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VOLUME 102, ISSUE 77

www.UniversityStar.com

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TUESDAY

APRIL 16, 2013

GO NE ONLI NOW

Urinetown Comes to Town The Texas State Department of Theatre and Dance will perform Urinetown, a musical comedy about a dystopian society that charges for bathrooms. To learn more about Urinetown, go to UniversityStar.com.

City’s new master plan to focus on community growth By Paige Lambert News Reporter The San Marcos Comprehensive Master Plan is being updated for the first time in nearly two decades to reflect the city’s population growth. The master plan is up for final approval and adoption at the April 16 San Marcos City Council meeting. Mayor Daniel Guerrero said the plan has not been updated since 1996 because of frequent changes in city leadership. The master plan is divided into six sections and aims to improve San Marcos’ economic development, environment and resource protection, land use, neighborhoods and housing, parks, public spaces and facilities and transportation. Guerrero said land use, infrastructure codes and public safety guidelines will be reassessed to fit the master plan and prepare for the city’s growth. Code changes will allow for other phases of the master plan to begin, and the process will take anywhere from six months to a year to complete, Guerrero said. The first and longest section of the master plan focuses on building San Marcos and its workforce, said Matthew Lewis, director of Planning and Development Services for the city. The section focuses on utilizing the airport and diversifying tourism to generate economic growth in the area. Another section of the plan centers on maintaining neighborhoods and creating better housing to attract middle-income citizens, Lewis said. “We have high and low income housing, but not a lot of options for the middle class,” Lewis said. “The goal is to create affordable housing for our missing middle and diverse housing areas.” The plan calls for growth to extend east of IH35 and toward the airport. Bill Taylor, chair of the Master Plan Steering Committee, said as a part of the plan the area will be equipped to house anything from residential to business properties. “We’re going to put water and utility lines all over that area and zone it to where they can do what they want, other than huge factories,” Taylor said. “The zoning will also draw growth away from the recharge zone.” Taylor said drawing new businesses with the relaxed zoning would help with the master plan’s other goal of protecting the environment and natural resources. Work has already begun to achieve some goals under the plan, such as tackling the issue of construction downtown. The Downtown Master Plan, which began work

BORDER to BORDER Couple bikes across country for breast cancer awareness By Amanda Ross News Reporter A Texas State couple will make a trip spanning three states and thousands of miles to raise breast cancer awareness—all with their dog in tow. Students Julie and Matt Swallow, both 28, are planning a bicycle tour of the West Coast of North America with their dog, Jet, to raise money for cancer research. The Swallows are looking for sponsors for their trip and have set their fundraising goal at $25,000. All money raised for the trip will go to the Susan G. Komen Foundation for breast cancer research. Sponsorship of the tour is provided through various organizations, businesses and individuals, Julie Swallow said. The Swallows aim to have one sponsor for each mile of their trip. The tour will begin in Vancouver, Canada and continue through the western United States, concluding at the southern border, Matt Swallow said. The couple will ride a total of nearly 2,109 miles—or about 50 miles a day for 40 days. The Swallows wanted to bike from Canada to Mexico for several years, but the idea to make the trip for cancer research was a recent development. Julie Swallow said her aunt was recently diagnosed with breast cancer, giving the tour a new sense of purpose and momentum. “We wanted to do the ride for something meaningful, and cancer is something that affects so many people all over the world,” she said. The Swallows reached out to the Susan G. Komen Foundation, wishing to partner with the high-profile organization. They were approved for partnership and

Carlos Valdez, Assistant Photo Editor

Matthew Swallow, interdisciplinary studies junior, and Julie Swallow, exercise and sports science junior, will be biking down the west coast from Canada to Mexico with their dog Jet this summer. hope to begin their trip in mid-August, Matt Swallow said. The couple said they are confident their goal will be met and are using fundraising websites, blogging and word-of-mouth to gain publicity. Matt Swallow said their blog, apinkframeofmind.blogspot.com, is racking up views and garnering attention from several organizations. Matt Swallow said he and his wife plan to stick to main roads, but will take occasional side trips to see attractions and make stops along the way. He said they will rely on camping, friends and the kindness of strangers to host them on their journey.

