Page 1

END OF THE ROAD

HUMAN BEAT

John Pointer turns his body into an instrument at the LBJ Ballroom

Football will try to go out on a high note by upsetting Bearkats’ playoff aspirations

SEE TRENDS PAGE 6

SEE SPORTS PAGE 14

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

NOVEMBER 16, 2006

THURSDAY

VOLUME 96, ISSUE 36

Grand jury indicts two Texas State students By David Saleh Rauf The University Star

A Hays County grand jury charged two Texas State students Nov. 8 with second-degree felony burglary of a habitation. Univeristy Police arrested Rene Esquibel and Stephen Darnell Sept. 15 in connection with a burglary of a residence in San Jacinto Hall where laptops, a digital camera, a stereo, iPods and a khaki bag containing about $120 were stolen. “They were indicted on a

second-degree felony,” James Booher, Hays County prosecutor, said. “It carries with it a potential punishment of two to 20 years and up to a $10,000 fine.” Capt. Rickey Lattie said UPD obtained evidence for three search warrants from a surveillance camera on campus that showed Esquibel and Darnell, pre-mass communication freshmen, leaving San Jacinto with items that have been identified as stolen. UPD simultaneously served the three search warrants Sept. 13 at Blanco, San Marcos

and San Jacinto Halls. “We’re glad we were able to solve a burglary,” Lattie said. “We do feel like we have the right suspects, and we’ll let the court system work out the details.” Affidavits for the search warrants obtained by The University Star revealed Esquibel and Darnell, both former members of the Texas State track and field team, apparently were observed at 1:53 a.m. Sept. 8 riding the elevator to an upper floor of San Jacinto. A surveillance camera recorded the two leaving the residence

Esquibel

Darnell

hall at about 3:15 a.m. The bulk in Esquibel’s backpack “appeared obviously fuller” as he exited San Jacinto, according to police re-

ports. “We can see (Esquibel) when he comes in and when he leaves,” Lattie said. “You can see the difference in the two videos between the empty backpack and the full backpack. We have good confidence that he walked in with an empty backpack and walked out with a backpack full of something.” Aissa Hamilton, pre-mass communication freshman, reported a laptop and a digital camera stolen from her room. Hamilton said the men in room number

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YOUR RECYCLABLES

434 invited Esquibel and Darnell to come over to their room the night of the incident. Hamilton said Esquibel and Darnell began asking suspicious questions. “Stephen was roaming through our rooms, going through our stuff,” Hamilton said. UPD later showed Hamilton the surveillance camera footage and she was able to identify two laptops that were stolen from her dorm room. “We saw our laptops,” HamilSee INDICTS, page 5

Lack of state funds cause of proposed tuition increase By Nick Georgiou The University Star

The Texas State University System Board of Regents will vote this week to approve an increase in Texas State tuition and fees. The university proposal follows a trend in rising tuition costs at Texas public colleges since the 2003 Texas legislature simultaneously cut public education funding and deregulated tuition. “Unfortunately, that trend will continue until the legislature steps up and puts more money into higher education,” said William Nance, vice president of Finance and Support Services. Nance and Provost Perry Moore said at the tuition hearing last month they had to adjust to the increasing cost of the higher education marketplace. The total operating budget for the university increased from $362 million in 2006 to $402 million in 2007. The need to stay competitive with other universities served as another explanation for the proposed increase. The hike in tuition will affect the revenue side of the 2007 Texas State budget if approved. The budget office will start to do preliminary income estimates based on those tuition and fee rates pending the approval. One-third of the total university budget is funded by state appropriations. Nance said the university is $3 million below where it was in 2003 in terms of state appropriation. “It’s not a huge percentage, but therein lies the issue of tuition and fee increases,” he said. The university receives just under $104 million from the state. The majority of these appropriations fund academic departments and programs. Nance said this funding is very low considering the university’s high student population and the state’s $8.5 billion appropriation for higher education. Eighty percent of the state appropriations are driven by two formulas, which are used for all 35 Texas public universities, See TUITION, page 4

Monty Marion/Star photo BEST REASON YET: Nicholas Maloukis, resource and environmental studies senior, holds a sign saying “recycling is sexy” Wednesday afternoon outside Evan Liberal Arts.

By Chelsea Juarez The University Star

T

he Environmental Service Committee and the National Association of Environmental Professionals teamed up for Texas Recycles Day and “4 R Future,” despite the gusty Wednesday weather. Two adjoining tables displayed the separate organizations, and volunteers set up petitions, pamphlets, mugs and T-shirts. On the side of the tables were three recycle bins, much like the ones inside buildings on campus. “The T-shirts and mugs were gone quick, but we’ve got more mugs on the way,” said Taylor Powell, president of the Texas State chapter of the National Association Environmental Professionals.

He estimated 300 mugs and T-shirts were distributed. Melody Baker, history senior, held as many mugs as she could and walked back and forth through The Quad handing them out to students passing by. “Get your free mug and save on your next refill,” she said. The green mugs, with the message “Reduce Waste, Reuse Me!” can be refilled around select locations such as Paws-N-Go and Jones Dining Hall for 69 cents. “We’re trying to get this discount to be around San Marcos, as well,” Taylor said. Baker said everyone seemed to show an interest in the mugs and the message. Taylor said to expect about 20 new recycling bins before next semester. The Environmental Service Committee purchased

10 of the steel outdoor bins, he said. One table displayed a large map of the Texas State community with highlighted areas. “We gave the students an opportunity to share their input on what places around campus would be ideal for the new recycling bins,” said Anjoli Fry, resource and environmental studies junior. “People have shown a genuine interest in our efforts and have given their input, which is what we hoped for.” The pamphlets included information about recycling, tips, pick-up schedules and hours of operation of recycling centers in San Marcos. Students were asked to sign petitions,

sion for where this county will go,” Sumter said. “We want to be inclusive, not exclusive. We want to talk to everyone in the county.” Democrats also won three contested Hays County Commissioner’s Court’s spots, signaling a shift from the previously Republican-majority court. Aside from Sumter’s win, Susie Carter Precinct 2 commissioner lost to Democrat Jeff Barton and Russ Molenaar Precinct 4 commissioner lost to Democrat Karen Ford. See POLITICAL, page 4

See ROUTE, page 5

See RECYCLING, page 3

Liz Sumter and Sherri Tibbe are paving new paths for women in Hays County politics. After last week’s election, Sumter became the first woman to get elected as Hays County Judge. Tibbe became the first female Hays County District Attorney. They were also both Democratic candidates. “The county has definitely seen a shift toward females elected into office. There are more females running for office,” said Joyce Cowan, Hays County elec-

Tibbe

tion administrator. “A few years ago we didn’t have a lot of female candidates and now a lot more are running successfully.” Sumter said she had no idea she was the first female to run for and

Today’s Weather

Sunny 69˚/41˚

Sumter

Precipitation: 0% Humidity: 25% UV: 5 Moderate Wind: WNW 9 mph

win the Hays County Judge seat. She found out on election night as the numbers were rolling in. “It wasn’t something we thought about or confirmed during my campaign,” she said. Sumter edged out incumbent Jim Powers last week with 52.2 percent of the vote. Sumter hammered Powers’ lack of bringing quality jobs to the area for students during her Oct. 23 Associated Student Government address. “I think what’s different between me and my opponent, who’s an eight-year incumbent, is that I have a true plan and vi-

Two-day Forecast Thursday Sunny Temp: 76°/46° Precip: 0%

Friday Sunny Temp: 75°/52° Precip: 10%

By Jacqueline Davis The University Star Officials with Auxiliary Services said they will begin making improvements to the bus stop in front of Bobcat Village beginning this week in efforts to make the site more comfortable and accessible to students. Paul Hamilton, manager of shuttle services, said landscaping and adding tactile bricks to an access ramp will be completed over the weekend. The rough brick ramp will provide handicap access and help the visually impaired find the area. A rain shelter will also be available early next week. It will be transferred from the back of Bobcat Village to serve as a bus stop marker for students. The shelter was supposed to be moved by mid-October. Hamilton said the month-long delay involved new form requirements set up by the Campus Master Plan Committee and two weeks of rain delays when a crew had to wait for the area to dry. “The committee now requires forms be filled out any time a change is made on campus,” Hamilton said. “It’s a totally internal process, and it was a learning experience on my part.” However, some students feel the improvements are coming too late, and the wait has added to a list of previous grievances with the bus situation. Karma Mitchell, creative writing sophomore, said she was especially concerned with the lack of substantial bus stop shelter after waiting 45 minutes for the bus one day in the rain, unable to board because all were full to capacity. “After the eighth bus went by, I called Auxiliary Services,” Mitchell said. Hamilton said the bus industry does not usually provide large rain shelters because the Texas Department of Trans-

Sumter, Tibbe paving new political paths By A.N. Hernández The University Star

Improvements to bus route beginning soon

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To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2006 The University Star


PAGE TWO Thursday in Brief

November 16, 2006

starsof texas state Jack Johnson, Texas State alumnus, was elected Nov. 7 to the Tennessee General Assembly as a state senator. Johnson graduated from Burnet High School in 1986 and then-Southwest Texas State University in 1989. Johnson will represent Tennessee’s 23rd district, which includes parts of southern Nashville/Davidson County and all of Williamson County.

After moving to the Nashville area in 1991, Johnson immediately became active in local grassroots politics. He worked on the U.S. Senate campaigns for Fred Thompson and Bill Frist, and in 2004 the Bush/Cheney campaign asked him to chair their reelection effort for middle Tennessee. — Courtesy of Jack Johnson’s Public Relations

News Contact — David Saleh Rauf, starnews@txstate.edu Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Study break THURSDAY Colleges Against Cancer is hosting the Relay For Life Team Captain Meeting at 8pm in the Evans Liberal Arts Building, Room 116. Any questions can be sent to Stacy Whittaker at sw1172@txstate.edu. The Organization of Student Social Workers meets at 12:30 p.m. in the Health Professions Building, Room 234. Simple Silent Sitting Group will meet from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Campus Christian Community Center. An on-campus Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. For more information call the Alcohol and Drug Resource Center at (512) 245-3601. The Tennis Club will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. at the tennis courts on Sessom Drive, behind Joe’s Crab Shack. All skill levels are welcome. For more information e-mail the Tennis Club President Chris Harris at ch1282@txstate.edu. Every Nation Campus Ministries is now meeting at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, Room G-02. There will be free food, fellowship and an inspiring message. The Rock - Praise & Worship will be 7:30 p.m. in the chapel of the Catholic Student Center. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting on 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. There will be contemporary worship, relevant teaching and prayer. Everyone is welcome. For more information call (512) 557-7988 or e-mail mail@texasstatechialpha.com. Students interested in becoming involved with the community, making business connections and learning leadership skills can attend the Students in Free Enterprise at 4:15 p.m. in McCoy Hall, Room 113.

MONDAY An on-campus Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be from noon to 1 p.m. For more information call the Alcohol and Drug Resource Center at (512) 245-3601. The Alcohol and Drug Resource center will be holding their weekly “Men Against Violence” meeting from 5 to 7 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center, Room 3-6.1.

Alpha Lambda Omega Christian Sorority will be holding its weekly Bible study at 8 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-13.1. Everyone is welcome to attend. Rise ‘N Shine Toastmasters Club meets from 7 to 8 a.m. at Cabela’s in Buda. Please use the Employee’s Entrance on the South side of the building. Visitors and guests are always welcome. Practice your speaking, listening, and thinking skills; boost self-confidence and develop leadership skills. For additional information call Clark Lyman at (512) 295-7777, e-mail clyman2059@aol.com or visit www.risenshine.freetoasthost.info. Latino Student Association will be having their weekly meeting at 6 p.m. in the LBJSC USAC Office, Room 4.9-1. All cultures are welcome to join. For more information log onto www.studentorgs.txstate.edu/LSA.

TUESDAY The Catholic Student Organization will meet at 7 p.m. in the CSC. The Catholic Student Center will have a free lunch for all students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the CSC lobby.

SATURDAY

An on-campus Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be 5 to 6 p.m. For more information call the Alcohol and Drug Resource Center at (512) 2453601.

There will be a Thanksgiving dinner for all students at 6 p.m. in the CSC lobby. Texas Department of Transportation and State Farm Insurance will be hosting “Mascot Day” at the state Capitol from 1 to 3 p.m., on the south steps of the Capitol as a part of the “Put Texas in your corner” vehicle registration compliance initiative, reminding Texans to register on time. This event will give families a chance to

On this day... 1776 — British troops captured Fort Washington during the American Revolution.

Sexual Abuse Survivors Group will meet from 5 to 6:15 p.m. To schedule a screening for this group, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 12:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland. For more information call (512) 357-2049.

SUNDAY

The photo caption in “Getting out the student vote” in Wednesday’s edition of The Star incorrectly identified three people. From left to right, they are Jude Prather, Sam McCabe and Jordan Anderson. In Thursday’s edition of The Star, the article “Native wild-rice endangered” stated 80 percent of Texas wild-rice has disappeared from the San Marcos River. Eighty percent of the rice has disappeared from the area near Clear Springs Apartments, not from the entire river.

take pictures with their favorite Texan college mascots.

Overeaters Anonymous meets at 5:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland. For more information call (512) 357-2049.

Football will be play Sam Houston State at 2 p.m. in Huntsville.

Corrections

The Tennis Club will meet from 6 to 8 p.m. at the tennis courts on Sessom Drive, behind Joe’s Crab Shack. All skill levels are welcome. For more information e-mail Tennis Club President Chris Harris at ch1282@txstate. edu. Go to www.UniversityStar.com and click on contact to view calendar and Stars of Texas State submission policies.

Bridgette Cyr/Star photo Clarissa Moreno, undecided sophomore (left), Tamara Woehl, undecided freshman (center) and Eriko Maruyama, international studies freshman share Pocky, a popular Japanese snack, while studying Tuesday afternoon in Arnold Hall.

