Page 1

Defending the First Amendment since 1911

INSIDE THIS ISSUE NEWS Pages 1-4 First Transit increases lap numbers during peak hours The Office of Auxiliary Services has added additional times to five major routes. Fewer faculty members taking developmental leave

OPINIONS Page 5

Letter to the Editor: President responds to open-door day criticism

TRENDS Pages 6-7 Ceramic artists display work at annual festival ‘Hide and Seek’ isn’t only game for children Powder Puff football teams compete for championship

DIVERSIONS Page 9

SPORTS Pages 10

Bobcats claw Colonels, Lions: The Bobcat volleyball team defeated Nicholls State and Southeastern Louisiana Thursday and Saturday. Women’s soccer ties for season title Bobcats prepare for homecoming against Lumberjacks

Today’s Weather

73°/50° Sunny Precipitation: 0% Humidity: 56% UV: 6 High Wind: WNW 8mph

Wednesday Mostly Sunny Temp: 80°/64° Precip: 10%

Thursday

Partly Cloudy Temp: 76°/51° Precip: 10%

Volume 99, Issue 26

27

TUESDAY

OCT

www.UniversityStar.com

See the interviews with two San Marcos City Council Place 6 candidates at UniversityStar.com

Early voting has low turnout By Chase Birthisel Assistant News Editor Early voting in San Marcos has had a low turnout, said Hays County elections administrator Joyce Cowan. Texas State held early voting Wednesday through Thursday in the LBJ Student Center. Cowan said the number of votes cast at Texas State, which has a student body of more than 30,000 people, on those days were 55 and 76, respectively. She said for the first-four days of early voting 488 people casted ballots in San Marcos. San Marcos voters are choosing City Council Members in Place 5 and Place 6. Eleven proposed amendments to the Texas Constitution are also on the ballot. Cowan said the 11 proposed amendments are not bringing voters to the polls. The propositions most likely to bring voters are 2 and 3, which involve property tax, she said. Cowan said she is slightly critical of candidates running for election. “With six candidates and 488 votes,” Cowan said, “that is like 70 or 80 people each one of them could have brought out. That’s not a lot.” ASG President Chris Covo said the student government did not arrange an early voter registration drive like in years past because of midterms and other obligations. He said elections immediately after a

Ben Rondeau/ Star photo EMPTY VOTING LINES: The early voting lines were short Thursday in the LBJ Student Center. Out of the thousands of students registered to vote, only a small percentage cast a vote on campus for early elections.

presidential election tend to dramatically decrease in number of voters. “Candidates understand that, and that is just the way it

is,” Covo said. Covo said the candidates have been visible in the city through debates and talking to students. He said voter fatigue

is often the reason for the low outcome. “We’re going to be working through homecoming,” Covo said. “Hopefully we’ll get more

students registered and to vote in the general election.”

By Billy Crawford News Reporter

said. “We currently have a strategy in place to be able to give $150,000 each year in scholarships by 2012.” Currently, Stelos Alliance offers scholarships of $5,000 and $1,000. Stelos Alliance will look to hold fundraising concerts and other events to increase the amount of each scholarship to $15,000 annually. The idea for Stelos Alliance began in 1988, when a memorial scholarship was started in the honor of Bill Hogue, a friend of both Poston and Keller who was killed in Austin weeks after his graduation. “For nearly 20 years Bill (Poston) headed the Hogue Memorial Scholarship by himself,” Keller said. “And then one day we got together and said ‘You know, this isn’t enough. We can do more,’ and so Stelos Alliance was born.” The scholarships that Stelos Alliance offers are directed toward students who are already

enrolled and have proven themselves to be active within the student body and community, unlike other scholarship organizations on campus. “We know there are students out there with a capacity for leadership that need financial aid in order to be a leader on campus,” Poston said. “I would hate to see someone not be able to be a leader because of financial constraints.” Poston said he could relate. While attending Southwest Texas State, Poston worked the graveyard shift in a hotel to pay his tuition. “I believe the leadership experiences I had when on campus provided me with opportunities after graduation that I wouldn’t have enjoyed otherwise,” Poston said. “That’s the sort of experience that we want to be able to support for students today.”