READ GROWTH, PAGE 3

READ Bike, PAGE 3 Map courtesy of Google

Strahan Coliseum chosen as home for new Victory Star

Pathway Program bridges gap between ACC, Texas State

ize the project so the star can be mounted. Smith said the committee needs to find out what the “final dollar figure” for the new VicThe new student-made Victory Star will tory Star will be to determine if additional soon shine at Strahan Coliseum as an indi- funds need to be raised. cator of Bobcat success. “We still have to understand what it’s goThe Victory Star committee has chosen ing to cost (students) to finish the star, to to install the structure on the wall above the even put it up on the building and some of ticket office at Strahan Colesium. The instal- those kind of logistical things,” Smith said. lation is part of the Lighting the Way initiaSmith said the committee discussed plactive, a three-year campaign to find a home ing the star on Jackson Hall, Alkek Library for the structure. and Strahan Coliseum. Smith said they The campaign was originally launched to chose Strahan because it was the least exreplace the Victory Star above Jackson Hall pensive option, the safest place to mount the with a new one. This was not a possibility be- star and had the best visibility from Bobcat cause of safety concerns—finding a home for Stadium. Juan Guerra, associate vice presithe student-made star became the new focus dent of Facilities, said the committee had of the campaign. to consider which location would be the Joanne Smith, vice president for Student most accessible for future maintenance on Affairs, said work needs to be done to final- the star. “Strahan is on ground level, you can drive right up to it, and it’s easy to get to it,” Guerra said. “It would be easy in the future if something breaks or gets damaged to go up there and fix it.” Guerra said the students who constructed the star must finish installing its lights and program a controller so it can be monitored through a web-based application. “That way, you don’t have somebody there flipping a switch because it’s actually going to be controlled through the web,” Guerra said. Guerra said Facilities will lift the 400-pound star up onto the side of Strahan once it is com Star File Photo A new Victory Star will be installed above the ticket office at Strahan READ STAR, PAGE 3 Coliseum.

By Xander Peters News Reporter

By Nicole Barrios News Reporter

A new co-enrollment program will attempt to provide an easier transition into university life for students transferring from Austin Community College beginning in fall 2014. The Pathway Program is designed for students to gain admission to Texas State while acclimating to the campus culture. The program allows students to utilize Texas State’s campus and services while completing the majority of their courses at Austin Community College, said Michael Heintze, associate vice president for enrollment management. Students will have the option of commuting to campus or living in residence halls at Texas State. Full admission to the university to complete a bachelor’s degree will be guaranteed to all students in the Pathway Program who maintain a 2.25 cumulative GPA. “It will provide students an opportunity to come to the university as full time entering freshmen and give them another option of co-enrolling in this specialized program (at Texas State),” Heintze said. Heintze said the program was implemented because of the opening of the ACC Hays County campus in the spring 2014 semester. Heintze said all students in the program will have to pay the normal amount of fees to access the Student Health Center, library and various other services. Provost Eugene Bourgeois said between 200 and 300 students will be accepted during the program’s first year after being selected by Undergraduate Admissions. He said students who choose to join the Pathways Program will be afforded the use of facilities and academic advising, as well

as access to cultural, academic and scholarly lectures. Bourgeois said students in the program will pay the same amount for dorm rooms if they choose to live on campus. “It better ensures completion of a fouryear degree with (Texas State),” Bourgeois said. Kelsie Pennington, mass communication junior, transferred from ACC at the beginning of the spring 2013 semester. She said the adjustment to life at a university from a community college was difficult at first, mostly because some of her credits did not transfer. “I was totally a fish out of water,” Pennington said. “It was just kind of hard trying to figure it all out on your first day of class. If I were able to wean myself into (Texas State) then I would have felt more comfortable with the situation.” Pennington said she would have taken advantage of a program such as Pathways if there had been the opportunity before transferring. Pennington said she would have lived in the Texas State dorms during her freshman year at ACC if it was an option. “I feel like it’s totally immersing yourself in the culture and way of living as a college student,” Pennington said. “It’s totally different than at ACC because they don’t offer dorms, but I would have done it to experience college more.” Bourgeois said universities are recognizing they must forge better partnerships with two-year schools. “It’s really a chance to strengthen the partnership (with ACC) to better ensure students who seek a four-year degree can come to Texas State from ACC in a much more formalized fashion,” Bourgeois said.


