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2013-2014 FACT BOOK

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As we enter our second century, we celebrate a future full of possibilities. One that embraces new knowledge and technological advances. One that will continue to build upon strong partnerships with alumni and friends, as well as community and governmental leaders, so that we may empower the next generation of Dreamers. Thinkers. Doers.


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WHERE WE ARE LOCATED

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WHO WE ARE Fast Facts Leadership Divisions

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WHAT WE OFFER Academics Undergraduate Degree Programs Graduate Degree Programs Helen Hardin Honors Program Study Abroad Living Learning Communities Scholarships And Financial Aid Graduate And Undergraduate Research Opportunities ROTC Programs

27 WHAT WE CONTRIBUTE 27 Teaching 28 Research 34 Partnerships 37 Alumni 38 Tiger Athletics 41 WHAT WE HAVE ACCOMPLISHED 41 Rankings 43 Chairs Of Excellence 44 Other Tiger Pride 47 WHERE WE ARE GOING 47 Strategic Plan 47 Campus Master Plan 49 Sustainability 50 SUMMARY

Important Numbers Undergraduate Admissions recruitment@memphis.edu www.memphis.edu 901.678.2111 or 800.669.2678 Graduate School Admissions www.memphis.edu/admissions/grad_adm.php 901.678.2911 Law School Admissions lawadmissions@memphis.edu www.memphis.edu/law/futurestudents/index.php 901.678.5403 U of M Operator 901.678.2000 Student Recruitment 1.800.669.2678 or 901.678.2111 Transcripts 901.678.3927 Financial Aid and Scholarships 901.678.4825 Alumni Office 901.678.2586 alumniassociation@memphis.edu Make a Gift 901.678.4376 www.memphis.edu/development/give.php


WHERE WE ARE LOCATED Memphis is the birthplace of many things. It’s where the world’s first hotel chain (Holiday Inn), the first full-service grocery store (Piggly Wiggly), the first outlet mall and the world’s first and largest overnight package delivery company (FedEx) were all born. Music fans recognize Memphis as the “Home of the Blues” and the “Birthplace of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” the place where such legends as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and B. B. King honed their talent. Food aficionados know Memphis for its pork barbecue and soul food. It is also home to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the Mid-South’s largest medical center and the world’s largest air cargo airport. The city’s vibrant history of culture, music and business innovation has helped shape the world, and it continues to inspire millions of people. The greater Memphis area has a population of 1.1 million, which makes the city the 24th largest in the country. It offers many cultural and entertainment opportunities, including major museum exhibits, sporting events, concerts, art shows, lectures and community festivals that take place throughout the year. The AAA baseball team, the Redbirds, and the NBA team, the Grizzlies, both call Memphis home. Several worldwide companies have their headquarters in Memphis. Due to the city’s diverse business and industry landscape, the city offers exceptional student internships and employment opportunities in a variety of fields, both during and after a student’s college career. A lot of great things have come out of the city of Memphis. We are proud to call it home.

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WHO WE ARE FAST FACTS Founded: 1912

Facilities: 239 buildings at eight sites, including the University of Memphis Lambuth Campus Enrollment: 17,222 undergraduates and 4,258 graduate/professional students from 87 countries and 50 states plus Guam and Puerto Rico, including students from 73 counties in Tennessee. Freshman Class: 2,252 first-time freshmen Degree Programs: More than 250 areas of study (17 undergraduate degrees/54 masters/25 doctoral) Faculty: 930 full-time faculty Student-Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Academic Calendar: Semester system (fall, spring and summer sessions) Student Life: Approximately 200 student organizations, including 25 sororities and fraternities Undergraduate Tuition: $8,312 (in-state, annually); $23,024 (out-of-state, annually) Scholarships/Financial Aid: More than 83% of students receive merit-based or need-based aid School Colors: Blue and gray School Mascot: Bengal Tiger School Motto: Dreamers. Thinkers. Doers.

Data from fall 2013

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LEADERSHIP

Brad Martin Interim President

David Rudd Provost

Rosie Phillips Bingham Vice President Student Affairs

Linda Bonnin Vice President Communications, Public Relations and Marketing

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David Zettergren Vice President Business and Finance

Tom Bowen Athletic Director

Julie Johnson Vice President Advancement

Ellen Watson CIO and Vice Provost Information Technology


DIVISIONS Academic Affairs (Provost David Rudd) The division of Academic Affairs provides leadership and support at the University of Memphis for all faculty personnel matters, faculty development, tenure and promotion, faculty governance, faculty-related policy, undergraduate and graduate academic programs and curriculum, classroom and learning environments, research support and compliance, institutional research, accreditation matters and community engagement. The university’s chief academic officer provides leadership to the division and to the deans of Arts and Sciences; Engineering; Communication and Fine Arts; Education, Health and Human Sciences; Business and Economics; Nursing; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Law; University College; Public Health; and University Libraries. This year, Information Technology Services began reporting to the Provost’s Office to emphasize the critical role that technology plays in the delivery of higher education. IT has responsibility for implementing, monitoring and maintaining University information technology, such as the campus data network, telephone system, computer systems, computer labs and servers. Additionally, it offers centralized support, training, and consulting concerning information technology to the campus community. Advancement (Vice President Julie Johnson) The University of Memphis Advancement Division fosters mutually beneficial relationships with alumni, friends, donors, and civic and corporate partners. The Development unit coordinates and implements fundraising programs through annual giving, as well as major and planned gifts. The comprehensive Alumni and Constituent Relations program promotes lifelong meaningful connections between alumni and their alma mater and engages community friends and supporters. In partnership with and under the auspices of the University of Memphis Foundation, the division maintains, stewards and invests private resources and distributes them to university programs in accordance with donor directives. Athletics (Athletic Director Tom Bowen) Athletics has responsibility for the athletic and academic endeavors of student-athletes participating in 19 NCAA Division I sports. The division is committed to providing a successful athletics program at the highest level of competition, characterized by academic, athletic and moral excellence in a diverse collegiate environment. The U of M has 383 student-athletes. Business and Finance (Vice President David Zettergren) The Division of Business and Finance is responsible for the management of university fiscal, physical and human resources, which include 239 structures totaling 6.2 million square feet on 1,607 acres at eight locations. Business and Finance’s 500 full-time employees provide service and support to almost 22,000 students and 2,500 faculty and staff. Communications, Public Relations and Marketing (Vice President Linda Bonnin) The Division of Communications, Public Relations and Marketing promotes the public’s general knowledge and understanding of the university. It publicizes activities taking place under the auspices of the U of M, disseminates university news, responds to inquiries from the media, produces university publications, develops marketing and advertising, plans most major university events and manages the U of M website. Student Affairs (Vice President Rosie Phillips Bingham) The Division of Student Affairs provides services, programs and activities that build on the university’s academic base. The division strives to consider all aspects of a student’s life at the university, always trying to be mindful of the “whole person” and the role the university can play in a student’s development as an individual, working and living responsibly within a community.

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WHAT WE OFFER ACADEMICS Degree programs at the University of Memphis are divided into 10 colleges and schools.

College of Arts and Sciences (Interim Dean Tom Nenon) The College of Arts and Sciences is the largest college in the Tennessee Board of Regents system, comprising 24 academic units, the ROTC programs and multiple research centers, including two Centers of Excellence. It is responsible for the lion’s share of the U of M’s undergraduate curriculum and awards nearly 500 students BA and BS degrees every year. The college is divided into three grand divisions: the social sciences, the natural sciences and the humanities. Fogelman College of Business and Economics (Dean Rajiv Grover) The Fogelman College of Business and Economics (FCBE) teaches a rigorous, relevant and wide-ranging business curriculum to almost 3,500 students at the undergraduate, master’s and doctoral levels. Academic programs offered include the BBA program with nine undergraduate majors; the MBA, CDMBA, EMBA, IMBA, MSBA, MS and MA programs at the master’s level, and the PhD program with concentrations in six academic areas. The College houses the Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality and Resort Management, the Sparks Bureau of Business and Economic Research, the Robert Wang Center for International Business and the FedEx Center for Supply Chain Management. The Fogelman College holds both business and accounting accreditation from AACSB International and is the only AACSB-accredited programs in the Memphis metropolitan area. In 1980, the College was named in honor of the Fogelman family. College of Communication and Fine Arts (Dean Richard R. Ranta) The College of Communication and Fine Arts (CCFA) is a hub of excellence and innovation in research, education and practice in the fine and performing arts, architecture and the communication disciplines. It is home to the Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music and the departments of Architecture, Art, Communication, Journalism and Theatre & Dance. CCFA also houses the Art Museum of the University of Memphis (AMUM), Jones Hall Gallery, the Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology, the Study of Rhetoric and Applied Communication, and Sustainable Design, as well as The Daily Helmsman and WUMR-U92 FM. CCFA enriches the cultural atmosphere of both the University and the community at large through a variety of public programs, including art exhibitions, media presentations, music and dance concerts, theatre performances, lectures, seminars and festivals. College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (Dean Donald I. Wagner) The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (CEHHS) boasts a distinguished faculty of more than 100 fulltime scholars in four departments and 14 research centers, including one of the University’s five Centers of Excellence, the Center for Research in Educational Policy. The founding program of the University of Memphis, the College enrolls more than 2,900 undergraduate and graduate students today in nationally-accredited professional programs. More than 50 degree programs prepare students for varied careers in nutrition and dietetics, health and sports sciences, counseling, educational psychology, P-16 leadership teaching and educational research. In addition, CEHHS is home to two laboratory schools: the Campus School (grades 1-5) and the Barbara K. Lipman Early Childhood School and Research Institute. Herff College of Engineering (Dean Richard Sweigard) Since its inception in 1966, the Herff College of Engineering has developed a reputation for excellent classroom instruction by its faculty and outstanding contributions to the engineering profession by its 7,500+ alumni. Today 50 faculty members, including two Chairs of Excellence, teach in the focus areas of biomedical, civil, computer, electrical and mechanical engineering and in engineering technology. The College is accredited and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees. Its name honors the late Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Herff, who endowed the College in 1964.