By Lori Jones News Reporter

make sure that there is a philanthropy program up and going and that the officers in place are doing their job.” The requirements include each member maintain at least a 2.25 GPA. The PIKE fraternity has a 2.80 GPA average said Alistair Laing, PIKE public relations head and management sophomore. “Normally, we do an event once each semester,” Laing said. “We’re trying to give back to the community.” Laing said each member “must get” 20-service hours. The PIKE fraternity members are holding a basketball tournament to raise money for muscular dystrophy Nov. 6 in the Student Recreation Center. Laing said the organization adopted a highway and will participate in a cleanup day in November.

see VOTING, page 4

SMPD hinders Stelos Alliance offers scholarships, trust with students, opportunites to student leaders ASG leaders say By Bianca Davis News Reporter

A bill was read stating the disapproval of recent San Marcos Police Department actions at Monday’s ASG meeting. Sen. Matthew Posey, political science senior, authored the bill to show public disapproval of the city’s decision to allow film crews of the upcoming G4 show Campus PD to accompany ride-alongs with the San Marcos Police Department. Posey said SMPD did not properly inform the public prior to allowing the filming. He said students informed him there were cops with cameras, and upon further investigation, discovered no one within the university knew anything about it. “There was very little information disseminated to the university and it was just an act by San Marcos Police De-

partment,” Posey said. “It was an act made without any consultation with the university whatsoever.” ASG President Chris Covo said members of Achieving Community Together should have informed university officials. Not informing the university, he said, goes against what ACT represents. “They knew this was going on and they never told anyone,” Covo said. “No university officials, no UPD officers, no students. That doesn’t coincide with what we’re trying to do with Achieving Community Together and with the community and the relationship we’re tying to build.” Posey said the decision not to communicate with the university hinders the bond A.C.T. is trying to create. “To go out and do this sort of thing really hurts our trust with the city,” Posey said. “A lot

Gordon Taylor assumes many roles. He is the founder of a new student organization, the chief of staff for the Associated Student Government as well as a member of Student Foundation and Black Student Alliance. Taylor’s multiple leadership roles, however, might not have been possible were it not for a gift he received last spring. Taylor received a scholarship from a non-profit organization started by Texas State alumni. Bill Poston and Melinda Keller started Stelos Alliance in June 2008 with the intention of offering 10 full-year scholarships to Texas State student leaders. “Our mission is to support exceptional student leaders and make it easier for them to pay for their education,” Keller

see ALLIANCE, page 4

Pi Kappa Alpha members closer to IFC charter A former Texas State fraternity expects to complete the colonization process early next semester after a five-year suspension for hazing. The Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, also known as PIKE, completed two of three phases in the process of obtaining a charter. “We are not considered initiated members,” said PIKE President Myles Burnett, history senior. “As soon as we finish phase three, we will be considered official Pi Kappa Alpha members.” The national chapter will recognize the PIKES when they finish phase three and attain a charter, Burnett said. “The phases are more of a checklist to make sure we’re Allie Moncrief/Star photo doing everything right,” Burnett said. “Phase three is a THEY’RE BACK: Members of Pi Kappa Alpha performed at the Oct. 20 Homecoming talent show on. lot of paper work. We have to

see FRATERNITY, page 4


Page Two

2 - The University Star

STARS OF TEXAS STATE

Senior nose tackle Garrett Hood recorded the first sack of his two-year career at Texas State when he pinned Northwestern State’s quarterback, Paul Harris, for an eight-yard loss. The Bobcats won 20-17 over Northwestern State at Turpin Stadium Saturday night. — Courtesy of Texas State Athletics

Texas State University – San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

ON THIS

DAY IN

HISTORY 1787: The first of the Federalist Papers, a series of essays calling for ratification of the U.S. Constitution, was published in a New York newspaper.