2 | Tuesday April 16, 2013 | The University Star

OPINIONS

For more viewpoints or letters to the editor, e-mail staropinions@txstate.edu

The “drain” to FBS pt. III

Transportation officials should make bus route changes permanent

A

lthough the newly rerouted Bobcat Tram stops are temporarily relieving many frustrations for students, transportation services officials should develop plans to keep several of the routes permanently diverted away from The Quad. Officials have rerouted most of the tram courses away from The Quad bus loop since April 8 to avoid construction projects on Sessom Drive, according to a March 28 University Star article. Passengers on the Post Road, Mill Street, Wonder World and Bobcat Tram Interurban routes are picked up and dropped off at the new Woods Street terminal. The Beretta Hall shelter receives passengers from the Blanco River, Aquarena Springs and Bobcat Stadium routes. The only routes with regular Quad bus loop pickups and drop-offs include LBJ, Ranch Road and Campus Loop. Capital Area Rural Transportation began operating the Campus Loop route April 1 and will continue to carry out functions during the bus reroute time frame. It seems safety has improved for students and bus drivers because less students are packed into The Quad bus loop at peak hours throughout the day. It is common to see crowds of students pushing, shoving and overflowing from the sidewalks onto the street in The Quad bus loop— sometimes in the direct path of incoming trams. Safety is a significant concern since there are only a few places to park trams in the loop along the sidewalk and surging numbers of students. Transportation services officials must acknowledge the noticeable decreases in student congestion and traffic at the bus terminals and put forth solid plans to continue dividing up the routes in the future. There is no reason for all of the trams to start and end their routes in The Quad bus loop. The university invested thousands of dollars to construct perfectly functional terminals throughout campus near LBJ, Commons and Woods Street, so these locations must continue to be utilized in semesters to follow.

By Daniel Palomo Opinions Columnist

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fter Texas State’s reclassification to the Football Bowl Subdivision level several years ago, the true success of the football program must continue to be scrutinized and evaluated by students and officials. A priority is something defined by action. A major priority of Texas State officials was to be reclassified several years ago to the FBS level. Has it been a successful transition over the years? In my first column of the “Drain” series published Sept. 15, 2010, I examined the circumstances leading to the student referendum that raised student athletic fees. This was the catalyst for the FBS reclassification movement. In part two of the same series published Sept. 28, 2010, I investigated the lofty plan Texas State officials implemented to be considered by the National Collegiate Athletic Association for reclassification. The athletic fee is the biggest drain to student pocketbooks by a wide margin, out of all other fees students are required to pay. This cost increases in $18 increments for each credit hour a student enrolls in. The athletic fee for an undergraduate student taking 12 hours this semester is more than the medical service, bus, publication, environmental service and international education fees combined. Many students often marvel at what the university is willing to “bet” on football. According to an Oct. 12, 2012 Sports Business Now article, only 23 of 338 NCAA Division I institutions reported positive net revenues. Texas State was not one of those 23, and it seems the university will not be heading into that positive revenue region anytime soon. College football is a big business with few winners and many losers, and this will not change overnight. It is very difficult to create a winning tradition in the FBS, and it is even harder to pay for it. Since 2005, Texas State has poured millions of dollars into the Jim Wacker Field at Bobcat Stadium in order to meet NCAA reclassification requirements. It is a shame the stadium has not exactly been filled near capacity regularly, though university officials have experienced record-setting crowds during last few semesters. However, relative to the stadium’s size, attendance is not so impressive. Seeing as the stadium’s official capacity is around 33,000, the stadium often remains half-empty during even the most highly attended games. Texas State’s acceptance into FBS in 2007 has been touted as a move that would positively affect the community’s attitude about the university’s prestige. Many people may determine prestige by the number of appearances a university’s football team has on ESPN, but I cannot accept that personally. Earning a college degree is first and foremost when picking a university to attend, and students should not place a higher priority on an institution based on an athletic team. The highest paid state employee is the University of Texas football coach, Mack Brown. The movement to increase athletic fees and bolster athletic programs in hopes of garnering the ever-elusive athletic prestige is nonsensical, especially amid multi-million dollar state budget cuts. Texas State launched the campaign to join FBS amid the 2007 recession with state support waning. The numbers say the campaign will ultimately be a net loss over time, as it has already demonstrated so far. I am unsure how FBS football will raise college attainment rates or give Texas a better economic position in and around the United States. Unfortunately, a quick glance at fee numbers can assure students in recent years this has been a top priority for Texas State. Officials have invested a tremendous amount of time, effort and money into the football program. Texas State has made it to the FBS, but has the university achieved success? It is time for students to change perceptions of success in regards to the university. Once students do that, maybe we will have a clearer view of Texas State’s own prestige—or lack thereof. --Daniel Palomo is a mass communication masters student.

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In addition, time and service efficiencies on the trams have noticeably improved for many students as a direct result of the bus reroutes. Many students are pleased with the lack of traffic buildup they would have likely encountered along Sessom, although some buses have to travel through The Square for the reroutes. A domino effect of traffic usually spills down Sessom when trains clog up traffic on Aquarena. Train congestion combined with Sessom construction projects diverting traffic through one narrow lane is a recipe for roadway headaches. Transportation services officials made the right move by relocating trams during the construction period and should continue this initiative throughout the year, although Sessom may be a more direct path to campus. A variety of changes will be brought to the Bobcat Tram system in the coming semesters along with the temporary reroutes. Students voted to pass a bus fee referendum earlier this month to take effect this fall, increasing the cost to $95 per student. Transportation service officials are in the final stages of selecting a new bus service provider for the contract beginning fall 2014, according to an April 10 University Star article. Officials appear to be looking for ways to increase the quality of tram services across the board for current and future Bobcats. Permanently rerouting many of the bus routes away from The Quad is a worthwhile solution to increase service quality, time efficiency and overall safety.