Schools’ efforts against global warming rewarded RESTON, Va. — Colleges and universities across the country are confronting global warming and the National Wildlife Federation is holding a contest to see which schools are doing the best job. The National Wildlife Federation’s Campus Ecology program is sponsoring Chill Out to identify and reward all the things colleges and universities are doing to reduce the impacts of global warming, the No. 1 environmental threat facing the nation. This includes programs addressing energy efficiency, alternative transportation, habitat restoration and uses of clean energy. “Colleges and universities are key places for demonstrating to society how to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide, the ma-

jor culprit of global warming,” said Julian Keniry, director of campus and community leadership for the National Wildlife Federation. “Our organization wants to recognize and applaud the schools which are leading the way to a more sustainable future.” Schools are eligible to win grant funding and to be featured in Chill Out: Campus Solutions to Global Warming, a nationwide multimedia broadcast on Earth Day, April 18. Paramount Pictures will also present the grand-prize winner with an oncampus theater showing of An Inconvenient Truth, Al Gore’s wakeup-call film about the threats of global warming. The first 100 campuses to enter will receive a free DVD copy of An Inconvenient Truth, cour-

CRIME BL TTER

tesy of Paramount, to be used for educational purposes on campus. Schools can enter the contest in two ways: By describing in 500 words or less what their college or university is doing to help solve the global warming crisis or by creating a 3-minute video about their school’s efforts and uploading it onto the YouTube Web site where entries will be judged by visitors to the site. Deadline for written contest entries is Feb. 2 and videos are due March 1. For complete information on the contest and how your school’s contribution to the global warming solution can receive national attention, go to www.nwf.org/chillout. — Courtesy of the National Wildlife Federation

1915 — Coca-Cola had its prototype for a countoured bottle patented. The bottle made its commercial debut the next year. 1952 — In the Peanuts comic strip, Lucy first held a football for Charlie Brown. 1973 — President Nixon signed the Alaska Pipeline measure into law. 1998 — In Burlington, Wis., five high school students, aged 15 to 16, were arrested in an alleged plot to kill a carefully selected group of teachers and students. 1998 — It was announced that Monica Lewinsky had signed a deal for the North American rights to a book about her affair with President Clinton. 1999 — Johnny Depp received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. 2000 — Bill Clinton became the first serving U.S. president to visit Communist Vietnam.

Graciela Iturbide exhibition now online

University Police Department Nov. 11, 3:33 p.m. Alcohol-MIP/Bobcat Stadium An officer observed a student in possession of alcohol. Upon further investigation, the student was found to be a minor and was issued a citation.

Nov. 11, 10:38 p.m. Property Damaged/ Bobcat Stadium An officer was dispatched for a report of damaged property. A portable toilet was set on fire. The fire was extinguished.

Nov. 11, 4:51 p.m. MIP/Bobcat Stadium An officer observed a student in possession of alcohol. Upon further investigation, the student was found to be a minor and was issued a citation.

Nov. 12, 5:07 a.m. Mischief Under $50/ Blanco Hall An officer observed a student drawing on a pillar. The student was issued a citation.

Nov. 11, 7:42 p.m. Medical Emergency/ Bobcat Stadium An officer was dispatched on a report of a medical emergency. A student had an asthma attack, was treated on-scene by EMS and released.

Nov. 13, 8:38 a.m. Medical Emergency/ Supple Science Building An officer was dispatched on a report of a medical emergency. A student fainted and was transported to Central Texas Medical Center for further evaluation.

Crime stoppers: UPD: 245-7867, SMPD: 353-TIPS

ONLY 5 MORE ISSUES OF THE UNIVERSITY STAR LEFT THIS SEMESTER!

The more than 50 images by acclaimed photographer Graciela Iturbide on display at the Wittliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican Photography. They can now be viewed online at www.library.txstate.edu/ swwc/wg/exhibits/Iturbide. This Web component of the exhibition was created by Tara Spies, evening reference assistant at the Alkek Library, with assistance from Connie Todd, Wittliff Gallery curator, Carla

Ellard, Wittliff Gallery assistant curator and Michele Miller, marketing and promotions coordinator. The Wittliff Gallery, located on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library, is open seven days a week, except during breaks and holidays. For exhibit hours and further information, visit www.wg.txstate.edu or call (512) 245-2313. — Courtesy of Alkek Library


NEWS

Thursday, November 16, 2006

ASG officials will collaborate at San Antonio conference By Kara Bowers The University Star Student government representatives from across the state will gather Saturday in San Antonio to discuss issues concerning students in public universities across Texas. Associated Student Government President Kyle Morris and Vice President Amanda Oskey will attend the forum to represent Texas State. They will be among approximately 50 student government representatives from Texas universities who will convene. Other schools include the University of Texas, the University of Texas at San Antonio, Sam Houston State University and Texas A&M University. “It gives us a chance to see what other schools are doing and to get together with other schools and collaborate,” Oskey said. “It only makes sense that

we collaborate our efforts.” The main focuses of the meeting are to generate ideas, put together an agenda and create proposals to present to the Texas legislature. Morris said issues most highly likely to be at the forefront of discussion are taxfree textbooks and decreased funding for Texas public universities, a recent trend in Texas legislation. “There is really no set agenda,” Morris said. “All issues are game.” The event’s host, The New Politics Forum, strives to connect young people with political professionals, candidates and scholars on a non-partisan basis and to get students involved in Texas politics. The forum will host an additional event, the Campaign 2006 Election Debriefing, which takes place Saturday afternoon. More than 70 students from various

Texas universities registered for the conference and are expected to attend. There will be various presentations on issues such as election results, immigration and the Latino vote and campaigning outside the two-party system. Morris and Oskey will attend the conference to gain perspective on the legislature and changes in the political landscape resulting from the election. The New Politics Forum hosts similar conferences about twice a year to get students involved in politics. The preliminary meeting will be the first of its kind hosted by the forum. Morris said he hopes it will serve as a useful tool to encourage student participation. “This is the initial point where everyone comes to the table,” Morris said. “We hope to unify student voices across Texas.”

The University Star - Page 3

Former HP chair pleads not guilty to role in boardroom leak By Pete Carey San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Former Hewlett-Packard board chair Patricia Dunn pleaded not guilty Wednesday to criminal charges stemming from her role in HP’s boardroom leak investigation. Dunn, who ordered the investigation, and four others who conducted it have been charged with four felony counts for using deception to obtain the personal phone records of board members, HP executives and nine reporters. Accompanied by her husband, William Jahnke, Dunn stood by her lawyer Raj Chatterjee in a courtroom crowded with reporters and photographers and entered her plea. She was originally scheduled to appear in court on Friday, but her lawyers asked for the change. They would not say why. After the brief hearing, Dunn climbed the stairs from the basement courtroom of Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Jerome Nadler, holding her hus-

RECYCLING: Students requested to sign petitions CONTINUED from page 1

pledging to create more awareness about recycling. Students signed their names and walked away with their mugs. “I signed the petition because I’m all about recycling and increasing the effort,” said Jill Parkes, geography senior. Baker said the event was about getting more people involved and informed. “This campus generates so much waste, and it takes money to dispose of that waste,” she said. “That money could be used more efficiently and spent on something more worthwhile.” For more information regarding waste management, tips and recycling areas, stop by the National Association of Environmental Professionals bulletin board located inside Evan Liberal Arts Building, or visit www.txstate.edu/esc.

Monty Marion/Star photo STRATEGIC PLACEMENT: Kaitlin Murphy, resource and environmental studies junior (left), helps Corin Arundale, athletic training sophomore (center) and Cody Chong, health and fitness management sophomore, mark where they think the best location for new recycling bins on campus would be.

band’s hand and surrounded by reporters. Neither she nor her lawyer had any comment. A complaint by Attorney General Bill Lockyer alleges that the five used “false and fraudulent pretenses” to obtain the phone billing records of 12 individuals. All five are charged with fraudulent wire communications, wrongful use of computer data, identity theft and conspiracy. Kevin Hunsaker, the former senior HP lawyer and ethics counsel who headed the investigation, pleaded not guilty at a hearing Nov. 7. The remaining three pleaded not guilty at an earlier hearing. They are Ron DeLia, head of Security Outsourcing Services and an outside contractor for HP; Matthew DePante, manager of Action Research Group, an information broker based in Florida; and Brian Wagner, a former employee of ARG who lives in Colorado. The attorney general’s office said that by Friday all the defendants will have filed waivers of appearance, meaning

they will not have to appear at future court dates, except for preliminary hearing, trial and any sentencing. A routine case management hearing is scheduled Friday. Dunn, the lead defendant in the case, launched two investigations into leaks of confidential information from HP board meetings. Both investigations were outsourced to DeLia’s firm, which used ARG to obtain personal phone records. The investigations were codenamed Kona I and Kona II after Dunn’s Hawaiian vacation retreat. The first was inconclusive, but the second identified board member George Keyworth as having leaked information to a CNet reporter writing a story about a Palm Desert board meeting in January of this year. When Keyworth was fingered as the leaker at a board meeting in Los Angeles, his ally on the board, Tom Perkins, abruptly resigned. The board voted to ask Keyworth to resign, but he refused. Eventually, Keyworth and Dunn both left the board.


NEWS

Page 4 - The University Star

Thursday, November 16, 2006

POLITICAL: Tibbe to leave Travis County Court after 11 years as a prosecutor CONTINUED from page 1

The remaining commissioners are Debbie Ingalsbe Precinct 1 commissioner and Will Conley Precinct 3 commissioner, whose terms expire in 2008. Conley, the court’s only remaining Republican, looks forward to bringing his newly elected colleagues up to speed. He said there were a lot of things in play during the recent elections for Republican candidates nation and countywide. “I still don’t think the county has gone completely blue,” he said. “This county is purple, that’s what I always say. It’s not a blue or red county; it’s purple

because it’s made of individual voters who vote for candidates, not just political parties.” This election cycle also saw women becoming the majority on the commissioner’s court, three to two. “I don’t think there’s going to be any significant difference because it’s a female or maleheaded court,” Sumter said. “I think the significant difference comes with the people who are elected. I think the people are saying they are looking for significant changes in leadership and this court is going to work very well together.” In another county election, Tibbe won the race for Hays

Got dirt?

County district attorney by a 23-vote margin, prompting Wesley Mau, chief deputy district attorney, to file a petition for a recount. The election administrators’ office recounted ballots Wednesday and determined that the recount did not change the vote total. Tibbe still had 14,906 votes to Mau’s 14,883 votes. Cowan said Tibbe’s election returns will be canvassed at 10 a.m. Thursday. “She is our newly elected DA,” Cowan said. “There are no discrepancies that I am aware of, so there’s no reason to contest the recount. I watched Mr. Mau shake her hand and congratu-

Send your news tips to us at starnews@txstate.edu

late her.” Tibbe said she was on pins and needles watching the election returns from her table at Bordeaux’s Restaurant in Kyle. That night, Tibbe said she could barely eat. “In my mind I was trying to tell myself that win or lose, we know we ran a good campaign and that regardless of the outcome, we were proud of our campaign,” Tibbe said. “But, underneath all that, you just really want to win.” Tibbe is currently the chief of Travis County Court No. 4 and has 11 years of experience as a prosecutor working for the Texas Attorney General’s Office

and Travis County. She said the first step she will take upon entering her post is assessing open cases and staff members to assure justice in every case. “I don’t plan on cleaning house but there will be a process where everyone is talked to,” she said. “I ran on a platform that I was going to make changes in Hays County, and I want to make sure that happens.” The race between her and Mau was one that was tense and often left the candidates going word-to-word about issues on television or in newspapers. One of Mau’s recent press releases questions Tibbe’s campaign

material, including a television ad that flashes a photo of Mau, while a voiceover says that half the cases brought to the district attorney’s office were lost. Mau said Tibbe’s campaign must have skewed the numbers. “I don’t know where Sherri Tibbe got her numbers from,” Mau said. Tibbe refutes Mau’s complaint. “The elections are over,” she said. “He is the first assistant to the DA. We are not saying he is solely responsible, the ad just says ‘district attorney’s office’ and Mau was part of that administration and bore part of the responsibility of the office.”

TUITION: Departments lack necessary funding CONTINUED from page 1

Nance said. The formula with the larger impact is the instruction and operations. It provides funding for academic programs, student services, faculty salaries, research and departmental operating expenses. “That formula system is probably the most important factor that affects our budget because of the way it treats institutions and institutions like us,” Nance said. “We have shortages that we’re trying to make up for.” The formula, used by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, is a complex matrix listing 21 different academic program areas in a vertical column and a horizontal row listing the level of education: lower division, upper division, masters, doctoral and special professions. The higher the division, the more funds the program receives. Texas State, however, does not have the higherfunded programs such as medicine, engineering and law. “The bulk of our areas are in things like liberal arts, teacher education and business,” Nance said. “Those are three of the lower-funded formula areas.” The rates increase dramatically for doctoral and master’s degrees, which, Nance said, should not happen. He said a recent study confirmed many people’s belief that the cost of doctoral and masters education is not as great as the formula demonstrates. “This is the major problem,” Nance said. “If the formula just gave us the per student appropriation, we would have $12-15 million more in state appropriations, and that can go a long way in off-setting tuition fee increases.” The proposed tuition increase is projected to bring in $9.5 million of additional revenue. Nance said he is hopeful the proposed changes in the way the formula is used will be more favorable

for Texas State. “They are making some changes in the formula that benefit us, but we’re still a long way to go to get to the average appropriation per student,” Nance said. The other two-thirds of the budget comes from auxiliary enterprises and designated funds. Auxiliary enterprises encompass residential living, athletics and student fees. As stated by law, state appropriations cannot be used for auxiliary enterprises. They must be self-supporting from their own income. An example of a designated fund is tuition. The university plans to increase designated tuition by $14 per semester hour. Designated tuition accounts for $60 million of the $92 million in designated funds. Nance said there has been a good consensus in President Denise Trauth’s cabinet and support from the regents in adapting to a deregulated tuition environment. He said almost 100 percent of the increases in tuition and fees have gone into academic instruction, faculty and staff raises and the hiring of more faculty members. Faculty, staff and students have input and influence over proposed budgets. “At the grassroots level, the faculty and staff should be having a discussion about what they need for a budget,” Nance said. Proposals start at the faculty level, then go from department chairs to deans to the provost and ultimately to the president’s cabinet. Moore said, at last month’s tuition hearing, increases in a department’s budget have been few and far between. “If you go to the chair of a department and ask them when the last time the provost gave them an operating increase in their budget, they are going to say they can’t remember,” Moore said. “These departments have struggled out there. Some 40 departments have struggled to keep up with these operational costs that are going up.”


