Page 1

VOLUME 103, ISSUE 62

www.UniversityStar.com

THURSDAY

FEBRUARY 27, 2014

Defending the First Amendment since 1911

VIDEO | UniversityStar.com

SPORTS | B4

From the Field to the Fans: Odus Evbagharu and his team of reporters discuss Bobcat Athletics in today’s episode.

Wagner preview: Texas State baseball continues its home game stretch with a three-match series against 0–3 Wagner this weekend.

UNIVERSITY

CONSTRUCTION

Board of regents to meet in LBJ Student Center

APARTMENT DEMOLITION On-campus complexes

to be razed as university focuses on new freshmen Campus Colony

By Kacee Letbetter News Reporter

Madelynne Scales | Assistant Photo Editor

U

niversity officials will soon implement plans to demolish all on-campus apartment complexes except Bobcat Village, leaving many students searching for off-campus housing options for the upcoming summer and fall semesters. Clear Springs Apartments, which has been vacant since September, will be demolished by fall 2014, said Juan Guerra, associate vice president of Facilities. Campus Colony and Comanche Hill on Comanche and Wood Streets and Riverside Apartments, located next to Strahan Coliseum, will close and be torn down at some point in the future, said Nancy Nusbaum, associate vice president for Finance and Support Services Planning. Administrators anticipate the Campus Colony and Comanche Hill properties to be the future site of an engineering building once state legislators approve funding for a Tuition Revenue Bond. Costly apartment renovation estimates and a need for expanded academic space led officials to decide on demolishing the complexes, Nusbaum said. The demolition of the campus apartments is not intended to encourage upperclassmen to move off campus, and may increase the amount of students who want to live in residence halls, Nusbaum said. The university’s primary housing concern lies with providing beds for the rapidly growing freshman classes, she said. “It doesn’t have anything to do with wanting the upperclassmen off campus,” Nusbaum said. “We would love to have the upperclassmen on campus, and we keep trying to add new residential halls to campus to have those that want to live on campus be able to live here.” Students living in Campus Colony and Comanche Hill were recently notified their leases will expire at the end of the spring semester, Guerra said. Some residents of Comanche Hill and Campus Colony are searching for off-campus housing to move into once their leases expire in May rather than applying to live in a residence hall. Alexandria Cowan, a nutrition and foods sopho-

See APARTMENTS, Page 2

—Compiled by Taylor Tompkins, news editor

Riverside Apartments

News Reporter

The Texas Stream Team is expanding its preservation and protection program by asking paddlers to collect samples from streams and rivers for research. The prog ram, which is a part of research efforts by the Meadows Center for Water & the

FACULTY SENATE

Professors discuss reallocating funds to add staff positions Senior News Reporter

Faculty senators and senate liaisons voted during their meeting Wednesday in support of using funds from faculty merit raises to increase staff positions on campus. A 3 percent faculty merit pool would total about $5.5 million and could be used to add staff or increase staff salaries, said Debra Feakes, chemistry and biochemistry senator. “We’re really talking about a pool, because different departments have different issues,” Feakes said. Getting new staff is the key because more peo-

Comanche Hill

River paddlers recruited for conservation efforts

By Juliette Moak

Austin Humphreys | Photo Editor

By Kelsey Bradshaw

ENVIRONMENT

Austin Humphreys | Photo Illustration Maxwell Ray, water resources senior, collects data from water tests in the San Marcos River once a month.

The Texas State University System Board of Regents will host two meetings open to the public in the LBJ Student Center today and tomorrow. The regents meet four times throughout the year at various campuses in the system. The open meetings will take place beginning at 3 p.m. today and will continue through 9 a.m. Friday. The meetings will be streamed online for the first time. Regents will discuss changes to curriculum and degrees, construction projects, contracts and personnel issues for universities in the system, according to the agenda. Each of the eight university presidents in the system will give a report on the status of his or her institution. The reports will include updates on retention and recruitment, university advancement, planning and other issues. The board of regents represent Lamar University, Sam Houston State University, Sul Ross State University and Texas State, as well as Lamar Institute of Technology, Lamar State CollegeOrange, Lamar State College-Port Arthur and Sul Ross State University Rio Grande College, according to the system’s website. The regents will attend a private dinner and tour the new Performing Arts Center while on campus, according to the agenda.

Environment, is recruiting canoeists and kayakers to help monitor water quality around the state. The “paddlers project” is being created to educate citizens on the quality of their local streams and rivers while providing consistent data on certain aquatic regions, said Travis Tidwell, Texas Stream Team monitoring program coordinator. “We wanted to introduce a new audience to citizen science,” Tidwell said. “Paddlers are in a great position to notice changes in water quality because they’re on the same stretch of water all the time, so we figured, why not ask them to take samples for us?” Paddlers will collect water samples from hard-to-reach and, in some cases, previously unmonitored areas after completing training for the program, Tidwell said. The team will measure PH and oxygen levels, temperature and conductivity using water quality monitoring equipment. Paddlers will take samples to observe the clarity, color and depth of the river as well. The team hopes to have groups scheduled to go out on a monthly basis beginning this spring, Tidwell said. “The paddlers project has taken a program that’s over two decades

See PADDLING, Page 2

Austin Humphreys | Photo Editor

See FACULTY, Page 2

CRIME

Accident in H-E-B parking lot damages vehicles, hospitalizes one pedestrian

Austin Humphreys | Photo Editor Parked vehicles were damaged after a man lost control of his vehicle Feb. 26 in the H.E.B. parking lot. The San Marcos Police Department took photos and mapped out the incident during a two-hour onsite investigation.

By Nicole Barrios Assistant News Editor

An accident in the H-E-B parking lot at 200 W. Hopkins St. Wednesday afternoon damaged several cars and sent one pedestrian to the hospital. An “elderly gentleman” was reversing his vehicle at about 4:30 p.m. when he lost control, said Tommy Norris, San Marcos Fire Department captain. An “elderly pedestrian” in the parking lot was injured and transported by emergency medical service to a hospital in Austin, Norris said.