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University College (Dean Dan Lattimore) Created in 1975, the University College predominantly draws upon coursework from academic units throughout the University to form interdisciplinary degree programs. Undergraduate degrees, tailored to fit adult, non-traditional students, include 25 undergraduate guideline programs found within the Bachelor of Liberal Studies or Bachelor of Professional Studies while graduate degrees include the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies and Master of Professional Studies. Courses are offered in the evenings, on weekends and online. Students can also earn credit for experiential learning, based on the credit-worthiness of some personal and professional experiences. Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law (Dean Peter Letsou) The National Jurist recently ranked the University of Memphis School of Law as one of the Best Value Law Schools in the nation in its new rankings. Memphis Law scored an A- in the rankings, thanks to our high bar passage rates, affordable tuition, average debt upon graduation, employment rate and our extremely attractive cost of living. The school is fully accredited by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, the society for legal education in the United States. The school’s renovated home is the historic former U.S. Customs House in downtown Memphis, near the city’s judicial and legal community. It is named after Dr. Cecil C. Humphreys, who served as the University’s president from 1960 to 1972. Loewenberg School of Nursing (Dean Lin Zhan) For more than four decades, the Loewenberg School of Nursing has prepared outstanding nurse leaders, practitioners, scholars and educators. The School offers high quality and innovative undergraduate and graduate programs. The online RN to BSN and RN to MSN programs are accessible, affordable, flexible and accelerated. The online MSN programs, a part of the Regents Online Degree Program, prepare students for careers in specialty areas such as family nurse practitioner, nursing administration, executive leadership, education and informatics. The family of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Loewenberg, in honor of their parents, established the endowment in nursing with the belief that this support would accomplish the greatest good. The School is committed to meeting the needs of healthcare and promoting the health of the global community through innovative education, rigorous research/scholarly work, academic practice partnerships and professional services. School of Communication Sciences and Disorders (Dean Maurice Mendel) The School of Communication Sciences and Disorders is nationally recognized for its academic, research and clinical education programs for educating future audiologists, speech-language pathologists and speech, language or hearing scientists interested in helping individuals with communication disorders. The School offers a graduate-only curriculum leading to the AuD degree with a major in Audiology, the MA degree with a major in Speech Language Pathology and the PhD degree with a major in Communication Sciences and Disorders with concentrations in Hearing Sciences and Disorders or Speech-Language Sciences and Disorders.. The School has been consistently ranked among the best graduate programs by U.S. News & World Report every year since 1998. School of Public Health (Dean Lisa M. Klesges) The newest school at the U of M, the School of Public Health (SPH) offers two PhD degree programs, in Epidemiology and Social and Behavioral Sciences, with a new PhD in Health Systems and Policy slated to begin in 2014. The SPH also offers two successful master’s programs. The Master of Public Health offers areas of study in biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, social and behavioral sciences, and health systems. The Master of Health Administration program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education, the only one of its type in Tennessee. The mission of the school involves the translation of knowledge and research into community practice to tackle pressing societal problems of social and environmental justice, health disparities, unhealthy lifestyles and accessible systems that support healthy living for individuals, families and communities. By emphasizing both discovery and application with the goal of moving “knowledge into action” locally, nationally and globally, the School offers graduate education, community practicum experience and research training to address the growing need for a proficient public health workforce.

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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Degrees are in parenthesis. Concentrations are listed beneath the majors.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES African and African American Studies (BA) Anthropology (BA) Biological Sciences (BS) Chemistry (BS/BSCh) Biochemistry General Chemistry Computer Science (BS) Criminology and Criminal Justice (BA) Earth Sciences (BA) Geoarchaeology Geography Geology Economics (BA) English (BA) African American Literature Creative Writing English as a Second Language Language and Linguistics Literature Professional Writing Foreign Languages (BA) French German Greek Japanese Latin Russian Spanish Multiple Concentrations History (BA) International Studies (BA) Global Processes Area Studies Mathematical Sciences (BS) Mathematics Statistics Philosophy (BA) Physics (BS) General Physics Materials Science Political Science (BA) Psychology (BA) Behavioral Neuroscience Cognitive Science General Psychology

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Top Ten Majors for Undergraduate Students* 1. Professional Studies 2. Nursing and Pre-Nursing 3. Psychology 4. Accounting 5. Health and Human Performance 6. Criminology and Criminal Justice 7. Teaching All Learners (Education) 8. Biology 9. Management 10. English * fall 2013

Professional Studies is a program housed within the University College.


Social Work (BA) Sociology (BA)

FOGELMAN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Accounting (BBA) Business Economics (BBA) Financial Economics Finance (BBA) Banking and Financial Services Business Finance Real Estate Risk Management and Insurance Hospitality and Resort Management (BA) International Business (BBA) Management (BBA) Management Information Systems (BBA) Marketing Management (BBA) Supply Chain Management (BBA)

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION AND FINE ARTS Architecture (BFA) Art (BFA) Art Education Graphic Design Photography Studio Arts Art History (BA) Communication (BA) Communication Studies Film and Video Production Interior Design (BFA) Journalism (BA) Advertising News Public Relations Music (BM) Composition Jazz and Studio Composition/Arranging Jazz and Studio Performance Music Education (Instrumental and Choral) Music History Performance Music Industry (BM) Music Business Recording Technology Theatre (BFA) Design and Technical Production Musical Theatre Performance

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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH AND HUMAN SCIENCES Health and Human Performance (BSEd) Dietetics Exercise and Sport Science Health Promotion and Lifestyle Management Human Development and Learning (BSEd) Integrative Studies (BSEd) Middle Grades Society Services Non-Licensure Physical Education Teacher Education (BSEd) Sport and Leisure Management (BSEd) Teaching All Learners (BSEd)

HERFF COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biomedical Engineering (BSBE) Civil Engineering (BSCE) Construction Engineering Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Structural Engineering Transportation Engineering Computer Engineering (BSCP) Electrical Engineering (BSEE) Computer Engineering Electrophysics Systems and Signals Engineering Technology (BSET) Mechanical Engineering (BSME)

LOEWENBERG SCHOOL OF NURSING Nursing (BSN)

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Liberal Studies (BLS) Asian Studies and International Trade Judaic Studies Religion in Society Liberal Studies (RODP) Interdisciplinary Studies Professional Studies (BPS) Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services Child Development Commercial Aviation Dance Disability Studies and Rehabilitation Services Health Services Administration Human Services Law Enforcement Administration Merchandising – Fashion

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Merchandising – Home Furnishings Nonprofit Development and Administration Organizational Leadership Paralegal Services Pre-School and Child Administration Technology Management Services Professional Studies RODP (BPS) Information Technology Organizational Leadership

DEGREE ABBREVIATIONS BA BBA BFA BM BLS BPS BS BSBE BSCh BSCE BSCP BSEE BSEd BSET BSME BSN

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of Fine Arts Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Liberal Studies Bachelor of Professional Studies Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science, Biomedical Engineering Bachelor of Science, Chemistry Bachelor of Science, Civil Engineering Bachelor of Science, Computer Engineering Bachelor of Science, Electrical Engineering Bachelor of Science, Education Bachelor of Science, Engineering Technology Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science, Nursing

http://www.memphis.edu/ugcatalog/

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GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Degrees are in parenthesis. Concentrations are listed beneath the majors.

CCOLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthropology (MA) Globalization, Development and Culture Medical Anthropology Applied Computer Science (MS) Bioinformatics (MS) Biology (MS/PhD) Chemistry (MS/PhD) Analytical Chemistry Computational Chemistry Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry Physical Chemistry City and Regional Planning (MCRP) Computer Science (MS/PhD) Creative Writing (MFA) Criminal Justice (MA) Earth Sciences (MA) Geography Earth Sciences (MS) Archaeology Geology Geophysics Interdisciplinary Studies Earth Sciences (PhD) English (MA) Composition Studies English as a Second Language Language and Linguistics Literature Professional Writing English (PhD) Applied Linguistics Composition Studies Professional Writing Literary and Cultural Studies History (MA/PhD) Ancient Egyptian History Mathematical Sciences (MS) Applied Mathematics Mathematics Statistics Teaching of Mathematics Mathematical Sciences (PhD) Applied Statistics Mathematics

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Philosophy (MA, PhD) Physics (MS) Computational Physics General Physics Materials Science Political Science (MA) Psychology (MS) General Psychology Psychology (PhD) Clinical Experimental School Psychology Public and Non-profit Administration (MPA) Public Policy and Management Romance Languages (MA) French Spanish School Psychology (MA) Social Work (MSW) Sociology (MA)

FOGELMAN COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS Accounting (MS) Accounting Healthcare Accounting Taxation Business Administration (MBA) Biomedical Management Entrepreneurship Executive Financial Services Law Professional Services Marketing Business Administration (MS) Finance Hospitality and Resort Management Management Information Systems Real Estate Business Administration (PhD) Accounting Economics Finance Management Management Information Systems Marketing and Supply Chain Management Economics (MA) International Business (IMBA)

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COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION AND FINE ARTS Architecture (MArch) Art (MFA) Ceramics Graphic Design Painting Printmaking/Photography Sculpture Art History (MA) Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora Egyptian Art and Archaeology General Art History Communication (MA) Communication Film and Video Production Communication (PhD) Journalism (MA) Music (MMu) Composition Conducting Jazz and Studio Music Music Education Musicology Orff-Schulwerk Pedagogy Performance Music (DMA) Composition Conducting Music Theory Performance Music (PhD) Music Education Musicology Theatre (MFA)

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH AND HUMAN SCIENCES Advanced Studies in Teaching and Learning (MEd) Childhood Literacy Reading Clinical Nutrition (MS) Counseling (MS/EdD) Clinical Mental Health Counseling Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling Rehabilitation Counseling School Counseling Counseling Psychology (PhD) Education (EDS) Educational Psychology and Research (MS/PhD)

