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WEDNESDAY JULY 20, 2016 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 5 www.UniversityStar.com

Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Over 200 people gathered at the Hays County Courthouse for Black Lives Matter march Jul.17. PHOTO BY RUSSELL REED | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BLACK LIVES MATTER marches through San Marcos for peace JeriLynn Thorpe News Reporter @jerilynnthorpe The Black Lives Matter organization in San Marcos invited the community to march for unity and justice Sunday evening. The event brought together hundreds of people from San Marcos, Texas State and surrounding areas for a night of solidarity. Texas State junior, Russell Boyd, organized the march along with 12 other Texas State students and alumni. “This was motivated in response to the recent tragedies that have happened around the country, along with the murders of Alton Sterling and Philando

Castile and in mourning of the five officers in Dallas,” Boyd said. Many BLM allies in San Marcos contributed resources for the event. San Marcos Police Department volunteered their time to patrol the event while other members of the community donated water, food, sound equipment and vehicles. One city council member, four members of clergy, EMS and a criminal defense lawyer were among those in attendance. The march began at Greater Bethel Baptist Church and continued to Hays County Courthouse where the organization’s leaders spoke on their personal experiences of mar-

ginalization, racially profiled encounters with police and what people can do to make a change. Chelsea Jordan, Iowa State alumna, came to the event because she feels if change does happen, she wants to say she was a part of it. “It is an issue, not just for black people, but everybody. We see the issues and we are ready for change,” Jones said. “Black lives matter too. We want everyone to know we aren’t just here as standby people. And that needs to be said.” Of the many issues addressed, a standout concern among the organization was politics and getting the community out to the polls.

Associate Professor of History at Texas State, Dwight Watson, was one of the first speakers at the courthouse. Watson opened with thanking the SMPD for being kind and courteous, but didn’t shy away from what history has shown him. “Every 20-30 years, we fight a fight on police brutality,” Watson said. “You all must get politically active. Elect people that will go to office and reflect things that are in your interest, not theirs.” Boyd said that in order for the country to support the BLM movement, there needs to be conversations within the homes of “privileged” people.

“What can people do who possess privilege in order to ensure that people of color are receiving the same amount of justice and equality,” Boyd said. “It starts with an open and honest conversation. There needs to be a lot of reform and change within the political system as far as people who possess privilege and are not allies to the community. That comes from, really, a strong sense of voting among minority communities.” Activist Skyller Walkes read aloud a poem in response to the murder of Castile and encouraged the community to put action behind their thoughts and prayers.

“I know that we are here to incite change,” Walkes said. “We are showing up at the table, but here’s the thing, we are showing up at the table, and we are equipped to have the discussion. We are no longer going to be prawns in a system that doesn’t recognize our humanity.” In closing, the leaders read the proclamation given to them by Mayor Daniel Guerrero, establishing July 17 as Love and Light Day. Currently, BLM in San Marcos is in the process of planning several initiatives to promote voting and making sure leaders are deputized to get people to register to vote.

CITY

Community contributes to making San Marcos a familyfriendly enviornment “Greetings from San Marcos” mural July 18. San Marcos was rated in the top 10 for worst cities in the US for families by WalletHub.

By Bri Watkins Assistant News Reporter @briwatkins17 WalletHub ranked San Marcos as one of the worst Texas cities to live in for families due to its lack of affordable housing. San Marcos has experienced a tremendous population growth over the years which has strained the regional and local housing market, said Kevin Burke, economic development and downtown administrator for the city. “The supply of new homes has not kept pace with demand, and as a result, housing in San Marcos has become less afford-

able,” Burke said. The City of San Marcos is moving in the direction of developing new housing stock at all price points. Blanco Vista, Cottonwood Creek and Kissing Tree are among the current developments under construction. To expand the residential and mixed-use master plan communities, the City has granted entitlements for several other developments expected to break ground soon. “The addition of this significant volume of highquality new housing stock is expected to relieve price pressure on the local housing market and contribute to the amenities and hous-

