work is merely part of a greater lineage, made possible by the people before, and surrounding me today. In particular, with printmaking, there were many skilled hands that worked together to create these pieces. These prints would not exist without that important collaboration.

The idea for this suite of four dresses came from the practice of requesting four veterans to stand in each cardinal direction for protection when particular ceremonies are taking place. My mother is a veteran. In thinking through the ways that the women in our lives stand guard, protect, and nurture our well-being, the idea for this set of four was born. Each print is individually named with a quality that embodies the ways they care for us all. Yet, this list of qualities could go on and on, and each person carries multiple roles. This list is simply a starting point, an acknowledgement and gesture of gratitude for the many women in my life who have helped

“My work is merely part of a greater lineage made possible by the people before and surrounding me today.” -DYANI WHITE HAWK

14


Dyani White Hawk (Sičángu Lakota, b. 1976), Wačháŋtognaka | Nurture, 2019 screenprint, 32” x 55.5.” Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist. Collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson.

15


16


17


Dyani White Hawk & Monica Edwards Larson “They are like little treasures and they feel like a very direct response and pushback from the onslaught of detached, screen oriented communication we are currently inundated with.” - DYANI WHITE HAWK

Monica Edwards Larson on why she dedicated Poetry Post 2019 to Native women:

Dyani White Hawk on her collaboration with Monica Edwards Larson on Poetry Post 2019:

The Poetry Post is a project of Sister Black Press, where quarterly mailings of small letterpress printed poetry broadsides and books are sent to subscribers over the course of a year. I decided to focus on Native women in 2019 after hearing Dyani White Hawk give a talk about her work in the fall of 2018. Towards the end of her presentation, she spoke about the atrocities facing Native women and urged the audience members to pay attention, become more aware, and to do what they could to help. I was so struck by her strong presence and honesty. I knew immediately that I needed to respond somehow. I decided I could use the power of my printing press to amplify Native women’s voices through poetry.

I was really excited to work with Monica on this project. We met over lunch and she introduced me to the work she had done with the poetry mailing thus far. The previous samples were so beautiful in multiple ways, through the voices represented in the poetry, the visual art work featured, and the beauty of the finely crafted letter press prints packaged and delivered quarterly to your mailbox. They are like little treasures and they feel like a very direct response and pushback from the onslaught of detached, screen oriented communication we are currently inundated with. Likewise, I was really excited to collaborate not only with Monica, but other female Native writers and artists. It was a joyful break

18

from what I am usually doing in the studio. Monica Edwards Larson on her collaboration with Dyani White Hawk: I asked Dyani for her input on selecting writers, as well as potentially featuring her artwork along with the poetry. She was very interested and gave me a few names of writers to consider. […] My collaboration with Dyani started by sending her the poem of Layli’s and asking her to visually respond to it. She sent a line drawing back to me, along with some ideas for fields of color in the background. I played around with scale and formatting and we exchanged feedback digitally through emails and photos. I felt that my responsibility was to represent her illustration (translate it) as closely as possible in print form.


Dyani White Hawk (Sičáŋǧu Lakota, b.1976 ) (illustration) and Monica Edwards Larson (American, b. 1965) (type design and printing), Sister Black Press 2019 Poetry Post Subscription, 2019, letterpress, dimensions variable. Poets: dg nanuok ookpik, Rose B. Simpson, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Layli Long Soldier On loan from Monica Edwards Larson and Sister Black Press.

19


Ramona Sakiestewa “When you collaborate with somebody, it’s kind of divinatory…” -RAMONA SAKIESTEWA

Sakiestewa on making the Raven prints:

Ramona Sakiestewa on her approach to printmaking:

The Raven prints were printed from a plate that had fabric glued to it for texture but it wasn’t as beautiful as it could be as a standalone piece. When I deconstructed the print, it was the perfect texture for the birds. The ravens are more literal than I tend to work, but I like the overall abstraction and motion I can get in the finished work.

The biggest thing I’ve learned about printmaking is you don’t have to have everything completely formulated in your mind and only take one try at it. There’s a huge range of spontaneous technology that you can develop within a printing session. I largely print from plastic sheets, just plates that I paint myself, or the printer and I create some process. I print a lot of material that is unrelated but has a thread in it for later work. I tend to deconstruct images and then reconstruct them later. Very often I’ll think, “that was a wasted two-days. I don’t really like anything I’ve done.” Then those printed images turn out to be the best papers for reconstructing something else. Not everything I think of works out in the moment but down the road it might be the perfect piece of paper for another piece.