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Educational Psychology Educational Research Higher and Adult Education (EdD) Adult Education Higher Education Organizational Leadership and Higher Education Health and Sport Sciences (MS) Exercise and Sport Science Health Promotion Physical Education Teacher Education Sport Commerce Instruction and Curriculum Leadership (MAT) Early Childhood Education Elementary Education Middle School/Special Education Secondary Education Special Education Instruction and Curriculum Leadership (MS/EdD) Early Childhood Instruction and Curriculum Instructional Design and Technology Reading Special Education Leadership and Policy Studies (MS) Leadership School Administration and Supervision Student Personnel Leadership and Policy Studies (EdD) Educational Leadership Policy Studies

HERFF COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Biomedical Engineering (MS/PhD) Civil Engineering (MS) Engineering Seismology Environmental Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Structural Engineering Transportation Engineering Water Resources Engineering Electrical and Computer Engineering (MS) Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Engineering (PhD) Civil Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Engineering Technology (MS) Mechanical Engineering (MS)

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LOEWENBERG SCHOOL OF NURSING Nursing (MSN) Advanced Practice Nursing Executive Leadership Nursing Administration Nursing Education Nursing Informatics

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Liberal Studies (MALS) Professional Studies (MPS) Strategic Leadership Human Resources Leadership Training and Development

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH Health Administration (MHA) Public Health (MPH) Biostatistics Environmental Health Epidemiology Health Administration Social and Behavioral Health Social and Behavioral Sciences (PhD) Epidemiology (PhD)

CECIL C. HUMPREYS SCHOOL OF LAW Law (JD)

SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS Audiology (AuD) Communication Sciences and Disorders (PhD) Hearing Sciences and Disorders Speech Language Sciences and Disorders Speech-Language Pathology (MA)

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS (GCRT)

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African American Literature Applied Lean Leadership Artist Diploma in Music Autism Studies Business Information Assurance Cognitive Science College Teaching Community College Teaching and Learning Disability Studies Entrepreneurial Journalism Family Nurse Practitioner Geographic Information Systems

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Healthcare Informatics Leadership Imaging and Signal Processing Information Assurance Instructional Computing Application Literacy, Leadership and Coaching Local Government Management Museum Studies Nursing Administration Nursing Education Nursing Informatics Packaging Engineering Philanthropy and Nonprofit Leadership Qualitative Studies in Education Software Testing Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) Urban Education Women’s and Gender Studies

DEGREE ABBREVIATIONS EdS IMBA MA MALS MArch MAT MBA MCRP MEd MFA MHA MMu MPA MPH MPS MS MSW MSN AuD DMA EdD JD PhD

Education Specialist International Master of Business Administration Master of Arts Master of Liberal Studies Master of Architecture Master of Arts in Teaching Master of Business Administration Master of City and Regional Planning Master of Education Master of Fine Arts Master of Health Administration Master of Music Master of Public Administration Master of Public Health Master of Professional Studies Master of Science Master of Social Work Master of Science in Nursing Doctor of Audiology Doctor of Musical Arts Doctor of Education Juris Doctor Doctor of Philosophy

http://www.memphis.edu/gradcatalog http://www.memphis.edu/lawacademics/curriculum.php

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HELEN HARDIN HONORS PROGRAM

For academically ambitious and talented students, the Helen Hardin Honors Program combines the best of a small liberal arts school with the wide-ranging opportunities of a large, nationally recognized research university. With 2,104 students participating in fall 2013, the Honors program is now entering its 38th year. It is the largest Honors program in the state of Tennessee. The academic credentials of students in the Honors Program are impressive. More than 20 percent of the incoming Honors freshmen scored 30 or higher on the ACT and 34 percent of them had a high school GPA of 4.0. This year the Honors Program admitted 530 freshmen students, its largest class ever, who participate in all aspects of campus life, including student government, athletics and the Greek system. They benefit from small classes that foster greater interaction between students and faculty and among the students themselves. The program includes enriched Honors courses, interdisciplinary seminars, independent study, an Honors thesis or creative projects and conversations with visiting scholars. Honors courses generally are discussion-based classes that emphasize writing, problem solving and critical and creative thinking. Honors students also have the opportunity to participate in nationally recognized undergraduate research conferences and extend their learning through internships and public service. Since 1991, the Honors Program has provided funds for 167 students to present their research projects at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research. Honors students are award winners at the national level. In the last seven years, U of M Honors students have won highly prestigious scholarships, including the Truman Scholarship, which is awarded to students who intend to attend graduate school in preparation for careers in government, education or elsewhere in public service; the Goldwater Scholarship, which is awarded to students who intend to pursue a research career in mathematics, the sciences or engineering; the David S. Boren Scholarship, which supports study abroad students; the Institute for International Public Policy Fellowship, which supports international affairs; and the Fulbright and the Rotary Scholarships, which support international graduate study. Honors students have received other highly competitive awards as well, including the UNCF/Merck Scholarship and the Phi Kappa Phi Fellowship. http://www.memphis.edu/honors/index.php

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STUDY ABROAD Our students travel to 50 countries and more than 200 study sites. We offer short-term, semester and yearly programs, with financial aid available to help students cover the costs. The University of Memphis study abroad programs are designed to provide students with the opportunity to combine a rigorous academic program with a crosscultural learning experience that is not available in the United States. Yearly and semester programs are available.

North/Central America

South America

Belize Argentina Canada Brazil Costa Rica Chile Dominican Republic Ecuador French Antilles French Guiana Mexico Peru Nicaragua Uruguay

Europe Africa Austria French La Reunion Bulgaria Ghana Czech Republic Morocco Denmark South Africa Estonia Finland Asia France China Germany India Greece Japan Hungary Korea Iceland Singapore Ireland Thailand Italy Latvia Australia/Oceania Malta Australia Netherlands Fiji Norway New Zealand Poland Portugal Russia Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom www.memphis.edu/abroad

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LIVING LEARNING COMMUNITIES

The University of Memphis started its first Living Learning Community more than 15 years ago with the Freshman First program. This program still exists today as a partnership between Residence Life and the Division of Academic Affairs ACAD 1100 program. In 2006 the University expanded Carpenter Complex and added an International House, Women in Engineering and Architecture and Design. With the opening of the Living Learning Residence Complex in the fall of 2010, the University continued its commitment with LLC offerings for Music Scholars, ROTC students, Emerging Leaders and Honors students. The Living Learning Communities program brings together students in both academic pursuits and housing. Each residential unit consists of bedrooms and baths. Some include a large kitchen and common area, meeting and classroom space, and practice space for music majors, as well as a personal work station and computer facilities. The common areas serve multiple functions, such as a studio or a seminar room for special tutoring sessions and other learning and professional development opportunities. Research confirms that living learning community students earn higher grades and are retained at a significantly higher rate than students not engaged in an LLC environment.

FRESH CONNECTIONS LEARNING COMMUNITY Fresh Connections is a unique opportunity for first-time, full-time freshmen to take a “packaged” schedule of three courses built around a common theme or academic area. Specially selected faculty work together within the community to integrate the theme into assignments and enrichment activities throughout the semester across courses. Communities satisfy three to nine general education credit hours, leaving room to add other classes of interest outside of the community schedule to satisfy requirements of a full-time student. Students in the learning communities take the “packaged” schedule together. Each learning community is limited to 25 students, which allows for development of close connections, study groups and collaboration through this unique learning experience. Research confirms that learning community students become more engaged in their studies and their college lives; their GPAs are higher; they successfully complete more hours in less time; and they continue on their program of studies at a higher rate. www.memphis.edu/freshconnections

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SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID The University of Memphis offers a variety of options for students who need some assistance in paying for their college education. Approximately 83 percent of all students at the University of Memphis receive some sort of assistance in the form of either merit- or need-based packages. For students who excel in academics and leadership, there are opportunities for merit scholarships. For those who meet federal criteria for need-based financial aid, there are a variety of options, including grants, low-interest loans, federal work-study and scholarships.

Distinguished Scholarship Programs for High School Seniors The University of Memphis selectively awards hundreds of academic scholarships each year to entering freshmen. All scholarships are awarded for the academic year (fall and spring semesters only). For priority consideration, freshmen students should be admitted to the University of Memphis by December 1. All U of M scholarships are awarded based on information submitted on the student’s admissions application. These scholarships are four-year, renewable scholarships requiring full-time enrollment. Cecil C. Humphreys Merit Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to all National Merit/National Achievement finalists who list the University of Memphis as their first choice with the National Merit Scholarship Corporation by the required deadline. This prestigious award is $9,700 per year plus additional stipends and benefits. The Cecil C. Humphreys Presidential Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to students with a minimum 30 ACT/1330 SAT and a 3.5 or above cumulative high school grade point average. It is a $7,500 per year award with additional stipends and benefits. University of Memphis Provost’s Scholarship The Provost’s Scholarship is awarded to students with a minimum 28 ACT/1250 SAT and a 3.25 or above cumulative high school grade point average. A limited number of these $5,500 scholarships are given each year. The Valedictorian Scholarship The Valedictorian Scholarship provides funding to top scholars from each of Tennessee’s accredited or state-approved high schools and from the following Mississippi counties: DeSoto, Marshall, Tate, Tunica, as well as Crittenden County in Arkansas. Recipients must rank number one in their class and meet the admission requirements of the University of Memphis. It is a $4,500 per year award.

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University of Memphis Dean’s Scholarship The Dean’s Scholarship is awarded to students with a minimum 25 ACT/1130 SAT and a 3.00 or above cumulative high school grade point average. This $3,000 per year award is given to a limited number of students each year. Non-Resident Scholarship The Non-Resident Scholarship is open to first-time freshmen and is designed to assist students who do not qualify for resident tuition, but desire to attend the University of Memphis. The scholarship will be applied to the student’s tuition statement applicable to the Non-Resident cost. The Emerging Leaders Scholarship The Emerging Leaders Scholarship is awarded to students with a minimum 21 ACT/980 SAT and a 3.0 or higher cumulative high school grade point average. The scholarship is awarded to a limited number of students each year. The Emerging Leaders Scholarship is a $5,500 per year award. On-campus housing is required during the freshmen year for students who are selected to receive this scholarship. First Scholars Program Students selected for the First Scholars program receive personalized support and an annual award of $5,000 renewable for a total award of $20,000 over four years. The program is open to incoming freshmen whose parents did not graduate from college. On-campus housing is required during the freshmen year for students who are selected to receive this scholarship.