NEWS

Thursday, November 16, 2006

The University Star - Page 5

INDICTS: University police recovered digital camera in Darnell’s room CONTINUED from page 1

ton said. “The dumb guy takes a mesh backpack when he’s stealing stuff. We could see our laptops.” Ashley Hoffmann, undecided freshman, was able to identify her khaki bag when she saw the surveillance camera footage. “I was called in from class and had to go in and watch footage of the boys who are accused of stealing our stuff,” Hoffman said. “I did find my bag on the camera. It was identical. The boys flashed the bag all the way across the screen.”

UPD has recovered multiple property items since the burglary, some of which were connected to crimes and some were not, Lattie said. Ashley Merrell, marketing sophomore, reported her iPod, a Canon ELPH digital camera and three memory cards as stolen. Police reports indicate that Merrel’s digital camera was found in Darnell’s bedroom during a search of his San Marcos Hall residence. “Whenever we got our stuff stolen, I called my mom at five in the morning,” Merrel said. “I

was like, ‘give me the serial numbers.’ I turned them in the next day. That following Tuesday they found (the camera).” Merrel said Esquibel and Darnell used her camera to take photos of themselves fanning hundred dollar bills after they sold the items they had stolen. “That’s why all I got was my camera back. I didn’t get my memory cards. They’re keeping them as evidence,” Merrel said. “There’s pictures of us in that memory card and there’s pictures of them on the same memory card flashing hundreds of dol-

lars.” Merrel and Hamilton said Esquibel and Darnell also used MySpace to trade correspondences about the burglaries. “Rene and Stephen’s MySpace page had constant messages back and forth saying ‘this is how we’re going to make big bucks,’” Hamilton said. “After the weekend went by, they were saying ‘We just got big bucks.’” Hamilton said they made copies of the Web pages and UPD looked into the MySpace correspondence. “We use any and all mate-

ROUTE: Garage will not be completed until 2008 CONTINUED from page 1

portation sets standards where all structures must be placed a specific distance from the road and designed to lessen resistance if a vehicle were to veer off the road and hit the structure. “That’s why they’re lightweight,” Hamilton said. “That doesn’t mean in the future we couldn’t provide sturdier rain shelters, but every dollar we spend on shelters is dollars that come away from operation. Right now we don’t have extra money set aside to build shelters.” Mitchell said the lack of shelter has been an ongoing concern. “I asked why there were no rain shelters. (Hamilton’s) argument is that we don’t give it to anyone else, why should we give it to you?” Mitchell said. “Why are the majority of the bus stops with no shade and no shelter from the rain when it takes 30 minutes sometimes to get on a bus? Then we’re standing out, dehydrating and having sunstroke. Why are they exhibiting such a cavalier attitude about student well-being?” Mitchell said she thinks the bus stop was best left in its old location behind Bobcat Village because of its proximity to an all-zone parking lot. “The loss of the Bobcat Village route has directly impacted commuter parking,” Mitchell said. “That impact is really going to be felt when construction comes. We’re going to need all

the commuter parking we can get, but it is on the opposite side of where the buses pick up.” Mitchell’s concern stems from the imminent loss of more than 100 commuter parking spots near the Student Recreation Center because of construction. The Speck Street parking garage is not slated for completion until March 2008. Mitchell and other students are still concerned about the bus route move, even while others have gotten used to it. “That gets down to providing service in an efficient way,” said John Root, director of Auxiliary Services in regard to the old Bobcat Village route serving its residents exclusively. “We were efficient to a couple hundred students at the expense of thousands of students.” LaTonya Revis, early childhood development senior, said the route change is inconvenient. “I was told we (Bobcat Village residents) need to learn to do without, but everyone else was using it too,” Revis said. The route move created a new portion of Aquarena Springs Drive where students are crossing through traffic to get to back to their apartments, creating a safety hazard similar to the bus stop across from Shalamar Apartments. “It would be nice if they had a crosswalk,” said Jessica Hurley, anthropology graduate stuDavid Racino/Star photo dent. “There will be a group of people walking across the street MAKING PROGRESS: Long-awaited improvements to the Bobcat and it’s kind of like playing Village bus strop on Aquarena Springs Drive are expected to be comFrogger.” pleted during the weekend.

rial we can locate to investigate a crime,” Lattie said. Police reports obtained through an open records request with the Hays County District Attorney’s office also say that Esquibel sold a stolen Xbox 360 to a resident of San Jacinto for $200. Esquibel also tried to sell a laptop to another student for $400. He was served with a second arrest warrant for an August incident in Blanco in connection with a stolen Xbox 360 and a laptop. A grand jury will meet on the second warrant next month, Lat-

tie said. Esquibel and Darnell could not be reached for comment. Booher said he was not sure if Esquibel and Darnell would be eligible for probation. “I don’t know where things stand in terms of a plea offer,” Booher said. “Quite frankly, it’s probably too soon to even make that determination.” No trial date for Esquibel and Darnell has been set. “They haven’t gone to trial, so at this time they’re just accused,” Lattie said. “They haven’t been convicted of a crime.”


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Thursday, November 16, 2006 - Page 6

happeningsof the weekend Thursday Cheatham Street Warehouse HoneyBrowne Lucy’s San Marcos Rich O’Toole/Casey Donahew The Triple Crown Ethereal Architect/St. Light Suzie/Mind Divided

Friday Cheatham Street Warehouse Sisters Morales Lucy’s San Marcos Burden Brothers The Triple Crown Word Association/Quanstar

Saturday Cheatham Street Warehouse Dr. G and the Mudcats Lucy’s San Marcos Kallisti Gold/Funkotron The Triple Crown Aster/Happy Families/Haunting Oboe Music

Trends Contact — Maira Garcia, starentertainment@txstate.edu

John Pointer promotes upcoming album, Schizophonic By Jessica Sinn The University Star Multi-instrumentalist John Pointer kept the crowd entertained Wednesday night as he stomped, strummed and sang with soul. The Student Association for Campus Activities sponsored John Pointer’s solo performance in the LBJ Student Center Ballroom. Pointer transformed his body into a human orchestra and showcased songs from his first full-length record, Schizophonic, to be released next year. Pointer said his combination of sound effects and instruments is analogous to a multiple mood disorder — but in a positive way. “To me, Schizophonic is an illustration of all that’s happening in my head and all those things are in there fighting for space,” he said. To create the illusion of a four-piece band, Pointer weaves David Racino/Star photo multiple lines together. He implies a four-piece band by si- JACK OF ALL TRADES: Multi-instrumentalist and beat-boxer John Pointer performs a solo show in multaneously combining a bass the LBJ Student Center Ballroom Wednesday evening. line, a keyboard, a drumbeat and a melody. behind cartoons, all the images sophomore Valin Zamarron, producers DJ Yellitch and AL“The ear is set up like the eye; are still but when you quickly known as Zeale32, opened the PHA 2020. Zamarron has taken I’ve developed a way of mak- flip through them, it appears show. This underground hop- part in emcee competitions naing an audible flip for the ear,” like they’re moving.” hop artist performed a mix of tionwide, including Scribble Pointer said. “That’s the concept Pre-mass communication songs from recent projects with Jam in Cincinnati. Zamarron

ost of my songs are based “M on feeling and one of the first things I feel is rhythm.” — John Pointer musician

said he creates thought-provoking lyrics by integrating poetry and self-expression. “My music is fresh and innovative hip-hop — not mainstream and a stretch from the norm,” Zamarron said. “The lyrics are current; they deal with my thoughts and reflect my emotions and opinions. It can be positive or negative; it’s real so it’s always going to be authentic and meaningful.” Like Zamarron, Pointer continues to pursue his true passion by creating music that’s true to his feelings. Pointer said his reflections of the world are filtered through his body and generate into songs. “Most of my songs are based on feeling and one of the first things I feel is rhythm,” Pointer said. “It’s all in a giant library of sound and I’ll sit down and see what my hands come up with.” Aside from his nationally televised commercials for

Schlotzsky’s and Chili’s, Pointer is active in the Austin music circuit and has performed with various music groups. In 2005, Austin City Council declared Jan. 27 “John Pointer Day.” Pointer said his natural ability to communicate with instruments allows him to create an innovative freestyle flow. “When the sound is in your head, you can sit down with the instrument and learn how to communicate with it, that’s what you call ‘ear-training,’” Pointer said. “I learned to communicate with my cello, drums, guitar, piano and bass.” Mike Caverly, psychology junior, said Pointer is an impressive vocal artist with extremely flexible vocal chords. “I heard him do a cover for Prince’s ‘When Doves Cry,’ back when he was with Schrodinger’s Cat,” Caverly said. “He’s a phenomenal singer, very flexible and totally original.”

DINING DOWNER Mandola Estate Winery’s grand

Thanksgiving has history of violence, betrayal among Native Americans By Carmel Rose Special to The Star Before you bite down into your deliciously golden-brown turkey and gravy with stuffing and cranberry sauce on the side, think about why you’re doing it. The American notion is that Thanksgiving started when the pilgrims and Indians coming together to share a large feast. Charles Smith, a Native American, knows of a different history. Smith believes Americans do not know the truth about Thanksgiving and said everyone has their own view of it. “The idea of Thanksgiving is so backwards,” Smith said. “It’s one of the biggest myths there are. Everybody’s entitled to his or her own opinion; however, tell the truth. The United States shouldn’t lie to make Thanksgiving look better.” Smith is his white name; his native and real name is Ahvuska Cane Guno Ustda Hili, which means “many drums.” He is a part of the Seneca family that is under the Iroquois Nation and cousins with the Cherokee and Wampanoags. The Iroquois Nation is from New York, parts of Canada and northern Pennsylvania. The Cherokee and the Wampanoags spread further south. The Wampanoags were the people who were involved with what we consider Thanksgiving. Smith said that whites turned on the Wampanoag and went into a series of battles. The Native Americans could have won if they fought together, but they fought individually and even against each other, Smith said. “To the victor go the spoils. The white men won the war, and they beat the socks off of us, so they’re the ones who wrote the history, and as a result they are going to write whatever makes them look favorable,” he said. James McWilliams, American history assistant professor, said Thanksgiving is a manufactured and commercialized holiday and has few accurate ties to the past. “It’s easy to fall into the allure. Thanksgiving is misleading; it’s not about Anglos and Natives coming together. Culture needs and wants their myths, and myths serve their purpose,” he said. Americans don’t like to look back and see all the wrong they’ve done, McWilliams said. “Thanksgiving is a crutch to convince ourselves and downplay the bad things that America did. It’s marked by moral failing and is a distraction from reality and unpleasantry,” he said. McWilliams said that Thanksgiving never had a real meaning, and that it is a standardized myth, but it is not necessarily a bad thing.

“It’s a social ritual, but it’s harmless,” McWilliams said. Jay McCullar, psychology senior, said he believes Thanksgiving is harmless because it is not hurting anyone, but Americans should know the truth behind Thanksgiving. “America, as a whole, will never be exposed about the truth about Thanksgiving or the truth about a lot of things. America is built on lies by crooks, and the crooks came over and took over,” McCullar said. McCullar also said Americans use Thanksgiving to “save face” or to make the United States look better and that it’s hard to really find truth under all of America’s dirt. “This is America; you can do what you want to do, but you can’t do what you want to do. The idea of Thanksgiving sounds good,” he said. Ricardo Zavala, political science senior, said he thought the history of Thanksgiving was actually about pilgrims and Natives having their first feast. Now knowing a different version of the story, Zavala said he was not surprised. “We do the same thing with Christmas and Easter. It’s all about money. Businesses make so much money during holidays like Thanksgiving; it’s very commercially based,” Zavala said. Still, the history of Thanksgiving is divided. Smith stands by what he knows. The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock and the Wampanoags met them and treated them like brothers, almost like gods, he said. “The Pilgrims were talking how they were persecuted in England because of their beliefs, so that when they came to Plymouth Rock, they’d have freedom of religion, but they did not respect the freedom of the people that were there,” Smith said. According to Smith, Pilgrims weren’t respecting the Wampanoags’ freedom of religion and after they had given up their land, the Pilgrims started taking better land from the Wampanoags. “They taught the Pilgrims how to raise crops, and the Wampanoags fed them for the full year and then the Pilgrims turned on the Wampanoags and started calling them heathens and saying that they didn’t believe in God,” he said. According to Smith, the Pilgrims actually killed people to get what they were storing for the winter, like meat and corn. “The only thing that the Pilgrims could have been thanking God for was the crops that they were able to raise and the crops that they were able to steal,” Smith said. So, who’s up for a slice of pumpkin pie?

opening offers tours, wine samples

By Leah Kirkwood The University Star Mandola Estate Winery in Driftwood invites wine lovers ages 21 and up to tour its 20-acre vineyard and taste six varieties of wine Saturday. The winery officially opened Aug. 12 and has been conducting tours and tasting ever since, but the event will serve as the estate’s grand opening. Event coordinator Laura Pennino said Saturday’s event will give guests a sample of Italian-style hospitality. “They’ll tour, they’ll taste, and everything is complimentary,” Pennino said. Mark Penna is the winemaker for Mandola Estate Winery. He studied horticulture at Texas A&M and has worked in the Texas wine industry for 20 years. “(Texas) is a good place to grow grapes; the soil’s good and we have a long growing season, but probably the most important is it’s near a population center, which makes it a great place to have a winery,” Penna said. Penna said the estate’s grapevines are still too young to produce fruit, so Mandola wines are made from imported grapes. “We’ll harvest our first crop next year,” Penna said. “It usually takes about three years for the plants to produce grapes.” Penna said the 30-minute tour explains the process of turning grapes into a bottle of table-ready wine. “We’ll describe the process and show the equipment that we use and explain why we do the things we do,” he said. Visitors to the winery can sample six 2004 Mandola wines in the estate’s tasting room. Penna and his crew produce two white wines — pinot grigio and viognier — and four reds wines — sangiovese, syrah, nebbiolo and canto felice — onsite. Photo courtesy of Mandola Estate Winery Mandola wines are also available at Clifford’s Original ITALIAN HOSPITALITY: The Mandola Estate Winery in Driftwood Wine Bar in Wimberley and Salt Lick 360 restaurants, but will host it’s grand opening Saturday where attendees can try most sales are conducted on the estate’s premises. Restaurateur Damian Mandola and his wife, Trina, partcomplementary samples of their six wines. nered with Houston-based cardiologists Stan and Lisa Duchman to found the estate, which is modeled after wineries in Tuscany. Mandola started the Carrabba’s restaurants with his nephew, which he recently sold to Outback Steakhouse chain in order to focus on the winery. The winery sells bottles of wine for $14 to $20, and deli Mandola Estate Winery will be open to the general public meats and cheeses from Mandola Italian Market will be from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Children are welcome with adult available especially for the event. supervision, but all guests participating in the wine tasting “If (visitors) want to buy food and sit outside and have a must bring a valid photo ID. picnic, they can do that, too,” Pennino said.