PHOTO BY VANESSA BELL | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

ing choices that make San Marcos a desirable community,” Burke said. With a vision to make a more affordable housing market for families, the city offers many programs which create a familyfriendly community. The Youth Services division in the Parks and Recreation Department hosts a variety of family-oriented programs including Movies in your Park, Daddy Daughter Dance and a Fall Family Ball. The city also provides summer camps, events for children with disabilities and training workshops. “The Youth Services division of the Parks and Rec-

reation Department is constantly looking at ways to partner with organizations to host more programs for children,” said Jessica Ramos, Youth Service Manager. Although San Marcos is home to the fast growing university, Texas State, the Youth Services division has compassed a partnership with the institution. “Without their help, we would be unable to host many of our programs,” Ramos said. The Therapeutic Recreation students serve in some of the programs including Fun Fish Day, an event for children with disabilities.

Youth Services also receive volunteer help from many Texas State students for the Fall and Spring carnivals. Along with programs hosted by the city, the San Marcos Public Library also contributes to assembling family activities. The San Marcos Public Library is a popular place for residents of Hays County. The library holds a collection books, CDs and DVDs for children and adults. During the summer, the library has provided over 100 free programs designed for babies through teens including story times, puppet shows, crafts and Lego Mania.

A variety of different programs are held Tuesday nights for families to enjoy quality time together, said Library Director Diane Insley. The library has collaborated with other agencies, organizations and individuals to provide young citizens with a rich literary experience including a monthly tradition of ‘Fired Up for Reading’ presented by the city firefighters. Firemen read stories, demonstrate equipment and give tours of the fire trucks to children. Residents can visit the San Marcos calendar to get more information on dates and times of events.


2 | Wednesday, July 20, 2016

NEWS

The University Star Bailey Buckingham, News Editor @bcbuckingham

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

TRAFFIC

State Highway 45 Southwest project to move forward Lesly De Leon News Reporter @leslyd28 The State Highway 45 Southwest project moved forward after the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority board approved seeking bids for construction of the four-lane toll road. The agency advertised for construction bids on June 30 and will accept bids by July 30. CTRMA board members could award the construction contract at their August 3 meeting. Justin Word, CTRMA’s director of engineering, said he anticipates giving the chosen contractor notice to proceed with construction on October 1. The four-lane, limitedaccess toll road will be 3.6 miles long, connecting MoPac South in Travis County to FM 1626 in Hays County. Mark Jones, Hays County Precinct 2 Commissioner, said the regional connector between Hays County and Travis County has been needed for a long time. “The roadway is too congested,” Jones said. “Eighty to 90 percent of Buda residents commute to Austin daily.” Construction of the project will cost $76 million, and the project’s total cost is $108 million. About $3 million will be

BEAUTY

City holds first ever Miss Beautiful SMTX Pageant Bri Warkins Assistant News Reporter@ briwatkins17

The location where the new FM 45 will be leading from South MoPac road. PHOTO BY SAM KING | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

used for bicycle and pedestrian improvements, including a 4.5 mile shared-use path. CTRMA is working with Travis County officials to build a small trailhead near Bliss Spillar Road. Travis County will contribute $15 million for funding the project and Hays County $5 million. The Texas Department of Transportation will provide $28.9 million in a toll equity grant and $60 million in a toll equity loan. The goal of building SH 45 SW is to provide increased mobility for southern Travis County and northern Hays County residents. Word said according to traffic modeling studies, South Austin area roadways from SH 45 to Ben White Boulevard could see increased mobility and reduced travel times. Jones said not building the connector is adding at least 15 to 20 minutes onto people’s commute. “If we move to construction of SH 45 SW we believe that the local routes will see as much as a 25 percent reduction in their travel times just from the traffic being drawn on this facility,” Word said. “Not only does it help the area but it also helps other local facilities.” Construction is expected to be phased. The decision was a priority for local stake-