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Emmanuel Ramirez, Star Illustrator

Kickstarter harbors, fosters student ideas

By Alex Pernice Opinions Columnist

S

tudents who want to see their creative goals become a reality should consider taking advantage of the Kickstarter website to generate funds and support for project ideas. Kickstarter is an online platform where several projects involving art, food, music and everything in between can receive funding. Participants post their ideas and plans on Kickstarter in an attempt to gain community funding and support, both of which are vital to launching projects. According to Kickstarter.com, the website became open to the public April 28, 2009 and has since helped 44 percent of posted projects reach their funding goals. The Kickstarter website is important because of its role in encouraging ordinary individuals to pursue their dreams, no matter how outlandish. The website hosts a community of users who donate to projects they deem worthwhile in the hopes of flourishing someone’s particular initiatives. Users who post projects often generate a supportive fan base,

Editor In Chief................................................Beth Brown, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor............................Lee Moran, starmanagingeditor@txstate.edu Letters..................................................................................starletters@txstate.edu News Editor...................................................Caitlin Clark, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor............................Hollie O’Connor, starentertainment@txstate.edu Opinions Editor..........................................Liza Winkler, staropinion@txstate.edu Photo Editor.......................................Austin Humphreys, starphoto@txstate.edu Sports Editor..........................................Cameron Irvine, starsports@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief......................Thomas Glasebrook, starcopychief@txstate.edu Web Editor.............................................Cayla Green, starwebeditor@txstate.edu

which in turn encourages them to move forward with an idea. Eventually, many donators or “backers” are rewarded for their generosity by seeing ideas succeed and receive special tokens in thanks. Funding hopefuls should check out the “The Art of Asking” T.E.D. Talk with alternative-rock icon Amanda Palmer if the statistics and reviews on the website are not compelling enough. Palmer has been using the Kickstarter platform since 2010, and all three of her created projects have received full funding. Palmer, the self-proclaimed “listener, love-lover, rule-hater,” has backed 32 other projects in the giveand-take nature of Kickstarter. She is a staunch supporter of the site and promotes it not only as a crowd-sourcing site but also as a powerful networking tool. Kickstarter projects tend to go handin-hand with college campuses because university students are often bursting with creative energy, but they lack the funds to implement ideas without backing. Students are often experiencing new things and discovering themselves during college. A few of the experiences that can spark creativity in students include changing majors, exploring career options and finding new talents. Many times, students lack significant funds to make their ideas a reality, and creative ambitions fall to the side in favor of more practical goals such as paying for tuition. Whether a student

Multimedia Editor.........................Alex Peña, starmultimediaeditor@txstate.edu Design Editor.............................................Sarah Ansell, stardesign@txstate.edu Account Executive.....................................Catie Brossard, starad3@txstate.edu Account Executive.................................Blakely Knowles, starad4@txstate.edu Account Executive.....................................Hannah Wilson, starad5@txstate.edu Media Specialist................................... Chris Salazar, chris.salazar@txstate.edu Advertising Coordinator...........................Kelsey Nuckolls, starad1@txstate.edu Publications Coordinator.......................................Linda Allen, la06@txstate.edu Publications Director...........................Bob Bajackson, stardirector@txstate.edu

wants to start a small business or record an album, gaining support through Kickstarter can definitely start projects on the right foot. Creative Texas State students and entrepreneurs could definitely use Kickstarter to their advantage. For example, Mark Nanez, marketing sophomore, got an idea during his freshman year to sell custom “Down To Float” tank tops to classmates and friends in the San Marcos area. Nanez, who is a graphic design wiz and a business savvy student, began to sell more products than he had ever expected across campus. His once-simple idea has now turned into a small apartment-run business, Stay Sweet Tees. Although Nanez did not use the Kickstarter platform to start his business, his could really benefit from the site for any additional projects he puts into action. Nanez could use the site to fund even larger projects than he currently has the capacity to finance and could generate more brand recognition for Stay Sweet Tees. No idea, whether big or small, is too crazy or unrealistic for Kickstarter and its huge community of backers and project creators. Students seem to be more creative and strapped for cash than ever before, and investing in Kickstarter is a smart decision for those who want to make their goals a reality. --Alex Pernice is a mass communication sophomore.