1858: Theodore Roosevelt, the 26th president of the United States, was born in New York City. 1880 Theodore Roosevelt married Alice Lee. 1914 Author-poet Dylan Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales. 1947: “You Bet Your Life,” starring Groucho Marx, premiered on ABC Radio.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

CRIME

BLOTTER

Oct. 19, 12 a.m. Disorderly Conduct/San Jacinto Hall A student was causing a disturbance at the location and was asked to leave by a police officer. A report was made of the incident. Oct. 19, 1:07 a.m. Assault — Contact/ Arnold Hall B A student reported to a police officer she was assaulted by a nonstudent. The nonstudent was arrested for assault by contact and issued a criminal trespass warning. The nonstudent was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center and is awaiting a court date.

Oct. 19, 3:23 a.m. Welfare Concern/San 1967: Expo ’67 closed in Allie Moncrief/Star photo Jacinto Hall Montreal. WORTH THE WAIT: Texas State students wait in long lines for the newly opened Panda Express. A nonstudent reported to the police she was 1978 Egyptian President concerned for a student. Anwar Sadat and Israeli ec eat Prime Minister Menachem Police made contact with Begin were named winners the student and there were no concerns. A report was of the Nobel Peace Prize. made of the incident. Throughout each school year the Halloween’s trademark treat- candy. Bring tournament at 9 a.m. Saturday before the 1997: The Dow Jones Texas State Golf Course offers several your costume and enjoy the Halloween Homecoming football game. industrial average tumbled Oct. 19, 4:49 p.m. opportunities for students, faculty, staff atmosphere. Prizes for this tournament include a Medical Emergency/LBJ 554.26 points, forcing the and community, to relax and play golf. “It is pretty popular between the father gift bag, golf towel and T-shirt, hats, golf Student & Visitor Center stock market to shut down In conjunction with the usual weekly and son or father and daughter teams. balls and sunglasses, along with tickets to A student reported to for the first time since events such as 2-for-1 Wednesday and Also, we tend to see buddies get together the football game and free golf at Onion a police officer she fell the 1981 assassination Texas 2-Man Thursday, two additional golf on the golf course from the San Marcos Creek, Vaaler Creek, The Bandit and while walking up the attempt on President events will take place this last week of community before they go to the football Landa park courses. stairs and injured her Ronald Reagan. October. game,” said Ryan Zimmerman, assistant For more information please visit www. head and ankle. The The Halloween Golf Event will be at director at Texas State Golf Course. campusrecreation.txstate.edu or call the 7 p.m. Thursday for a Halloween golf Whoever you decide to bring will Texas State Golf Course at 512-245-7593. 2002: Dallas Cowboys student was transported game. Glow in the dark balls are available certainly ensure a great Halloween running back Emmitt Smith to Central Texas Medical along with night golf equipment, food and weekend at the Homecoming Golf — Courtesy of Campus Recreation Center for a medical broke the NFL career evaluation. rushing yardage record of 16,726 held by Walter Payton. (Smith finished his Oct. 19, 10:45 p.m. Public Intoxication/ career with 18,355 yards Benjamin Alire Sáenz and Carmen illustrators and publishers to produce children’s books include A Gift from Aquarena Springs Drive rushing.) Tafolla will be honored with the Tomás books that authentically reflect the lives Papa Diego, Grandma Fina’s Wonderful While on patrol, a police Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book of Mexican American children and young Umbrella and A Perfect Season for officer observed a 2002 Luiz Inacio Lula da Award during a series of events beginning adults in the United States. Dreaming. He is a professor of creative Thursday at Texas State. The Tomás Rivera considers works in writing at the University of Texas-El Paso. Silva was elected president nonstudent jump out The award is for books published in two categories: “Works for Older Children/ In The Holy Tortilla and a Pot of Beans, of a vehicle while in of Brazil in a runoff, 2007 to 2008, and marks only the second Young Adult” and “Works for Younger Tafolla humorously examines hypocrisy, motion. Upon further becoming the country’s time in the history of the Tomás Rivera Children,” with each category under prejudice and other modern myopias by investigation, the student first elected leftist leader. Award two authors’ works have tied for the consideration in alternate years. This weaving the story of a magical tortilla’s was arrested and cited honor. year’s winners were nominated as “Works spiritual mission with those of a heart for public intoxication 2004 The Boston Red Sox A public reading featuring both authors for Older Children/Young Adult.” More transplant patient’s bedside marriage, the and transported to Hays won their first World Series will be held 1 p.m. Oct. 29 in the LBJ than 40 books published in 2007 and blessing of a handful of dirt and a crossCounty Law Enforcement since 1918, beating the Student Center ballroom on campus. The 2008 in this category were considered for dressing street person. Center and is awaiting a St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 in event is free and open to the public. this year’s Tomás Rivera Award. Living and writing in her hometown court date. Game 4. Texas State President Denise Trauth will He Forgot to Say Goodbye is the coming- of San Antonio, Tafolla has cultivated a