holders, according to technical work group meetings. Word said phasing construction will help manage water quality in the area as the project is located in the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone and Water Quality Protection Lands. CTRMA will be able to remove 98 percent of solid particles in stormwater runoff in the recharge areas, Word said. Critics of the project have said protecting the area’s environment outweighs the need to relieve traffic congestion. In February, a coalition of neighborhood, environmental and civic groups filed a lawsuit in federal district court against CTRMA and TxDOT to prevent the MoPac South, MoPac intersections and SH 45 SW projects from moving forward. CTRMA filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit April 26, said Dee Anne Heath, CTRMA director of external affairs. There is no injunction or order restraining CTRMA from continuing action on the project, so the agency will continue moving toward construction, Heath said. “If everything goes right, they’re expecting to begin construction in October of 2016,” Jones said.

Aimed to express the beauty of women with disabilities, the City of San Marcos Parks and Recreation Department is hosting a beauty pageant at 7 p.m. Friday, July 8 at the San Marcos Activity Center. The winner of the pageant will be crowned by Miss Glitz and Glamour, Victoria Hinojosa. Awards will also

be extended to First, Second and Third Runner Up, Best Smile, Most Articulate and Most Inspirational. There will be a musical performance, by Ashleigh Stone, a local singer-songwriter. “Our goal is to provide a positive experience for the contestants to build confidence and self-esteem,” said Jennifer Mach, Special Events and Marketing Coordinator for the City of San Marcos. This is the first time the

City has hosted the Miss Beautiful Pageant and is providing free entrance to the public. All donations go toward the prizes and awards for pageant participants. The City will be accepting donations for next year’s pageant. “We are excited to what kind of impact the pageant will have on all the women participating in it,” Mach said.

ELECTION

San Marcos mayor will not endeavor a fourth term By Bri Watkins Assistant News Reporter @briwatkins17 As the municipal elections for Mayor quickly approach, San Marcos Mayor Daniel Guerrero has announced he will not seek a fourth term for November 2016. Guerrero was elected in 2010. Throughout his tenure, he has directed the city toward improvement after the destructive May and October floods, managed growth in San Marcos, protected the environment and built great partnerships within the community.

COURTESY PHOTO

“Building effective partnerships with neighborhood groups, community organizations, business and industry, the school district, the university and all levels of government has been a big part of my focus,” Guerrero said in a written statement. Council Member John Thomaides, Place 3, has officially announced his candidacy for mayor. “I’ve had the unique opportunity to serve this community on City Council,

and I am fully ready to assume the role of Mayor on day one. I will bring a fresh perspective while maintaining a steady hand in leading our city forward as Mayor,” Thomaides said in a written statement. Filing for a position in the elections will begin July 23, but the first day to submit an application will be July 25 due to office closure.

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The University Star

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 | 3

LIFESTYLE

Denise Cervantes, Lifestyle Editor @cervantesdenise

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

FOOD

FASHION

Rock the summer with these accessories By Trista Castillo Lifestyle Reporter @tristaaaaa From a 90s classic to modern jewelry and bags, this summer is jam-packed with trending accessories. Here are five summer looks that add a modern twist to a timeless style.

Most everyone in San Marcos is excited about the opening of the new In-N-Out Burger, but are they aware of the infamous secret menu? PHOTO BY TYLER DUMAS | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Not so secret menu items at fast food restaurants By Vivian Medina Lifestyle Reporter @vjmedina6 The next time you walk into your favorite fast food joint, try something new and order from its secret menu. Hidden menu items can be found at most popular fast food chains such as, Burger King, McDonalds and In-N-Out. Janelly Sanchez, Burger King employee, said she enjoys having a secret menu because it allows customers to choose from items not found anywhere else. “The veggie burger is probably the most popular item from our hidden menu,” Sanchez said. “A lot of vegetarians thank us for having it since not many other fast food places offer meatless options.” Other than its popular veggie meal, Burger King’s secret menu also includes the Rodeo Burger—a whopper topped with onion rings and barbecue sauce—and ‘Frings,’ a combination of fries and onion rings. Another Burger King secret item is the Suicide Burger, which comes with four patties, four cheese slices, bacon and a special