He did not know if the male pedestrian was injured directly by the driver or by another vehicle. Norris said four to five vehicles were damaged in the incident. EMS and SMFD officials rendered first aid to the injured pedestrian and “packaged him for transport” to the hospital, Norris said. He did not know the ages of the injured man or the driver of the car, he said. The magnitude and “chaos” of the scene and the need to quickly transport the injured pedestrian prevented Norris from gathering his usual amount of information, he said.

Norris said it appeared the driver of the vehicle may have pressed on the accelerator instead of the brake, causing him to lose control. Norris said he did not think drugs or alcohol were involved in the incident. “I think it’s just one of those things that was an accident,” Norris said. “So I don’t know what may transpire as far as legal actions.” Police performed a two-hour on-site investigation that included taking pictures and mapping out the parking lot, which was cleared by around 6:30 p.m., Norris said.


A2 | The University Star | News | Thursday February 26, 2014

1997

Legislation banning most handguns in Britain went into effect.

ON THIS DAY in history

1951 The 22nd Amendment to the Constitution, limiting a president to two terms of office, was ratified.

2002

A mob of Muslims set fire to a train carrying hundreds of Hindu nationalists in Godhra, India; some 60 people died.

2010

An 8.8 magnitude earthquake and tsunami killed 524 people in Chile, caused $30 billion in damage and left over 200,000 homeless.

2002

2008

Alicia Keys won five Grammy Awards for her debut album, “Songs in A Minor.”

Author and conservative commentator William F. Buckley Jr. died at age 82. Courtesy of The New York Times

APARTMENTS, continued from front more who lives at Campus Colony, and Kimberly Abanaka, a psychology senior who lives at Comanche Hill, both signed leases in fall 2013 and now must move out of their apartments less than one full year later. Both Cowan and Abanaka said they experienced residence hall life as freshmen but will not consider residence halls as a living option for next year. “The dorms were okay, but I don’t want to be restricted like that again,” Abanaka said. The remaining on-campus apartment option for students will be Bobcat Village, located on the corner of Aquarena Springs Drive and Mill Street. Other campuses such as Texas Tech University and UTSA have similar living options, offering only one on-campus apartment complex. Cowan said it is difficult for upperclassmen to secure a lease at Bobcat Village because it is available to incom-

PADDLING, continued from front

ing freshmen. Amanda Cepola, sophomore Campus Colony resident, said her on-campus apartment has come with benefits not available in a residence hall or off-campus apartment. “Living at Campus Colony provides all the benefits of an off-campus apartment but also allows me to walk to class and avoid rent payments as part of my student loan,” Cepola said. Once students experience the freedom of an apartment, returning to a residence hall is not a comparable option, Cepola said. Bobcat Village will not be a prime option for Cepola next year, she said. “(The complex is a) distance from campus, and along with the stricter RA surveillance, it makes Bobcat Village a less desirable living option,” Cepola said. “At this point, I think it would just be easier to find something off campus.”

old—the oldest of its kind in the Texas—and given it new life,” Townsend said. The data will be recorded and sent to the Meadows Center to be reviewed by a quality assurance monitor and posted to the team’s online data viewer. The data collected will be useful for protection efforts, Tidwell said. “The data that’s collected can be used for things like the San Marcos Watershed Initiative, where we’re working on a watershed protection plan to improve the water quality in San Marcos and keep standards high,” Tidwell said. The combination of paddling and citizen science is a natural fit for outdoors enthusiasts, said Shane Townsend, senior program advisor for the Meadows Center. There is a “huge” paddling community in Texas that cares about water quality and its preservation, Townsend said. There are scientists who are interested in paddling as well, and the event creates a “perfect meeting ground.” The Texas Stream Team is currently working with paddling clubs in New Braunfels and

Austin to create plans to monitor the Guadalupe River, Lake Dunlap and Lake Buchanan, Tidwell said. Paddlers will join students and residents such as water resources senior Maxwell Ray, who has collected data from the San Marcos River every month for the last two years. Ray is one of nearly 8,000 citizens who have volunteered for the Texas Stream Team since it began monitoring the state’s water resources 23 years ago. “I think it’s the community’s responsibility to protect their water quality,” Ray said. “If you can’t rally behind that, what can you get behind?” Paddlers are required to take an online safely course, and the stream team is available to educate participants on the proper scientific practices to use when testing water samples, Townsend said. “If you’re a student who owns a canoe or kayak, we can help you find a local chapter, or you can get together with some friends and form your own,” Townsend said.

FACULTY, continued from front ple are needed, said Mary Ellen Cavitt, music senator. The university has handled dividing its budget well in the past when compared to many others in the country, Cavitt said. “In my experience, the university has never done a successful redistribution process, in terms of budget,” said Michel Conroy, Faculty Senate chair. Conroy said there was a priority put on faculty positions and salaries as opposed to staff in the past. The university does not do “budget justification” or an explanation of each part of a budget, Cavitt said. “In terms of the Academic Affairs budget priorities, the number one priority has been ‘no loss’ faculty positions and increasing faculty salaries (in the past),” Conroy said. “We all know the pie (of money) is only so big.” Some departments are re-

questing more staff members, and some officials want to retain the employees they currently have, Feakes said. The amount of staff members needed to be added varies across all departments, Cavitt said. Susan Weill, mass communication and journalism senator, said the faculty in her department would not likely oppose lessen merit raises overall to hire more staff members, as long as administrators were including themselves in the process. “But when they feel like the administration is not sharing the sacrifice, that really becomes an issue for the faculty in my department, I think,” Weill said. The senators agreed the topic of staff prioritization would be a good one for Provost Eugene Bourgeois to consider at an upcoming meeting.