Sakiestewa on collaborating with designers and architects, including her work at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian: I actually like collaboration, but I had to really, truly, get over myself because when you work by yourself you can fiddle and change and your time is not someone else’s money. When you collaborate with somebody, it’s kind of divinatory, meaning you are trying to divine from your client or the architect what they think they want, feel, and see. It’s something that has to resonate with them, not just you. I know some artists don’t like collaboration because it doesn’t feel like their work, but once I got on to it, and could work through my own misgivings and taste, I could find solutions that work for everyone’s ideas. It’s like a puzzle.

No matter what the medium is, I like to put a woven element in it so the reconstruction is sometimes literally sewn together. Printing also allows for layering of color that I used to get in tapestries. There might be three different strands of color across one shot in a weaving. I have a penchant for layering, sewing, and dimension in my prints that comes from my weaving.

20


(Left) Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi, b. 1948), Raven 2, 2017, deconstructed monoprint, ink, silk, thread, 30” x 22” Courtesy of Tai Modern Gallery and the Artist. Collaborating printer: Michael McCabe, Fourth Dimension Studio. (Right) Ramona Sakiestewa (Hopi, b. 1948), Raven 3, 2017, deconstructed monoprint, ink, silk, thread, 30” x 22” Courtesy of Tai Modern Gallery and the Artist. Collaborating printer: Michael McCabe, Fourth Dimension Studio.

21


22


Sara Siestreem

Sara Siestreem (Hanis-Coos and American, b. 1976), FIRST BASKET, 2013, three-color lithograph, 30” x 40” Courtesy of Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Collaborating printer: Frank Janzen.

Sara Siestreem on FIRST BASKET: FIRST BASKET is a lithographic print I made at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts in 2013. I burned a Xerox of the first basket I made in 2011 onto a lithography plate to provide the black and white image you see in the print. I then combined my drawing

gesture and paint motif through additional layers to complete the composition. In tribal culture, the first basket that you make is highly significant. It marks the beginning of a life’s work. In order to ensure that you continue the practice and to garner good luck, you are to give the basket to an esteemed elder. This basket now belongs to Lillian Pitt

23

(Wasco) who has mentored me since 1999. It has been a privilege and honor to know her and to have come up under her wing.

“In tribal culture, the first basket that you make is highly significant.” -SARA SIESTREEM


Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Salish and Koontenai, b. 1940), Christmas, 1940, 12” x 10” The Tamarind Archive Collection. Collaborating printer: David Afsah-Mohallatee.

24


Jaune Quick-to-See Smith “Nature is the common denominator for my paintings… For Native peoples, religious stories come out of nature, plants and animals.” -JAUNE QUICK-TO-SEE SMITH

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith on the mix of art and life that inspires her, as well as her experiences with print collaboration: Moving among painting, lithography, monoprinting, writing, public art, teaching, curating, politicking, gardening, traveling and drawing all stretch me in different ways, causing me angst and sturm and drang, but also forcing me to think more creatively so I don’t get in a rut. Each medium I work with requires drawing.

sometimes I don’t know if it’s successful or not until later. Whereas in my studio, I can be a butterfly, listen to Maria Callas, clean brushes for three days waiting to move into the zone, my creative place. In my painting, I start with an idea and develop it over time. My process is slow, it takes time and thought, and each painting tells its own story. I am a slow painter. My work is not serendipitous, and I cannot speed up the process. It is most important the work has meaning for me. […]

Printmaking at a shop is a more collaborative process, and every master printer’s personality is different. So while I am concentrating on my print, I also have to navigate my way through the terrain of collaboration. It’s a new relationship, or an old relationship revisited. It is close-up and intense for a week or two, with a tight deadline structure. I could just break out into a rash telling you this. Printmaking is a masochistic process for me, and it’s hard wrought to get a successful print, although

Nature is the common denominator for my paintings, prints and drawings. In my drawings, I use the microcosm and in my paintings the macrocosm. For Native peoples, religious stories come out of nature, plants and animals. [Excerpt from an interview with Charles Muir Lovell in the exhibition catalogue, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith: Made in America, Belger Arts Center at University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2003.]