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos and is published every other Wednesday in the summer semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. on publication days with a distribution of 6,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Tuesday, April 16, 2013. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief. The first five issues of each edition of the paper are free. Additional copies of the paper can be purchased at 50¢ per copy. Contact The University Star office at (512) 245-3487 to purchase additional copies.

Visit The Star at www.UniversityStar.com


The University Star | Tuesday April 16, 2013 | 3

NEWS

BIKE

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The Swallows are also signed up with Couchsurfing.com, which matches travelers with locals willing to provide a place to stay for the night, they said. Their dog Jet is even being helped with lodging for the trip. Dutch Dog Design supplied the Swallows with a specialty carriage to tow him across the country in.

GROWTH

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

in the fall, concentrates on making the area more pedestrian friendly and diverse. Lewis said downtown is going to be more student-oriented until the middle class is attracted to San Marcos. There are currently bike lanes on C.M. Allen and Cheatham Street and near Rio Vista Park. Taylor said the parks portion of the plan is aimed at connecting all parklands and activity areas with bike lanes. “We took a big step toward this part of the plan when (the city) got Cape’s Camp,” Taylor said. “Before there was a void that we couldn’t fill and connect. Now it’s that missing puzzle piece that will add a mile of bike lanes.” According to the transportation section of the plan, encouraging alternative modes

STAR

Jet, a four-year-old black mixed breed, is used to accompanying the couple on their bike rides. The Swallows are avid bikers. They often cycle from Austin to Julie Swallow’s family home in Seguin, with Jet always in tow, Matt Swallow said. The couple will take the fall semester off in order to take their tour.

of transportation will be considered when planning new infrastructure projects. One of the first transportation projects will be on Ranch Road 12. Construction will begin in two years to widen the road and build sidewalks, Taylor said. Taylor said the Comprehensive Master Plan will serve as the city’s blueprint for growth during the next 10 years, with an update and rewrite during the fifth year. Two of the six elements will be reviewed and updated each year, Taylor said. “The community itself has grown and become different in so many ways, but we are recalibrating our lookout for the city,” Guerrero said. “We know what we are doing for the next 10 years.”

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

plete and bolt it onto the building, securing it for severe weather conditions. Guerra said the university will hire a contractor to install the star. He said the project will most likely take no more than four weeks to complete depending on how hard it is to lift the star onto the side of the building. Guerra said Facilities employees will be coordinating with the contractor, and Information Technology will most likely provide the data points and wiring to connect the star and control it electronically. Guerra said installation of the finished star will cost about $28,000. Cats in Action raised $25,000 by selling raffle tickets for the Lighting the Way campaign. The student organization conducted fundraisers at campus events and sporting

activities to raise money to mount the star. Chandler Sparks, biology senior and president of Cats in Action, said Jackson Hall is where he would “love to see the star go.” However, he said Strahan is an excellent alternative because of its visibility and significance to the university. “The building is significant because it’s where we hold graduation, sporting events and convocation so there are a lot of reasons to light up the star right there at Strahan,” Sparks said. Smith said the committee will continue to work on the long-term project of upgrading the current star on Jackson. “We’ll have two stars for now, but I think that it will be a great addition to the star we currently have,” Smith said.

Communication issues lead to new policy proposal for ASG By Xander Peters News Reporter The Associated Student Government is drafting a University Policy and Procedure Statement in an attempt to solve communication problems between the administration and student body representatives. The statement would outline communication methods that would come into play when there are fee increases and other changes that need to be passed by student votes. ASG President Nathan McDaniel said the idea for the statement arose after a lack of communication between administration and the student government when the Bobcat Tram Interurban service was canceled and a fee increase was proposed. “It’s to increase the collaboration in the way that students and administration communicate on important topics, such as (the cancellation of the interurban service),” McDaniel said. Transportation services officials recently asked for the student bus fee to be increased for the fall 2014 semester. The fee increase was passed by a student vote April 3 through a referendum included on the ASG election ballot. Nancy Nusbaum, interim director of transportation services, said she previously had never dealt with fee increases or referendums with ASG before taking over the department from Joe Richmond Sept. 1. The statement is being crafted as a result of miscommunication between her office and ASG during the bus cancellation and fee increase. McDaniel said ASG had been aware since the summer that the administration could possibly call for a bus fee referendum but thought it would not happen until next year. “Had I known what (ASG)’s procedures were, then I would have made sure to follow them,” Nusbaum said. “I was under the impression that they knew the information that