R B Playing Golf with family, friends ensures memories this Halloween

Sáenz, Tafolla honored with Tomás Rivera children’s book award

host an invitation-only luncheon Oct. 30, at which she will present the authors with their awards. Events will continue Oct. 31 at the Texas Book Festival in Austin at the Capitol Building with a programming session featuring Sáenz and Tafolla. Sáenz won for He Forgot to Say Goodbye, and Tafolla won for The Holy Tortilla and a Pot of Beans. The Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award, established at Texas State in 1995, is designed to encourage authors,

of-age story of the unlikely friendship that develops between Ramiro Lopez, a teen dealing with his brother’s drug addiction in a working-class Mexican-American barrio of El Paso, and Jake Upthegrove, a misfit with anger management problems from the affluent West Side. With little in common, the two discover the one thing that unites them is their abandonment by their respective fathers. Sáenz is an American Book Awardwinning author of poetry and prose for adults and teens. His published bilingual

reputation as a folklorist of the ChicanoMexicano community. Her work has been recognized at the Texas Book Festival, UCI National Literary competition and Wellington International Poetry Festival. Her children’s books include That’s Not Fair!: Emma Tenayuca’s Struggle for Justice/ No es Justo!: La Lucha de Emma Tenayuca por la Justicia, What Can You Do with a Rebozo? and Baby Coyote and the Old Woman. — Courtesy of University News Service

2005: White House counsel Harriet Miers withdrew her nomination to the Supreme Court after three weeks of criticism from fellow conservatives. — Courtesy of New York Times

Oct. 19, 11:21 p.m. Medical Emergency/ Intramural Fields A student reported to a police officer she injured her ankle while playing sports. She refused medical transportation. —Courtesy of University Police Department


News

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

The University Star - 3

First Transit increases lap numbers during peak hours By Clay Thorp News Reporter Following student concerns of not enough trams, especially during peak travel times, the Office of Auxiliary Services has added additional times to five major routes throughout San Marcos. The increased service on routes which include Bobcat Stadium, Campus Loop, Aquarena Springs, Blanco River and Post Road, went into effect Oct. 14. “Once we learned there were some over-loads on the system, I met with Bill Nance (vice president of Finance and Support Services) and Joanne Smith (vice president of Student Affairs) to review some immediate actions we could take to add services within the tram system,” said Robert Gratz, Special assistant to University President Denise Trauth. “We knew a considerable pressure point was late afternoons, so there were additional routes added then.

We are continuing to monitor housing patterns and class scheduling patterns to accommodate any student needs.” The shuttle system, under the direction of manager Paul Hamilton, has not added to the number of buses in the fleet, but has increased the number of times a bus makes a certain route. “For the most part, we don’t need to increase the number of buses sitting in a yard at Wonderworld to increase the number of service laps per day,” Hamilton said. Hamilton has increased service laps on Monday through Thursday from 553 - the number of laps during the Fall 2008 semester - to 602 and Friday’s 325 - from Fall 2008 - to 336 laps. “The average price of a bus is $250,000. We don’t need to increase student fees to pay for another bus when we can just add service laps to account for an increasing student population,” Hamilton said. Texas State currently holds