FYI


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Burden Brothers release deeper album, will play Lucy’s By Jessica Sinn The University Star The Burden Brothers, a cast of ‘90s rockers, are at the mercy of their true calling — making music. After leaving their respective bands, former Toadies vocalist Vaden Todd Lewis and Reverend Horton Heat drummer Taz Bentley decided to take a hiatus from the chaotic music business. Despite their efforts to lay low, these veteran musicians couldn’t stay out of the limelight for long. The Burden Brothers are slated to play Lucy’s San Marcos Friday. The three-string arenarock band will showcase songs from previous albums, along with tunes from their latest CD, Mercy, at Lucy’s San Marcos. As Lewis and Bentley toured with their former bands, they occasionally crossed paths and discussed future plans to work on new projects together. As Tiffany Searcy/Star file photo soon as Bentley found out the BACK IN TOWN: The Burden Brothers, seen here performing Feb. 2, 2005, will play Friday at Lucy’s Toadies broke up, he convinced Lewis to tag along with him to believes musicians reach a point it’s in you and it’s got to get out. They were caught off guard Seattle to record music. Since of no return once they set foot in I don’t think that artists are able when radio stations picked up a then, the duo has written, re- the music business. to leave it alone.” handful of experimental songs. corded, toured and later formed “I didn’t bring him back; we During their leave-of-absence, “We took well-deserved time a new band together, which is brought each other back,” Bent- Lewis and Bentley only wanted away from our music and later based in Dallas. Bentley said he ley said. “When you’re an artist, to jam together and hang out. put a few songs on the Internet,”

Bentley said. “When a demo of ‘Beautiful Night’ ended up on radio in Austin, we realized that a single had taken off. At that point we made the decision to get back into the industry.” Lewis and Bentley said they hastily created their first album in 2003, Buried in Your Black Heart, as a result. “The first album was kind of a knee-jerk reaction from the single,” Lewis said. “This record is more solid — it’s more deep and emotionally connected.” As soon as Bentley and Lewis were able to collect themselves, they decided to recruit a crew of well-known rockers. Bentley said the band’s diversity allows more opportunities to break the mold and take creative risks. “There’s different sounds; we took more risks and we really pushed the envelope as a band,” Bentley said. “It’s very easy to get stuck in a rut when every song falls into a particular pattern. With Mercy, we took more chances.” Fame and fortune are not on Bentley’s agenda. He primarily wants to focus on what matters most: music and having fun. “We’ve had our fame already and we’re not trying to achieve anything,” Bentley said. “We’re

e’ve “W had our fame already

and we’re not trying to achieve anything. We’re aware of who we are, where we are and want to keep it fun – not work.” — Taz Bentley Burden Brothers drummer

aware of who we are, where we are and want to keep it fun — not work.” Burden Brothers has accumulated a fan base in San Marcos and Bentley said he enjoys playing for the “good and rowdy” crowd at Lucy’s. “There’s more freedom for people to come out and be themselves in smaller towns,” Bentley said. “It seems whenever we roll through college towns, people care about the experience — they’re more into the band and have more fun.”

Documentary shows aftermath of Dixie Chicks’ comments on Bush By Terry Lawson Detroit Free Press Dixie-chicked (verb, slang); to be pilloried as part of a mass campaign to malign a reputation or endeavor. Usage: “I don’t want to be Dixie-chicked,” spoken by a producer in deciding not to air a joke potentially offensive to evangelicals on the TV series Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. Also see: “Swift-boated.” Natalie Maines is adamant. If she had it to do over again, she wouldn’t. “I have to put it in perspective. Between the three of us we have seven children, people who depend on us. I put our career on the line with a careless joke, and I didn’t ask Emily (Robison) or Martie (Maguire) about it beforehand — I just blurted it out,” she said. “Our livelihood is playing live. And we had to cancel concerts on this tour because we couldn’t sell tickets. The radio stations won’t even accept advertising for our shows, much less play our records.” It has been more than three years since Maines, lead singer and guitarist of the Dixie Chicks, said, “Just so you know, we’re ashamed that the president of the United States is from Texas” between songs at a London concert. As we see in Shut Up & Sing,

a new documentary about the consequences of her statement, Maines was cheered in the auditorium. But back home it sparked a firestorm that refuses to go

As is made obvious in Shut Up & Sing, Maines’ sincerity in being sorry about what she said, and when and where she said it, isn’t the same as disavowing it. She’s

“I

had actually been interested in doing something on (the Dixie Chicks) before all that blew up, just because the issues they were addressing in their songs, like spousal abuse, made them pretty unique in country music.”

— Barbara Kopple director

out, despite polls that indicate the primary reason Democrats retook control of Congress last week was dissatisfaction with the Iraq war that had not yet been declared at the time. Maines said she, “opened my big mouth without thinking.” “I’m not poor-mouthing,” said Maines, having her say, even though a publicist is doing her best to cut the conversation short. “Obviously, we’re not starving or anything. I’m just saying that this is on my head, and all Emily and Martie did was stand by me … I apologized to everybody, including the president. But I can’t undo what’s done, and I’ve been through hell for it.”

also angry and saddened by the reaction, “especially the fact that someone could be mad enough at me for having an opinion different than theirs that they would threaten to kill me.” Maines and the other members of the trio, the top-earning-act in country music for five years before the remark, received death threats. “It’s pretty amazing what these women have been through,” said Barbara Kopple, director of two Oscar winners, 1976’s Harlan County U.S. and 1991’s American Dream. Kopple directed Shut Up & Sing with Cecila Peck, daughter of movie icon Gregory Peck, who

produced the Kopple-directed The Hamptons reality series for TV. “I had actually been interested in doing something on them before all that blew up, just because the issues they were addressing in their songs, like spousal abuse, made them pretty unique in country music,” Kopple said. “Then when Natalie said what she did and the heat was on, I knew for certain I wanted to do something.” The problem was that the Dixie Chicks, initially thrown for a loop by the uproar and news that some country stations were not just banning their records but urging listeners to burn them, wanted to turn the heat down. “I think we were hoping it would die down and we could get back on with our lives,” Maines said. “But it quickly became obvious that wasn’t going to happen. We already had a two-person video crew with us. So they shot some of the early stuff, us talking to our manager and with each other about this thing that had gotten so out of control.” “Then Cecilia approached us about doing something about what we going through, how it was affecting us, about how every conversation we had with anybody eventually came down to this subject. She was so emotionally attached, I think it just

Hip-Hop Congress begins community outreach program By Krystal Castaneda The University Star Hip-Hop Congress, partnered with the San Marcos Police Department, will put on the first Congress Kidz event, “edutaining” youth. Hip-Hop Congress is a student organization driven to design, produce and initiate community projects which advance the culture of hip-hop. It support the causes of underrepresented communities through education and entertainment and provide campus leadership and mentoring to local youth. For the first Congress Kidz event, Hip-Hop Congress will present a program including skits, songs, a PowerPoint presentation and demonstrations. It will be centered on resisting peer pressure and opening minds to higher education. Tim Swain, vice president of Hip-Hop Congress, said that this collective effort for community outreach is needed.

“We observed the San Marcos community and decided it was necessary to give the kids of today skills relevant to prevent problems of the future,” Swain, communication studies sophomore, said. Congress Kidz uses the culture of hip-hop to teach and inspire young people to get involved in social action, civic service and cultural creativity. Valerie Martinez, assistant principal of Travis Elementary and coordinator for the Congress Kidz event at the school, said she wanted her students to participate in the program because of its content. “The issues covered by this presentation are real and imminent in the lives of our kids. Additionally, the delivery of the presentation appeals to the students since it is hip and entertaining,” Martinez said. “It conveys the message in a way that is not preachy or dull.” Through this outreach, HipHop Congress hopes to give at-

risk kids a solid foundation to make decisions as they transition into junior high. “My hope is that the students will get an early exposure to the message that drugs, gangs and violence do nothing but make others and themselves unhappy. At this age, the students are coming to a time when they are beginning to notice behaviors around them and want to emulate those behaviors,” Martinez said. “We must give them the skills to refuse falling into destructive behaviors. Congress Kidz is one mechanism to deliver those skills.” Martinez said she is appreciative of the organization’s work. “My personal opinion of the event at this point is that a great deal of thought and planning has gone into making the presentation exciting and meaningful,” she said. “Mr. Swain obviously has a keen sense of what works with kids and a personal drive to make a difference.”

“W

e observed the San Marcos community and decided it was necessary to give the kids of today skills relevant to prevent problems of the future.”

— Tim Swain Hip-Hop Congress vice president

Swain said his organization is happy to help the communtiy. “The harvest reaped from this will be satisfaction in knowing we helped become a part of something major in the San Marcos community and school system,” Swain said.

Photo courtesy of www.DixieChicks.com NO TAKE BACKS: The Dixie Chicks, who have faced backlash from the country-music community after lead singer Natalie Maines’ (center) comments during a London concert, have expressed their apologies but still face low support in the U.S.

touched us. And it got the three of us all opening up to each oth-

er, which I know turned out to be a good thing.”


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Pastures of Plenty highlights music of American icon Woody Guthrie By Jeffery D. Hooten The University Star Most Americans grew up singing Woody Guthrie songs even if they were unaware of it. Pastures of Plenty is a tribute in song and dance to the life and music of Woody Guthrie, the Great Depression-era folksinger. Guthrie wrote songs such as “This Land is Your Land” and “So Long, It’s Been Good to Know You.” The Vanaver Caravan, a touring dance and music company from New York, will be performing their production Pastures of Plenty at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Evans Auditorium. “It’s a rhythmic and musical experience filled with joy and hope,” said Ramona Staffeld, a dancer in the company. Staffeld said the production will include various types of

traditional American dances — including clogging, swing and modern dance — choreographed to interpretations of Guthrie’s songs. Guthrie was known for writing songs reflecting the values of the common person during the Great Depression, including social institutions like labor unions. “He dedicated his entire life to social justice,” said Livia Vanaver, cofounder and choreographer of the Vanaver Caravan. The event is part of the Supple Folk Music Series and the Common Experience initiative. Common Experience seeks to create a dialogue among the university and community. This year’s theme is “Protest and Dissent.” Guthrie’s support of organized labor and striking and speaking out against oppression made him a controversial figure. Many

labeled him a communist. “(Guthrie) had to speak out,” Staffeld said. “He was singing the songs of the people and turning the wheels of change … he was working for everyone in that way.” Staffeld said Guthrie’s songs were accessible to everyone and written in a plain style. Guthrie is known for being an influence on musicians such as Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Bragg and Steve Earl. The Vanaver Caravan, referred to by Vanaver as a “multigenerational creative force,” formed in the early 1970s after Bill and Livia Vanaver met. They decided to create a tribute to Woody Guthrie after a similar production in honor of folksinger Pete Seeger influenced Guthrie’s daughter, Nora, to suggest such a production to honor her father. The narration of the produc-

tion will be a compilation of Guthrie’s own words. Guthrie’s message concerns the ability to overcome. He once said, “The note of hope is the only note that can help us or save us from falling to the bottom of the heap of evolution, because, largely anyway, all a human being is anyway, is a hoping machine.”

✯FYI Tickets are $10 for the general public and $5 for students. All seats are reserved. Tickets can be purchased by phone by calling (512) 245-2030 or (877) TIC-TXST. For further information call the events coordinator at (512) 2453501.

Thursday, Nov. 16

Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration

Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration The “greatest hits” of the permanent archives, including the 1555 edition of Cabeza de Vaca’s La relación y comentarios, a songbook made by an 11year-old Willie Nelson, costumes and props from Lonesome Dove and much more. The archives are located in the Southwestern Writers Collection on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library. Exhibit hours: Monday/Tuesday/Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday/ Thursday: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Call (512) 245-2313 for more information.

Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide The exhibit includes self-portraits, portraits, famous works and neverbefore-exhibited images by one of Mexico’s greatest photographers from the Wittliff Gallery’s major collection of Iturbide’s work. The exhibition is located in the Wittliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican photography on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library. Exhibit hours: Monday/Tuesday/Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday/ Thursday: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Call (512) 245-2313 for more information. Carole Greer — 10times3 Exhibit This exhibit is a retrospective and celebration of Professor Carole Greer’s 30 years at Texas State. Professor Greer will retire at the end of the fall 2006 semester. The exhibit is located in Gallery II of the Joann Cole Mitte Building. Gallery hours: Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday/Sunday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Call (512) 245-2664 for more information. The exhibit is free and open to the public. Mari Omori — Material Witness A native of Japan, Houston artist Mari Omori makes sculptural installations that revolve around the notion of identity, self and cultural memory. The exhibit is located in Gallery I of the Joann Cole Mitte Building. Gallery hours: Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday/Sunday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Call (512) 245-2664 for more information. The exhibit is free and open to the public. Saxophone Studio Recital Students of Doug Skinner, music professor, and Todd Oxford, senior music lecturer, will perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 2452651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. The Rocky Horror Show Is everyone ready to do the time warp again? This campy cult classic immortalized on film is coming to Texas State as a live performance. Join Brad and Janet as they stumble into the strange world of the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter, that sweet transvestite who is cooking up his latest creation, Rocky. The musical, written by Richard O’Brian and directed by Jay Jennings, will be performed at the MainStage/Theatre Center. For mature audiences. Call the Theatre and Dance Departmental Office at (512) 2452147 for more information. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $10 general admission and $5 students. Choreographer’s Showcase The concert features choreography of students enrolled in the Advanced Choreography course and faculty choreography set on the Performance Workshop class. The event will be held at Jowers Center, Studio 178. Call the Dance Department Office at (512) 245-2949 for more information. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $5. Trombone Ensemble Charles Hurt, music professor, will direct an ensemble in Evans Auditorium. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Friday, Nov. 17 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration

Carole Greer — 10times3 Exhibit Mari Omori — Material Witness The Rocky Horror Show Graduate Voice Recitals Madeline Elizondo, student of Juli Wood, will perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Senior Clarinet Recital Renee Rodriguez, student of David Pino, will perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Vanaver Caravan: Pastures of Plenty This full concert work, created by Bill and Livia Vanaver, is a celebration of Woody Guthrie as balladeer and Woody Guthrie as a man in music, song and dance. The event, held at Evans Auditorium, is part of the Supple Folk Music Series. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $10 general admission and $5 students.

Sunday, Nov. 19 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Photo courtesy of Lois Greenfield FREEZE: Dancers Amber Wirthman, Elijah Vanaver, Isabel Cottingham, Talli Jackson David Pakenham and Ramona Staffeld, along with the dance company Vanaver Caravan, will perform Pastures of Plenty at 7:30 p.m. Saturday in Evans Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Nov. 22 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Thursday, Nov. 23 - Saturday, Nov. 25 Happy Thanksgiving.

Sunday, Nov. 26 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide Senior Voice Recital Brigitte Smith, student of Cheryl Parrish, will perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Jazz Combo Music faculty members Freddie Mendoza, Morris Nelms and Pete Rodriguez will direct jazz students at George’s in LBJSC. Call (512) 2452651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Monday, Nov. 27

Carole Greer — 10times3 Exhibit

Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration

Mari Omori — Material Witness

Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Men’s and Women’s Chorus The men’s and women’s choruses team up for a performance at Evans Auditorium. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 3 p.m. Tickets: $2 general admission and $1 students.

Thesis Exhibition I The exhibition is a survey of work by studio art majors in their senior thesis studios in Gallery I and II of the Joann Cole Mitte Art Building. Gallery hours: Monday through Friday: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday/Sunday: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Call (512) 245-2664 for more information. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Junior Horn Recital Jonathan Miller, student of Steve Hager, will perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. University Singers Students from the co-ed ensemble will perform at Evans Auditorium. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $2 general admission and $1 students. Double Reed Recital Students will perform on double-reed instruments in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Monday, Nov. 20 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Jazz Orchestra Keith Winking, music professor, will direct an orchestra at Evans Auditorium. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $2 general admission and $1 students.

Tuesday, Nov. 21

Convocation Recital Music students perform in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 2452651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m. The event is free and open to the public Jazz Combo

Tuesday, Nov. 28 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide Thesis Exhibition I Texas State HornCats Steve Hager will direct the group at the University Performing Arts Center. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, Nov. 29 Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide Thesis Exhibition I Trombone Studio Recital Students of Charles Hurt perform in the Music Building Band Hall, Room 224. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 3 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration

Carole Greer — 10times3 Exhibit

Ojos Para Volar/Eyes to Fly With: Photographs by Graciela Iturbide

Mari Omori — Material Witness

Treasures of the Southwestern Writers Collection: A 20th Anniversary Celebration

Guitar Ensemble Recital Mark Cruz, senior music lecturer, will direct guitar students in the Music Building recital hall. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Senior Jazz Trumpet Recital Addie Benavides will perform at George’s in LBJSC. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Jazz Lab Band The band will perform at Evans Auditorium. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $2 general admission and $1 students.

Saxophone Ensemble Recital Todd Oxford will direct an ensemble at the University Performing Arts Center. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information. Time: 6 p.m.

Cory Morrow Live On Campus SACA presents Cory Morrow, country music artist, at the LBJSC Mall. Time: 7 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

The Rocky Horror Show Choreographer’s Showcase Salsa Night John Lopez, associate music professor, will direct Texas State’s Salsa del Rio Band at George’s in the LBJ Student Center basement. The event is sponsored by SACA. Time: 9 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Saturday, Nov. 18


TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

Thursday, November 16, 2006

RIX’S

TECHNOLOGY FIXES

Prepare a game plan to avoid new console chaos Well, the wait is almost over. Time flew and here we are, just a few days before the domestic release of the Wii and the Playstation 3. It seems like only yesterday we were all pining over the revolution and the silvery banana controller. If you secured a console by preordering, congrats. If not, my heart goes out to you. I didn’t get a preorder. I like the extra couple days it takes to get a console. It gives me time to soak up all the reports and deliberate further on an expensive purchase. Anyway, most stores have been sold out of preorders for both systems for months now, so even if I wanted to rush out to GameStop and grab one, their consoles are pretty much all but spoken for. A few stores — Best Buy and Wal-Mart — don’t do preorders, so if you missed out on the window of opportunity, go camp out. Don’t expect to be alone. And definitely don’t go without a plan of action. The last thing you want to do is plan out your purchase after getting to the store. Games will go just as fast as consoles, so don’t overlook software. Just because you are lucky enough to get a Wii

on Sunday doesn’t mean you’ll be able to get The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. Shelves will be emptied quickly of AAA titles for both consoles, so know what you want and have enough cash in hand to carry out your goods in a timely manner without having to call the parents and finagle some last-minute money from them at midnight or 8 a.m. All of this advice is dependent on actually locating a PS3 or a Wii. Game Crazy, GameStop and EB Games have been taking preorders for a while now, so if you camp out for hours the night before, hoping somehow, someone forgot to pick their console up, you’ll probably be out of luck. Don’t rule these places out, but there are some other stores you’ll want to check out first. Target, Best Buy and Circuit City are great for camping. They don’t take preorders so it’s firstcome, first-serve. There are some lesser-known stores that often carry new consoles — Sears, for instance — so they are good for last looks, but it’d be best not to get your hopes up. Target will be issuing vouchers for the Wii to those waiting in line outside. If you can get one, it guarantees

✯Star Comics BILL RIX Star Copy Chief

you a Wii, so you can go home and sleep before picking it up Sunday. Just make sure you get it before noon, or your reserved console becomes open game. Best Buy has a system similar to Target but doesn’t pull it off as smoothly most of the time. Regardless, all these stores will offer those who didn’t preorder a shot at gaining our next-gen toys. A final word about camping — be careful. I love video games, but if I miss the first launch window, that’s OK, it’s a video gaming system. It’s a want, not a need. For some people, though, missing the window isn’t OK. People can get violent at the thought of going home emptyhanded, so be careful of yourself and your surroundings. If someone wants a PS3 or Wii enough to become belligerent about it, just let it go. Launches like this only come twice a decade or so. It’s best not to get caught up in it too bad. These are the consoles that will be played until 2010 or so, so it’ll be all right if you don’t get one until the new year. Take it easy and game the hell out of Thanksgiving regardless of whether or not you take the plunge.

SU DO KU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively.

Yesterday’s solutions:

Yesterday’s solutions:

© Pappocom

The University Star - Page 9


OPINIONS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

onlineconnection Do you think Americans know enough about the history of Thanksgiving? Go to www.UniversityStar.com to vote in our online poll. Results will be published in Thursday’s issue of The University Star.

Thursday, November 16, 2006 - Page 10

*This is not a scientific poll

FAREWELL& GOODNIGHT Opinions Contact — Emily Messer, staropinion@txstate.edu

THE MAIN POINT

E

d Bradley was a journalist and a jazz enthusiast. He was the male CBS anchor with an earring. Bradley also helped open doors for black journalists in broadcast news. On Nov. 9, the world said goodbye to Bradley. He died of complications from chronic lymphocytic leukemia at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. The University Star feels we should all take a moment to reflect on the achievements of Bradley and his impact on society. Bradley’s career was impressive, and he was a well-respected journalist. He was among some of the first black journalists to work in network television news. The National Association of Black Journalists honored Bradley with its Lifetime Achievement Award last fall. He also won a 2003 Emmy for lifetime achievement, along with 18 other Emmys. These are among the many awards Bradley received during his more than 40-year career in news. Bradley’s work as a journalist was stellar. In the 1960s, he covered the riots in Philadelphia as one of his first news reporting assignments. He moved to Paris in 1971, where he became a CBS news stringer. One year later, he was sent to Saigon to cover the Vietnam War for two years. Injury from a mortar round that caused shrapnel wounds to his arm and back didn’t slow Bradley down. After Vietnam, he switched to political coverage and moved to Washington, D.C. to cover the 1976 Carter campaign. His work entitled him to be the CBS News White House correspondent for two years. He later served as the principal correspondent for CBS Reports. In 1981, Bradley became a part of the 60 Minutes staff. His personal hobbies were equally interesting. For more than a decade, Bradley hosted the Peabody Awardwinning program Jazz at Lincoln Center on National Public Radio. The New York Times also reported he was a close friend of musician Jimmy Buffet, whom Bradley sometimes joined on stage. Syndicated columnist Clarence Page said Bradley was an influential role model in his life. Growing up in a working-class Philadelphia neighborhood, Bradley took up his parents’ challenge to “be anything he could be.” And he succeeded. “Even in those days, before the doors of opportunity were fully opened to black Americans, Mr. Bradley challenged the system,” Page said Tuesday in his column. “He worked hard and prepared himself. He opened himself to the world and dared the world to turn him away. He wanted to be a lot, and he succeeded. Thanks to examples like his, the rest of us know that we can succeed, too.”

Ed Bradley’s death leaves impact on journalism history

Diversity strengthens gay community The Nov. 7 article about Lambda’s Bobcat Ball brought up a few different issues about the homosexual community that I would like to address. First of all, stereotypes, even if they seem fun, or good, or neutral, are still stereotypes. Stereotypes are overgeneralizations of a large group of people based on what some of that group may be like. This type of thinking is faulty and does affect the way we perceive individuals who belong to a certain group. For instance, thinking all Latinos speak Spanish or that Asians are smart may not seem like bad things, but it changes the way we perceive, treat and relate to individuals in those communities. Believing the stereotype that all homosexual individuals attend social activities such as drag shows is a faulty overgeneralization, even if it does not seem like anything bad. There is not one encompassing lifestyle of all gay people. Homosexuals are just as diverse as heterosexuals. For some gay people, going to drag shows is a part of their life. Other gay people, like myself, would rather stay at home than go to any party, whether there is a drag show or not. There are gays who are Christian, Republican, Jewish, veterans and teachers. We do not have one lifestyle. We are made a community by our common experiences such as coming out, dealing with discrimination and day-to-day prejudice. These things are stronger than one type of life could be. Because of all of our differences, we can make our community stronger by understanding the many different perspectives to the common things we share. And all of us together, young and old, able and disabled, Atheist and Christian, can make a bigger difference in our work toward equality than could just one part of who we are. Sabrina Jennings applied sociology senior Activists for Sexual Minorities president Think you have something to say? Log on to www.UniversityStar.com and click on the letters link to read old letters and submit new ones.

Online Poll Results ASG Ethics

D

o you think the Associated Student Government should establish a code of ethics and ethics committee? Do you think the Associated Student Government should establish a code of ethics and ethics committee?

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Pat Stark/Star illustration

Yes

No

Not sure/ I don’t know

73%

17%

10%

Results compiled from The University Star Web site online poll. This is not a scientific survey.

ASG president has right and obligation to endorse candidates This column will adThis is important dress several recent because they came to “issues” surrounding recognize the signifithe Associated Student cance of the student Government, local elecvoice before MAP tions and a so-called bias ever influenced their in my administration for strategy. I believe MAP and Associates can- KYLE MORRIS with certainty that didates. These issues have ASG President they would have adappeared in The Unidressed ASG regardversity Star through a couple less of MAP. These candidates of articles, some of the Main began to address ASG in the Points and one column by Sean spring because of Chris Jones’ Wardwell. I generally support association with ASG and his The Star, and I feel like they do successful city council election an overall good job of reporting bid. After all, he did tout his innews. However, I do feel several volvement and success in ASG points and perspectives were during his Fall 2005 campaign, overlooked in recent coverage and thus other politicians and commentary on this issue. viewed it as a critical mechaFirst, you were never told five nism to accessing the student of the seven MAP candidates vote. This historical context was who addressed the ASG Senate never presented in the recent in this election cycle had spostring of stories and opinions, ken at Senate meetings before so I simply ask that you conthey were ever MAP clients. sider it now. Considering this

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

information, any claim of an ASG bias for MAP candidates is suspect. Second, there is this issue of Sam McCabe, ASG voter registration czar, being the CEO of MAP. Since I took office on June 1, I have had an open door policy for student involvement in ASG. Not everyone meets the requirements for being a senator, but every student meets the requirements for serving in ASG on some level as an executive appointment. I would have a deeper ethical issue if I turned any student away from ASG knowing that their student fees help pay my personal wages and sustain the ASG budget. McCabe is a student at this university who pays student service fees just like everyone else. McCabe’s expertise is in elections and student voting, and he wanted to be involved

Editor In Chief...................................Jason Buch, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.........................Emily Messer, staropinion@txstate.edu News Editor..............................David Saleh Rauf, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor....................Maira Garcia, starentertainment@txstate.edu Photo Editor...................................Monty Marion, starphoto@txstate.edu Sports Editor..................................Chris Boehm, starsports@txstate.edu

in ASG. Why would I turn the campus expert on student voting away from ASG? ASG’s goal is to represent the interests of the students, which includes substantially impacting local politics. My appointment has helped achieve that goal and has expanded the influence of students in the local community. Third, The Star claims we have sacrificed student voter education for student voter turnout. Ultimately, voter education is the responsibility of the voter. Nobody can force you to learn anything; it is a decision. Yes, we can encourage education just like registration. However, that’s not our expertise, and that’s not what turns heads in local politics. What’s more essential to demanding attention from local politicians: having 100 student voters who are highly educated