they said they did not know.” McDaniel said the lack of communication during those decisions is a problem that needs to be corrected. The administration did not discuss the bus cancellation or fee increase with students in a timely manner, he said. “We had to scramble and get it all done, because of the simple fact that there wasn’t a set policy saying ‘This is how we need to do this,’” McDaniel said. “If we would have known earlier then we would have been able to work it out with more time.” McDaniel said ASG has suggested the administration provide a 60-class day notice to student body representatives before a vote takes place. He said another alternative would be for the administration to consult with ASG 120 class days in advance of a student vote. Administrators may also attend an ASG meeting to let the advisory committee know when a vote may need to be held, he said. Cody DeSalvo, McDaniel’s special assistant, said the statement would be a university policy that binds not just ASG together but administration as well. He said the first part of the statement would be to require the different departments on campus to provide ASG a proposal in writing before fees are requested to be raised. This would allow ASG time to consult with students before any referendums or votes take place. Nusbaum said the procedures must be followed if they are to benefit the entire university. McDaniel said the statement is still in the works but will have a lasting effect on the student body and ASG because it will be permanent. “We just feel like having the policy in place makes a standard for everyone,” McDaniel said. “That’s our hope, that students are in the dialogue with what’s going on for now and forever.”


4 | Tuesday April 16, 2013 | The University Star

TRENDS

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Keep San Marcos Beautiful Spring Concert Series

Carlos Valdez, Assistant Photo Editor

Matthew Schuste, guitarist for Kabomba!, performs for Keep San Marcos Beautiful April 11 at San Marcos Plaza Park. By Fiona Riley Trends Reporter Children, families and elderly couples filled San Marcos Plaza Park with laughter, conversations and relaxation Thursday

night during the second of five concerts in the Keep San Marcos Beautiful Spring Concert Series. The evening kicked off at 6:30 p.m. with catering services provided by Whole Foods, selling

Q&A D.T. Max

Author of David Foster Wallace biography

By Jordan Gass-Poore’ Trends Reporter Author D.T. Max’s new biography “Every Love Story is a Ghost Story” chronicles the life of “In-

finite Jest” writer David Foster Wallace. The book is the first of its kind, filled with grammar, bandanas, antidepressants, irony and love. Max spoke about the mark Wallace left on the world Friday in the Wit-

Carlos Valdez, Assistant Photo Editor

chicken tacos, buffalo wraps and more. Other vendors sold incense, stoneware and other merchandise. Among jewelry vendors was The Imperfect Bones, selling necklaces made with chicken and rat skulls and raccoon jaws as pendants, and a jewelry stand made out of a chicken’s scaly leg. All items were handmade by Hannah Parks. “My mom actually knows this man who butchers quails and sends them to meat markets,” Parks said. “He just gives me the heads, because they throw them away anyway, and I just go ahead and taxidermy them so they don’t go to waste, and use them in necklaces.” Working with Parks was Iris Isais, an origami jewelry crafter selling items such as hairclips and earrings. “I think it’s sort of applicable to Keep San Marcos Beautiful because it’s made from recycled materials,” Isais said. “It’s all made from things people usually throw away.” The evening’s musical enter-

tainment featured The HappenIns, The Sweet Nuthin’ and Kabomba!. Renee Denton, wife of Kabomba! bassist Neal Denton, brought their infant daughter along to experience her father’s music despite the noise level. “Kabomba! love playing in the park,” Renee Denton said. “And I was very happy, because I could come. Normally they play in a smoky bar, and I really wanted to be able to bring our baby to come see her dad play, so I was really excited.” Kaycee Toller also attended for the Kabomba! experience and is no stranger to the group and their music. “I like them a lot,” Toller said. “I’ve heard them play several times, and I like that they have kind of a ska sound to them, and they’re fun to dance to.” Jennifer Shaw, special events coordinator, expressed a positive attitude toward the series’ progress so far this season, as well as the series overall. “This is actually the only music series put on by the City of

San Marcos that would cater to the fun, alternative crowd,” Shaw said. “There’s three events left, so come on out and join us.” The last three events for Keep San Marcos Beautiful will take place April 18, April 25 and May 2.

tliff Collections while on tour to promote his book.

of the modern literary life where you’re requested and required to talk about yourself in some way ... Between the private sphere captured in the letters and the public sphere captured in the interviews, I felt that I had pretty good source material.

would just sit and talk for hours and let the discussion go wherever ... At the time, I wasn’t thinking about doing a biography. It just became so interesting that I just wanted to continue with what I was working on.