sauce. McDonald’s doesn’t have an official hidden menu, but the hacks can be used at any location as long as the order is clearly explained. Justin Lang, McDonald’s employee, said the customer-made guide is a good way to help someone work the menu to create a one of a kind order. “We can pretty much add any sauce, meat or side you want to the order as long as you pay for the extra ingredients,” Lang said. “I’ve heard about the secret menu that is online and even though it is not official, that doesn’t mean we can’t make what you ask.” Visit your local McDonald’s and try the Land, Sea and Air burger, which is a combination of the Big Mac, McChicken and FiletO-Fish patties. The Chicken McGriddle is also a game changer by putting together the sweet taste of maple syrup and chicken. Another simple but tasty order is fries with a side of Big Mac sauce. For a more accredited hidden menu, In-N-Out is known for having its not-sosecret menu publicized and

displayed on its website. Caroline Hines, In-N-Out employee, said the secret menu allows customers to have a variety of options. “We want the customer to be happy and get the full experience of great service at In-N-Out,” Hines said. “I think having the not-so-secret menu helps accomplish that goal.” If one patty isn’t enough, go for the Double Meat Burger on the secret menu. 3 x 3’s and 4 x 4’s are also offered containing three or four patties and cheeses respectively. For the healthier option, try the Protein Style Burger, which replaces the bun with hand-wrapped lettuce. Grilled Cheese and an Animal Style Burger are also on the hidden menu. Sanchez said the secret menu offers a personal connection with customers. “I always think it’s really cool when customers come in and order from the secret menu,” Sanchez said. “It kind of feels like we are communicating in a secret language.”

1. Chokers You can thank the 90s for this trend. These little necklaces have been all the rage this season. Whether it is embellished, plain or velvet, chokers have taken over the summer. For a casual look, go with a thin and simple choker that matches your outfit. A plain black choker will do the trick for most occasions. Stand out on a night on the town with an embellished choker to catch the light. 2. Arm Cuffs Arm cuffs have been trending this season because

they are an adorable way to dress up any look. They aren’t the biggest piece of jewelry, but a little can go a long way. Arm cuffs are easy to find and stretch to your arm size. This accessory can go perfectly with your favorite beach dress. 3. Rose Gold Whether it is a purse, watch or necklace, rose gold has been the color of the season. This pretty pink-gold makes a perfect combination for any accessory. The pink rose gives a soft, romantic look to all jewelry. This is why the color has been such a knockout this summer. You can mix your rose gold jewelry with white and yellow gold, because it is a mixture of gold and copper. Watch out for this color when shopping for jewelry, because it’s a trend you need to buy. 4. Cat-Eye and Round

Sunglasses Cat-eye sunglasses have been a timeless style for several years. Now there is a new cateye style in town which has become popular on runways. It is called Cat and Round, which is a combination of rounded frames with a cateye look on top. This is a spring and summer trend combined, giving us the best of both worlds. 5. Chain Handle Bags Use a handle bag to be casual and chic all at once. The color depends on your own personal style, but brighter colors have been the most eye-popping in boutiques and retail stores. Chained slings come with a thinner, longer chain, and bigger bags will come with a thicker, shorter chain. This trend puts edgy and fun together, which is what summer is all about.