2014 2015

2014 2015

applicant The

April 2

2015

April 14.

3

March April 2 Monday April 14


The University Star | Advertisement | Thursday February 26, 2014 | A3


A4 | The University Star | Thursday February 27, 2014

OPINIONS

UniversityStar.com

THE MAIN POINT

Demolishing on-campus apartments positive decision T

he decision to tear down old and derelict on-campus apartment buildings to replace them with parkland and new structures is a positive one and will no doubt help Texas State polish its image as a university striving to achieve tier one status. Clear Springs Apartments closed its doors to residents for the fall 2013 semester, and Comanche Hill, Campus Colony and Riverside Apartments will close to students at the end of the semester, according to a Feb. 27 University Star article. Officials plan to tear down the university-owned apartment complexes, excluding Bobcat Village, in the near future. Comanche Hill and Campus Colony will be torn down in the near future to make way for a new engineering building, pending funding from the state legislature. University-owned apartments including Clear Springs, Comanche Hill and Campus Colony are eyesores and Breanna Baker | Star Illustrator substandard. While the older university-owned apartments are a cheap fix for students on a environment than dorms. If stutight budget, the complexes can dents want to venture outside no longer safely and adequately of university-affiliated housing house students. It is embarrass- complexes, however, there is no shortage of apartment options ing for a university striving to in San Marcos. achieve tier one research status Sanctuary Lofts, The Timto have an on-campus complex deemed “uninhabitable,” as was bers Apartments, Treehouse Apartments and Vistas San the case with Clear Springs. It is reassuring to know Texas Marcos are just a few of many off-campus complexes within State administrators finally walking distance of campus. It understand the need for a visuis understandable why adally appealing skyline when it ministrators plan to demolish comes to on-campus housing. many of the university-owned The worn-down on-campus apartments, especially considerapartments starkly contrast ing there are dozens of housing Texas State’s shiny, new multimillion dollar dorms like Chau- complexes on the outskirts of campus. tauqua and Gaillardia Halls With the soon-to-be destrucas well as construction plans tion of many campus apartfor the West Campus Housing ments, administrators should Complex and the Moore Street make an effort to consider Housing project. upperclassmen when planBobcat Village is the only ning future complexes. To put university-owned apartment it in perspective, Texas A&M expected to be left standing afUniversity and the University ter the demolition of the other of Texas-Austin both reserve campus complexes. Located 30 percent of the rooms in just off campus by Bobcat some dorms for upperclassmen, Stadium, the slightly more according information on the expensive option allows stucampuses’ housing websites. Indents to live in a less restrictive

February

Black History Column Series

In honor of Black History Month, the opinions section will spotlight a column written by one of The University Star’s black staff members in each issue. The University Star hopes to showcase a variety of perspectives in the new series dedicated to bringing issues in the black community to light.

Black people must take initiative to enact change

Odus Evbagharu Sports Editor Mass communication junior

people must not use their Bforlack circumstances as excuses failure. The eradication of The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University. stead of wait-listing upperclassmen wanting to live on campus, the editorial board suggests administrators reserve a percentage of space in existing or new dorms for upperclassmen. Another option is for officials to designate at least one dorm, whether it is one of the new complexes or one of the older existing ones, for nonfreshmen and non-traditional students. Although catering to freshmen is important, such an option will provide upperclassmen who enjoyed living in the university-owned apartments with at least one alternative on-campus housing option in the future. Administrators are taking a huge leap in the right direction by demolishing old universityowned apartments, a decision which is likely to attract large freshman classes and rake in more tuition and fees. Once the wrecking balls cease to swing, new facilities and parkland will rise from the construction debris like a Phoenix across campus.

negative stereotypes within the community must start with the individuals within it. The black community has constantly overcome seemingly unbearable circumstances, from picking cotton as slaves in the 1800s to being drenched by highpressure water hoses like dogs in the 1960s. The change the community is truly looking for, however, starts with the individuals within it. Over the past month, University Star columnists have written about a variety of topics for Black History Month discussing issues ranging from hair to names to how the black community is misrepresented in American society. As positive as those discussions have been, blacks must not make excuses for themselves. Circumstances and skin color must not dictate where blacks choose to go in their lives. Discussion of these issues is crucial, but that does not mean blacks should constantly complain or whine about others’ ignorance. Blacks have both a burden and responsibility to be better and do more in today’s society. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Medgar Evers and others did not fight only to have blacks wallow in self-pity. They wanted everyone to have a fair shake at life, regardless of race. In retrospect, I think men like King and Evers would be proud of what blacks have accomplished so far, but by the same token I

think they would be disappointed about some of the issues going on in the community. It is an honor and privilege to have witnessed the first black man elected president. But what good does it do if black people continue to kill each other in Chicago or Detroit? What good are all of our achievements when every day, more blacks find themselves in jail for robbing liquor stores or selling dope? What good are our successes when black fathers continue to adhere to all the negative stereotypes, failing to care for the kids they brought into the world? Blacks have come a long way in conquering certain demons that have been haunting the community for generations, but change has to start with individuals. Whites, Hispanics, Asians and other races cannot take the black community seriously if we constantly deny accountability for our actions. No more sagging pants, showing up late for work and selling crack just to drive a Rolls-Royce. Black men need to take care of their kids and hold jobs to become responsible fathers. Individuals need to dream of being more than just ball players and singers. The world is still waiting on the cure for cancer and HIV—who is to say it will not be a black person who finds it? I am not saying all black people fit the stereotypes and do not aspire to be more, but those who are looking for more in life should encourage others in the community to make individual changes. Black people who settle for less and use their circumstances as an excuse only get in the way of progress. Such defeatist attitudes within the community decay the foundation civil rights leaders worked hard to build. It is time to change the stereotypes associated with the black community. Black people must strive to be and do more—a change that starts by looking in the mirror.