Jordan Gass-Poore’: How did you first hear about David? Was it prior to your article in The New Yorker? D.T. Max: I actually first heard about David when his first book called “The Broom of the System” was in galleys. His publisher sent me a copy asking if I would review it. JGP: Did you end up writing a review of “The Broom of the System”? DTM: I didn’t write a review, but I read the book. I thought it was completely amazing. I read many of David’s books when they came out. One of the pleasures of the biography and The New Yorker piece was getting more and more deeply into David. JGP: What was it like as David’s biographer to have never met him? DTM: Most biographers don’t meet the people they write about because usually it’s a biography about a person who’s long dead. I had hundreds of letters, and I had a lot of interviews. He was a figure

JGP: What were the reactions of David’s friends and family when they heard that you were going to be writing this biography? DTM: People were supportive. I could not have written the biography without the support of his wife, his agent and other members of his family, his sister especially. I think that’s a testament to the fact that people wanted to know ... He died this way, and he left this big gaping hole and people want to know what happened. JGP: What was the research process like? Where did you even begin? DTM: I first attended a memorial service at Pomona College where he taught ... After that, I began to call people and try to arrange times to talk ... It was a very positive process. I would go with a tape recorder or notepad and we

Grace Johnson, 12, juggles two hoola hoops April 11 at the Keep San Marcos Beautiful spring concert series.

JGP: Through your research, was there anything that surprised you or confirmed your ideas about David? DTM: The research was actually very surprising. You think you’ve got it down after you’ve done all this work for The New Yorker piece, but actually, it’s not true ... For one thing, my reading of the work got much, much deeper ... I think in a certain way what the book did was intensify things that the magazine article asserts, but maybe a little more timidly. The ferocity of his commitment to writing comes out more, I think, in the book. His difficulty in his relationships I think, especially with women, comes out much more in the book ... Lastly, the intensity of the depression was probably something I hadn’t quite grasped ... There are a lot of things about his life in his twenties that I found out only for the book, like breakdowns and crises and so on.


The University Star | Tuesday April 16, 2013 | 5

SPORTS

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SOFTBALL

Texas State wins series against UTA By Odus Evbagharu Sports Reporter

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After going 1-18 against schools from Texas this season, the Texas State softball team was able to take two out of three games against the University of TexasArlington this past weekend. The Bobcats (11-30, 6-6) shutout the Mavericks (18-21, 3-9) in both of Friday’s contests but came up short on Saturday, losing 1-0. “Any time you can go on the road and take two out of three it shows that you are headed in the right direction,” said Coach Ricci Woodard. “I felt like we pretty much dominated Friday, and then Saturday we just let things slip away from us.” The ball club lost on Saturday in the eighth inning on a sacrifice fly hit by UTA junior third baseman Taylor Zink. Texas State collected five hits for the game with freshman left fielder Kelli Baker going 2-3 and drawing a walk. Baker hit .500 for the weekend series in addition to scoring a run and getting three RBI. “I just like to take things one game at a time,” Baker said. “I like to make adjustments after each of my at-bats and just think ahead to what I think the pitcher is going to throw me.” Senior catcher Macie Hair went 4-9 in the series, drawing a walk and scoring a run. She did not strike out over the weekend. “We are just trying to put the ball in play,” Hair said. “We’re just trying to get base hits as opposed to taking hacks up there. I think it’s working out for us so far.” The Bobcats’ pitching staff blanketed the UTA offense on Friday. Junior pitch-

er Rayn House played a complete game shutout in the first game of the doubleheader, winning 5-0. House picked up her fourth win of the season, walking one batter and striking out seven. Freshman pitcher Ashley Wright threw five and one-third innings to pick up her sixth win of the season in the second contest Friday. Wright gave up four hits and struck out one batter. House came into the matchup and pitched one and two-third innings to pick up the save and complete the shutout, 2-0. “If they can hold teams down to under a run a game, it gives us a definite chance,” Woodard said. “They are just starting to pitch with more experience. They are finally getting to a spot where they understand pitch counts and how to pitch in situations.” Texas State combined to get 19 hits over the first two games of the series and outscored the Mavericks 7-1 over the weekend. The 24 hits accumulated over the weekend are the most hits the Bobcats have had in a weekend series all year. “The big thing is that we got 19 hits on the board Friday,” Woodard said. “As long as we tune and focus and attack good pitches, we do OK. It’s when we’re not disciplined at the plate is when we tend to struggle at the plate a little bit more. As long as we continue to attack good pitches and be focused at the plate, we are going to see some good things come out of it the rest of the way.” The team will take on No. 10 Texas A&M University (34-9) Tuesday at the Bobcat Softball Complex. The Aggies defeated Texas State Mar. 26 in College Station 9-1 in five innings. Twitter: odus_Outputs Hill Country MHDD Centers CSA III / In New Braunfels

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6 | Tuesday April 16, 2013 | The University Star | Sports

AROUND THE WAC Baseball Standings WAC

Total

CSU-Bak.

9

3

24 13

UTA

9

3

20 15

TXST

8

4

15 20

Sac. St.

7

5

21 15

Dallas B.

7

5

20 16

New M. St.