Distinguished Scholarship Programs for Transfer Students University of Memphis Community College Transfer Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to transfer students who are graduating from a Tennessee community college and have a minimum 3.5 or above cumulative combined transfer grade point average. This $6,500 per year award is renewable for four semesters. University of Memphis Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship It is awarded to transfer students who have earned a two-year degree from a community college who present a copy of their Phi Theta Kappa membership card or certificate along with their application for this scholarship. This $1,000 per year award is renewable for four semesters. The University Transfer Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to students who desire to transfer to the University of Memphis from another four-year institution within the first two years of their high school graduation (two years from the start of the fall term). This scholarship requires a minimum 25 ACT/1130 SAT, a 3.0 or higher cumulative high school grade point average and a 3.0 or higher transfer college grade point average. This competitive $3,000 per year scholarship is awarded to a limited number of students.

Distinguished Scholarship Programs for Adult Students The Adult Scholarship The Adult Scholarship Program is designed to help adult students reach their educational goals. This highly competitive, renewable scholarship is $5,500 per year for full-time students/$3,000 per year for part-time students and is awarded annually to a limited number of students. To be eligible, adult students must be pursuing their first undergraduate degree and they must reach their 25th birthday by August 1st of application year. Current students must have a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and new students must meet the Adult Admission requirements to be eligible.

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Additional Programs and Awards Tennessee Hope Scholarship Program In-state residents may be eligible for the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship Program. Several different awards are available to eligible students who enroll at a Tennessee college or university. Border County Tuition Waiver Students who live in Crittenden County in Arkansas, or Desoto, Marshall, Tate and Tunica Counties in Mississippi, may be eligible for the Border County Tuition Waiver, which allows them to attend the University of Memphis at in-state tuition rates. Non-Resident Honors Student Award (NRHSA) This program offered by the Helen Hardin Honors Program allows non-resident students to attend the university at instate tuition rates. Approximately 30 awards are given each year. Academic Common Market Participation in the Academic Common Market allows qualified students from selected states to pay in-state tuition while pursuing certain degree programs at the University of Memphis. This arrangement is available only to students whose home states do not offer the designated program. Eligibility for programs offered by the University of Memphis is determined by the state in which the student resides.

Grants Federal Pell Grant This is a non-repayable, federally-funded program for undergraduate students pursuing a first bachelor’s degree. Awards vary in amount each year and are based on financial need and hours of enrollment Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) This is a non-repayable, federally-funded, university-based program for undergraduate students pursuing a first bachelor’s degree. Awards are given to early applicants who have submitted all required information, demonstrated the most financial need and have the lowest Expected Family Contribution (EFC) on the Student Aid Report. Tennessee Student Assistance Award (TSAA) This is a non-repayable state grant program available to undergraduate Tennessee residents pursuing a first bachelor’s degree. This award is contingent upon Pell Grant eligibility, state funding and early submission of the FAFSA form.

Loans Federal Direct Student Loans Subsidized Stafford Loan A low, variable interest loan available to degree-seeking students enrolled at least half-time (six undergraduate credit hours) with financial need. The interest is paid by the government while the students are attending school. Repayment of both principal and interest begins six months after graduation or when enrollment ceases to be at least half-time. Unsubsidized Stafford Loan A low, variable interest loan available to degree-seeking students enrolled at least half-time (six undergraduate credit hours; five graduate credit hours). It is not based on financial need. Interest will be charged from the time the loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. The interest can be paid while the students are still in school. Repayment of both principal and interest begins six months after graduation or when enrollment ceases to be half-time.

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Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) This program allows a parent with a good credit history to borrow to pay the cost of education for a dependent undergraduate student enrolled at least half-time (six undergraduate credit hours). The yearly limit is equal to the student’s cost of attendance minus any other financial assistance expected or received. The interest rate is 6.41 percent. There is no grace period for this loan. Interest begins to accumulate at the time the first disbursement is made. Repayment of both principal and interest generally begins within 60 days after the loan has been fully disbursed. Parents are eligible to apply for loan deferment. Federal Perkins Loan A low-interest loan for degree-seeking students with exceptional financial need. This program is federally funded and administered by the University. Priority is given to early applicants with at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average. Repayment begins nine months after graduation or when enrollment ceases to be at least half-time.

Work Programs Federal Work Study This federally-funded, need-based employment program is administered by the University and available to students who are enrolled at least part-time. Students are employed on campus for approximately 20 hours each week and are paid bi-weekly (minimum wage or higher). Placement is based on job skills and availability. Regular Student Employment This program offers on-campus jobs to students who do not qualify for Federal Work Study. Students are usually paid bi-weekly (minimum wage or higher). The availability of jobs depends on student skills and the needs and funding considerations of campus departments. http://www.memphis.edu/scholarships/ http://www.memphis.edu/financialaid/

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GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES Both graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Memphis are given the opportunity to participate in research projects. Undergraduates do so through their participation in the Helen Hardin Honors Program. An undergraduate research database exists online to match students and their interests with researchers in all fields at the U of M and the surrounding Memphis area. Examples of current areas of research that undergraduate students are participating in include: Biology; Biomedical; Chemistry; Communication; Psychology (Institute for Intelligent Systems); Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research; Earth Sciences; Electrical and Computer Engineering; Health and Sport Sciences; Political Science; and Women’s and Children’s Health. Graduate students become involved with research projects primarily through their interaction with faculty. In addition to the examples noted above, they are also involved in these research areas: School of Communication Sciences and Disorders; Public Health; Bioinformatics; Music; Healthcare and Technology; Egyptian Art and Archeology; and International Business. Students at the University of Memphis have ample opportunity to participate in research projects that will enhance their classroom education and strengthen their skills.

ROTC PROGRAMS Students can elect to participate in one of three branches of the ROTC at the University of Memphis.

ROTC – Air Force College students can pursue a commission in the U.S. Air Force while also earning a college degree through the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps at the U of M. Students can participate in the program for the first two years, with any major, without a commitment to joining the military. Upon returning from Field Training the summer after their second year, cadets enter the Professional Officer Course, where they continue to work on the necessary knowledge and qualities of an Air Force officer. Upon graduation, they are commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Air Force. While in the program, students will develop professional and leadership skills and may compete for both Air Force and University of Memphis Leadership Scholarships. ROTC – Army Students can pursue a commission as an officer in the U.S. Army through U of M Army ROTC while working toward a degree in any area of study offered by the U of M. Upon successful completion of University academic and Army ROTC requirements, cadets will be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve or U.S. Army National Guard. ROTC – Navy College students who want to serve their country as officers in the Navy or Marine Corps can participate as midshipmen in the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps. Upon graduation, midshipmen are commissioned as ensigns in the U.S. Navy or second lieutenants in the U.S. Marine Corps.

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WHAT WE CONTRIBUTE TEACHING Approximately 21,500 students are enrolled in on-ground classes or through our online degree programs. Records show that 17,233 undergraduates 3,897 graduate students and 360 law school students were enrolled in fall 2013. From 2000 to 2013, the U of M has awarded 53,968 degrees, including a record number of 4,314 during the 2012-13 academic year. In addition to the main campus in the heart of east Memphis, the University of Memphis operates a campus in Jackson, Tenn., and off-site campuses in Bartlett, Collierville, Cordova, Covington, Dyersburg, Millington and Whitehaven. Offcampus sites had 4,506 enrollments for fall 2013. Additionally, the U of M had 2,219 enrollments in the Regents Online Degree Program (RODP) while another 4,667 enrollments came through the University’s own online degree programs. Campus School, operated by the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences in cooperation with Shelby County Schools, is a laboratory school for grades 1 through 5. Campus School is committed to the development, implementation and demonstration of exemplary programs and projects and instructional strategies. The school strives to improve education through the development of innovative ideas in research, curriculum development, clinical experiences and in-service training in an experimental environment. Campus School is a member of the National Association of Laboratory Schools, is ranked in the top five percent among Tennessee schools, and is recognized as a “Reward School” by the Tennessee Department of Education. Since 1959, the Barbara K. Lipman Early Childhood School and Research Institute has served as the laboratory demonstration early childhood school for the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences. It is the only laboratory school in the United States that has both a Montessori and a Reggio Emilia-inspired classroom demonstration in a constructivist learning environment. Accreditation by the National Association for the Education of Young Children has been continuous since 1987. The Lipman School enrolls diverse students between ages 2 and kindergarten.

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RESEARCH Carnegie Classification The University of Memphis is classified by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as RU/H or Research Universities – High Research Activity. In 2005 the Carnegie Foundation changed its classification categories to three basic classifications for doctoral-degree granting institutions:

RU/VH (Research Universities – very high research activity) RU/H (Research Universities – high research activity) DRU (Doctoral/Research Universities)

The Carnegie Foundation has been classifying colleges and universities since 1970. In 1997 it announced plans for a comprehensive overhaul to the classification system which would take place in 2005. It was at this time that the designation for the University of Memphis changed from Doctoral/Research University-Extensive to RU/H. The Carnegie Foundation’s website delineates the difference between the three basic classification categories for doctoral-degree granting institutions: Level of research activity. Doctorate-granting institutions were assigned to one of three categories based on a measure of research activity. It is important to note that the groups differentiate solely with respect to level of research activity, not quality or importance. The difference between a VH (Very High) classification and an H (High) classification can be found in whether or not an institution has a medical or veterinary school, or not. Again, from Carnegie’s website: For two categories of doctorate-granting institutions, we distinguish institutions offering medical education (defined as human or veterinary medical education, including allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine). Institutions in other categories may also offer medical education, but the numbers were not large enough to justify subcategories and we judged it preferable to differentiate with respect to the other graduate fields, rather than with respect to the presence or absence of medical education.