a contract with First Transit Inc, who provides licensed bus drivers and a dispatch staff who coordinates daily travel. The contract, signed in 2006 and set to expire in 2013, has cost the university “around $3 million a year,” Hamilton said. At the university’s current rate of growth, this could increase to $3.5 or $3.6 million per year, Hamilton said. Since 2004, student enrollment at Texas State has increased by 15.1percent. In that same time frame, however, Hamilton has increased service capacity by 13.1 percent — a two percent gap. “We’re growing at almost the same rate as student enrollment,” he said. To fill any possible gap in service capacity, Hamilton has applied for and received a grant for an additional two buses. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has signed off on the proposal and delivery of the two additional buses is expected in 6 to 8 months, Hamilton said.

In the mean time, Hamilton’s advice to students, especially those who travel between 3:15 p.m. and 5:15 p.m., is to

expect a crowded bus. “Any transit system is going to be packed at peak times,” he said.

Twenty percent of students have never ridden a public transit bus of any kind, Hamilton said.

a small tree stump to his presentation to show the senate what he intends to research. “He (a fellow researcher) has invited me to come and visit his lab,” Butler said. “He is able to find the same kind of information using this new technique using tree ring cores which spares the tree and yet still has the same kind of information for dating things like avalanches.” Jennifer Battle, professor in the department of curriculum and instruction, is requesting developmental leave for fall 2010. Battle said she needs to focus on the final chapter of a book she is writing. “I’m looking to get developmental leave so I can concentrate on the project of writing a book on the Tomas Rivera Mexican American Children’s book award that I have been director of for 15 years,” Battle said. Battle wants to find a new publisher. She used the example of the publisher for

the Coretta Scott King Award for African American children’s literature. Willard B. Stouffer, political science professor, said his developmental leave would focus on tax changes. Stouffer said he wants to continue his research on Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations to finalize the chapters of a book he is working on. He said he hopes to complete the book by January 2011. Stouffer said there are seven million millionaires in America and said they should have single tax brackets. “I think the social security tax is unfair,” Stouffer said. “I think the income tax is unfair because it basically makes the top rate a tax on the upper middle class and not the very wealthy,” Stouffer said. “If they paid two or three or four percent more I think we could make a dent in the national debt and pay for the forming healthcare system.”

In comparison, 25 faculty members applied for the fall 2009 developmental leave. The Faculty Senate allowed applicants five minutes to present their developmental leave plan at the Wednesday meeting. Developmental leave presentations used to be made each semester. However, in 2008 Provost Perry Moore requested the senate take applications annually. Bill Stone, senate vice chair, said the senate used to receive 13 to 17 applications each semester. “It may simply be because of the fact that we are on a one year cycle and it is harder for faculty to plan in advance, and it could just be that the faculty are busy with their classes,” said Stone, criminal justice professor. Feakes and Stone said faculty members are afraid of leaving their departments. However, Stone said faculty are not allotted time to focus on research.

“The real fact of life is when you are trying to do your research agenda and teach all your classes, you are really frequently so busy that you don’t get a chance to sit down and think ahead,” Stone said. Applicants are expected to present a clear and concise description to the senate of their intentions upon taking developmental leave, Feakes said. Stone said the presentations have been clear so far. “The proposals that we have the most trouble with is when you read it you can’t tell what the person wants to do,” Stone said. “So far I think we have had very good luck with that.” To be eligible, a faculty member must be employed full time, have tenure, and have worked at least six years at Texas State. The policy and procedure statement 8.02 defines “A faculty member as (someone who has been employed) “at least six years of service since his or her last

Development Leave, and who have submitted the report(s) from previous leave(s).” Faculty members cannot apply for developmental leave while serving on the Faculty Senate. Feakes said faculty requesting leave rarely fall out of the guidelines. “We are judging to make sure they are following the guidelines which is that it must be a personal enhancement,” she said. Stone said developmental leave applicants are almost guaranteed a spot. “As a rule they don’t change it,” Stone said. “Once the senate has made a recommendation, the deans, provosts, and the regents go along with it.” Stone said the number of applicants has ranged from 30 to 32 in some semesters. Feakes said she wants the application numbers to increase. “We don’t want anyone to feel intimidated to apply,” Feakes said.