5

7

19 17

SJST

5

7

11 25

UTSA

4

7

19 16

Seattle U.

3

8

12 22

LA. Tech

2

10 12 24

WAC

Sunday Scores UTSA

5

CSU-Bak.

6

Sac. St.

5

New M. St.

4

SJST

7

UTA

9

LA. Tech

6

TXST

BASEBALL

Texas State rallies from losing streak By Jordan Brewer Assistant Sports Editor After five straight losses, Bobcat baseball battled back with some offensive firepower to sweep Louisiana Tech University in a three-game series this weekend. Texas State was playing the last-place team in the WAC coming into the weekend series with the Bulldogs. However, the Bobcats treated the series like their season depended on it. Junior first baseman Austin O’Neal stated their mission was simple: Win all three games. “Everything,” O’Neal answered about how much the Louisiana Tech series meant to the season’s outlook. “We went into this weekend without a doubt in our minds we wanted to win

three games. Everyone is swinging the bats, staying aggressive. It’s been a lot of fun the last few days.” The Bobcats won two of their three games with a bevy of offensive production all up and down the lineup. The Bobcats hit three home runs, two of which were by O’Neal and the other by senior center fielder Morgan Mickan. Texas State won game one 1-0, took the second 9-5 and tied a season best 13 runs in a 13-6 victory Sunday. The weekend series got off to the needed start because of the right arm of sophomore pitcher Taylor Black. Coming into the series Black had won two of his last three starts. He went seven and two-third innings without giving up a run on four hits Friday. He also struck out six bat-

ters while walking five in the 1-0 victory. Senior Andrew Stumph got two of the team’s six game one hits in four at-bats as he continues to get fully healthy. Mickan scored the game’s only run on a Stumph single. In Saturday’s 9-5 win, the Bobcats got five of their runs in the sixth inning. Freshman second baseman J.D. Stinnett was the main catalyst, driving in two RBI on his double. O’Neal started his big weekend on Saturday with three RBI and three hits in his four at-bats. He also added two runs scored in game two. O’Neal was the catalyst in Sunday’s eight-run fifth inning when he hit a three-run homer to take the lead 8-5, ultimately resulting in a 13-6 victory for Texas State.

“I felt like this weekend, starting Saturday, we were offensive,” Harrington said. “I thought we =were aggressive in counts where we could be. This team is still trying to grow offensively. It’s helpful when Stumph is in there. He’s a seasoned veteran, not only the production side of it but just the presence.” O’Neal finished the weekend 6-9 with two homers, four runs scored and seven batted in. Stumph batted 5-11 with two runs scored and five batted in. “I worked on some things when I was out (with an injury),” Stumph said. “Just some small things to keep me refreshed. (Batting coach) Silva worked with me on some things. The batting lineup, 1 through 9, has confidence.” Mickan was quietly productive in the series going 3-7 with five runs and two batted in, walking three times. Junior utility infielder Colby Targun had his best game on Sunday, getting three hits in four at-bats. Sophomore right fielder Cody Lovejoy shined bright on Saturday with two hits in five at-bats while also driving in two. The starting pitching did enough to secure victories for the Bobcats in all three games but other than Black, none of the starters earned wins. Junior Scott Grist started Saturday and went four and two-third innings, giving up one earned run on six hits. Reliever Austen Williams earned the victory, his first of the season, giving up two runs in two innings off four hits. Junior Kyle Finnegan lasted three and two-third innings on Sunday, giving up three earned runs including two homers and seven hits. Freshman reliever Jeremy Hallonquist earned his first win pitching three and a third innings. He surrendered one run on three hits and struck out three. Junior Hunter Lemke earned the save in Friday’s 1-0 win after an inning and a third of work. After walking a batter and giving up a hit in the ninth, Lemke settled down to retire the side. Lemke also held the Bulldogs to no runs and no hits in the ninth on Sunday.

Austin Humphreys, Photo Editor

Twitter: @jbrewer32

13

Softball Standings WAC

Total 30 14

New M. St.

11

1

SJST

9

3

31 14

LA Tech

6

6

21 19

Seattle U.

6

6

17 23

TXST

6

6

11 30

UTSA

5

7

20 19

UTA

3

9

18 21

Utah St.

2

10

8

Seattle U.

3

8

12 22

LA. Tech

2

10 12 24

Saturday Scores

33

WAC

UTSA

2

New M. St.

3

Utah St.

0

Seattle U.

8

SJST

5

LA. Tech

6

SJST

4

LA Tech

2

TXST

0

UTA

1

Junior pitcher Hunter Lemke gave up zero runs in the ninth against Louisiana Tech April 12 during the first of three games this weekend.

April 16, 2013  

The April 16, 2013 issue of the University Star.

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