OPPOSING VIEWS VEGANISM

Vegan lifestyle often pretentious, only possible for privileged minority

Savannah Wingo Opinions Editor Journalism junior

hile a vegan lifestyle can be positive for W some, the pretentious attitude many vegans carry is not, and comes off as privi-

leged and ignorant. Do not get me wrong—I am not bashing veganism as a whole. I think the vegan diet is, for many, a positive way to reduce one’s environmental impact and to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. Moral issues aside, animalbased products require more space and money to produce, and create pollution in the process. From an environmental perspective, the vegan diet is a positive way to protest the meat industry and the way it affects the world around us. Many vegans choose their diet not only because of the environmental benefits it offers, but because they have a moral opposition to the consumption and production of meat. This moral position would be fine if only many vegans did not feel the need to foist their opinions upon others. Even household pets have been forced to adhere to vegan diets at the behest of their owners—a choice that often leaves animals at the very least malnourished and at the worst, dead. Even animals sent for slaughter do not have to endure such drawn out torture. My point is veganism is not for everyone, period. The stereotype of the militant vegans who, much like dogmatic bible-thumpers, feel the need to lecture and convert any and all humans who adhere to a standard diet is unfortunately rooted in truth.

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building, Room 101 San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

Regardless of the benefits and drawbacks to veganism, no one should ever feel they are justified in shoving their opinions down the throats of others. Not only is doing so rude, but it ends up scaring off people who otherwise might have given the cause a chance. Those who choose a vegan diet are completely justified in their decision, but must realize they are coming from a very privileged position. Not only do vegans have access to dietary information, they have the money, time and means to prepare restrictive meals. These facts are often taken for granted in arguments for veganism. Because of this, militant vegans tend to come off as completely ignorant to the struggles of the working class. Many argue vegan diets need not be expensive, and ingredients for vegan meals are easily accessed and often very affordable. While this is true to a degree, many vegan staples such as olive oil, tofu and dairy alternatives are far from cheap. Furthermore, for many lower-class families, neighborhood grocery stores are either inaccessible or do not have a wide selection of fresh produce. According to a Food Research and Action Center report, low-income neighborhoods often lack full-service grocery stores with a variety of produce for sale. Even if families do have access to such a grocery store, products such as hamburger meat, eggs and bread are often cheaper and more filling than vegan options. A vegan diet is out of the question for those with certain religious beliefs, allergies or living situations. Assuming that anybody has the ability to adapt to a vegan diet is a privileged assumption indeed, and one reason why many vegans have come to be seen as patronizing and pretentious in the public eye. I have no problem with vegans or veganism in general. I only start to take issue with the lifestyle and its adherents when others are forced to endure painfully privileged lectures about what they should or should not eat. While veganism can be a positive lifestyle choice for some, it is not for everyone, and that is a fact vegans should take care to remember.

Editor-in-Chief.................................................Caitlin Clark, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor..........................Liza Winkler, starmanagingeditor@txstate.edu Letters..................................................................................starletters@txstate.edu News Editor............................................Taylor Tompkins, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor.............................................Amanda Ross, startrends@txstate.edu Opinions Editor..................................Savannah Wingo, staropinion@txstate.edu Photo Editor.......................................Austin Humphreys, starphoto@txstate.edu Sports Editor.......................................Odus Evbagharu, starsports@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief................................Lesley Warren, starcopychief@txstate.edu Design Editor.................................................Lee Moran, stardesign@txstate.edu

Web Editor.........................................Anthony Garza, starwebeditor@txstate.edu Account Executive...................................Stephanie Macke, starad2@txstate.edu Account Executive.....................................Catie Brossard, starad3@txstate.edu Account Executive.................................Blakely Knowles, starad4@txstate.edu Account Executive......................................Taylor Bradham, starad5@txstate.edu Media Specialist............................................ Chris Salazar, c.salazar@txstate.edu Advertising Coordinator................................Kelsey Nuckolls, kjn16@txstate.edu Publications Coordinator.......................................Linda Allen, la06@txstate.edu Publications Director...........................Bob Bajackson, stardirector@txstate.edu

Vegan diet affordable, plausible for college students

Ashley Trumps Opinions Columnist Mass communication senior

eganism is a healthy and ecoV nomical lifestyle that is easy for college students to adapt to.

It is incredibly easy for some people to laugh at vegans. Some enjoy waving fried chicken at a vegan and proudly proclaiming their ability to eat anything with a face. Many people seem to think all vegans fit the stereotype of only eating salad and quinoa, being skinny and sickly and experiencing no joy in food. True, there are probably some out there who only consume leaves and crackers, but the truth to veganism is much more complex than the viewpoint many people seem to hold. The fact is, veganism can be incredibly cheap, healthy and environmentally responsible. It is totally possible to conform to a vegan diet without coming off as a pretentious creep. The sad truth about college life is that, more often than not, college kids are broke. Many people hold the mistaken belief that in order to be vegan, one must be a yuppie snob with enough money to buy weird things like spirulina and chia seeds. This is not true. According to a May 16, 2012 USA Today article, proteins such as red meat, chicken and fish are the most expensive food by portion size.

Conversely, grains, vegetables, fruit and other types of protein like beans and legumes are the least expensive. Cutting out meat and dairy actually eliminates two of the more expensive food groups. Common vegan staples are not difficult to find and are often available in bulk, making them even cheaper. The belief that eating healthy is more expensive is a myth. With a little forethought and planning, going vegan is perfect for poor, ramenguzzling college students. Vegan food does not have to be boring, either. For those who crave variety, endless combinations can be made with vegetables, grains, fruits and meat substitutes—the latter of which are unnecessary nutritionally, but can help spice things up. Another misconception is that vegans cut out too many food groups for it to be considered a healthy lifestyle. Everyone seems to think that without two pounds of meat per day, a person will just shrivel up and blow away. According to information on WebMD, many people tend to eat far more protein than they actually need. Increased consumption of the macronutrient actually does not build more muscle or increase strength significantly. Soy foods, legumes and whole grains can all add up to more than an adequate amount of protein for any diet. Of course, the ethical reasons behind veganism tend to play a part in choosing such a diet. However, morals are a sticky and ambiguous area and can lead to a lot of resentment when the preaching begins. Regardless of how students may feel about eating creatures that were adorable when they were alive, veganism is an intelligent, economical diet choice for everyone—not just yuppies and hippies.