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Additionally, in 2006 the University of Memphis became one of only 62 colleges and universities in the nation and two in Tennessee to be designated with Carnegie’s new classification of Community Engaged. There are now nine universities in Tennessee with this designation. There are three levels of classification, with the U of M’s designation for “Curricular Engagement and Outreach Partnerships” being the highest level in the classification system. Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered by an act of Congress in 1906, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an independent policy and research center, whose primary activities of research and writing have resulted in published reports on every level of education. Influential achievements include development of the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association (TIAA), publication of the Flexner Report on medical education, creation of the Carnegie Unit, the founding of Education Testing Service and the establishment of the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The Carnegie Foundation was also a leader in the effort to provide federal aid for higher education in the form of Pell Grants, which assist low- and middle-income students. RECENT RESEARCH ACTIVITY During fiscal years 2011 through 2013, the University of Memphis was awarded $152.4 million in external research support. Fueled by strong multidisciplinary research programs in bioscience, hazards, learning technologies, transportation, K-12 education and public health, as well as niche specialties in sensor technology, economic research and student development in STEM, the University has more than doubled its annual research support since 2000. Combined, these areas accounted for $112 million, or 74 percent, of the University’s total externally supported research from 2011-2013. Multi-Disciplinary Research Focus Areas By their nature, multi-disciplinary focus areas involve a wide range of faculty applying multiple approaches to resolve big questions. The following six areas of multi-disciplinary research focus accounted for $95.2 million, or 62.5 percent of the U of M’s externally supported research activity during the past three years. BIOSCIENCE 3-year funding total: $15.6 million Bioscience research at the University of Memphis leverages strong connections to the region’s medical device manufacturers, as well as partnerships with UTHSC physician investigators and health care providers. This broad area includes emphases on implant technology, tissue engineering, bone regeneration, neuroscience, bio and nano materials science, bioimaging, genomics, computational chemistry and biomechanical modeling of human systems. In addition, this area leads the University’s recent efforts in commercialization and technology transfer. Programs and Partners Involved: Biomedical, Electrical and Computer, and Mechanical Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Neuropsychology, Health and Sport Sciences, and Bioinformatics; partners from the region’s medical device industry, Memphis BioWorks; UTHSC physician researchers; Southern College of Optometry; and Mayo Clinic. Also, Medtronic, Wright Medical, Spine Wave, Zimmer, Stryker, Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation, Abbott Labs, Advanced Neuromodulation Systems, General Electric Company, and the Memphis Research Consortium. HAZARDS 3-year funding total: $17.7 million With strong leadership in its Center for Earthquake Research and Information, the University of Memphis has become nationally known for its expertise in modeling, predicting and mitigating earthquake-related risks. Recently this focus has expanded to include investigations related to a broader range of natural and man-made disasters, including ground water and drinking water supplies, with activities supported by a strong and growing geographic information system infrastructure.

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Programs and Partners Involved: Center for Earthquake Research and Information, Civil Engineering, Earth Sciences, Center for Projects in GIS, the Ground Water Institute, and Chemistry (drinking water analytics); external partners include USGS, the Tennessee Seismic Safety Commission, MLGW, the City of Memphis, Shelby County Government and several manufacturing and insurance-related businesses. Also, State Farm, Radiance Technologies, Ring Industrial and American Water Works Association. LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES 3-year funding total: $13.4 million The University of Memphis is internationally known for its work in cognitive science related to the development and assessment of learning technologies. Comprised of researchers and students from the fields of computer science, mathematics, cognitive psychology, physics, neuroscience, education, linguistics, philosophy, anthropology, engineering and business, the Institute for Intelligent Systems is noted for its work in artificial intelligence, complex dynamic systems, neural networks, evolutionary modeling, massively parallel systems and biological systems. Programs and Partners Involved: Computer Science, Mathematics, Cognitive Psychology, Physics, Neuroscience, Education, Linguistics, Philosophy, Anthropology, Engineering and Business; external partners include the US Army, Navy, and Air Force, International Paper, The College Board, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, universities and school districts across the nation and software development companies. TRANSPORTATION 3-year funding total: $7.3 million As North America’s distribution center, Memphis is a focal point for intermodal transportation. Strategically positioned with five Class 1 railroads, crossed by several interstate highways and home to the world’s largest air cargo airport and the nation’s fourth busiest inland waterway port, it is a major transportation hub. This effort includes faculty from supply chain management, information systems and transportation engineering, and addresses critical issues affecting the planning, design and operation of the nation’s intermodal freight transportation system with an emphasis on issues and opportunities that have special significance for Memphis, the State of Tennessee and the lower Mississippi Delta region. Programs and Partners Involved: Civil Engineering, Marketing and Supply Chain Management and Management Information Systems; external partners include the Memphis Regional Chamber, Tennessee Department of Transportation and multiple private companies. Also, Canadian National, FedEx and Ingram Barge.

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K-12 EDUCATION 3-year funding total: $19.3 million True to its roots as a teacher education school, the University of Memphis maintains a robust and multifaceted research program related to teacher preparation, school leadership, urban education and educational assessment. Through a broad set of partnerships with K-12 school districts, the University has received external support to develop and test new pedagogical methods with promise to address the unique needs of urban school students and exceptional students (special education), as well as teacher mentoring and induction. Through its Center for Research in Educational Policy, the University has earned a national reputation for research excellence in educational assessment. Programs and Partners Involved: Center for Research in Educational Policy, the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences (all departments), Center for Rehabilitation Research, and Special Education Institute; external partners include Shelby County Schools, Appalachian Regional Education Lab, Head Start and state pre-school programs, school districts and state Departments of Education across the nation (including Tennessee) and private educational research organizations. PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE 3-year funding total: $18.3 million High-need urban communities provide both unique opportunities and challenges related to health care research. With expertise in health economics, behavioral health research, and addictions, our researchers design and test interventions to address some of the region’s most pressing health problems (including smoking cessation and obesity) both independently and in collaboration with faculty at UTHSC. Programs and Partners Involved: Health Administration, Health Economics, Health and Sports Sciences, and Communication Sciences and Disorders ; external partners include Methodist Healthcare, Baptist Memorial Healthcare Corp., Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Assisi Foundation, the Plough Foundation, the Memphis-Shelby County Health Department, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee Healthcare Foundation, community-based health promotion organizations, the Urban Child Institute, the Memphis Research Consortium and a wide range of UTHSC faculty researchers. Niche Specialties In addition to the collaborative, multi-disciplinary approach represented on the previous page, the University has developed targeted expertise in the highly focused specialty areas described below. Collectively, these areas represent $17 million, or 11 percent of total externally funded research over the past three years. SENSORS 3-year funding total: $5.2 million The growth in nanotechnology combined with advances in computer science has made it possible to develop advanced diagnostic and detection sensors for use in a wide range of industries. Through strong support from the U.S. Army, Electrical Engineering faculty have developed advanced detection systems for use in security and advanced military settings. Faculty in computer science have received support from the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health to develop biosensors capable of measuring and transmitting information related to human stress and health indicators. Faculty in Chemistry have patented and licensed their thin film and sensor technologies. Programs and Partners Involved: Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Chemistry; external support is primarily from federal agencies. ECONOMIC RESEARCH 3-year funding total: $3.4 million The Sparks Bureau for Business and Economic Research (SBBER) has ranked among the largest and most successful business research centers in the nation for nearly two decades. SBBER conducts research related to economic, demographic and business issues that impact Tennessee and the surrounding region including economic impact studies,

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revenue forecasting, survey research, education and training studies, labor market analyses, welfare reform evaluations and economic development strategic plans and reviews. The SBBER is also home to three associated research centers: the Center for Manpower Studies, the Center for Real Estate Research and the Applied Information Technology Center. Programs and Partners Involved: The Sparks Bureau for Business and Economic Research; external partners include the Memphis Regional Chamber, the Memphis Realtors Association and the state of Tennessee, as well as city and county government. WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT IN STEM 3-year funding total: $8.4 million Several years ago, a core group of scientists began to develop targeted initiatives to recruit, retain and ensure the success of students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Resulting efforts to reach out to the K-12 community and develop innovative ways to support a non-traditional and historically disadvantaged student population have brought national recognition through National Science Foundation grants to support research experiences for students, internships and the development of new curricula. In addition, external private support has been secured to develop innovative summer outreach programs and school-year-based mentoring initiatives. Strong support from state and federal government through the Tennessee Race to the Top program has provided additional impetus for development of cutting edge teacher professional development and K-12 school support programs in STEM areas. Programs and Partners Involved: Engineering, Education, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science and Biology; external partners include Shelby County Schools, local and national industry and subject matter teaching associations, including the American Chemical Society, the Tennessee Math and Science Teachers’ Associations, etc., private donors, Volkswagen Group of America, and the National Science Foundation. This represents a fraction of the important research that is currently taking place at the University of Memphis.

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CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE The University of Memphis has five Centers of Excellence.

Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) Established 1977 - Dr. Chuck Langston, director This “stand-alone” center facilitates interdisciplinary research and is devoted to understanding causes and consequences of earthquakes through the use of state-of-the-art seismic and GPS networks. The Center also provides necessary technical and practical information to the public. Degrees related to CERI’s mission are awarded in conjunction with the Department of Civil Engineering and the Department of Earth Sciences. Center for Applied Psychological Research (CAPR) Established 1984 - Dr. Guy Mittleman, director CAPR applies scientific methods and the knowledge of psychology to solve problems of individuals, communities and society. Programs offered by the Center include the Psychological Services Center, which serves the Memphis area. Its initiatives address a number of societal issues, such as smoking cessation (including those funded by the National Institute of Health), adolescent obesity, gambling addiction, reducing health risks in minority populations, job-related stress reduction and the causes/effects of drugs and alcohol on the brain. It is also involved in the creation of intelligent tutoring systems, issues of grief/loss and assisting with workforce training to meet the changing needs of Tennessee business and industry. The Center staff has worked with state and local agencies to address autism, teen pregnancy prevention, highway safety and sexual misconduct among mental health professionals. For every $1 invested by Tennessee in CAPR, its faculty members bring in $5.50 in external grants. It is housed within the Department of Psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences. Center for Research Initiatives and Strategies for the Communicatively Impaired (CRISCI) Established 1984 - Dr. Maurice Mendel, director Research areas of CRISCI include remediation of communication difficulties experienced by persons with hearing impairment, the development and improvement of devices and methods concerning issues associated with hearing aids, cochlear physiology in typical and impaired human listeners, assessment of speech perception by hearing and hearing-impaired persons, stuttering, infant vocal development, communication disorders resulting from acquired neural disorders, and communication in children with autism spectrum disorder. Housed within the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, its faculty members are recognized nationally and internationally for their contributions to their respective fields. Institute for Egyptian Art and Archaeology (IEAA) Established 1984 - Dr. Lorelei Corcoran, director The Institute houses the Mid-South’s largest collection of ancient Egyptian artifacts, 1,100 items. The collection is used by scholars from around the world, and is often the subject of field trips by students from local and regional school systems. The Institute has also initiated and sponsored several significant archaeological endeavors in Egypt. These include the Great Hypostyle Hall project at Karnak, Egypt, in 1993; the sponsorship of the Amenmesse Project in the Valley of the Kings in 1995; and a cooperative project with Italian Archaeological Mission to Luxor, Tomb of Harwa at Thebes in 2003. In 2006, a U of M team discovered a new tomb, #63, in the Valley of the Kings. That discovery received worldwide attention in the mass media as well as in scholarly circles. It is housed in the Department of Art within the College of Communication and Fine Arts. Center for Research in Educational Policy (CREP) Established 1989 - Dr. Martha Alberg, director CREP is dedicated to improving Pre/K-through-12 education. It is nationally recognized in the areas of school reform and choice, teacher education, educational technology, intervention for at-risk students, literacy, after-school programs, and evaluation methods for school improvement decision-making. CREP customizes its research for each “customer’s” needs, with its results being used locally, regionally and nationally. Among the services CREP provides are program evaluation

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strategies, data collection, student evaluations, school administrator assessments and professional development and training. The faculty and staff of CREP have worked with educators in Tennessee, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Michigan and Texas. They have assisted charter schools, Catholic schools and public schools. They have been particularly helpful to school systems in assisting them with meeting the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. CREP has also devised programs associated with such disciplines as engineering, algebra and science, and it has been important to the success of the Memphis Math Academy and the Smart Tennessee statewide financial literacy program. CREP is housed within the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences.

PARTNERSHIPS Building productive partnerships is a cornerstone of the University’s mission and vision. As a metropolitan research University, the U of M strives to form mutually beneficial partnerships with business, government and community groups that foster learning for our students, provide support for our faculty and positively impact the quality of life in the Greater Memphis community. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching recognized the University of Memphis’ commitment in 2006 by awarding of the classification of Curricular Engagement and Outreach and Partnerships and the University has been named a member of the President’s Honor Roll for Community Service each year since its inception in 2007. At any given time, the University of Memphis has approximately 1,200 active partnerships in the community. These range from safe community projects, regional economic development, leadership development and reading initiatives to improving our neighborhoods, providing free legal counseling and helping to prevent such societal problems as smoking, obesity and teenage pregnancy. Here are just a few ways in which the U of M has teamed up with the community to yield positive change. • Partnerships with the United States Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee and the National Institute of Justice support various projects including the Memphis Sexual Assault Research Project, Project Safe Neighborhoods and the COMPASS program. • The U of M’s Center for Information Assurance (CfIA), the only Tennessee institution designated by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research (CAE-R). The Center develops educational tools, programs and training for use throughout the Mid-South. By regularly offering information assurance courses and hosting workshops for students and professionals, including police officers and other law enforcement officials, CfIA works to create a future of secure online commerce and a safe computing environment. • The Center for Intermodal Freight Transportation of the Herff College of Engineering has partnered with the U. S. Department of Transportation and the Tennessee Department of Transportation to conduct research on freight-related information technology, network evaluation, public risk assessment, infrastructure analyses and economic, environmental and safety impact analysis. Significant corporate partnerships with CN, Ingram Barge and FedEx have also fueled these efforts. • The College of Education, Health and Human Sciences partners with multiple school districts in the Leadership Fellows Program, a cohort initiative where U of M faculty work with groups of school administrators to prepare them to fill critical leadership positions in K-12 schools. The University has also received funding to support a West Tennessee STEM Hub and demonstration school that will provide professional development for individuals to become Master Teachers, who will then serve as a resource for other science and math teachers in their districts. • The University Neighborhood Partnership is a collaboration between the University of Memphis, neighborhood

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groups and public and private entities that supports the economic and social development in the University District. Faculty from every college, senior staff from Business & Finance and Student Affairs, as well as representatives from the city of Memphis and Shelby County have joined with neighborhood organizations to comprehensively address social, health, urban design and safety issues in neighborhoods surrounding the University of Memphis. The most recent success was the receipt by the City of Memphis of a Tennessee Department of Transportation grant to revitalize nearby Walker Avenue. • The University’s School of Urban Affairs and Public Policy has partnered with the Community Foundation of Memphis and United Way of the Mid-South to create a Strengthening Communities Program designed to build capacity in neighborhoods and community organizations while furthering the engaged scholarship activities of the university faculty. In the five years since its inception, 32 capacity-building and small grants have been awarded to improve neighborhoods and spur economic growth. Thirty community-partner organizations have hosted projects with 23 faculty/student research partners funded. Nearly $350,000 in total combined dollars has been invested in community-based projects and research. Two examples of the process and outcomes of the Strengthening Communities initiative are the South Memphis project and the Memphis Music Magnet. • The U of M Ground Water Institute has teamed with researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to find undiscovered fault lines under the Mississippi River, to see if fault lines running under the river shape the lowest points and to determine the flow of the river and how the Mississippi River and the aquifer interact with each other. • The FedEx Institute of Technology is an epicenter for interdisciplinary research and has partnered with local venture capitalists, business advisors and area industry to launch a robust Technology Transfer program designed to identify and rapidly move university-developed technologies to the marketplace. Centers and Institutes are producing discoveries in logistics, biomedical engineering, technology and education, matching the industrial clusters in the area. To support innovation within the community, the FedEx Institute and the Fogelman College of Business and Economics are collaborating with experienced innovation practitioners to launch the Memphis Innovation Bootcamp, an intensive, hands-on introduction to the latest concepts in design thinking.

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• The U of M Center for Economic Education, in partnership with First Tennessee, supports economic and financial literacy training workshops for area K-12 teachers and administrators. These workshops help them incorporate economic and financial literacy into their existing curricula, modeling for students how to incorporate good decision-making behavior and analytical thinking in all areas of their lives. • The Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law has partnered with Memphis Area Legal Services to provide free legal services to under-represented clients. The University supports a Child Advocacy Clinic, a Civil Advocacy Clinic, a Domestic Violence Clinic and an Elder Law Clinic. • The Memphis Research Consortium (MRC) is a regional collaborative that promotes research among partner organizations and facilitates the transfer of information, ideas and technologies from research entities to the commercial marketplace and the community. MRC leverages the region’s existing research assets and collaborations and supports new academic-industry research partnerships tied to regional economic interests and national research priorities. Its goal is to further West Tennessee’s reputation as a leader in research related to areas of strength and opportunity in bioscience and bioengineering, health and medicine, transportation and logistics and learning technologies. Partner institutions include: University of Memphis, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis Bioworks Foundation, FedEx Corp., Smith & Nephew, Wright Medical Technology Inc., Medtronic Inc., Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp., Methodist Healthcare and St. Jude Children’s Research Center. • The School of Public Health is a partner in Healthy Shelby, one of the five Memphis Fast Forward Initiatives, which strategically aim at accelerating economic growth and improving the quality of life in Memphis and Shelby County. Collaborating with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Healthy Shelby is pursuing economic vitality by achieving three essential goals of better health, better care, and lower healthcare costs, also known as the “Triple Aim” - care transitions (end of life care), infant mortality reduction and chronic disease. These health conditions account for the majority of healthcare costs. The program is a partnership of local governments and private and not-for-profit businesses, including Shelby County and city of Memphis governments, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp., Saint Francis Hospital and the Regional Medical Center. The School of Public Health plays a key role in research and evaluation for the program.

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• FIT Kids: The national child obesity epidemic is especially serious in Tennessee which has received a grade of “F” on the national “Report Card: State Efforts to Control Childhood Obesity.” Funded by the FedEx Institute of Technology, the School of Public Health is working with several community partners, including The YMCA of Memphis and the Mid-South and Church Health Center, to develop an electronic tool to help parents understand their children’s risk of obesity and provide recommendations for healthy living. The revised FIT Kids tool will be a web-based application that will assess behavioral risk factors for childhood obesity, provide lifestyle change recommendations and link parents to community health resources.

ALUMNI One of the University’s largest contributions to the greater community is our alumni. Many have become nationally and internationally renowned in their fields. More than a few have gone on to stardom as actors, authors, politicians and corporate executives. Locally, our alumni have made a huge impact on the community, especially in the fields of business, banking, law, education and the arts. More than 66,000 of our graduates live within a 40-mile radius of Memphis. With more than 127,000 living alumni, the University of Memphis has actively worked to enlist all of them as ambassadors for the University and to increase the size of our Alumni Association. Membership has grown by more than 1,000 percent over the last ten years, increasing from 1,117 to 12,000, the largest growth in U of M history. There are now over 70 clubs, chapters and areas of participation. Alumni play a vital role in the life of the University through philanthropy, volunteer participation, student recruitment and athletic support. The Alumni Association annually hosts more than 300 events for alumni.

http://www.memphis.edu/alumni/index.php

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TIGER ATHLETICS There is something special about the relationship between the City of Memphis and its hometown Tigers. It’s a part of a tradition that dates back more than 100 years. It began with a simple chant that reverberated throughout the city, “We Fight Like Tigers”. A rallying cry for a fledgling football team – it became a source of pride, unity and identity for a city in need of positive reinforcement. Now, more than a century later, though the names and faces of the athletes have changed many times, Memphis still wears its heart on its sleeve when it comes to the Tigers. Woven into the fabric of every big game and memorable play are the hopes, fears and elations of the Tiger faithful who fill Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium on sweltering September afternoons or pack FedExForum to capacity on a December mid-week evening. They come to watch their hometown team do battle. It’s part of their civic pride. If the Tigers win, the city wins as well. The athletic program has grown exponentially over the past century, but the relationship that was forged in the days when cotton was king and steam-driven paddle-wheel boats were an everyday occurrence on the mighty Mississippi River has never wavered. Tiger sports remain special – so distinctly a part of the city’s identity. Athletic Leadership Tom Bowen was named the University of Memphis Director of Athletics in April 2012 after serving in the same role at San Jose State University for eight years. Since his arrival, Bowen has held fact-finding meetings, gathered information from a variety of sources and groups about Tiger athletics, raised funds for capital building projects, restructured and realigned his staff and set about building a “culture of champions.” The charismatic leader has overseen the construction of a state-of-the-art training and medical rehab center in the Elma Roane Fieldhouse for women’s athletics; kicked off the construction of a fully certified, Olympic-style track facility at the Park Avenue Campus; and will soon launch a project to add a modern clubhouse for the women’s softball team, all while moving at a rapid pace to add an indoor football practice facility and a new men’s basketball practice facility. Externally, Bowen was a driving force in the formation of the new American Athletic Conference, as well as serving on the BCS Athletic Directors Advisory Board representing the American Athletic Conference.