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4 | Wednsday, July 20, 2016

The University Star

OPINIONS

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

Mikala Everett, Opinions Editor @mikala_maquella

SOCIETY

The Meaning of Terrorism By Cris Rivera @cris_rivera13 Opinions Columnist In the late 18th century, the word terrorist began its appearance in the English language. This had very little mention until after the 1950s, and spiked in use near the 21st century. The word “terrorist” or “terrorism” has been thrown around not only on national television, but also in conversations between various people in and around my life, making it a prominent word and topic of regular conversation. Through the nature of events tied to this word, and the chosen current enemy “at war” with the United States, and by proxy Europe, terrorists have garnered a face and a portrayal that fails its true definition. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines terrorism as “the use of violent acts to frighten the people in an area as a way of trying to achieve a political goal,” or “as a means of coercion.” This is a simple definition which is vague to a point that allows for terrorism to be a blanket term for the intent of violent acts. The problem comes at

the portrayal of the individuals and groups which routinely use violent acts to get their end goal. Through the 90s, and its intensity after 9/11, multiple terrorist groups have arisen to combat large governments— mainly the U.S.—by this means to get freedom, revenge or in some cases, change the world into an image of their choosing. The strongest rise in terrorist activity against American citizens has come from groups operating from the Middle East, mainly based out of Iraq and Afghanistan with affiliations to extremist Islam. This is rather common knowledge because of media outlets covering these horrendous acts, and generally only painting this image with the use of Islam-related terrorist attacks. This image has been painted and repainted through every attack on American soil—or the recent European attacks— and has made members of the general public forget the true meaning of terrorism and use it to brand faces that look different from their own, come from a different place or practice a different religion. The term terrorism

STAFF ILLUSTRATOR

should not be held for those who look and believe differently than we do, but should be used to define an act and intent matching the definition. People do not need to be Muslims, from the Middle East or tied to terrorist organizations to be considered terrorists. A terrorist simply needs to complete a terrible act

meant to create fear in others in an attempt to coerce them to change something. This can range from the Charleston Church attack aimed at causing terror in African Americans to the recent Orlando Pulse attack aimed at the LGBTQIA community. American society as a whole has seemed to forget

every citizen here comes from a different background and has the right to think, believe and feel however they want. No way of believing or looking brands someone a terrorist like no way of believing or looking makes someone a criminal. The act of being a terrorist is left to the actions each person decides to commit.

Terrorism is terrible and needs to be brought to an end, but as a society, let’s make sure to look in the right direction first. - Cris Rivera is a computer science freshman

RELIGION

The problematic way Muslims endorse homophobia

STAFF ILLUSTRATOR

By Maria Tahir @sapstomarz Opinions Columnist In the face of America’s astonishing Islamophobia— only fueled by Trump’s inflammatory comments— it seems like betrayal for a Muslim to bring up criticism within her own community. That being said, an issue this relevant shouldn’t be overlooked for the sake of keeping up appearances. Young Muslims are taught sayings and actions of the Prophet Muhammad so they may better themselves and society. Through the Prophet’s example, we are taught tolerance and understanding. We are taught

to love people in spite of the wrongdoings they commit. Growing up, one story in particular left an imprint on my mind. An old woman would throw her trash on the Prophet everyday he passed her house. The day she did not, he went to the old woman’s house to check on her. Upon learning she was sick, he prayed for the return of her health. Examples such as these are what we grew up learning and were taught to abide by. However, merely being told these things is not enough for a lesson to stick. Actions speak louder than words, and the parents and teachers that taught us

The University Star Editor-in-Chief..................................................Emily Sharp, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor...........................Brandon Sams, starmanagingeditor@txstate.edu Letters...............................................................................universitystar@txstate.edu News Editor............................................Bailey Buckingham, starnews@txstate.edu Sports Editor.........................................Autumn Anderson, starsports@txstate.edu Lifestyle Editor......................................Denise Cervantes, starlifestyle@txstate.edu Opinions Editor........................................Mikala Everett, staropinion@txstate.edu Multimedia Editor................................Lara Dietrich, starmultimedia@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief.....................................Claire Abshire, starcopychief@txstate.edu