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University and is published every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of the spring and fall and every other Wednesday in the summer semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. on publication days with a distribution of 6,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Thursday, February 27, 2014. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief. The first five issues of each edition of the paper are free. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased at 50¢ per copy. Contact The University Star office at (512) 245-3487 to purchase additional copies.

Visit The Star at www.UniversityStar.com


The University Star | Thursday February 27, 2014 | A5

TRENDS

UniversityStar.com

SXSW

PERFORMING ARTS CENTER OPEN HOUSE

March 7 — 16

preview By Amanda Ross Trends Editor

W

ith the start of South by Southwest a little more than a week away, many students are shelling out money for badges and wristbands, eager to be exposed to the latest in the interactive, music and film industries. Below are The University Star’s must-sees SXSW this year.

INTERACTIVE // March 7 - 11 One of the most accomplished scientists of our time, astrophysicist and author Neil deGrasse Tyson will be a keynote speaker at SXSW Interactive. Tyson’s list of accomplishments includes 10 books, 19 honorary doctorates and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Time selected Tyson as one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2007. Additionally, he was the first scientist to attract more than one million Twitter followers.

Music // March 11 - 16 Free and open to the public, indie rap/television superstar Donald Glover will take the stage March 15 at Butler Park as his alter ego Childish Gambino. Glover, who first rose to prominence as a cast member on NBC’s “Community,” is already garnering acclaim for his recently-released sophomore album “Because the Internet.” His upcoming SXSW performance is part of the album’s promotional tour, “The Deep Web Tour.” While the event is free, attendees must pre-register for a complimentary guest pass either online or in person at the venue prior to the event. Wristband and badge holders do not need to apply for a guest pass to gain entrance.

Austin Humphreys | Photo Editor A public open house will be held Sunday to celebrate the opening of the new Performing Arts Center. According to a Feb. 12 University Star article, the grand opening performance titled “Public Spectacular” will take place in the Patti Strickel-Harrison Theatre in the center, which holds 312 patrons. Students from the College of Fine Arts and Communication will perform in the show. The first performance will be from 2-2:45 p.m., and the second takes place from 4-4:45 p.m. There will be free, guided tours from 4:45-5:15 p.m. A limited number of free tickets will be available to students, faculty, staff and the community for the two

performances Sunday. No tickets are required for the guided tours. Patrons can reserve tickets online at txstatepresents. com and call Texas State Presents at 512-245-6500 with any questions. According to a May 13, 2011 press release from the university, ground was broken on the center June 3, 2011. The center’s opening marks the end of the university’s seven-year Pride in Action campaign. —Compiled by Lesley Warren, copy chief

Live Music Update Thursday, Feb. 27 Jason Eady Band

Cheatham Street Warehouse

10:45 p.m.

Eric Hisaw

Triple Crown

6 p.m.

Lesley and the Ly’s

Red 7 Austin

9 p.m.

Kabomba!

Triple Crown

10 p.m.

Clay McClinton

Cheatham Street Warehouse

10:45 p.m.

The Well

Red 7 Austin

9 p.m.

The Lion and the Giraffe

Triple Crown

10 p.m.

Keller Williams & More Than a Little

Emo’s Austin

8 p.m.

Red Ox

Red 7 Austin

9 p.m.

Silas Feemster

Triple Crown

7 p.m.

Friday, Feb. 28

Saturday, March 1

Film // March 7 -15 Austin residents Richard Linklater and Ethan Hawke collaborate on a film 12 years in the making. The darling of Sundance Film Festival, “Boyhood” follows the personal growth of a boy from first grade through high school graduation. The film was shot slowly, with production first starting in 2002. Linklater, the film’s director, filmed scenes with young Ellar Coltrane only a few days per year. The film’s screening is already being touted by SXSW as a “festival favorite,” meaning audience seats are bound to fill quickly.

Sunday, March 2

2201 E. Ben White • Austin TX

2/28

Bart Crow Don’t Miss The Finals March 6th

Austin

3/7

3/8

& Josh Grider

3/14

Tickets onsale

NOW!

midnightrodeoaustin.com facebook.com/midnightrodeoaustin

Cody Jinks

John Corbett

Jason Cassidy


A6 | The University Star | Advertisement | Thursday February 26, 2014


VOLUME 103, ISSUE 62

www.UniversityStar.com

Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Baseball to play Wagner at home this weekend B2

SUN BELT STANDINGS B5 Softball will travel to Mississippi for Gulf Coast Classic tournament B2 Photos by Austin Humphreys and Allison Brouillette

BOBCAT NEWS AND NOTES

B3 Bobcats lose secondstraight game against Western Kentucky B4 Texas State prepares for final two home games, post season hanging in balance B4


B2 | The University Star | Sports | Thursday February 27, 2014

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Texas State prepares for final two home games, post season hanging in balance By Ishmael Johnson Sports Reporter @Ish_46

Madelynne Scales | Star File Photo Men’s basketball is preparing for matchups against Western Kentucky and Georgia State in the Bobcats’ final home games.