25


Wendy Red Star

Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke Crow, b. 1981) Rez Car 2, 2010 Two-color lithograph 22.5” x 30” On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Collaborating printer: Frank Janzen

Wendy Red Star on making The (HUD) at Crow’s Shadow Institute of Art: Drawing the big gesture in the background of The (HUD) was really challenging for me because of my fear of drawing and mark making. I was thinking about a tornado coming along and stacking houses on top of each other. I was really interested in the architecture on the reservation, which isn’t anything fancy. They are HUD [Housing and Urban Development] houses that were built on the reservation in the 1970s. The thing that I like about them is that they come in

these really bizarre colors. It’s a very colorful palette but it’s a palette made from the cheapest paint that the government had an excess of. I get a kick out of the Easter-egg colors that are presented in the different towns on my reservation. There are three different styles of houses, which is very suburban, so I also think about the assimilation and civilizing of my community. Although, no one really thinks about having a nice lawn there. On the reservation, a lawn is not a concept. It’s just a place to park your car. What I liked about The (HUD) is that it really got me thinking about the 26

houses as stand-ins for the people who lived in them, their subtle characteristics, like a trash can or the blankets that were hanging in their windows. Red Star on the inspiration for the print, Rez Car: When I made Rez Car, I was thinking about muscle cars and asking, “what is our muscle car?” Well it’s this fucked up reservation car, sort of the total opposite of the muscle car. This car was my favorite on the reservation. I really kind of treasure that car. Even though it was an eyesore in the landscape, it had a lot of sass and character.


27


Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke Crow, b. 1981) The (HUD), 2010, two-color lithograph with photograph, 30” x 22.” On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Collaborating printer: Frank Janzen.

28


29


Marie Watt “I like to refer to myself as the Crow’s Shadow poster child” -MARIE WATT

Marie Watt reflects on her first time working with Crow’s Shadow master printer Frank Janzen:

Watt on collaborative practices and whether or not the term “collaboration” is meaningful:

The entire process of collaborating with a master printer was new to me. Frank showed me prints that he made at Tamarind. He looked and listened to what I was doing in my studio and suggested things that mirrored my drawing practice, which was really useful. I was drawing with a reed or quill pen at the time and I experimented with that on the plates. They [including Sanctuary] are some of my favorite plates I’ve ever made.

I totally use it. “Collaboration” best captures that idea of working together but it doesn’t completely summarize what happens. At the same time, I’m super reticent about terms like “social practice” and “social engagement” because I think they are trendy, for one, and also there is a set of expectations that comes with that terminology that I find confusing. I’ve been working with sewing circles since 2003. In the sewing circles and even my sculptures where people contribute blanket stories, I’m most interested in making meaningful connections or setting a table for connections to happen on their own terms, just inviting people in to come as you are, making a space where people can gather and the outcome can be many different things. That’s really what my process is more about, so maybe I should talk about myself as a “connector” more than a “collaborator.”

The palette of the prints is drawn from blankets that I’ve interacted with or scavenged. Frank really took the time to arrive at the color palette I was interested in, even more so in later prints. It wasn’t a natural thing for me to figure out. He was always such a great and patient collaborator. I was struck by how methodical he had to be to arrive at the color I wanted to use but then to make it again for the edition. If you look at prints, you don’t necessarily think about how methodical you have to be. Printmakers have a special gene and wiring that allows them to do that.

30


Marie Watt (Seneca, b. 1967), Transit, 2004, six-color lithograph, 22� x 30.� The Tamarind Archive Collection. Collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Deborah Chaney.

31


Emmi Whitehorse Emmi Whitehorse on printmaking and how it has informed her painting: I trained as a printmaker, and use a lot of the techniques learned in printmaking in making my work, but I don’t think of myself as a printmaker. I love the feel of paper. I tend to draw more. Line is important to me. Ramona Sakiestewa on assisting Emmi Whitehorse in the print studio: I helped Emmi Whitehorse print once. She did some amazing small prints that we gave away at a fundraising dinner. It was so much fun to see how she works. Even though her work looks very spontaneous and fluid she really has a focused way of putting down a precise visual vocabulary in each image. She made 90 prints that day. They were small, but still a lot of work for her. And then just hearing

her talk about her experiences. {…} As an artist, you don’t often get moments like that where you work artist-to-artist. That’s something printmakers get to do. They’re almost like therapists. They get to go into the heads of artists and get to know what they like and how they print. If you have an idea, printers help you work through it. For me, being Emmi’s assistant for the day with the printer was enlightening. Spending time watching her work was a gift. She’s very fun and there’s a lot going on in her head. I knew her but I’d never seen her work in the moment. Working in the print studio like that, you also learn about the artist’s humor and quirks and their sense of color or texture. It’s revealing in a very nice setting. Emmi Whitehorse on applying Navajo philosophy to artmaking: As an artist, I have intentionally avoided

32

politically oriented subject matter and angst-ridden or physical wrestling with the act of painting itself. To make art, the act of making art must stay true to a harmonious balance of beauty, nature, humanity and the whole universe. This is in accordance with Navajo philosophy. I have chosen to focus on nature, on landscape. My paintings tell the story of knowing land over time - of being completely, microcosmically within a place. I am defining a particular space, describing a particular place. They are purposefully meditative and mean to be seen slowly. The intricate language of symbols refer to specific plants, people and experiences.