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on all candidates and issues, or having 9,500 student voters who can sway any election in Hays County? Plus, I personally believe it is up to the candidates to educate voters themselves because it forces them to communicate and interact with their constituents. This gives constituents a choice, which is the fundamental component of democracy. That said, we will work in the future to provide education groups like the League of Women Voters more access to students so they can be better educated before voting. Fourth, there is the claim by Sean Wardwell that I should not be endorsing candidates as ASG president. My first question is: Why is it acceptable for The Star to endorse candidates but not me? But next, I contend that not only is it my right to

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endorse candidates, it is my obligation as well. Again, I am under oath and paid to protect the interests of Texas State students. Providing students with my opinion on who the pro-student candidates are in an election is one way of advancing our collective interests. My opinion isn’t definitive or absolute, but I do contend that I give a bit more attention to these issues on any given day than the typical student. Finally, after all of this, The Star endorsed two MAP candidates and no others. Not to mention, a very flattering article on MAP appeared in yesterday’s paper. How do they avoid their own suggestion of bias? That, I’ll let you ponder on your own. Kyle Morris is the Associated Student Government president The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright November 16, 2006. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


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All classified ads are charged 20¢ per word. Ads may be emailed to starclassifieds@txstate.edu. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. Classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. Refunds will only be given when a classified ad has been paid by credit card. The Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, and discontinue any classified ad at any time without prior notification. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. Classified ads that do not note heading, will be put under the appropriate heading. All classified ads are published free, on-line at www.universitystar.com. Since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

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HELP WANTED SALES. PT.-$3,000/MO. Must have a burning desire to achieve $3,000 or more a month. We will train the right person. For consideration and interview call (512) 667-7002. STUDY BREAKS MAGAZINE is now hiring account executives/advertising sales. Great pay, flexible hours. (512) 480-0894. ATTENTION STUDENTS! POSITIONS AVAILABLE •$13 Base Appointment •Flexible Schedules •Customer Sales/Service •No Experience Needed, will train •All Ages 17+ •Conditions Apply Call today (512) 392-7377 www.workforstudents.com TEACHERS NEEDED: now hiring full-time and part-time teachers. Fulltime lead teacher to start end of December for younger 3’s. Bilingual preferred. PT immediate opening. Must be available M-F 2:30-6:30. Education major/ experience preferred but not required. Quality Child Development Center in Kyle. (512) 405-3700 or fax (512) 405-3701. www.rockinghorseacademy.com MONAVIE - DELICIOUS BEVERAGE with 19 “super fruits” including acai berry from Amazon. Drink and see benefits & or become distributor with unlimited earning potential. www.mymonavie.com/JulieLong ATHLETIC, OUTGOING MEN for calendars, greeting cards, etc. $75-200/ hr. No exp. needed, (512) 684-8296. DO YOU LOVE WORKING WITH KIDS? Are you available to work from 2:30pm-6pm (M-F) in the spring semester? If you answered yes, the SUNSET after-school program is currently seeking fun and energetic individuals to join their team. Please call (512) 392-1992 if you are interested. EQUESTRIAN AND PHOTO MODELING OPPORTUNITIES. Apply on-line @ www.texasarabianhorses.com ATHLETIC MALE MODELS WANTED for physique photography in Austin. $200-$1,000 per session. Call Wu at (512) 927-2448. STUDENT RANCH HELP WANTED! On a ranch, 14 miles outside of San Marcos on Hwy. 80. 4 positions available. For more information call James, (512) 825-9901.

HELP WANTED BROWN-KARHAN HEALTHCARE in Dripping Springs is looking for motivated individuals who would like a rewarding employment experience in the healthcare field. Great opportunity to work with brain injured or psychiatric residents. Part time and full time opportunities available. Looking to fill primarily weekend, evening shifts, overnight shifts during the week. Candidate must be 21 years of age and have satisfactory driving record. Background check & drug screening is required. Pay begins at $8.50, but commensurate with experience and education. Qualified candidates may be eligible for health insurance, PTO, and monthly gas allowance. If eligible there is a sign on bonus of $150. Please fax your resume to Kerri at (512) 858-5104, or e-mail to kalvis@brown-karhan.com, for questions call (512) 894-0701 ext 219. Visit our web site at www.brown-karhan.com. WILSON’S LEATHER OUTLET. Seasonal staff needed. (512) 805-8443. BOBCATSNEEDJOBS.COM. We need Paid Survey Takers in San Marcos. 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. FAST PACED CLEANING COMPANY located in New Braunfels seeking FT and PT help. Very flexible hours. Make up to $9/hr. (830) 237-5304. EARN $800-$3,200/ MO. to drive brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.DriveAdCars.com SWIM INSTRUCTOR-PT/FT Tom’s Dive & Swim is seeking energetic, selfmotivated, and friendly individual to teach swim, indoor pool. Experience required. Email resume to Jason@TomsScuba.com or phone (512) 451-3425. !BARTENDING! Up to $300/day. No experience necessary. Training Provided. Age 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 157.

HELP WANTED CARETAKER NEEDED in Martindale, TX. Weekends only, 12-4 pm, $7.50 hourly. Only serious applicants need apply. Please call (512) 805-0196 or (512) 557-6113, ask for Melissa. BAR/WAITSTAFF/ENTERTAINERS. Make holiday spending money $$$! Will train AM/PM. PT/FT. Flex. schedules. Sugar’s, 404 Highland Mall Blvd., Austin (across from Highland Mall). (512) 451-1711. APPLICATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED for experienced kitchen cooks and wait staff at the Wimberley Cafe. Part-time and full-time shifts available. Open daily, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information and directions, call (512) 847-3333. CRAIG ‘OS PIZZA is now hiring daytime drivers/delivery person for morning or night shift. Apply at Craig ‘Os 690 Centerpoint Rd., next to Starbucks across from the outlets. (512) 558-2220.

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ROOMMATES ROOMMATE WANTED. $350/mo. 3BD/2BA house. Call (512) 757-4356. MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. 3BD/2BA house. 5 min. from campus. Huge yard. Call (830) 305-1036 for more information. ROOMMATE NEEDED. SINGLES or couples welcome. 1BD available in a spacious 2BD/2.5BA two-story apartment. $428 plus bills. Pet friendly. Call (512) 787-8825.

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SUBLEASE SUBLEASE-OUTPOST APARTMENTS. Immediate move in. No payment until December. Individual lease, furniture, with private bath. All bills paid except electric. On shuttle route. Many amenities. For more info call (512) 618-8136. WALK TO CAMPUS! $325/mo. Huge room, all bills paid but electric. Free cable and internet. Available January 2007. (512) 665-2857. FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED, in January. Sublease my room in a 4BD/4BA apt. ONLY $349/mo. Call Erin at (214) 773-0074 I AM LOOKING FOR A GUY TO SUBLEASE. I have one roommate in a spacious 3BD/2BA modular home located in north San Marcos. The rent is $350 a month and then bills average $120 a month for everything. You could work with the other roommate to get somebody into the third bedroom to drop rent. It is currently unused so it could be turned into just about anything. The complex is gated, easy access to I-35, has a pool, and basketball court. The lease runs through April 30th. I will pay $100 per month of rent so your rent will only be $250.00. Or we can work out another arrangement. You can reach me at (512) 644-5128 or cmstrick25@yahoo.com

WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell. (512) 353-4511.

THE UNIVERSITY STAR WILL NOT PRINT NEXT WEEK. HAVE A SAFE HOLIDAY!


SPORTS

Thursday, November 16, 2006

The University Star - Page 12

Don’t rule out a Michigan-Ohio rematch just yet By Mitch Albom Detroit Free Press DETROIT — In boxing, every guy has a plan until he gets hit. In college football, everyone has a national championship system — until it doesn’t work. Lately, pundits have been shooting down a possible Michigan-Ohio State rematch for the national title. They don’t like it. Even Bo Schembechler has said he wouldn’t want one. Of course, I remember Bo when he didn’t want any national championships, either. The arguments go like this: “If Michigan and Ohio State play again for the national title, it waters down this weekend’s game.” Or “If they play again, it’s like splitting the series.” Or “If they

play again, and the loser wins the next time, then it’s … it’s …” It’s what? It’s — to paraphrase Hyman Roth in The Godfather — the system we’ve chosen. And that system is to let computers help rank teams and put the top two in a national championship game. Hey. I didn’t invent the thing. I’ve been in favor of a four-team playoff for years. But we don’t have that. We have rankings. And if No. 1 plays No. 2 and it’s a close game, and you follow the way this dumb system has worked all year, then the two of them playing each other again is hardly out of line — and it shouldn’t matter whether you like it or not. You can’t be Mr. Spock most of the season and Captain Kirk

at the end. Can’t stop it now. Remember that computers don’t account for things like hype or boredom. The computer doesn’t care that you can’t get revved up for the same game twice in six weeks. (Which, by the way — with sports what it is — is laughable.) A computer’s job is to stick with the facts and apply them as equally in the first week as in the last. So let’s run a few scenarios. Say Michigan-Ohio State is decided by a late field goal. Michigan wins. (Hey, it’s my scenario, I can pick who I want.) Who, besides Ohio State, should Michigan play? Well, next up is USC, No. 3 in the BCS rankings — the same USC that squeaked past lesser opponents this year and only

jumped this high because a bunch of other one-loss teams became two-loss teams. Now suddenly the Trojans, who got thumped by — ahem — Oregon State, should play for the title over the Buckeyes? Why? Isn’t losing to Oregon State worse than losing to Michigan? But wait. USC has to play Notre Dame, which has been climbing up the outside like a racehorse. What if the Fighting Irish upset the Trojans? Their fans would say Notre Dame must play Michigan for the title. Except these two teams already met, and the Wolverines trashed them. Why should the Irish get a second chance when the Buckeyes can’t? Why is a rematch of an early-season game any better than a rematch of the season finale?

Someone will make a case for No. 4 Florida. But the Gators already lost to Auburn, a team that has lost twice, including a beating by Georgia. Someone else will say, hey, No. 6 Rutgers is undefeated. But are you telling me a Michigan-Rutgers national championship is more desirable than UM-OSU? You live with a computer, or you lose it. You can’t just unplug it. Blame the system. Now it’s true, the BCS also is determined by two polls voted on by coaches and writers. And those voters might say Ohio State had its chance or only conference winners should play for the title or nobody likes a rematch. But none of that is true in other sports. In pro-football, the

team you play in the season finale can be the team you face in the Super Bowl. In the NBA or NHL, conference winners can be eliminated by wild-card teams. You can say that’s what makes college football different. But that’s silly. What really makes it different is the dumb BCS system — a system designed to address this problem. By the way, if we had a playoff involving the top four teams, with No. 1 playing No. 4, and Michigan beat Ohio State on Saturday, guess who Michigan might face in the next game. No. 4 Ohio State. The truth is, rematches don’t ruin anything except an argument. So is college football in the national championship business or the argument business? Sometimes I can’t tell.

Bob Knight’s contact with player thought by many to be harmless By Tim MacMahon The Dallas Morning News Tech administrators stood behind Knight. Athletic director Gerald Myers released a prepared statement Tuesday afternoon defending Knight’s action, which was replayed repeatedly on ESPN. Myers said that he had discussed the matter with Knight, Forward Michael Prince and his parents and determined that Knight “quickly lifted” Prince’s chin and told the player not to worry about making mistakes. “In my opinion, Coach Knight did not do anything wrong,” Myers said in the statement that concluded by saying that the school would have no further comment on the issue. School president Jon Whitmore was not available for comment. Margaret Lutherer, Tech’s director of marketing and communications, consulted with Whitmore and said, “Gerald Myers’ statement is our statement.” Michael Ainsworth/Dallas Morning News The faculty senate president said Knight’s contact with UNDER THE LIGHTS: Texas Tech coach Bob Knight yells during Prince, a 6-foot-7-inch sopha NCAA tournament game in March 2005. Knight is under scrutiny omore forward from Plano for making contact with Texas Tech forward Michael Prince. West, has received more atten-

tion than it deserves because of the coach’s reputation. Knight’s temper led to his dismissal from Indiana despite his legendary status in the state after 29 years with the Hoosiers. “I don’t see anything to address,” James H. Smith said of Monday’s incident. “There was no abuse or violence that took place. Anybody who coaches, they’re going to have physical contact with individuals. Physical contact and physical abuse are two different things.” Several fans in the sparse crowd at United Spirit Arena for Tuesday night’s game against Arkansas-Little Rock agreed with Smith. Most fans gave Knight, now eight victories shy of breaking Dean Smith’s NCAA wins record, a standing ovation when he walked on the court a few minutes before the opening tip. The student section chanted, “Bobby! Bobby! Bobby!” The crowd roared when Knight came on the floor and playfully smacked Darryl Dora on the back of the head to congratulate him for a strong rebound in the first half. Later on, Prince smiled when Knight did the same thing to him. Randy Geyer, an Indianapolis resident whose seat is right behind the Tech bench, said Knight only nudged Prince’s chin Monday in an effort to get the player’s attention. “I think the media is overhyping it because it is Bobby Knight,” said Gerard Varrone, a Texas Tech senior from Fort Worth. “It’s all just getting blown way out of proportion.” Prince, who scored two points in 11 minutes, committed a turnover and two fouls

prior to a timeout late in the second half of the win over Gardner-Webb. Prince had his head down, and Knight used his right hand to pop Prince under the chin and appeared to scream, “Look at me.” After Tech’s 93-59 victory over Arkansas-Little Rock on Tuesday, Knight didn’t want to talk about Monday’s incident. “I have said nothing publicly about it, nor do I intend to, and that’s the attention it deserves.” Knight told ESPN.com Tuesday that he flipped Prince’s chin up in an effort to raise the player’s confidence. “I’m sure there are some cases where I have been wrong, but (Monday night) wasn’t one of them,” Knight told the Web site. “I was trying to help a kid, and I think I did. If I was confronted with the same set of circumstances, I would do the exact same thing.” On Tuesday, he did not answer questions about the ESPN. com interview and threatened to cut short his post-game news conference if those questions persisted. ESPN replays showed Prince rubbing his chin after taking a seat on the bench. “It was nothing,” Prince told the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. “He was trying to teach me, and I had my head down, so he raised my chin up. He was telling me to go out there and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. He said I was being too hard on myself.” Prince’s mother, Suzette, was at the game and spoke to her son about the incident. “After talking to Michael, he didn’t think it was an issue, so I would hope that nothing would

happen (to Knight),” she told the Lubbock newspaper. “He is a great coach that cares about his kids, and we’re comfortable with that.” Knight had three memorable instances involving contact with players at Indiana. In 1993, Knight appeared to kick his son, Pat, now Tech’s head-coach designate, in the shin after pulling him from a game. In 1994, Knight butted heads with guard Sherron Wilkerson during a courtside huddle. Both said the contact was accidental. Guard Neil Reed accused Knight of choking him during a 1997 practice. Reed, who transferred from Indiana following that season, made the accusations in March 2000. A tape showing Knight grabbing Reed by the neck surfaced a month later, helping lead to Knight’s firing from the school he turned into a national basketball powerhouse. NCAA president Myles Brand, who as Indiana president fired Knight, declined to comment Tuesday about the incident through a spokeswoman. “My initial reaction based on the way it’s been described to me is that it’s an institutional issue,” said Kevin Weiberg, Big 12 commissioner. “We don’t have conference rules, per se, that govern how you interact with your own team. I’m not trying to pass the buck on it, but that’s an honest answer about it.” Staff Writers Chuck Carlton and Brian Davis contributed to this story.