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The American Athletic Conference The University of Memphis began competition in the American Athletic Conference in the fall of 2013. The American consists of numerous athletic programs which are very familiar to Tiger fans. League membership included Houston, SMU, UCF, USF, Cincinnati, Temple, Louisville, Rutgers, Connecticut and Memphis for the 2013 season. East Carolina, Tulane and Tulsa will be added in 2014 to replace Louisville and Rutgers. Navy will enter the conference in 2015 as a football-playing member only. Tiger Scholarship Fund The athletic department’s fund-raising division, the Tiger Scholarship Fund (TSF), has continued to set records for dollars raised for more than 18 years. Since 1995, the Tiger Scholarship Fund has taken donation levels from approximately $1.8 million annually to the current level of more than $7 million per year. TSF contributions play an essential role in providing student-athletes with the opportunity to receive a college education, while competing at the highest level of collegiate sports. Indoor Football Facility In June 2011, the Memphis athletic department announced the “Vision for Victory” campaign, a $10 million capital project designed to directly benefit the Tiger football program. Approximately $8 million of the campaign, funded by private donations, is allocated for the construction of a 90,000 sq. ft. indoor practice field. The remaining funds will be used for continued improvements to the current Murphy Athletic Complex football training center. An extensive remodeling and branding project was completed in recent months. Football Weight Room The Tiger football team celebrated the grand opening of its new 13,000 sq. ft. weight training facility in February 2011. The $3 million project, used solely by the Tiger football team, was made possible through privately donated funds. The

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spacious state-of-the-art weight room can accommodate multiple groups training simultaneously and features multiple power racks, as well as various free weights and weight training machines. A portion of the facility is designed for cardio and rehab work. Frank Flautt Golf Training Center In the fall of 2009, the Athletic Department opened the Frank L. Flautt Golf Training Center at the Park Avenue Campus. The 6,000 sq. ft. practice facility has six hitting bays which open onto a 425-yard driving range. There is a 2.5 acre short game practice area and four Champion Bermuda putting greens. The Flautt Center is equipped with a V-1 swing-analysis system, Flight-Scope, a Tomi putting training system, men’s and women’s locker rooms, coaches’ offices, a players’ lounge, study areas with Internet service, and equipment and cart storage areas. FedExPark The Tiger baseball program opened its new facility, FedExPark, in April 2010. The stadium has a state-of-the-art clubhouse with indoor pitching and hitting areas, coaches and team locker rooms, training room, laundry room and meeting and recruiting rooms. There are new team dugouts with the Tigers’ home dugout being attached to the clubhouse. The stadium features a new press box and suites, radio broadcasts booths, television broadcast booth, as well as a modern concession stand. Larry O. Finch Center The men’s basketball team trains each day in the Larry O. Finch Training Center on the Memphis campus. The Finch Center, which has been compared to several NBA practice facilities, has had recent upgrades which include a Hall of Fame area, new player lounge, larger meeting rooms, a new training and physical conditioning area and a new video theatre and technology center. A HydroWorx pool was installed in the Finch Center training room in 2013. Elma Roane Fieldhouse The Memphis women’s basketball and volleyball teams play their home events in the Elma Roane Fieldhouse. The facility, which had new locker rooms, meeting rooms, film rooms and a player lounge added in 2011, recently underwent another major renovation. In July 2013, the women’s athletic program moved into a new, state-of-the-art athletic training and strength and conditioning center located on the first floor of the facility. The renovated area contains a new weight training center, a cardio-fitness area, a HydroWorx PolarPlunge pool, a second HydroWorx pool equipped with an underwater treadmill for injury rehabilitation, four 40-yard sprint tracks, a laundry facility and a players’ lounge. Tiger Softball Complex In 2006, the athletic department opened the Lady Tiger Softball Complex at the Park Avenue Campus. A construction project will start in spring 2014 to add a clubhouse to the already modern facility. The clubhouse will contain coaches’ offices, a team meeting room, indoor hitting and pitching facilities and a medical training and examination room. Tiger Track Private donations are being used to construct a new, nine-lane BSS 1000 Dual Durometer Synthetic track and stadium at the Park Avenue Campus. Separate throwing areas are located north of the track and will include a competition and practice shot put training pit. Jumping and steeplechase competition areas will be located at the south end of the track. The facility will also include a full soccer field in the infield area. Additional phases of the project will add lights, scoreboard, press box, locker rooms and an expanded grandstand. Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium/Rex Dockery Field Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium serves as the home venue for the Memphis Tiger football team. The stadium, which has a seating capacity of 59,308 and offers 44 luxury suites, has recently undergone several renovation projects. Prior to the kickoff of the 2010 season, the city of Memphis officially opened Tiger Lane, a $16 million tailgating fan experience area located on the property west of the stadium gates. A second major project was completed in time for the 2012 season which included multiple improvements funded by FedEx, the city of Memphis and the University of Memphis. The

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most visually impressive change was a new, 98’x48’ HD video board in the stadium’s south end zone. The project also included a new 38’x12’ scoreboard in the north end zone. In addition, new LED light standards were added that provide 50 percent more lighting yet cut energy costs, a new synthetic turf playing surface, renovations to the concessions stands, new elevators and a painting and sealing of the exterior of the Liberty Bowl. The press box and sky suites were updated and remodeled prior to the 2013 season. FedExForum The Memphis Tiger basketball team utilizes FedExForum for its home games. One of the finest basketball facilities in the nation, the venue also serves as the home court for the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies. Opened in 2004, the 18,400-seat arena gives the Tigers one of the most modern facilities in the nation. Memphis has ranked among the NCAA’s leaders in attendance 12 of the past 13 years, averaging over 15,600 fans per contest since the 2000-01 season. The facility includes restaurants, gift shops, modern concession stands and other amenities that offer Tiger fans a word-class game day experience. FedExForum, which will serve as the host venue for the first American Athletic Conference Tournament, will again play host to the NCAA Regional Finals in 2014. Mike Rose Soccer Complex The Memphis men’s and women’s soccer programs play their home matches at the 136-acre Mike Rose Soccer Complex. The facility features 16 FIFA-dimension, lighted playing fields and a 5,000 seat main stadium, which provides all of the amenities required to televise/and or video stream each contest.

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Racquet Club of Memphis The Memphis men’s and women’s tennis programs recently moved their home matches and daily training and practice sessions to the Racquet Club of Memphis. Located just two miles from campus, the facility offers the teams both indoor and outdoor courts. The Tigers have their own new locker rooms and player lounges and the teams play on the same courts used during the annual ATP Tour stop in Memphis. A new pavilion is currently under construction on the outdoor courts for fan comfort. Having the Racquet Club as a home venue has benefited both the men’s and women’s teams in their climbs in the national rankings each year. Other Athletic Facilities Other University of Memphis athletic facilities include RangeMaster, an indoor shooting facility which serves as the home of the Memphis Tiger Rifle team and AutoZone Park, the St. Louis Cardinals’ AAA baseball stadium in Memphis. The state-of-the-art baseball stadium, which has been compared to several major league parks, is located in downtown Memphis and serves the Tigers as a home field for games that might sell out FedExPark. Future Projects Not to rest on what has been accomplished over the past few years, Director Tom Bowen has very specific strategic building plans for the future. Plans are on the drawing board for several major capital projects including a men’s basketball practice facility at the Park Avenue Campus, a remodel and renovation of the main basketball arena in the Elma Roane Fieldhouse, an office complex for athletic coaches at the Park Avenue Campus, a second building phase for FedExPark, as well as the second phase of construction for the current track/soccer project at the Park Avenue campus.

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WHAT WE HAVE ACCOMPLISHED A University’s success can be measured in many ways. Student engagement, faculty and staff awards, alumni accomplishments and athletic success are just some of these benchmarks. Below are a few of our additional accomplishments.

RANKINGS The University of Memphis has several nationally ranked programs. • Our Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology graduate programs are ranked 12th and 15th nationally by U.S. News & World Report. • Based on low tuition and high passage rates on the Tennessee Bar exam, the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law is ranked nationally in preLaw magazine’s “best value” category. • Our master’s degree program in rehabilitation counseling is ranked 17th nationally by U.S. News & World Report. • The Communication Department’s Rhetorical Studies Ph.D. program was ranked in the top 15 nationally by the National Communication Association.