to treat our oppressors with kindness became the same people who insult the gay community. This scope of micro aggressions was never just towards gay people, but for anyone that stereotypes could be applied to. Black people, women and countless others are victim to slurs and insults as well. The only difference between other groups and the gay community is Muslims are told the identity of homosexuals is founded in sin. Our parents and Imams warned us with stories about Prophet Lot, whose town was belayed with God’s righteous fury after

ignoring his pleas to give up their homosexual lifestyles. This is the only group the Holy Qur’an gave Muslims a reason to be against. Although it never gave an example of any prosecution led by man, it did grant religious backing to a pre-existing cultural stigma against people who are not strictly heterosexual. So, some Muslims grow up in a home that is openly against homosexuals, shrugs at their mistreatment, overlooks the abuse they face or ignores their existence entirely. These behaviors, meant to discourage one from “turning gay,” work doubly to enforce

negative views of LGBTQIA people altogether. This attitude of not tolerating gay people seeps into the hearts of young Muslims, and causes apathy at best towards a community already marginalized constantly. Instead of standing up to oppressors of all groups, young Muslims become oppressors themselves. Instead of loving people in spite of their choices, we hate them for it. Simply doing nothing when witnessing homophobia is not solving the problem, but making the viewer an oppressor as well. When Muslim people avoid

talking about gay people or only talk about them to denigrate their lifestyle, they are perpetuating hate crimes against them. They are perpetuating an intolerant society for an entire group. This is everything our beloved Prophet spent his life fighting against. Muslims know Islam to be a religion of peace. Until we treat everyone equally, love them in spite of their flaws and fight all forms of oppression, we cannot call it that. -Maria Tahir is a Psychology junior

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University and is published every Monday and Thursday of the spring and fall and every other Wednesday in the summer semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. on publication days with a distribution of 6,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Thursday, April 21, 2016. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief. The first five issues of each edition of the paper are free. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased at 50¢ per copy. Contact The University Star office at (512) 245-3487 to purchase additional copies.

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The University Star

SPORTS

Wednesday, July 20, 2016 | 5 Autumn Anderson, Sports Editor @aaautumn_

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

VOLLEYBALL

Women’s Volleyball looking to improve this season By: Lisette Lopez Sports reporter @Lisette_1023 The Texas State Volleyball team looks to head to the Sun Belt Conference Championship Tournament this season. The Bobcats have earned their spot in the SBC Tournament every year. Last season, the team went 13-3 in the conference and 19-12 overall, making it into the tournament. The team was tied for NO. 2 with Appalachian State in the conference. The Bobcats made it to round two in the SBC Tournament. They lost the second round against Appalachian State, losing all three sets. This was the third consecutive loss in the championship game. The last time Texas State won the championship game was in 2013 with Head Coach Karen Chisum by their side. Coach Chisum has quite the resume. She is only the 13th coach to reach 800 wins in NCAA Division I history. She is heading into her 37th season with the Bobcats and is standing at an 821-521-3 record. Along with her achievements, she is the sixth win-

ningest active head coach in the NCAA Division I volleyball, and the longest tenured Texas State Head Coach. With numerous achievements as a coach for the past 38 years, Chisum is a standout Texas State alumnus. Last season alone, the Bobcats picked up wins against UTSA, UT-Arlington and Sam Houston State. The team also had a victory over the 2014 SBC Champion Little Rock Trojans with a 3-1 match. Chisum could not have done this alone. This past season, junior Jordan Kohl and sophomore Madison Daigle achieved Sun Belt All-Conference honors. Daigle led the team and finished fourth in the Sun Belt in hitting percentage with .318. She was second on the team in total blocks with 67, and led the team in solo blocks with eight. This summer, Kohl was a top-seeded contender for Team USA. She plays for Team USA in the 2016 World Deaf Volleyball Championships. This right-side hitter led Team USA to a victory in the 2016 Pan American Deaf Women’s Regional Volleyball Championship