KTSW: Freeman wins award for

Oregon Ducks game coverage CONTINUED from page 13

by a KTSW employee at the CBI convention in Dallas. “It’s definitely the moment I’m most proud of, especially considering it was only the third game I called in my life. And I think part of it was that the game was such a big stage for a small school.” Freeman said he doesn’t know if he will be back to do football again next season, but would love to if still in the area. The Texas State alumnus acknowledged the athletic department, as part of a Division I school, may go to commercial radio at some point. This could close the door of opportunity for

Freeman, especially if the job is again handed over to a KTSW student. “A lot of factors depend (on returning next season),” Freeman said. “KTSW gets a clear signal for a long distance. But while it is free for the university to put the game on the air, it gets no money in return, and there is a possibility (of that) with Division I schools. Texas State is in such a strange market; Austin doesn’t want the Bobcats because it’s so proLonghorns, and San Antonio probably couldn’t provide the kind of coverage the Bobcats would need.” Freeman has only worked full-time at KGNB for a few months, but has witnessed the

departure of people who hired him. Fred Stockwell, a former general manager who hired him for freelance, now works at Radio Disney. Jim Vance, who hired Freeman full-time this summer, was let go approximately two weeks ago. Freeman said the revolving door hasn’t affected him so much as the wish to focus on his career and move on to bigger markets. “I tell most people the key is preparation, and Brant took it to heart,” Culhane said. “He understands that the game is the end of the job. A lot of people come in and think the job starts at kickoff. I can talk to Brant and know he’s had a conversation with players and coaches.”


Thursday, November 16, 2006

SPORTS

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FOOTBALL: George’s health

important to offensive muscle CONTINUED from page 14

second in both scoring, with 24.2 points per game, and total offense, with 341 yards per contest. D.D. Terry, senior running back, leads the Bearkats and the conference with 1,187 yards rushing and 14 touchdowns. Terry ranks sixth nationally with 1,187 yards and ranks first place all-time in the school record books for a single-season rushing total. Texas State knows slowing down Terry is going to be difficult, but it is the key to stopping the Bearkats’ offensive attack. “They’ve beaten everybody this year by running the football,” Bailiff said. “Terry runs every play like it’s a kickoff return. He hits the hole with tenacity and breaks tackles. He’s a complete back.” Terry has been a pleasant surprise for the Bearkats this season after playing linebacker last year. The Bobcat coaching staff is extremely impressed with Terry’s performance. “He was a very average lineAustin Byrd/Star photo backer for them last year, but MAKE A PATH: Senior runningback Greg Gold looks for an he’s an unbelievable running opening in the defense during the Bobcats’ Wednesday evening back,” Bailiff said. “Coach Whitpractice. ten made a great discovery in the

Freshman midfielder’s spot on the team yet to be determined By Carl Harper The University Star

selves.” Seledee’s ejection in the first half of the game As Bobcat socagainst McNeese State cer proceeds into the dampened the Boboff-season, the future cats chances of postpresence of freshman ing a rally, and they midfielder Andrea ultimately lost the title Seledee is still uncermatch 1-0. Seledee was tain. potential candidate Seledee’s actions for tournament Most of unsportsmanlike Valuable Player award, conduct during the as she led the team Andrea Seledee Southland Conferwith seven shots and ence championship two clutch goals over game Nov. 5 at the Bobcat Soc- the post-season weekend. The cer Complex led to her receiv- two goals came in the semifinals ing a red card and ejection from game against Southeastern Louthe game. After throwing water isiana in a 2-1 Bobcats overtime at hecklers in the stands, she win. Kamryn Koch of McNeese shoved teammate Natalie Hold- State received the MVP award, er off the bench after Holder at- as she put away Texas State with tempted to calm her down. an early second half goal. “Her future with the team is “What you do is your charstill up in the air,” Coach Kat acter; that’s who you are,” said Conner said. “It happened, and senior Kristy Collison. “I hate to it’s over with. I’m ready to move see stuff like that happen. In all on.” my years playing here, I hadn’t Teammates of Seledee said seen that before. We’re out of she sent out an apology e-mail the loop right now, so we don’t to the team and apologized know what is going to happen. again in person during the last I can only hope for what is best team meeting. for the team.” “Apology letters have been This was the incident of consent out, and measures have troversy for the team in the last been taken to take control of the few months. Three players were situation,” said goalkeeper Paige dismissed from the squad durPerirraz. “Andrea is a good per- ing the summer before the season, and it’s unfortunate it hap- son began. Former players Karin pened. People will be forgiving Henrichsen, Danielle Holloway for it.” and Natalie Jackson were inThe Bobcats on the field dur- volved in different confidential ing the incident didn’t even purposes that were non-related know what was taking place. to academics. These events oc“I was surprised and didn’t curred during the spring semeseven know what happened,” se- ter and resulted in the players nior Kim Phillips said. “I would being removed from this year’s have never expected that to roster. happen.” “They broke team rules; A teammate and friend on therefore, we had to let them and off the field, Perirraz was go,” Collison said. “That was a between the goal posts when past year’s problem. When you the situation took place. finish one season, you’ve got to “I can honestly say I didn’t move on. This was another seasee this coming from her,” Per- son and we’ve got to move on irraz said. “With the intensity from here.” and pressure that comes with Players on the team said they the games, it’s amazing you would put the incident behind don’t see this more often from them. But the situation will players. I give compliments to most likely not go away until a anyone who can handle them- decision is made on Seledee’s future with the team. “Its one of those things you never want to happen at the beginning or the end, or in my case, the end of my career,” Perirraz said. “The team will be OK after this. I don’t blame either incident on our season or losing the championship game. . I’m sad it happened, but at the same time I’m satisfied with the — Paige Perirraz commitment that I personally made to the team.” goalkeeper

ndrea is “A a good person and its

unfortunate it happened ”

off-season.” Sam Houston State developed the league’s second-ranked passing attack this season despite not using the services of Oklahoma transfer Rhett Bomar due to NCAA suspension. Junior quarterback Brett Hicks has the Bearkats’ passing game averaging 199.7 yards per game despite starting the season as the number three quarterback on the depth chart. “They’ve used three quarterbacks this season,” Bailiff said, “but they’ve settled in on (Hicks) because he’s really consistent and solid in all phases.” Hicks has possibly the most talented group of receivers in the conference, led by tight-end Blake Martin, who paces the team with 36 receptions and 439 yards receiving. Brandon Perry, senior wide receiver, is Hicks’ favorite deep threat with 30 receptions for a league-leading 552 yards receiving. Texas State’s best chance at beating the Bearkats will be with their league-leading offense. They are going against a suspect Sam Houston defense that is allowing 25.7 points and 350 yards of total offense per game. The Bobcats average 347.3 yards of total offense per game, including the league’s best pass-

ing offense with 202.3 yards per game. Texas State’s offensive strategy hinges on the health of quarterback Bradley George, who sat out last week’s game with a bruised elbow. The coaches are unsure whether George will be able to go, although he was cleared to practice earlier this week. “Right now he’s day to day,” Bailiff said. “If you ask him he’ll say he’s ready to go, but this is a long-term decision. If there is no risk of injury he’ll play, but we’ll sit down later with the training staff and make that decision.” Chase Wasson took the majority of the snaps at quarterback with the first-team offense during Wednesday’s practice and will be starting again if George

can’t. Wasson said he will be ready to go regardless of where he starts. “The coaches haven’t made the decision to who is going to start,” Wasson said, “but I’ll be ready to help my team wherever they need me.” Wasson struggled with passing this season, completing half his passes and throwing four interceptions in 63 attempts. Wasson has been extremely effective on the ground, leading the Bobcats with five rushing touchdowns, and ranks second on the team, with 273 yards rushing. Texas State looks to move the ball more on the ground, as opposed to through the air, with Wasson at quarterback. ONE TO GO: Coach David Baliff talks to the Bobcat football team at the end of practice Wednesday evening.

Austin Byrd/ Star photo

Broadcaster set to do season finale as voice of Bobcat football By Chris Boehm The University Star Saturday’s football game at Sam Houston state could mark the end of an era in Bobcat broadcasting. Brant Freeman will call Texas State’s final football game of the season, on KTSW 89.9, the student-run radio station. The Bobcat alumnus was given the chance to come back this season to do football play-by-play for the third straight year. Freeman graduated in the spring with a degree in mass communication, then was hired on full-time at KGNB 1420. He had previously worked for the station as a freelancer doing high school football games last season. During the summer KGNB and the Texas State athletic department discussed broadcasting the football games on the New Braunfels station. KGNB would only consider the idea if Freeman was allowed to do the broadcasts. Assistant Athletic Director Don Coryell and Athletic Director Larry Teis had met people from the radio station and were fine with the condition. “Brant’s done an outstanding job the past three years,” Coryell said. “Our fans relate to him and they’ve become accustomed to his voice.” The deal eventually fell through, but Coryell told Freeman he would still like the broadcaster to come back and do games on KTSW. That decision came down to Coryell and Dan Schumacher, station general manager and senior lecturer in the school of mass communication and journalism. “Brant came in and did an excellent job,” Schumacher said of Freeman’s start at the station. “It’s not an ideal situation. I’m always trying to get students as many opportunities as possible, but it’s definitely not a negative situation with Brant being a recent alumnus.” Freeman, while glad to be back calling games, said he had mixed feelings about taking away the chance for another student to gain experience on air the same way he did for two seasons. “Part of me was happy to come back, but on the other hand I feel bad,” Freeman said. “While I was a student here, I was the lead voice for football, basketball and baseball, and I’m sure a lot of students thought, ‘now that Brant is gone, maybe we’ll get a shot to do these things.’ There’s a good chance a lot of them were disappointed. I did feel a bit guilty, but I understand both sides.” Freeman said the university wanted a professional-level voice for a team that had just went to a national semifinal game. “The athletic department was just accustomed to the work I’ve done. I’m sure a lot of those guys at KTSW are going to do great things, but from the athletic department’s perspective, they probably just weren’t sure,” he said. Freeman will not be calling Bobcat basketball games, as that seat was left for current students at KTSW. Freeman’s duties at

“I

usually spend a good 20 to 25 hours on one game. I have a drive for calling games, and now that football season is over, I don’t know when the next time will be that I get to.” — Brant Freeman KTSW football broadcaster

KGNB revolve mainly around football, covering the high school season in addition to Texas State’s. The Boerne native also hosts The David Bailiff Show, broadcast live for KGNB every Thursday evening. In addition to speaking with the Bobcats’ football coach, Freeman speaks with potential guests earlier in the week and consults various press material. “I usually spend a good 20 to 25 hours on one game,” Freeman said. “I have a drive for calling games, and now that football season is over, I don’t know when the next time will be that I get to.” Freeman began his collegiate career in 1999 at Texas-San Antonio, only to find the university did not have a mass communication program. He then spent a year at San Antonio College before narrowing his choices to Texas Tech, Abilene Christian, North Texas and then-Southwest Texas. “I did a poor job of finding out where to go to college,” Freeman said. “I didn’t do any investigating. I figured, ‘hey, I live 10 minutes away from UTSA, I guess I should go there.’” Freeman spent a year at Texas State without knowledge of KTSW’s existence. In the spring of 2003, Justin Sluder, a co-worker at Palmer’s Restaurant, Bar and Courtyard, told Freeman about a broadcasting opportunity he saw at KTSW while visiting his girlfriend. The broadcaster’s first game would be a women’s basketball contest at Lamar. Kyle Bush, KTSW’s sports director at the time, scheduled Freeman for just three games his first semester with the station, but asked him to take on a women’s basketball game at Lamar when other announcers weren’t available. “Of course I said, ‘yeah, definitely,’” Freeman said. “I had a week to get ready, and there’s no such thing as over-preparing, but if there was, I did it. I had no idea how to prepare for a game,” he said. “It was one Saturday and I started prepping on Monday. I didn’t even realize I had a men’s game the same week, and didn’t do much to get ready for that one.”