Post-season aspirations are on the line this weekend in the men’s basketball team’s final two home games with Western Kentucky and Georgia State taking on Texas State at Strahan Coliseum. The Bobcats will participate in a Sun Belt battle of the two top defensive teams Thursday against second place Western Kentucky. The Hilltoppers allow an average of 67.2 points per game compared to the Bobcats’ 66.5 points, making them the number one defense in the conference. Both teams shot below 50 percent from the field and combined for 21 turnovers in their Feb. 1 meeting. Texas State lost the match 68-64 at the E. A. Diddle Arena in Bowling Green, Ky. Wes Davis, junior guard, had four fouls in the contest and has experienced foul trouble in a series of recent games. “I’ll try to be a little less aggressive,” Davis said. “It probably won’t be as bad this time because we’re at home against them. I know at their place they were calling fouls a little more

quickly than they will here. I just have to give them a little more room, but stay aggressive at the same time.” Seniors Joel Wright, Reid Koenen, Gordon Ball, Corey Stern and Phil Hawkins will be playing their final home games Saturday against Georgia State. “It’s going to be a little bittersweet,” Koenen said. “I came here four years ago, played all four seasons, and I’m the only player who’s been here for four years. It’ll be kind of sad but exciting at the same time to have my family down here, not only for me but the other four seniors as well.” T h e c o n fe r e n c e - l e a d i n g Georgia State Jaguars are looking to secure their number one seed in the Sun Belt tournament as they take a 13–1 conference record to San Marcos. The Jaguars have won 18 of their last 20 games, including a rescheduled Feb. 17 68–41 victory over Texas State. Ryan Harrow, Georgia State guard, scored 17 points and shot 54.5 percent from the field against Texas State. Davis guarded Harrow in the game and is again slated to defend the player in the upcoming match.

Harrow is fifth in the conference in scoring, averaging 17.3 points per game and second in assists per game with 4.6. “I have to do a better job of guarding the on-ball screens,” Davis said. “(Georgia State’s) job is setting it up top and letting (Harrow) do whatever he wants. I have to do a better job to force him away from the screen and see if we can get help as he drives to the hoop.” The Jaguars held the Bobcats to under 30 percent shooting and six assists compared to their own 14. Georgia State was able to shoot 52.5 percent from the field. “We were playing with them in the first half,” Koenen said. “In the second half, we came out pretty poorly, and they ended up blowing us out. It’s just going to be more of a defensive mindset to come out and take away their best players in Ryan Harrow and R.J. Hunter.” Davis said two consecutive wins at home will not only fuel the rest of the season, but carry momentum into next year and give the seniors a proper sendoff. “We just have to make sure they go out with a bang,” Davis said.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Bobcats lose second-straight game against Western Kentucky By Quixem Ramirez Sports Reporter @quixem

The Texas State women’s basketball team lost its second conference game at home this season Wednesday against the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers. Western Kentucky scored 75 points on 53 shots in the 75-50 victory. The Hilltoppers have won four straight games by an average margin of 28 points. The Bobcats’ 30-point loss is their 10th loss by double-digits and the team’s third by 20 or more points this season. Texas State’s loss snapped its five-game winning streak at home dating back to Jan. 4. The Bobcats have lost consecutive games for the first time since Dec. 22, a span of 15 games.

“Our energy level definitely wasn’t where it needed to be,” said Coach Zenarae Antoine. “It was something that was addressed in the locker room at halftime. I really challenged them to figure out how to get it going. There’s only so much screaming and yelling that you can do. At some point it has to come from within.” Kaylan Martin, senior guard, missed her second game this season with “leg fatigue.” “I’m never one for excuses, but there are situations sometimes that arise,” Antoine said. “Without having Kaylan Martin, the team really struggled. I equate it to not having (Seattle Seahawks quarterback) Russell Wilson in a game. She is very much that player for us.” Martin registered three consecutive single-digit performances after

finishing in double-digits in eight of 10 games, her second longest streak this season. “I’m still hopeful that she’ll be back (for Georgia State),” Antoine said. “Regardless, we are going to have to figure a way to operate. Even if she’s back, you don’t know how much she can go. It’s my job we figure a way to compete. We are down, but we are definitely not out.” Ayriel Anderson, sophomore guard, started in place of Martin and played 10 minutes before exiting the game with an ankle injury. Texas State is 3-8 with Anderson as a starter and 9-6 when she comes off the bench this season. “The game plan doesn’t change,” Antoine said. “It stays the same. It’s a matter of execution and the times when it gets tough on them. The

game changes when you have Ayriel (Anderson) starting at the point, because she’s more explosive.” The Bobcats committed 19 turnovers leading to 22 points for Western Kentucky. “We saw a lot of mid half-court action going on,” Antoine said. “We just did not stay aggressive, and then we turned the ball over by over penetrating or doing a poor job on ball reversals. They were getting deflection after deflection after deflection.” The Bobcats made 37 percent of their shots in the second half after shooting 30 percent in the first half. “I think there were times where there were seeds of doubt,” Antoine said. “They struggled at times and they were really apprehensive, and that kind of snowballed from there and it got compounded when Ayriel

went down with an ankle injury.” The Bobcats are 9-6 in the conference with three games remaining. “I still think we are in a good place,” Antoine said. “They (the Sun Belt) seed one through eight, and all teams have shown the ability to beat each other home or away.” Texas State’s last home game is Saturday against the Georgia State Panthers. Martin and forwards Jasmine Baugus and Ashley Ezeh are the three remaining seniors on the team. “I’ve got a soft spot for all three of them,” Antoine said. “I’m looking forward to Georgia State, and I know these three seniors are going to bring it because Texas State means a lot to them, and they are very appreciative that they are here.”


The University Star | Sports | Thursday February 27, 2014 | B3

BOBCAT NEWS AND NOTES TRACK & FIELD

TWEET OF THE WEEK

Bobcats strong at SBC Indoors championship The Texas State women’s indoor track and field team finished second in the Sun Belt Conference Championships Tuesday while the men took third place. The final tally in team scoring gave Western Kentucky the women’s championship with 169 points. The Bobcats scored 121 points, making them the only other team to reach triple digits. Third place Arkansas State had 78.5 points. UTArlington won on the men’s side with 185 points and the Bobcats finished third with 79 behind Western Kentucky’s 149 points. The Bobcats will have to wait to see who will compete at the NCAA Indoor Nationals.