“To make art, the act of making art must stay true to a harmonious balance of beauty, nature, humanity and the whole universe.” -EMMI WHITEHORSE


(Left) Emmi Whitehorse (Navajo, Diné, b. 1957), Ginger Wood # 2, 2005, ten-color lithograph, 23” x 18.” The Tamarind Archive Collection. Collaborating printer: Bill Lagattuta. (Right) Emmi Whitehorse (Navajo, Diné, b. 1957), Element, 2005, nine-color lithograph, 23” x 18.” The Tamarind Archive Collection. Collaborating printer: Bill Lagattuta.

33


Indelible Ink features lithographs, monoprints, silkscreen, and letterpress prints that were made in collaboration with five print studios located in the mid-west and western United States. Collaboration, in the setting of the print workshop, implies a specific space for and process of artmaking. Artists are invited to the workshop for a residency, typically two or three weeks, and work in tandem with highly skilled printers who bring their aesthetic and technical knowledge to creations envisioned by the artist. Communication is key to setting shared goals, developing ideas, and building trust. When all goes well, collaboration is a rewarding process for both the artist and the printer, producing work that would not exist without contributions from both. ⎯ Mary Statzer

34


II. The Collaborators

35


36


Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts

Location: The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in the foothills of Oregon’s Blue Mountains, ten miles from Pendleton, Oregon. Founded: Crow’s Shadow is a nonprofit organization formed in 1992 by local artists James Lavadour (Walla Walla) and Phillip Cash Cash (Cayuse and Nez Perce). Printers: Frank Janzen (2001-2017) and Judith Baumann (2017 – present). Janzen and Baumann trained at Tamarind Institute. CSIA Mission: To provide a creative conduit for educational, social, and economic opportunities for Native Americans through artistic development. Frank Janzen on print collaboration: “Never underestimate the artist because they have a vision. The printer has to bring it to fruition. That’s all you can do. My approach to collaboration was informed by my interest in dealing with the psychology of people. It’s getting to know another human being. The majority of the artists I worked with are now friends. It's made my life richer.”

37


Fourth Dimension Studio

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico Founded: The studio was founded by Michael McCabe in its present location in 2005. Printer: Michael McCabe studied at the College of Santa Fe, the Institute of American Indian Art, and the Naropa Institute. He has been making prints for more than 30 years. Fourth Dimension Studio’s Mission: McCabe offers assisted monotype sessions and teaches workshops at the studio in Santa Fe and in California. He works with Native and non-Native artists from the United States, Europe, and South America. Michael McCabe on print collaboration: “It’s all about communication, sharing information, and getting people involved. It’s not about making money but rather giving and receiving something back in return.”

38


Highpoint Editions

Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Founded: Co-founders Carla McGrath and Cole Rogers established Highpoint Center for Printmaking and Highpoint Editions in April 2001 as a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the art of printmaking by providing educational programs, community access, and collaborative publishing opportunities. Printers: Master Printer, Cole Rogers; Senior Printer, Zac Adams-Bliss; Assistant Printers, Kate Goyette and Megan Anderson; and, Director of Artist Programs, Josh Bindewald. Rogers, Goyette, and Anderson trained at Tamarind Institute. Highpoint Edition’s Mission: Highpoint Editions publishes fine art prints made by invited professional artists in collaboration with Cole Rogers and Highpoint Editions staff. Highpoint advances the work of artists by presenting artists’ projects to a broad public through gallery shows, lectures, symposia, and placing Highpoint prints in important public and private collections. 
 Cole Rogers on diversity at Highpoint Editions: “Highpoint Editions publishes projects by artists representing a wide range of ages, cultures, ethnicities, genders and sexual orientations… While there is a rich tradition of prints made by Native American artists, we feel that they are still underrepresented and are an important addition to the fabric of our publications.”