Freeman said he was anxious at first, but commuting to the game with a seasoned broadcaster proved beneficial. “I was told to meet Bill Culhane out in the parking lot at Jowers at 6 or 7 in the morning, for the first time ever. I was so nervous. The drive was five hours long, so we had time to talk about everything (relating to the game).” Freeman and Culhane, a long-time Texas State radio personality, have continued to work together, calling football as a team for the third straight year. “Brant wants to do well,” Culhane said. “Just like any relationship, you get better as you go along. We don’t pretend to be Michaels and Madden, but we take each other in stride.” Freeman admitted to struggling in his first game, but said he received plenty of good feedback from friends, family and co-workers. He said many people at Palmer’s were aware of his career goals and felt he was perfect for the job. Freeman said he was considered the “sports guru,” and often answered questions on the subject. Friends and family have supported Freeman during his time as a broadcaster. His girlfriend, Linda Smith, helps him prepare for Bobcat football games by compiling stat cards and her father records all his broadcasts on DVD. Freeman’s father, William, once owned a business that former San Antonio Spurs announcer Jay Howard did commercials for. Brant interviewed Howard while attending San Antonio College, and said the event switched his interest from newspaper to onair work. “I’d watch games and mute them and try to call games myself,” Freeman said. Freeman even would turn the sound down while playing the Madden football video game and call his own contests. “That’s just something I thought of. It was hard to do, living with people,” Freeman said. “I had to wait until they were gone. It’s embarrassing. Of course, there were those awkward moments where they walk in and you shut up.” All the prep-work paid off, with Freeman quickly settling into his broadcast duties once given the chance. The women’s basketball team won the Southland Conference playoffs, earning a birth to the NCAA tournament during Freeman’s first semester at KTSW. Freeman was chosen by Schumacher to cover the game, even though he called none of the SLC tournament matches. “I was ecstatic,” Freeman said. “I thought, ‘wow, I’m going to call an NCAA tournament game, this is cool.’ It was a really cool experience.” Freeman’s coverage out of Eugene, Ore., in a game against the Oregon Ducks, won him the College Broadcasters Incorporated award for best sports broadcast in the nation. He was informed in November 2003 See KTSW, page 12


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FOOTBALL: George’s health

important to offensive muscle CONTINUED from page 14

second in both scoring, with 24.2 points per game, and total offense, with 341 yards per contest. D.D. Terry, senior running back, leads the Bearkats and the conference with 1,187 yards rushing and 14 touchdowns. Terry ranks sixth nationally with 1,187 yards and ranks first place all-time in the school record books for a single-season rushing total. Texas State knows slowing down Terry is going to be difficult, but it is the key to stopping the Bearkats’ offensive attack. “They’ve beaten everybody this year by running the football,” Bailiff said. “Terry runs every play like it’s a kickoff return. He hits the hole with tenacity and breaks tackles. He’s a complete back.” Terry has been a pleasant surprise for the Bearkats this season after playing linebacker last year. The Bobcat coaching staff is extremely impressed with Terry’s performance. “He was a very average lineAustin Byrd/Star photo backer for them last year, but MAKE A PATH: Senior runningback Greg Gold looks for an he’s an unbelievable running opening in the defense during the Bobcats’ Wednesday evening back,” Bailiff said. “Coach Whitpractice. ten made a great discovery in the

Freshman midfielder’s spot on the team yet to be determined By Carl Harper The University Star

selves.” Seledee’s ejection in the first half of the game As Bobcat socagainst McNeese State cer proceeds into the dampened the Boboff-season, the future cats chances of postpresence of freshman ing a rally, and they midfielder Andrea ultimately lost the title Seledee is still uncermatch 1-0. Seledee was tain. potential candidate Seledee’s actions for tournament Most of unsportsmanlike Valuable Player award, conduct during the as she led the team Andrea Seledee Southland Conferwith seven shots and ence championship two clutch goals over game Nov. 5 at the Bobcat Soc- the post-season weekend. The cer Complex led to her receiv- two goals came in the semifinals ing a red card and ejection from game against Southeastern Louthe game. After throwing water isiana in a 2-1 Bobcats overtime at hecklers in the stands, she win. Kamryn Koch of McNeese shoved teammate Natalie Hold- State received the MVP award, er off the bench after Holder at- as she put away Texas State with tempted to calm her down. an early second half goal. “Her future with the team is “What you do is your charstill up in the air,” Coach Kat acter; that’s who you are,” said Conner said. “It happened, and senior Kristy Collison. “I hate to it’s over with. I’m ready to move see stuff like that happen. In all on.” my years playing here, I hadn’t Teammates of Seledee said seen that before. We’re out of she sent out an apology e-mail the loop right now, so we don’t to the team and apologized know what is going to happen. again in person during the last I can only hope for what is best team meeting. for the team.” “Apology letters have been This was the incident of consent out, and measures have troversy for the team in the last been taken to take control of the few months. Three players were situation,” said goalkeeper Paige dismissed from the squad durPerirraz. “Andrea is a good per- ing the summer before the season, and it’s unfortunate it hap- son began. Former players Karin pened. People will be forgiving Henrichsen, Danielle Holloway for it.” and Natalie Jackson were inThe Bobcats on the field dur- volved in different confidential ing the incident didn’t even purposes that were non-related know what was taking place. to academics. These events oc“I was surprised and didn’t curred during the spring semeseven know what happened,” se- ter and resulted in the players nior Kim Phillips said. “I would being removed from this year’s have never expected that to roster. happen.” “They broke team rules; A teammate and friend on therefore, we had to let them and off the field, Perirraz was go,” Collison said. “That was a between the goal posts when past year’s problem. When you the situation took place. finish one season, you’ve got to “I can honestly say I didn’t move on. This was another seasee this coming from her,” Per- son and we’ve got to move on irraz said. “With the intensity from here.” and pressure that comes with Players on the team said they the games, it’s amazing you would put the incident behind don’t see this more often from them. But the situation will players. I give compliments to most likely not go away until a anyone who can handle them- decision is made on Seledee’s future with the team. “Its one of those things you never want to happen at the beginning or the end, or in my case, the end of my career,” Perirraz said. “The team will be OK after this. I don’t blame either incident on our season or losing the championship game. . I’m sad it happened, but at the same time I’m satisfied with the — Paige Perirraz commitment that I personally made to the team.” goalkeeper

ndrea is “A a good person and its

unfortunate it happened ”

off-season.” Sam Houston State developed the league’s second-ranked passing attack this season despite not using the services of Oklahoma transfer Rhett Bomar due to NCAA suspension. Junior quarterback Brett Hicks has the Bearkats’ passing game averaging 199.7 yards per game despite starting the season as the number three quarterback on the depth chart. “They’ve used three quarterbacks this season,” Bailiff said, “but they’ve settled in on (Hicks) because he’s really consistent and solid in all phases.” Hicks has possibly the most talented group of receivers in the conference, led by tight-end Blake Martin, who paces the team with 36 receptions and 439 yards receiving. Brandon Perry, senior wide receiver, is Hicks’ favorite deep threat with 30 receptions for a league-leading 552 yards receiving. Texas State’s best chance at beating the Bearkats will be with their league-leading offense. They are going against a suspect Sam Houston defense that is allowing 25.7 points and 350 yards of total offense per game. The Bobcats average 347.3 yards of total offense per game, including the league’s best pass-

ing offense with 202.3 yards per game. Texas State’s offensive strategy hinges on the health of quarterback Bradley George, who sat out last week’s game with a bruised elbow. The coaches are unsure whether George will be able to go, although he was cleared to practice earlier this week. “Right now he’s day to day,” Bailiff said. “If you ask him he’ll say he’s ready to go, but this is a long-term decision. If there is no risk of injury he’ll play, but we’ll sit down later with the training staff and make that decision.” Chase Wasson took the majority of the snaps at quarterback with the first-team offense during Wednesday’s practice and will be starting again if George

can’t. Wasson said he will be ready to go regardless of where he starts. “The coaches haven’t made the decision to who is going to start,” Wasson said, “but I’ll be ready to help my team wherever they need me.” Wasson struggled with passing this season, completing half his passes and throwing four interceptions in 63 attempts. Wasson has been extremely effective on the ground, leading the Bobcats with five rushing touchdowns, and ranks second on the team, with 273 yards rushing. Texas State looks to move the ball more on the ground, as opposed to through the air, with Wasson at quarterback. ONE TO GO: Coach David Baliff talks to the Bobcat football team at the end of practice Wednesday evening.

Austin Byrd/ Star photo

Broadcaster set to do season finale as voice of Bobcat football By Chris Boehm The University Star Saturday’s football game at Sam Houston state could mark the end of an era in Bobcat broadcasting. Brant Freeman will call Texas State’s final football game of the season, on KTSW 89.9, the student-run radio station. The Bobcat alumnus was given the chance to come back this season to do football play-by-play for the third straight year. Freeman graduated in the spring with a degree in mass communication, then was hired on full-time at KGNB 1420. He had previously worked for the station as a freelancer doing high school football games last season. During the summer KGNB and the Texas State athletic department discussed broadcasting the football games on the New Braunfels station. KGNB would only consider the idea if Freeman was allowed to do the broadcasts. Assistant Athletic Director Don Coryell and Athletic Director Larry Teis had met people from the radio station and were fine with the condition. “Brant’s done an outstanding job the past three years,” Coryell said. “Our fans relate to him and they’ve become accustomed to his voice.” The deal eventually fell through, but Coryell told Freeman he would still like the broadcaster to come back and do games on KTSW. That decision came down to Coryell and Dan Schumacher, station general manager and senior lecturer in the school of mass communication and journalism. “Brant came in and did an excellent job,” Schumacher said of Freeman’s start at the station. “It’s not an ideal situation. I’m always trying to get students as many opportunities as possible, but it’s definitely not a negative situation with Brant being a recent alumnus.” Freeman, while glad to be back calling games, said he had mixed feelings about taking away the chance for another student to gain experience on air the same way he did for two seasons. “Part of me was happy to come back, but on the other hand I feel bad,” Freeman said. “While I was a student here, I was the lead voice for football, basketball and baseball, and I’m sure a lot of students thought, ‘now that Brant is gone, maybe we’ll get a shot to do these things.’ There’s a good chance a lot of them were disappointed. I did feel a bit guilty, but I understand both sides.” Freeman said the university wanted a professional-level voice for a team that had just went to a national semifinal game. “The athletic department was just accustomed to the work I’ve done. I’m sure a lot of those guys at KTSW are going to do great things, but from the athletic department’s perspective, they probably just weren’t sure,” he said. Freeman will not be calling Bobcat basketball games, as that seat was left for current students at KTSW. Freeman’s duties at

“I

usually spend a good 20 to 25 hours on one game. I have a drive for calling games, and now that football season is over, I don’t know when the next time will be that I get to.” — Brant Freeman KTSW football broadcaster

KGNB revolve mainly around football, covering the high school season in addition to Texas State’s. The Boerne native also hosts The David Bailiff Show, broadcast live for KGNB every Thursday evening. In addition to speaking with the Bobcats’ football coach, Freeman speaks with potential guests earlier in the week and consults various press material. “I usually spend a good 20 to 25 hours on one game,” Freeman said. “I have a drive for calling games, and now that football season is over, I don’t know when the next time will be that I get to.” Freeman began his collegiate career in 1999 at Texas-San Antonio, only to find the university did not have a mass communication program. He then spent a year at San Antonio College before narrowing his choices to Texas Tech, Abilene Christian, North Texas and then-Southwest Texas. “I did a poor job of finding out where to go to college,” Freeman said. “I didn’t do any investigating. I figured, ‘hey, I live 10 minutes away from UTSA, I guess I should go there.’” Freeman spent a year at Texas State without knowledge of KTSW’s existence. In the spring of 2003, Justin Sluder, a co-worker at Palmer’s Restaurant, Bar and Courtyard, told Freeman about a broadcasting opportunity he saw at KTSW while visiting his girlfriend. The broadcaster’s first game would be a women’s basketball contest at Lamar. Kyle Bush, KTSW’s sports director at the time, scheduled Freeman for just three games his first semester with the station, but asked him to take on a women’s basketball game at Lamar when other announcers weren’t available. “Of course I said, ‘yeah, definitely,’” Freeman said. “I had a week to get ready, and there’s no such thing as over-preparing, but if there was, I did it. I had no idea how to prepare for a game,” he said. “It was one Saturday and I started prepping on Monday. I didn’t even realize I had a men’s game the same week, and didn’t do much to get ready for that one.”

Freeman said he was anxious at first, but commuting to the game with a seasoned broadcaster proved beneficial. “I was told to meet Bill Culhane out in the parking lot at Jowers at 6 or 7 in the morning, for the first time ever. I was so nervous. The drive was five hours long, so we had time to talk about everything (relating to the game).” Freeman and Culhane, a long-time Texas State radio personality, have continued to work together, calling football as a team for the third straight year. “Brant wants to do well,” Culhane said. “Just like any relationship, you get better as you go along. We don’t pretend to be Michaels and Madden, but we take each other in stride.” Freeman admitted to struggling in his first game, but said he received plenty of good feedback from friends, family and co-workers. He said many people at Palmer’s were aware of his career goals and felt he was perfect for the job. Freeman said he was considered the “sports guru,” and often answered questions on the subject. Friends and family have supported Freeman during his time as a broadcaster. His girlfriend, Linda Smith, helps him prepare for Bobcat football games by compiling stat cards and her father records all his broadcasts on DVD. Freeman’s father, William, once owned a business that former San Antonio Spurs announcer Jay Howard did commercials for. Brant interviewed Howard while attending San Antonio College, and said the event switched his interest from newspaper to onair work. “I’d watch games and mute them and try to call games myself,” Freeman said. Freeman even would turn the sound down while playing the Madden football video game and call his own contests. “That’s just something I thought of. It was hard to do, living with people,” Freeman said. “I had to wait until they were gone. It’s embarrassing. Of course, there were those awkward moments where they walk in and you shut up.” All the prep-work paid off, with Freeman quickly settling into his broadcast duties once given the chance. The women’s basketball team won the Southland Conference playoffs, earning a birth to the NCAA tournament during Freeman’s first semester at KTSW. Freeman was chosen by Schumacher to cover the game, even though he called none of the SLC tournament matches. “I was ecstatic,” Freeman said. “I thought, ‘wow, I’m going to call an NCAA tournament game, this is cool.’ It was a really cool experience.” Freeman’s coverage out of Eugene, Ore., in a game against the Oregon Ducks, won him the College Broadcasters Incorporated award for best sports broadcast in the nation. He was informed in November 2003 See KTSW, page 12

11 16 2006  
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