CHAIRS OF EXCELLENCE The University of Memphis has 24 Chairs of Excellence, more than any other university in Tennessee Board of Regents system. A Chair of Excellence is a definitive authority in his or her field. Below is the list broken down by discipline:

College of Arts and Sciences Bornblum Chair in Judaic Studies – Vacant W. Harry Feinstone Chair in Molecular Biology – Tom Sutter Jabie Sanford Hardin III Chair in Combinatorics – Bela Bollobas Lillian and Morrie Moss Chair in English - Vacant Lillian and Morrie Moss Chair in Philosophy – Shaun Gallagher Lillian and Morrie Moss Chair in Psychology – J. Gayle Beck Fogelman College of Business and Economics William N. Morris Chair in International Economics – David Kemme Robert Wang Chair in International Business – Ben Kedia Sparks Family Chair in International Business - Vacant Sales and Marketing Executives Inc. Chair in Sales – Rajiv Grover Arthur Andersen and Company Alumni Chair in Accounting – Vacant Thompson-Hill Chair in Accounting - Zabihollah “Zabi” Rezaee Morris S. Fogelman Chair in Real Estate - Mark Sunderman Wunderlich Chair in Finance – Thomas H. McInish University of Memphis Chair in Free Enterprise Management – Peter Wright Federal Express Chair in Management Information Systems – William J. Kettinger School of Communication Sciences and Disorders Plough Chair in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology – D. Kimbrough Oller

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College of Communication and Fine Arts Dorothy Kayser Hohenberg Chair in Art History – Yasser Tabbaa Helen and Jabie Hardin Chair of Economics/Managerial Journalism – Otis Sanford College of Education, Health and Human Sciences Lillian and Morrie Moss Chair in Urban Education - Beverly Cross Herff College of Engineering Herbert Herff Chair in Biomedical Engineering (I) - Warren O. Haggard Herbert Herff Chair in Biomedical Engineering (II) – Gary Bowlin Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law Herbert Herff Chair in Law - Andrew McClurg Loewenberg School of Nursing William A. and Ruth F. Loewenberg Chair in Nursing – Sunghee Tak

OTHER TIGER PRIDE U.S. News & World Report, in conjunction with the National Council on Teacher Quality, ranked the elementary and secondary teacher preparation programs at the University of Memphis among the Honor Roll in its first Teacher Prep Review. The University of Memphis has one of the top 10 most successful internship programs of any college or university in the nation, according to the “Short List” published by U.S. News & World Report. The College Database recognized the University of Memphis as the top college in Tennessee for students interested in military service. U of M faculty include Emmy, Grammy and Peabody award winners, in addition to Fulbright recipients. The University of Memphis chapter of Up `til Dawn raised more than $122,000 for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital for the 2012-13 academic year, making it the top fundraising chapter in the country. For two straight years, Tiger Athletics was recognized by the NCAA as having an Academic Progress Rate (APR) among the top 10 percent nationally for Baseball, Men’s Basketball, Women’s Golf and Women’s Tennis. The University of Memphis campus has been designated a Level 2 Arboretum by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council and the Tennessee State Division of Forestry. To achieve that designation requires that at least 60 varieties of trees must be labeled and available for a self-guided tour. The Loewenberg School of Nursing has one of the largest BSN and MSN programs at a public university in Tennessee. Graduates consistently score high on licensure exams, and several classes have scored 100 percent. The Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology is home to the largest public collection of Egyptian antiquities in the MidSouth. Our Center for Earthquake Research and Information maintains a 144-station seismic network throughout the southeastern United States for earthquake monitoring, and conducts scientific research on all continents of the world.

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The Tennessee Department of Health has designated the U of M Gambling Clinic as the state gambling addiction treatment center for the West Tennessee area. The University of Memphis is consistently ranked one of the safest large campuses in the state of Tennessee. For more than a decade, the pass rate on the bar exam for graduates of the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law has exceeded state averages. The Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music is the only doctoral degree-granting music school in the state of Tennessee and within a 300-mile radius of the city of Memphis. The Campus School at the University of Memphis has been recognized as one of the highest achieving schools in Tennessee, with 99 percent of its students scoring proficient or advanced in both reading and math. The U of M was named to the first President’s Honor Roll in 2006 for Distinguished Community Service with distinction for hurricane relief service. It has been honored every year since then. More than half of the doctoral faculty in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders are Fellows of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). This designation is awarded to only about one percent of the 118,000 members of ASHA.

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Each semester more than 200 U of M students provide volunteer note taking services to fellow students with disabilities. Their generosity helps the University keep costs down, while providing quality accommodations to disabled students. More than 50 judges in the State of Tennessee are graduates of the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law. All academic buildings on the main U of M campus have wireless Internet access. The Center for Information Assurance (CfIA) has been designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the National Security Agency (NSA). The center is committed to community cyber security research and to community education concerning this crucial issue.

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WHERE WE ARE GOING PRIORITIES The University exists to provide learning, research and service. To that end, we have established eight major initiatives for 2013-14. • Enrollment – To build actionable plans to increase enrollment by 1,700 students by 2016. • Complete College – To put processes and accountabilities in place to increase the completion percentage for the entering freshman class of 2013-14 to 55 percent, and to develop completion strategies and metrics for transfers and non-traditional entrants. • College of Education – To make the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences the top producer in the nation of great K-12 teachers, and to provide at least 400 great teachers per year in our core geographic market. • Organizational Effectiveness and Efficiency – To complete a strategic review of the University’s organization and operations to improve effectiveness and efficiency so we can reinvest in strategic priorities, and to streamline our working relationship with the Tennessee Board of Regents to improve speed and responsiveness, as well as reduce expenses. • Integrated Plan – To develop an integrated plan for the Park Avenue Campus (including the launch of a $40 million capital improvement plan for Athletics), and to establish priorities for repurposing existing facilities. • Service Quality – To develop best-of-class standards and to create incentives and accountabilities for performance. • Top 30 – To develop 10-year human capital plans between the U of M and the top 30 employers in our core geographic market. • Advisory Boards – To create effective community advisory boards for certain University programs and student support services to drive more strategic insight, community engagement and support. As the university moves forward, it will engage in a continuous dialog of assessing its plan, analyzing its progress and articulating its outcomes.

CAMPUS MASTER PLAN We have just completed design and awarded construction contracts for two major facility additions to the University. The Community Health Building is being constructed on the Park Avenue Campus, and will encompass approximately 162,000 sq. ft. and will provide new accommodations for an expanded Loewenberg School of Nursing, the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders and the Memphis Speech and Hearing Center. A new student housing facility has been designed and is under construction as a replacement for Richardson Towers. This new facility will house more than 750 beds with classrooms, study rooms and residence life operations. It has a mix of living/learning suites and apartment-style housing to accommodate all students. We are currently engaged with design teams to pre-plan our next major facility addition to the University. The biochemistry and biology facility for expanded research in those fields will be approximately 68,000 sq. ft. and will also house a central animal care facility. The project design is complete and funds are being requested through the state capital outlay program.

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In 2010, we opened our new University Center. This 170,000 sq. ft. complex is the largest building project on campus since the completion of the Ned McWherter Library in 1994. The three-story building houses a grand atrium, food court and full-service restaurant, student organization offices, conference rooms, a 350-seat theatre, a ballroom, post office and a 24-hour computer lab. We also began holding classes in our beautiful Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law building in downtown Memphis. One of the primary benefits of the relocation of the law school, for students as well as for members of the bar and the bench, is its proximity to the courts and many of our local law offices. Students are able to observe the day-to-day workings of the legal system, while attorneys and judges have easy access to the law school’s library. In June 2011, the Gulf States Region of the American Institute of Architects awarded its highest honor to two Memphis firms – Askew Nixon Ferguson Architects (ANFA) and Fleming Associates Architects – for their “sensitive” renovation of the former U.S. Customs House/ Post Office for the law school. Also in fall 2010, we opened our new Living Learning Residence Hall designed to accommodate approximately 496 students in our Helen Hardin Honors Program. It replaced the old West Hall and includes classroom space as well as living areas. Students live in “neighborhoods” that accommodate 18 to 22 students each. The buildings meet State of Tennessee Sustainable Design Standards in terms of “green” design.

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SUSTAINABILITY Seven years ago, former University of Memphis President Shirley Raines signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment, signifying the University’s commitment to addressing environmental challenges. Since then, the U of M has developed a sustainability plan that is expanding current campus efforts to become more sustainable, integrate sustainability into campus policies and curriculum, support the development of an environmentally conscious culture on campus and work with the greater Memphis community to foster sustainability initiatives. The student-initiated Green Activities Fee has been implemented, resulting in about $400,000 annually used for educational purposes, events such as the Mid-South’s largest “green” event — Tiger Blue Goes Green Day each October — and outfitting the U of M’s patrol fleet with several hybrid vehicles, resulting in a 30 percent annual reduction in fuel consumption. Recycling efforts have increased 500 percent. The University has added the Recycling Zone Prototype near Mynders Hall, which is serving as a demonstration site for sustainable practices and is available to students, faculty and others to deposit a wide range of recyclable materials. The U of M also boasts a student residence complex that was the first and most sustainable public building in Tennessee, meeting LEED Silver standards in sustainability and green design. The University’s expansive TIGUrS garden, adjacent to the Elma Roane Fieldhouse, features dozens of varieties of fruits and vegetables and serves as an educational tool for University and Campus School students as well as the general public. Architecture students developed and designed the TERRA House, a futuristic sustainable demonstration house in Memphis’ Uptown neighborhood that has become a model for the nation. The student-designed TERRA (Technologically and Environmental Responsible Residential Architecture) House received the top Platinum rating from the Green Building Council.

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SUMMARY As the University of Memphis enters its second century, its longstanding tradition of academic excellence and its vision for the future will be held out for the community, and the world, to see. While we have accomplished much in the last century, we know the future holds even greater promise. Not only will we continue to attract and retain the best and brightest students, faculty and staff, but we will also work diligently to increase both the number and the scope of our productive partnerships so we can build an even better tomorrow for our fellow citizens. We will continue to build upon our research initiatives by tapping into the ingenuity and expertise of our faculty and students to make new discoveries, to patent new technologies and to realize heightened creativity in the arts. The University of Memphis is comprised of is the summation of all of our pursuits.

Dreamers. Thinkers. Doers. This is who we are. It is what we do. It

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www.memphis.edu The University of Memphis is a Tennessee Board of Regents Institution. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University •UOM247-FY1314/2C50


U of M Fact Book : 2013