39


Sister Black Press

Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Founded: Sister Black Press was founded by Monica Edwards Larson in 2000. Printer: Monica Edwards Larson studied printmaking and letterpress at Arizona State University. She has been teaching book arts at various colleges in the Twin Cities, including Minneapolis College of Art and Design and Minnesota Center for Book Arts, for the past fifteen years. Sister Black Press’s Mission: Monica Edwards Larson prints for other artists and creates personal projects in the studio. She takes book arts and letter press to the community through two initiatives: The Bike Press and Poetry Post Subscription Series. Monica Edwards Larson on collaboration: “When collaborating with other artists and writers, I am guided by – and surrender to – wonder… and the forces of chance, uncertainty and possibility. I open myself to learning… by hearing other stories and beliefs. I hope to foster a sense of trust as we allow our individual artistic sensibilities to ebb and flow within the work.”

40


Tamarind Institute

Location: The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. The Tamarind archive of papers and ephemera are housed at the Center for Southwest Research at Zimmerman Library at UNM. UNM Art Museum holds the print archive. Founded: The Tamarind Lithography Workshop was founded in Los Angeles, CA, in 1960 by June Wayne as a means to “rescue” the dying art of lithography. In 1970, it moved to University of New Mexico and became Tamarind Institute. Directors include: June Wayne (1960-70), Clinton Adams (1970-85), Marjorie Devon (1985-2015) and Diana Gaston (2016-present). Printers: Bill Lagattuta (1988-2015), Valpuri Remling (2015-present), Brandon Gunn, Director of Education (2016-present), and dozens of Tamarind printer apprentices. Lagattuta, Remling, and Gunn trained at Tamarind Institute. Tamarind Institute’s Mission: Tamarind Institute is a non-profit center for collaborative printmaking, dedicated to research, education, and creative projects in fine art lithography. It provides the only printer training program of its kind in the world. Diana Gaston on Tamarind’s long commitment to diversity: “In the 1980s, Marjorie Devon became Tamarind’s director. She had a very distinctive vision to cultivate an international reach for the workshop. She also developed programming and projects to celebrate Indigenous cultures. Marge was always looking for interesting projects that would tease out ideas that were not on the surface, yet were shared by different cultures. We continue to explore how we can diversify this medium—make it more accessible to artists and to students who want to pursue advanced training in lithography.”

41


Each artist and many of their collaborators were interviewed for the exhibition labels. The interviews have been excerpted, edited for clarity, and approved by the artist for presentation in the exhibition and online. I am very grateful to everyone who participated in these interviews, who patiently and thoughtfully answered my questions. A special note of thanks also goes to Dyani White Hawk for her curatorial suggestions, which came at a critical time and changed the direction of the exhibition for the better. ⎯ Mary Statzer

42


III. The Exhibition Checklist

43


Indelible Ink: Native Women, Prints, Collaboration Julie Buffalohead, Ponca, b.1972 Fox Tussle, 2015 Two-color lithograph, HC 1/2, edition of 8 23” x 35” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Zac Adams-Bliss, Cole Rogers, Megan Anderson, Kate Goyette Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Revisionist History Lesson, 2014 Lithograph, HC 2/2, edition of 8 24.5” x 30.25” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Zac Adams-Bliss, Cole Rogers, Megan Anderson, Nuno Nuñez Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Trickster Showdown, 2015 Screenprint and lithography, HC 1/2, edition of 10 27.5” x 56” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Zac Adams-Bliss, Cole Rogers, Megan Anderson, Nuno Nuñez, Kate Goyette Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Andrea Carlson, Anishinaabe (Ojibwe), French, Scandinavian, b. 1979 Anti-Retro, 2019 Screenprint, HC 1/2, edition of 20 33” x 47.75” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson, Kate Goyette Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Exit, 2019 Screenprint, HC 1/2, edition of 20 33” x 47.75” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson, Josh Bindewald Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Dyani White Hawk, Sičáŋǧu Lakota, b.1976 Takes Care of Them, suite of four prints Wówahokuŋkiya | Lead, 2019 Wókaǧe | Create, 2019 Nakíčižiŋ | Protect, 2019 Wačháŋtognaka | Nurture, 2019 Screenprints with metallic foil, HC 2/2, edition of 18 32” x 55.5” Highpoint Editions collaborating printers: Cole Rogers, Zac Adams-Bliss, Megan Anderson Courtesy of Highpoint Editions and the Artist Trust and Loss, 2013 Four-color lithograph, Tamarind Impression 1/2, edition of 15 30” x 22” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Damela Erten The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2014.7.2