Courtesy of Texas State Athletics

TENNIS

BASEBALL Player of the Week

Texas State axes Lumberjacks The Texas State women’s tennis team beat former conference foe Stephen F. Austin 4-3 at the Bobcat Tennis Center Sunday afternoon. The victory is Texas State’s fifth straight win and improves the Bobcats’ overall record to 5-2, while the Lumberjacks fall to 2-4. Texas State plays its next six matches on the road before returning home March 26 to play Arkansas State, a Sun Belt Conference team.

The Bobcats begin the road trip with a conference match against Louisiana-Monroe March 1, then travel March 2 to Natchitoches, La. to face Northwestern State. Texas State plays Rice March 8 before playing three matches in Alabama. The Bobcats play Alabama-Birmingham March 10, Alabama State March 12 and South Alabama March 13 in a conference match.

Lucas Humpal, sophomore pitcher, was named Sun Belt Conference Pitcher of the Week Monday. He was recognized by College Sports Madness as the Sun Belt Baseball Player of the Week. Humpal pitched a complete game shutout Friday against CaliforniaRiverside. His 13 strikeouts in the game were the most in an outing by any pitcher in the Sun Belt so far this season, the most by a Bobcat since 2011 and a career record for Humpal. He gave up four hits in the outing and one extra base hit. Humpal walked two batters in the performance.

8 9 .9 KTSW TOP 5 ADDS

KTSW TOP 5 ADDs 1)

PHANTOGRAM

▶▶

2)

Voices

NATURAL CHILD

▶▶

Dancinʼ With Wolves

3) TACOCAT

▶▶

NVM

4) WILD BEASTS

▶▶

5)

Present Tense

SLEEPY SUN

▶▶

Maui Tears

ktsw.net

Zenarae Antoine, women’s basketball coach

classifieds PRELEASE 8/20/2014 $850. 2BD/2.5BA townhouse 1,000 sq.ft., 3 blocks from TxState, small, clean & quiet community. Free HBO, Full size W/D. www.windmilltownhomes. com or (512) 396-4181, leave message. 2-STORY TOWNHOMES W/ yard or patio. Near Campus. Units have wood and tile flooring. $775$900 per unit. 512-392-

6706. $6,000-$10,000 PAID EGG DONORS.ALL RACES, N/SMOKERS, AGES 18-26. SAT>1100/>ACT>24/ GPA>3.0 Reply to: info@ eggdonorcenter.com LOS CUCOS MEXICAN CAFE -LOOKING FOR SERVERS FLEXIBLE HOURS. Apply at 1310 Common St. New Braunfels, TX 78130.


B4 | The University Star | Sports | Thursday February 27, 2014

BASEBALL

Texas State to play Wagner at home this weekend By Kirk Jones

Sports Reporter @kirk_jones11

The baseball team continues its home game stretch with a threematch series against 0-3 Wagner this weekend. Texas State beat Texas A&MCorpus Christi Tuesday with help from bench players Ben McElroy, junior outfielder, and Austin O’Neal, senior first baseman. McElroy and O’Neal both received RBIs in the game. McElroy’s base hit put the ball club in the lead, while O’Neal increased the lead with a two RBI single. Hunter Lemke, senior pitcher, allowed one run in the outing. This was Lemke’s third-straight game

allowing at least one run in the ninth. “I just need to keep the ball down,” Lemke said. “I’m most successful when I can keep my pitches down in the zone. I need to make the adjustment and let my defense back me up.” The Bobcats are 6-1 at home, and have won 27 of their last 30 home games dating back to the 2013 season. “Most people are comfortable at their own home,” said Coach Ty Harrington. “You know the environment and the surroundings. However, a lot of it is that we have had big crowds. It’s exciting— the players love the energy and recognize that and look forward to that.” Bobcat Ballpark has averaged

1,654 fans in the last seven home games. Every home game has reached at least 1,000 patrons in attendance, and the season opener nearly reached 2,500 fans. Wagner comes into the game after losing three straight games to Elon last weekend. The Seahawks scored 6 runs in the series while Elon scored 32. “Focus is something we are going to have to get better at,” Harrington said. “Our attention level and focus level against Corpus Christi was not good. It certainly was not something we had grown accustomed to. Hopefully this weekend we regain some of that focus we had earlier in the season.” The Bobcats are on a four-game winning streak. The pitching staff has a 2.63 ERA and 43 strikeouts

during this streak. “I don’t doubt our kids want to do well,” Harrington said. “Our guys want to win, but whether it was the change in game time or not, come Friday we need to come out with more intensity and more involved focus.” Tyler Pearson, senior catcher, produced a hit in each one of the Bobcats’ four games during the streak. Pearson earned his fourth multi-hit game Tuesday, leading the team with 11, and places second in batting average with .379. Lucas Humpal, sophomore pitcher, will take the mound against Wagner, looking to build off a career start last week against California-Riverside. “Hopefully (Humpal) can come out with the same kind of focus,”

Harrington said. “His attention to detail and prep work need to be the same as when he took on Riverside. If he can continue his hard work, he will continue to throw well.” Humpal is 1-0 to begin the season with a 2.84 ERA, .284 opponents batting average and a complete game. Austen Williams, junior pitcher, will make a start this weekend. Williams is 2-0 this season, with a 0.00 ERA, 15 strikeouts and a .089 opponents batting average. Williams has yet to allow an earned run as he has pitched shutout innings against Air Force and California-Riverside. Williams will take the mound behind Humpal and Taylor Black, redshirt junior, to pitch the final game of the series.

SOFTBALL

Bobcats will travel to Mississippi for Gulf Coast Classic tournament By Cameron Cutshall Sports Reporter @CameronCutshall

The softball team will look to raise its energy level when the Bobcats travel to Mississippi this weekend as one of 10 teams competing in the Gulf Coast Classic. “We want to gain that energy we lost last weekend back,” said Coach Ricci Woodard. “That’ll be our main focus as we head into this tournament.” Texas State will be joined by Memphis, Ohio, Baylor, South Alabama, Louisiana, UTSA, Nicholls State, Chattanooga and Mississippi State in the classic. The Bobcats will play five of the teams in the tournament, opening Friday at noon against Memphis. The Tigers are coming into the tournament with a 7-5 overall record, currently fifth in the American Athletic Conference. Brittany Vaughn, Memphis infielder, enters the game with a .382 batting average and a .476 on base percentage. Vaughn has scored 8 runs, 13 hits and leads the team with 10 RBI. Leading the pitching for the Tigers is Ellen Roberts who has a 1.68 ERA and is 4-2 on the season. Roberts has pitched 41.2 innings this

season, allowing 38 hits and 15 runs and striking out 34 batters. Texas State will start Saturday’s double-header against Ohio. Ohio is coming into the tournament with a 12-1 overall record. Seven of the team’s nine players are currently batting between .275 and .476 in their first 13 games of the season. The leader for the Ohio Bobcats and the Mid-American Conference in hits and batting average is Adrienne Gebele, catcher, with a .476 average and 20 hits. Alexandria Basquez, infielder, has 15 hits and leads the team with 11 RBI for Ohio this season. The Bobcats will face No. 15 Baylor in their second game Saturday, the only ranked team they will face all weekend. Baylor is coming into the matchup with a 12-3 record. This will be the first of two matchups between the teams this season. Texas State has not defeated Baylor since the 2012 season. Whitney Canion, Baylor pitcher, will enter the tournament with a 7-2 record, 1.10 ERA and 65 strikeouts this season. Canion was chosen at the beginning of the season as one of 50 players to watch for USA Softball’s Player of the Year award.

The Bobcats’ first game of Sunday’s double-header will be against former Southland Conference opponent Nicholls State. The teams have not faced each other since the 2012 season, where they split their two game series in Louisiana. The Colonels will enter the tournament with a 5-11 overall record. The team went 1-4 in the Houston Classic tournament last weekend where it was outscored 50-20. Texas St ate will face the Mississippi State Bulldogs in its final game of the tournament. The Bulldogs are coming into the tournament undefeated with 14 wins. They have yet to give up more than one run to an opponent. The team is outscoring its opponents 81-7, throwing seven shutouts this season. Alison Owen, Bulldogs pitcher, has thrown 42.2 of 93 innings pitched for Mississippi State. Owen has a 0.49 ERA and is 7-0 on the season while leading the team in strikeouts with 64. “The competition is going to get tougher,” Woodard said. “This tournament will prepare us for what is to come. We’ll try to start March off playing good softball.”

Austin Humphreys | Photo Editor The Texas State softball team will compete in the Gulf Coast Classic in Gulfport, Miss. The Bobcats went 3-2 in last week’s tournament.


The University Star | Sports | Thursday February 27, 2014 | B5

SUN BELT STANDINGS MEN’S BASKETBALL Conference Overall

Team Georgia State

Western Kentucky

Arkansas State Louisiana

UT-Arlington

Arkansas—Little Rock Louisiana-Monroe Troy

Texas State

South Alabama

Overall Pct.

Streak

13-1

20-7

0.741

W3

10-4

18-9

0.667

W1

9-5

17-9

0.654

W3

9-6

18-10

0.643

7-7

12-14

0.462

7-8

12-15

0.444

L5

8-14

0.364

L2

Overall

L1 W1

5-9

4-10

9-17

0.346

L2

4-10

8-19

0.296

L1

3-11

9-18

0.333

W1

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Team

Conference Record

Arkansas State

Streak

Overall Pct.

Overall Record

12-3

18-9

0.667

W2

Western Kentucky

10-5

18-8

0.692

W4

Arkansas—Little Rock

9-6

14-11

0.560

L1

Texas State

9-6

12-14

0.462

L2

Georgia State

8-7

12-15

0.444

L2

Troy

7-8

11-15

0.423

W2

6-9

13-13

0.500

W3

Louisiana-Monroe

6-9

10-17

0.370

W1

South Alabama

5-10

7-18

0.280

L6

3-12

4-22

0.154

W1

Louisiana

UT-Arlington

BASEBALL

SOFTBALL Overall

Overall Pct.

Streak

South Alabama

11-1

0.917

Louisiana-Monroe

12-4

Texas State

Team

Team

Overall Record Overall Pct. Home Away Streak

W6

Louisiana

8-1

0.889

3-1

5-0

W8

0.750

W4

Texas State

6-2

0.750

6-1

0-1

W4

11-5

0.688

L1

Western Kentucky

6-2

0.750

5-1

1-1

W4

Western Kentucky

9-4-1

0.679

W4

Arkansas—Little Rock

5-2

0.714

4-2

1-0

L2

Louisiana

9-5-1

0.633

W1

Troy

6-3

0.667

5-3

1-0

W3

UT-Arlington

10-6

0.625

W1

Georgia State

4-3

0.571

2-1

2-2

W1

Georgia State

6-4

0.600

L3

Arkansas State

5-4

0.556

5-4

0-0

W2

Troy

5-8-1

0.393

L1

Louisiana-Monroe

4-4

0.500

2-2

2-2

L1

South Alabama

3-4

0.429

2-3

1-1

W1

UT—Arlington

2-5

0.286

0-3

2-2

W1


B6 | The University Star | Sports | Thursday February 27, 2014


February 27 2014  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you