STAR FILE PHOTO

against Brazil. Kohl led the team with 49 kills in five matches. This year’s team is experienced, with only two seniors graduating from the 2015 roster. Tying for NO. 2 in the conference in 2015, can take them to the championship game this upcoming season. The Bobcats have their first game against Texas A&M University on Aug. 26. The team will be participating in the North Texas Challenge along with North

Texas and Nevada. The home-opener game will be Aug. 30 against Baylor. Last season, the Bobcats took a 0-3 loss in the match in Waco. It was a tough loss against a Big 12 opponent, but the Bobcats look to improve for their homeopener. Three days later, the Bobcats will be hosting the Bobcat Classic on Sept. 2-3. Stephen F. Austin, Kennesaw State and Tulsa are participating in the tournament. This season, the Bobcats

will be taking on Texas Tech and Stephen F. Austin. With experience against Baylor and SMU, the team has an idea of what they are going up against. With Texas Tech being a Big 12 opponent, using their knowledge against Baylor may help them defensively in the match. The Bobcats will be participating in four tournaments this season, before heading into their conference play. The team will be play-

ing two Big 12 Conference teams this season, to make or break their overall record. Even with the addition of Coastal Carolina in the SBC, the Bobcats still have a solid shot at making it to the SBC Championship game, and winning. The Bobcats are looking to add the 10th tournament team championship under Chisum’s belt, and are hungry for the SBC Championship.

BASEBALL

Bobcats Snag Pitcher, Nick Fraze for Upcoming Season. By: Kier Rouse Sports reporter @KierRouse The Texas State Baseball team has officially announced the signing of Nick Fraze, an incoming freshman pitcher who will join the Bobcats next season. While helping the Bobcats out on the mound, Fraze plans to major in business. The Hebron High school pitcher will be making San Marcos his new home from Carrollton, Texas. The 6-foot-3 right-handed pitcher has had an extensive career thus far. Fraze had the opportunity to play with both Hebron High School and the Dallas Patriots in his High School career. Some of Fraze’s accomplishments include making the Texas High School Baseball Coaches’ Association All-State Team while attending Hebron. Fraze led his team to a 28-8 end of season record and to the third round of the District Championship 6-6A this season. Fraze also earned the First-Team All-District 6-6A honors. Texas State Head Coach Ty Harrington expressed his excitement for the upcoming season with the addition of Fraze to the team. “We know the type of quality character player we’re getting because of the way Coach Stone at Hebron and Coach Stout for the Dallas Patriots run their programs. We look forward to Nick competing for a starting role,” Coach Harrington told Texas State Athletics. Fraze has been named the 10th best pitcher in Texas overall as seen on MaxPreps.com as well as in the top 100 100th best pitcher in the country. Fraze was born Oct. 24, 1997 and is the son to Michael, stepmother Beth Fraze and mother Lisa Bassett Fraze. Nick Fraze has two younger siblings in ad-

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dition to an older brother, Jake who currently pitches for Mississippi College. Nick Fraze chose Texas State because of the opportunity to play for the Bobcats as well as work with the coaching staff. In high school, Nick Fraze racked up a total of 14 strikeouts in a 3-0 spotlight game win against Ryan in the playoffs. He also went 9-1 in the third round of state playoffs. With a 1.60 ERA and a grand total of 94 strikeouts, Nick Fraze has proven himself one to watch and a valuable asset in the game.

“We love his length and athleticism on the mound,” Recruiting Coordinator and Assistant Coach for Texas State, Jeremy Fikac said via Texas State Athletics, “his numbers from his senior year show he is a competitor and a winner.” The Bobcat Baseball staff is excited to see what Nick Fraze brings to the table and look forward to working with him as a student athlete. Congratulations to Nick Fraze on his signing. It’s a good day to be a Bobcat.

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