44


Dyani White Hawk, Sičáŋǧu Lakota, b.1976 (illustration) Monica Edwards Larson, American, b. 1965 (type design and printing) Sister Black Press 2019 Poetry Post Subscription, 2019 Letterpress on paper Sizes variable Poets: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Spacing, 2017 Layli Long Soldier, Edge, 2015 dg nanuok ookpik, Warming, 2018 Rose B. Simpson, Evidence, 2012 On loan from Monica Edwards Larson and Sister Black Press Ramona Sakiestewa, Hopi, b. 1948 Raven 2, 2017 Raven 3, 2017 Deconstructed monoprints, ink, silk, thread 30” x 22” Collaborating printer: Michael McCabe, Fourth Dimension Studio Courtesy of Tai Modern Gallery and the Artist Sara Siestreem, Hanis Coos, b. 1976 FIRST BASKET, 2013 Two-color lithograph with photograph, CSPI 1, edition of 16 30” x 40” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Salish and Koontenai, b. 1940 Green Chile, 1995 Red Chile, 1995 Christmas, 1995 Lithographs, Tamarind Impressions 1/2, editions of 10 12” x 10” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: David Afsah-Mohallatee The Tamarind Archive Collection, 97.1.65, 97.1.66, 97.1.10 In the Future, 1995 Three-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 17 33.25” x 25.75” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: Paul Croft The Tamarind Archive Collection, 97.1.63 Indian Heart, 1993 Five-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression, edition of 30 30” x 22.25” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: Margaret Raab The Tamarind Archive Collection, 94.1.3 A Map to Heaven, 2002 Five-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 2/2, edition of 20 3”9 x 34.5” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: Uli Kuehle The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2003.16.24

45


Modern Times, 1993 Five-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 30 30” x 22.25” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: Paul Croft The Tamarind Archive Collection, 94.1.37 Theaters of War, 2006 Six-color lithograph, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 15 30.25” x 22” Tamarind Institute collaborating printer: Bill Lagattuta The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2008.11.38 Wendy Red Star, Apsáalooke Crow, b. 1981 The (HUD), 2010 Two-color lithograph with photographs, CSPI 1, edition of 12 30” x 22.25” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Rez Car 2, 2010 Two-color lithograph with photographs, CSPI 1, edition of 12 22.5” x 30” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Yakima or Yakama – Not For Me to Say, 2015-16 Two-color lithograph with photograph, CSPI 1, edition of 20 24” x 40” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Marie Watt, Seneca, b. 1967 Blankets, 2003 Five-color lithograph on Rives BFK grey paper, CSPI 1, edition of 16 19.75” x 25.75” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Blanket Stories: Continuum (Book I), 2007 Six-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 16 22.25” x 30” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Aaron Shipps The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2008.11.31 Blanket Stories: Continuum (Book I/Book III), 2007 Six-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 60 22.25” x 30” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Brooke Steiger The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2008.11.30

46


Sanctuary, 2002 Two-color lithograph on Rives BFK grey paper, CSPI 1, edition of 12 17.5” x 18.5” Crow’s Shadow collaborating printer: Frank Janzen On loan from Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts Transit, 2004 Six-color lithograph with chine collé, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 25 22” x 30” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Deborah Chaney The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2005.6.9 Emmi Whitehorse, Navajo, Diné, b. 1957 Element, 2005 Nine-color lithograph, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 25 23” x 18” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Leshoka Joseph Legate The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2006.11.60 Ginger Wood #2, 2005 Ten-color lithograph, Tamarind Impression 1/3, edition of 25 23” x 18” Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2006.11.59 Rushing Water, 2000 Four-color lithograph, Tamarind Impression 1/4, edition of 20 Tamarind Institute collaborating printers: Bill Lagattuta and Sarah Dudley The Tamarind Archive Collection, 2001.15.74

47


Photography Credits: Images Courtesy of Stefan Jennings Batista: pages 8, 9, 16, 17, 19, 22, 27, 29; Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts: pages 23, 26 28, 37 and the cover; Fourth Dimension Studio: page 38; Geistlight Photography, Albuquerque: pages 24, 31, 33; Highpoint Editions and the Artist: pages 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 39; Sister Black Press: page 40; Tai Modern Gallery, Santa Fe: page 21; Tamarind Institute: page 41.

48


© 2020

49


50

Profile for UNM Art Museum

Indelible Ink: Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration  

This online catalog documents the exhibition Indelible Ink: Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration, organized by Mary Statzer, Curator of...

Indelible Ink: Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration  

This online catalog documents the exhibition Indelible Ink: Native Women, Printmaking, Collaboration, organized by Mary Statzer, Curator of...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded