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MONDAY APRIL 4, 2016

VOLUME 105 ISSUE 53 www.UniversityStar.com

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Hays County named fastest growing in Texas

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By Bailey Buckingham SENIOR NEWS REPORTER @bcbuckingham

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GoFundMe page to raise money to grow their business. With little knowledge of where to begin, their courage in stepping out and talking to banks began to make business progress. The day they received funding, the building which formerly housed Los Cucos opened up. “Our dream turned really quick into a reality and our vision is to give that to anyone who wants it,” Henry said. They used the school resources to make personal experiences in the business world.

Texas State may be the Rising Star of Texas, but the university slogan can now be applied to all of Hays County as it is now the fastest-growing county in Texas. According to data released by the U.S. Census Bureau, Hays County has experienced a 23.9 percent increase in population since 2010. There are now 194,739 residents in the county, compared to 157,107 in 2010. While Hays County holds the No. 1 slot for fastestgrowing county in Texas, it also claims the fifth spot in the national ranking. Laureen Chernow, communications manager for Hays County, said all of Central Texas is in a period of rapid growth, but Hays has been on an incline for years for several reasons. She said the county is a lovely place to live, but its economic growth also attracts residents. Texas State is another big draw for the county. “Hays County is also close to large cities such as Austin and San Antonio, but has a lower cost of living than larger cities,” Chernow said. “This attracts individuals who are looking for a lower cost of living and a small-town atmosphere that is not always found in the more crowded areas.” Chernow said the county has been taking steps to prepare for a growth increase for years by developing infrastructure such as roads, and updating development rules and regulations. Debbie Ingalsbe, Precinct 1 commissioner, said she has lived in Hays County the entirety of her life and has seen the rapid growth in San Marcos as well as the county over the years. Growth in counties can bring benefits and detriments alike, but it is the county’s job to collaborate in order to alleviate any issues that may occur. “With growth comes a lot of opportunities,” Ingalsbe said. “But with growth, there can also be factors that can be challenging for any city or county.” Ingalsbe said Hays County has worked continually over the years to ensure adequate water supply for the future. “Water is such a precious commodity,” Ingalsbe said. “Without it we cannot make it. This is one of the issues that the county is open to any discussion that will contribute to the conservation of our area and our natural resources.” The county has been very active in developing an on-

See BAD HABITS, Page 2

See GROWTH, Page 2

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UNIVERSITY

Quizlet users may be violating Texas State’s Honor Code By Richard Dray NEWS REPORTER @RichardDray

Students who use the popular studying network Quizlet could face steep consequences by unknowingly violating Texas State’s Honor Code. U n a u t h o r i z e d collaboration between students and use of university materials without the consent of faculty members are a breach of code. The issue lies in whether or not faculty specifically permit students to post returned class materials and assignments on Quizlet, said David Wiley, chair of the university Honor Code Council. “If the instructor is fine with the student posting all of (their) class notes on (the site) then there will be no honor code case,” Wiley said. John Blair, English professor, is not only okay with students using Quizlet, but encourages it. Quizlet allows students to upload questions and answers or terms and definitions to study using digital flash cards, games and practice tests. “I think it does help,” Blair said. “It helps them understand what sort of questions to expect.” However, Blair says if students are willing to study Quizlet posts, they might as well read the book instead. “I’ve definitely obtained better grades from using Quizlet,” said Ryan Pittman, geography junior. This situation is not always the case, however, as not every faculty member shares Blair’s perspective. If students do not know their instructor’s policy, they should ask before posting anything to Quizlet, Wiley said. “It is up to the student to make sure he or she understands the collaboration that is allowed by the faculty

See QUIZLET, Page 2

Texas State Student Dre enjoy hookah on March 23,2016 at Bad Habits Hookah Lounge

CASSANDIRA ALVORADO STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BUSINESS

How a college dream came true for three Texas State students By Bri Watkins NEWS REPORTER @briwatkins17

From full time students to dream-chasing hearts, three Texas State students turned their aspirations into a reality when they opened the doors of Bad Habits Hookah Lounge. Texas State seniors Taylor Henry (exploratory professional), Ericksen Stewart (management) and Ryan Castillo (management) met each other in high school, and are now owners of the newly developed hookah lounge in San Marcos. Bad Habits Hookah Lounge opened Feb. 22,

but its development was a journey which required hard work for these undergraduate students. Henry said their business started when they entered the 3 Day Startup program. 3DS is an event where students team up to pitch ideas, choose which idea they wanted to pursue and present their business plan. “This is what fueled us, what absolutely 100 percent made (Bad Habits) happen,” Henry said. Nobody ended up joining their team, but they did not let that stop them from working toward their goal.

CEO of Limestone Networks, Inc. Gary Kendall mentored them during this time by asking challenging questions. Stewart said Kendall’s advice motivated them to test the waters which led to the idea of catering hookah. Once the three entrepreneurs received advice from mentors, they presented Bad Habits to San Marcos for the first time at a pool party at The Avenue. From that moment, new doors began to open for the business as the students began networking. Henry, Stewart and Castillo created a

SCIENCE

Q&A with Dr. Kim Rossmo, Canadian criminologist By Rae Glassford NEWS REPORTER @rae_maybe

Kim Rossmo is a Canadian criminologist who pioneered the field of forensic geographic profiling, and now works as a research professor at Texas State’s Center for Geospatial Intelligence and Investigation. Rossmo sat down with The University Star to talk about his experience in uncovering the identity of street artist Banksy, what geographic profiling actually entails, and the future of the field. Rae Glassford: A study was done by Queen Mary College of London in 2016, which used geographic profiling to identify Robin Gunningham, a probable candidate for being the true identity of the street artist Banksy. You were part of that academic team? Kim Rossmo: Yes, we

had one of the team’s doctoral students collect data on Banksy artworks in England, and we started analyzing those by looking at all the different credible Banksy suspects. The only viable candidate turned out to be Gunningham. That doesn’t prove that he’s Banksy, it simply provides strong evidence to that effect. So, he was a good suspect before; now, he’s a better suspect. RG: How long does it typically take to conduct a study of this nature? Is geographic profiling particularly timeconsuming? How much data, on average, do profilers have to sift through in order to find what they’re looking for? KR: The process of identifying the graffiti from Banksy’s website, and then visiting the location of each artwork to geo-code their positions, took time because it required the student involved to travel between London

JOSHUA CASTELLANO-DAVILA STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Dr. Kim Rossmo, research professor, March 23, in his office in Hines Academic Center.

and Bristol. You can input all the necessary data into the computer in half an hour, so it’s quick. The software is much more tractable now than it was in the early days, because technology has advanced so far. Nowadays, you can run it all on a laptop. There are two forms of data. The first is input data, for

creating the profile. We recommend a minimum of five locations—for the Banksy case we had 140. Then, there’s what you want to do with the profile, which will depend on the case. RG: It was stated by the Queen Mary academic team that the purpose of the study was to demonstrate broader

uses for geographic profiling. Was Banksy chosen as the subject of this study because he’s a public figure, or for other reasons? KR: He was chosen because he’s a source of graffiti. In earlier studies done at the University of Maryland, we went to Turkey to look at the geo-spatial structure of terrorist cells. And one of the things we noticed is that there was a lot of antigovernment graffiti in areas where supporters of terrorist groups could be found. So we suggested that it might be worthwhile to compile databases on the locations of this graffiti because it would help focus prioritization efforts. So, the idea was that this study was an exercise in geocoding graffiti. What might analysis of graffiti locations tell us? From what we have seen, this method works very well in terms of making inferences about where someone

is living. RG: Which investigative challenges is geographic profiling intended to target, specifically? KR: Information overload. There’s something like a million people on the United States terrorist watch list, so it’s about how you focus limited resources. For example, the attack in Brussels—the perpetrators were known, but they weren’t being focused on. The degree to which we can develop evidence-based prioritization tools will allow intelligence agencies and law enforcement to know who to focus on, so that they can be more effective. RG: I understand that you have developed and patented a mathematical formula for geographic profiling? KR: Yes, the algorithm was the product of my PhD research. I came up with it

See ROSSMO, Page 2


2 | Monday, April 4, 2016

NEWS

The University Star

BAD HABITS, Henry said the comaraderie at Bad Habits makes his team unique. Growing up playing sports, Henry knew the kind of atmosphere he wanted to provide in his business and team values were at the top. “We can ask each other for anything in this world and we know that in one way or another it is going to get done,” Henry said. “We are a team—inside of work, outside of work. There is nothing we wouldn’t do for each other which is bottom line for our

GROWTH,

Anna Herod, News Editor @annaleemurphy starnews@txstate.edu

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

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culture here.” As businesses grow, it’s easy to lose track of communication. The Bad Habits team is actively making an effort not to become a part of that trend. “Your opinion matters,” Stewart said. “Your happiness matters. We learned from our other jobs of what not to do. Our past has taught us how to treat employees and how to effectively communicate.” Henry had a goal to design the architecture in a way that

localizes the community. Everything in the lounge was designed by a local artist one of the owners knows personally. “We welcome people to come and drop off their work so their talents can be exposed,” Henry said. He said the team has a love for getting to know their customers, and are always wanting to help them out in any way possible. Students should take every opportunity they come across at Texas State to get

QUIZLET,

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going relationship with the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, Ingalsbe said. There has been extensive work on the county’s roadway system through collaboration between the county and Texas Department of Transportation. The priority is the safety and mobility of the motorists who travel on Hays County roads. “If we wouldn’t have stepped up and partnered with TxDOT, these roads may have taken 20 or 30 years to be developed,” Ingalsbe said. “I think as a

them where they want to be in life, Stewart said. He said these opportunities often come from professors. Business management associate professor Robert Konopaske inspired Stewart and Henry to achieve their dreams. “It’s amazing how a professor can light a fire so quick,” Henry said. “Don’t let intimidation keep you from talking to professors.” To Stewart and Henry, the college experience means taking the tools and

county we have been very aggressive because our goal is to do our best to keep up with the increased number of vehicles traveling on these roadways.” Ingalsbe said another area the county has been specifically aggressive on is economic development. Leaders are working to bring high-quality, highpaying jobs to the area. “I have talked to many students who come to Texas State,” Ingalsbe said. “They fall in love with the area. They want to stay here, but they cannot find

a job. We need to continue to work hard to bring in high-quality jobs.” Hays County has focused on ensuring that local law enforcement, as well as health facilities are equipped with the staff and resources needed to accommodate the increased population, she said. Chernow said she feels all cities within Hays County are readily equipped for population growth and remains confident they will continue to take needs for future growth into consideration.

that will creep up behind you.” The owners said they hope to promote growth in the San Marcos community by expanding their business. Their story is still being written, and their dreams continue to grow. “As far as having what it takes, you don’t need much,” Henry said. “All you need is a drive to do what you want and if you can find that passion, there isn’t a thing in this world that can stop you.”

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member,” Wiley said. Without this consent from faculty, a student faces whatever punishment the instructor deems suitable. However, there are ways to avoid unfair punishment. Refusing the punishment normally comes in one of two forms, Wiley said. There are either students who deny improper use of class materials or those who admit to academic misconduct but feel the punishment is unfair. “That’s when we have hearings—when students don’t accept one or the other or both,” Wiley said. The Honor Code Council, which is made up of 16

ROSSMO,

MADISON MORRISS STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

knowledge you learn from your professors in class and putting them to use outside of the classroom. Henry hopes his story will build awareness among high school students to realize they already have what it takes to pursue their dreams. “My advice to high school students is to take that leap,” Henry said. The last thing you want to do is make the decision of ‘maybe this isn’t for me.’ You never want to get that feeling of regret of what if. There’s always doubt

faculty members and 14 students, presides over these hearings. After making a decision, the council sends its conclusions to the dean of the college in which the violation occurred. The dean then makes the final decision. However, they normally follow the suggestion of the council, Wiley said. There are a number of ways other than Quizlet students could be breaking school policy and be punished for those actions, Wiley said. Students who swipe their friends in to classes or assist their fellow students in appearing present in classes when they are not are breach-

es of university policy. “Our students don’t seem to think that it is academic misconduct, and basically its forgery,” Wiley said. Although a student may not get caught the first couple of times they forge attendance, they are eventually found out when the behavior becomes habitual, especially if attendance in that class is linked with a grade, he said. “Students and faculty share a role equally in academic integrity,” Wiley said.

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in 1991, but then it took me another four years to collect data, to verify it, test it, tweak it, etc. So, it was a long process, academically speaking. RG: This method has been described as imprecise by critics. What are some of the difficulties associated with this process? KR: Many people who have not worked in law enforcement want an “X-marks-

the-spot,” and that’s just not realistic. Geographic profiling isn’t some kind of magic recipe. But the proof is in the pudding—it continues to be used by law enforcement agencies and other organizations around the world. If it wasn’t effective, people wouldn’t be using it. RG: What does the future of geographic profiling look like?

KR: We’re really interested in potential applications to epidemiology. There are more veterinarian and medical uses than we initially realized. We also hope to see more expansion of its role in counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency. And to that end, Texas State has received quite a bit of federal funding to conduct research.

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The University Star

Monday, April 4, 2016 | 3

LIFESTYLE

Carlie Porterfield, Lifestyle Editor @reporterfield starlifestyle@txstate.edu

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

QUICK AND HEALTHY BREAKFAST IDEAS 2

3 1 By Vivian Medina LIFESTYLE REPORTER @vjmedina6

LARA DIETRICH STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

1. APPLE AND PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES

2. OVERNIGHT OATMEAL

3. YOGURT BREAKFAST BOWL

If you do not have much of an appetite, but still want to gnaw on something in the morning, this dish will certainly interest you. It takes anywhere from two to five minutes. It all depends on how you want to cut the apple. You can make the slices into sandwiches, or if you are running out of time, the apple can be cut into regular slices. Another great time saver is to buy pre-cut apples.

For students who hit the snooze button, oatmeal onthe-go is the perfect breakfast meal because you prepare it the night before. When morning comes, you can take it out of the fridge and eat it on your way to class!

For the student who prefers a nutritious and Instagram-worthy meal for breakfast, but has no cooking skills whatsoever, this parfait is definitely for you. This recipe takes about 5 minutes, and it is much healthier than the sugarpacked yogurt bottles like Yoplait.

Ingredients: 2 Apples Peanut butter Maple Syrup/Honey Granola

Chocolate chips Directions: 1 Cut the apples crosswise, so when you place two slices together, it makes a sandwich. 2. Take two slices and spread peanut butter all over one side of both slices. 3. Take one of those slices and sprinkle granola, maple syrup or honey. 4. If you are wanting a sweet taste, add some chocolate chips. 5. Take both apple slices and place them together. 6. Repeat for the rest of the apple slices.

Ingredients: Rolled Oats Milk Maple Syrup/Honey Fruit: Berries, Strawberries, Sliced Bananas Nuts Chocolate Chips Directions: All of the measurements are based on your personal preference, so any of the ingredients can be changed.

1. Pour the rolled oats into a mason jar or to-go cup. 2. Add milk until it is fully covering all of the oats. 3. Sprinkle maple syrup or honey to add more flavor. 4. Top it off with your choice of fruit and nuts. 5. If you want a nice treat, add some chocolate chips as well. 6. Close lid and place the jar in fridge. Leave it overnight so the milk soaks into the rolled oats. 7. Next morning, take it out of the fridge, add a spoon and you are ready to go. If you prefer warm oatmeal, put it in the microwave for one minute.

Ingredients: Greek Yogurt Granola Maple Syrup/Honey Fruit: Sliced Bananas, Berries, Strawberries Directions:

All of the ingredients in this recipe are measured to taste, which means you may want a lot of berries, but only a tiny amount of sliced bananas. If there is an ingredient you don’t like, it’s perfectly fine to replace it with something else. 1. Fill a bowl or cup with Greek yogurt. 2. Add a layer of granola to the top. 3. Sprinkle maple syrup or honey. 4. Add your favorite fruits such as, sliced bananas, berries and strawberries

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The University Star

OPINIONS

Brandon Sams, Opinions Editor @TheBrandonSams staropinion@txstate.edu

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

THE MAIN POINT

Thanks Obama, no really Regardless of political ideologies, President Barack Obama was a oneof-a-kind man with grace, humility and unbridled kindness. As the curtains close on his presidency, America will look back on his presidency say: “Thanks, Obama.” Even if you disagree with some of Obama’s policy proposals, executive actions or political philosophies, what cannot be denied is that he is a class act. Despite unprecedented obstructionism and pervasive racist attacks, Obama stood above it all. Like a dove hovering over the masses, he was the perfect model of decorum. In the face of hatred and never-before-seen racialized attacks he never faltered or broke character. For instance, compare Obama’s treatment of protesters and dissidents to that of potential presidential candidates— namely, Donald Trump. Through his violent

rhetoric Trump has incited mobs of people to harass and attack protesters at his rallies. On the other hand, when Obama was heckled, called a liar and derided he never devolved into a rabid animal. Obama has perfectly traversed the first-ever “social media presidency.” While it may seem shallow on the surface, in the ever-changing world of media it is important for the leader of the free world to stay relevant with new communication styles and techniques. Outside of his pleasant disposition, Obama has accomplished as much as he could have, given the political climate. He has moved America forward in terms of economic growth and social progression. Obama was the first sitting president to support same-sex marriage and denounced “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” He has been the singular best sitting president in regards to the rights of the gay

community, though his record on the greater LGBTQIA community is admittedly nonexistent. He continues to be on the right side of history. The Affordable Care Act is not particularly popular, but no one can deny that millions of people who were once uninsured can now get the help they need. Putting the lives of the American populace above profit margins is the mark of a leader. Outside of social issues, the economy may not be booming but Obama has conquered the greatest economic crisis America has had since the Depression. Right now America’s unemployment rate is sitting below 5 percent for the first time since before Obama took office in 2008. While the presidency is naturally polarizing due to the two-party system, the facts are not up for debate. Aside from policy, however, Obama has been a symbol of what a

BIRMY MICHELE STAR ILLUSTRATOR

president should be. Frankly, Obama is just a really cool president. Love him or hate him, he’s smooth, cool, calm and laidback. He may not be everyone’s ideological cup of tea, but he’ll definitely be missed.

America could use his kindness and quiet humility, especially in these trying political times. It seems everyone running for president, on both sides of aisle, is rude or aggressive. They lack his charisma and wit,

and more importantly his compassion. For seven years of relative progress and much-needed humanity, The University Star says offers a sincere “Thanks, Obama.”

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University.

RAPE CULTURE

UNIVERSITY

School dress codes enforce rape culture

Texas State Student Government should be abolished

By Allison Chavez @AllisonChavez21 OPINIONS COLUMNIST

Girls, cover up those shoulders—they’re distracting to those uncontrollably predatory schoolboys. Boys and girls alike come into contact in schools with the medieval practice of dress code— otherwise known as the rules that force girls to cover up all those sexual body parts. Dress codes in schools perpetuate rape culture through the insistence that girl’s bodies are sexual objects which can be distracting for boys. After all, nothing screams “sex” quite like an exposed shoulder. If one were to peruse the dress code section available in a school handbook, there is a high likelihood that it would disproportionally affect the “inappropriate” attire of girls. Surely, there will be a few sentences tacked on at the end about the few items of clothing that boys should stay away from. Unlike girls, boys pretty much just have to make sure their naughty bits are, for the most part, covered.

They are basically allowed to prance around school in tank tops and daisydukes if they so desire, while girls practically have to cover up from head to toe in order to conceal body parts that might be considered sexually distracting to boys. Girls having to cover up in order to not be offensive speaks to how determined our society is to sexualize their bodies. No matter the girl’s age, society insists that any exposed skin is sexually provocative and should be hidden from view so boys will not be aroused. Therein lies the fallacy of dress code: it adversely favors boys and dumps all the blame on girls. The more institutions we have that label girls’ bodies as sexual objects, the more engrained it is going to become in our society— and the harder it will be to root out. There is a disturbing belief system in most schools in which girls are taught how to cover themselves so their sexual bodies are not a diversion to boys. Instead of this harmful practice, we should be teaching boys not to view girls as sexual

objects to be possessed and viewed like a statue whose only value comes from their appearance. Boys, take some responsibility for yourselves, and make the decision to view girls as more than just a set of boobs and a nice pair of legs. By placing the blame on girls for boys’ straying eyes, we are enforcing rape culture. We are giving power to the belief which states women cause men to rape by being too provocative or being indecorously attired. Girls should not be forced to change their behavior to keep from tempting boys. Instead, we should teach boys not to view girls as sexual items, and to place the responsibility of treating girls with respect and courtesy on the boy’s shoulders. So, boys and girls, let us take a stand against the unjust misogyny of school dress codes by choosing not to judge girls as “too sexual” or “trashy” for wearing clothes that (heaven forbid) expose a shoulder or even worse, a kneecap. —Allison Chavez is a journalism freshman

By Jeffrey Bradshaw OPINIONS COLUMNIST @jeffbrad12

In 1776, the Founding Fathers declared independence from England. Today, I want to declare independence from the Student Government at Texas State. Actually, I want to go one step further and say we should abolish Student Government. Let me first point out that Student Government has accomplished several things in the past like creating grant programs, but they have not done enough to warrant their existence. Student Government’s purpose is to serve the student body as our representatives in the university—sounds reasonable enough. However, only 2 or 3 percent of students vote in elections each year. Their position as representatives for students is without grounds. Granted, it is technically students’ fault for not voting, but it’s also Student Government’s job to make the election times widely known. The only reason I even knew about the elections was because

I work for the campus newspaper. One noticeable failing is the lack of outreach and marketing of the campus government. Seeing as they have $605.50 for marketing in this year’s budget, they better get on it. Almost every day, there are people yelling in the Quad about tacos or something, and not once have I heard someone from Student Government do the same. They might table in the Quad, but I have never seen them. Not witnessing Student Government doing something may be my fault, but its members need to do more to make people aware. Furthermore, the “legislation” they have passed is lacking to say the least. This year, they approved upwards of $700 for new polo shirts. Yep, shirts are what they are spending time on. They should not serve as the representatives of students if they do so little for us. If I wanted to know what Student Government has done for me, I should not have to search very hard. When you go to the accomplishments page on their website—

yes, they have a website, which I’m sure you didn’t know about, it lists four accomplishments in the time I have been at Texas State. I have been here for three years. Certainly there are more, but even Student Government doesn’t deem these other accomplishments important enough to mention. One piece of legislation they seem to like is increasing student fees. Speaking of money, this year’s budget is $80,987. This money is coming from students, and it would be no problem if Student Government accomplished something, but they do not. Student Government seems useless, and I stand by that statement. I can appreciate a résumébuilder just as much as the next person, but when it costs students almost $81,000, it makes it hard to find the beauty. In biology, the term for a needless organ is vestigial. Student Government is this school’s vestigial organ and, just like the appendix, it needs to be removed. —Jeffrey Bradshaw is a political science junior

RESEARCH

Stem cells important for social progress By Cris Rivera @cris_rivera13 OPINIONS COLUMNIST

A study done by Chinese researchers successfully created mouse sperm cells out of stem cells. This is a huge success in stem cell research, and an important breakthrough for the 48.5 million infertile couples around the world. Stem cell research has recently become a very real possibility to help many people. However, as with anything related to human embryos, a

large controversy has surrounded funding and research. This controversy is tightly wound up in the abortion debate, because of how stem cells are researched in relation to humans. The process in which stem cells are turned into sperms cells is called in vitro fertilization, which requires scientists to take out the inner-cell mass from the fertilized egg also called blastocysts. These blastocysts are taken from an IVF facility, and are generally in excess

The University Star Editor-in-Chief...........................................Kelsey Bradshaw, stareditor@txstate.edu Letters................................................................................universitystar@txstate.edu News Editor........................................................Anna Herod, starnews@txstate.edu Sports Editor..............................................Paul Livengood, starsports@txstate.edu Lifestyle Editor......................................Carlie Porterfield, starlifestyle@txstate.edu Opinions Editor..........................................Brandon Sams, staropinion@txstate.edu Multimedia Editor..............................Daryl Ontiveros, starmultimedia@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief.................................Abigail Marshall, starcopychief@txstate.edu

and donated by couples who have been treated for infertility. Embryos that have been fertilized inside of a woman’s body, however, are not used. This distinction is what makes the difference in the ethics of stem cell research. These blastocysts are where the controversy begins. As with abortion, people believe life begins at conception, and as a result fetuses begin having rights before being born. These people believe the moment fertilization happens, the embryo now has rights like

any other person, which means experimenting or taking cells without “consent” is illegal and immoral. This is neither a logical nor a realistic way to look at the entire situation. The blastocysts given to scientists are generally in excess as well as donated for the purposes of research or they end up discarded if not used for science purposes. In other words, the blastocysts are thrown in the trash if not used to better society. This is not morally

superior than using blastocysts to help living people bring children into the world. These blastocysts are being used to further medical research to help treat health problems affecting millions of people. This research will allow people to form families who would not otherwise be able to. There is only good being done by this research. No one is being hurt by the use of embryos to create life, or by other health benefits which come from stem cell research. To tell

another person they are not allowed to have the same happiness others enjoy on the basis of a close-minded perspective is wrong and cruel. Imposing beliefs on another person is antithetical to American values. The United States was founded on freedom for all people. —Cris Rivera is a computer science freshman

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University and is published every Monday and Thursday of the spring and fall and every other Wednesday in the summer semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. on publication days with a distribution of 6,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Monday, April 4, 2016. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief. The first five issues of each edition of the paper are free. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased at 50¢ per copy. Contact The University Star office at (512) 245-3487 to purchase additional copies.

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The University Star

SPORTS

Monday, April 4, 2016 | 5 Paul Livengood, Sports Editor @IAmLivengood starsports@txstate.edu

UniversityStar.com @universitystar

SOFTBALL HAS TIME TO BOUNCE BACK AFTER AVERAGE SEASON START By Thomas Mejia SPORTS REPORTER @ThomasMejia79

Halfway through the season, the Bobcats are currently 11 games over .500 with a 23-12 record. So far, I give Texas State a B. The Bobcats started with a historical 9-1 record. Texas State has racked up major wins this season, such as the first three-game series in the Sun Belt. After splitting the first two games, the Bobcats defeated ULMonroe in game three to capture the 2-1 series victory. The Bobcats got off to a quick 3-0 lead in the first inning and racked up five more runs to extend the lead to 8-0. Randi Rupp, sophomore pitcher, kept the Warhawk offense scoreless with 12 strikeouts. A historic home victory against Texas is one game that stands out the most. The win versus the Longhorns was the first since 2010. The Bobcats scored seven runs in the fifth inning, securing the Bobcats’ 9-5 victory over the Longhorns. Rupp said the victory against Texas is the best win so far in her

collegiate career. Rupp has been dominant through the entire season. She currently has a 16-6 record in the circle and has pitched 132.1 innings— the most in the rotation by far. Next in the Bobcat rotation with 55 innings is Paige Williams, junior pitcher. Rupp has been able to maintain a 1.69 ERA, allowing 32 earned runs, 32 walks and striking out 181 batters. What the Bobcats need is someone to step up when Rupp isn’t on the mound. Williams and Quincy Charleston, junior pitcher, are a combined 7-6 record on the mound. Charleston is pitching a 1.93 ERA and has struck out 37 batters. Williams’ ERA is 2.89 and she has given up six home runs while in the circle. In order for the Bobcats to make a deep run in the Sun Belt Conference tournament, Charleston or Williams must be able to perform when their number is called. Offensively, the Bobcats are inconsistent. During one game, Texas State put up a seven-run inning. During the next game, the Bobcats struggled to get

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three hits through seven innings. Kelli Baker, senior second baseman, leads Texas State with a .339 batting average and 38 hits. Corrina Liscano, junior third baseman, leads in

homeruns with five. Leaving runners on base has also been an issue for the Bobcats. In game two against Texas, the Bobcats were down 2-3 in the top of the sixth with a runner

on third base and one out. Texas State could not score in the game tying run, ultimately losing to the Longhorns 2-3. The Bobcats could be in a better position in the

Sun Belt, but they have the ability to bounce back as the second half of the season begins.

at Baylor—a win for the Bobcats—another threegame series took place at Bobcat Ballpark against Louisiana-Monroe, where Texas State swept the series. Texas State’s record was then 12-4, and the team was on a roll. Following the LouisianaMonroe games, the Bobcats were able to pull out another sweep against Appalachian State in a three-game series. However, this high of winning sadly came to an end this past weekend. The last five games the team has played

have resulted in losses. Unfortunately, the threegame series loss against South Alabama ruined the Bobcats’ undefeated streak in the Sun Belt conference. Hoping to end this losing streak, Texas State will soon face Georgia Southern. The Bobcats need a win in order to make the top five in the conference. Although these last five games have been losses, Texas State will not give up, and it is important that we all still support our fellow Bobcats. Go Cats, go!

BASEBALL: A MID-SEASON RECAP By Brooke Phillips SPORTS REPORTER @brookephillips_

As April is just around the corner, the Texas State baseball team heads right into the middle of its season. I give the baseball team a B-. Currently, the Bobcats have an overall record of 15-10, and a Sun Belt conference record of 6-3. Until just a few games ago, the team was undefeated in the Sun Belt. However,

the Bobcats’ last threegame series against South Alabama ruined that record, and the Jaguars have taken the lead in the conference (9-0). Although the Bobcats fell short last week, the beginning of their season started off great. In the seasonopening games at the Bobcat Ballpark, the team competed against Washington State. Texas State won the first three of the four-game series. The next four games

were away, and the Bobcats won two and lost two. Their record was then 5-3, still putting them in the conference. Back at home on March 1 was the highly anticipated University of Texas game. This game brought the largest crowd yet, and tickets sold fast. Most people expected Texas to win, and the Bobcats almost proved them wrong—until the 11th inning. Texas State was head-tohead with the Longhorns

throughout the game. By the end of the ninth inning, the game was tied—causing the teams to go into not 10, but 11 innings. The Longhorns scored six runs in the eleventh inning alone. Although this game was an upset for Texas State, the team did not allow the loss to ruin games to follow. At home again, it was time to take on Incarnate Word. This three-game series was just what the Bobcats needed for a confidence boost, as they swept the Cardinals. After playing away

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