Star File Photo

Fewer faculty members taking developmental leave By Lora Collins News Reporter The Faculty Senate has seen a drop-off in applicants for developmental leave according to Chair Debra Feakes. Faculty Developmental leave applications are due annually Oct. 15. The leave allows faculty to take a full year off with a 50 percent pay cut or a semester off with full pay. Applicants take developmental leave to focus on specific research objectives. David Butler, professor in the geology department, is requesting leave to focus on his research of the sampling of Traumatic Resin Ducts in rings of trees affected by avalanches. Butler said he wants to study at the Laboratory for Dendrogeomorphology in Bern, Switzerland. Butler said he has worked with tree rings in the past but uses crosscuts to measure the effect of avalanches on tree growth. Butler brought


4 - The University Star

news

Tuesday, October 27, 2009


Opinions

The University Star – 5

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

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Trends 6 – The University Star

process color

The King Continues

Michael Jackson will have a new single released Oct. 12 entitled “This is it” by Sony Music Entertainment. The song will feature backing vocals by his brothers and is part of an album that corresponds with a future film chronicling Jackson’s final days of rehearsal.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009


Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Trends

The University Star - 7


8 - The University Star

Advertisement

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c ro s s w o rd

diversions

The University Star - 9

Thursday’s Puzzle Solution

sudoku Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk TOday’s sudoku solution

© 10/27/09 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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news

4 - The University Star

Alliance

continued from page

Stelos Alliance is now working with Margarita Arellano, dean of students, to launch a Leadership Institute this spring. This will be a co-curricular organization, not affiliated with any specific college on campus, which will offer courses that encourage leadership and service. “A lot of students have the burden of having to pay for college and still balance being ac-

Fraternity “Every fraternity seems to have a negative connotation, and we try to break that,” Liang said. “We don’t want to be the typical frat guy.” Roland Bassett, PIKE member and finance sophomore, said the alumni will put forth money toward a house for the organization. “We can’t get a house until we get a charter,” Bassett said. “It’s an incentive to get stuff done, but right now our main focus is getting a charter.” The alumni will choose the

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Voting

1

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tive in the student body,” said Gordon Taylor, finance senior. “The Stelos Alliance gives students the opportunity to give back because someone gave to you. They’re always trying to help our students and this institution.” Taylor said that the financial assistance he received from Stelos Alliance allowed him to hold his current student-leadership positions.

Poston and Keller hope to extend Stelos Alliance to campuses outside of Texas State. “Our vision is to make Stelos Alliance a platform of support for not only student leaders across the state, but across the nation,” Poston said. “Our goal is to make sure that no student leader has to sacrifice their leadership because of financial constraints.”

property for the house, Bassett said. “It’s a pat on the back to our alumni who really got us going again,” Laing said. “They are the ones who petitioned the IFC (Interfraternity Council) to get us back on campus.” Laing said a majority vote was taken among other campus fraternities as another requirement to regain recognition at Texas State. “The fastest time for any colony to be recognized by a national chapter is 10 months,”

Burnett said. “We started the process under a year ago, so we are right on track to be one of the top colonies in the country.” Burnett said the PIKE members will participate in an initiation ceremony next semester when phase three is complete. “We will really be able to become brothers and learn what our letters mean,” Burnett said. “The guys have been working Ben Rondeau/ Star photo hard to get to where they are EARLY BIRDS: Students discuss campaigns and early voting for CIty Council election for now, and we can’t wait to join Places 5 and 6. the rest of the country.” Mandy Domaschk, College dents were unable to vote be- The Quad Thursday advocatDemocrats president, said cause they were unregistered. ing students vote at LBJ she wishes ASG and the Col“I had hoped that ASG Domaschk said low turnouts lege Republicans were more and the College Republicans for non-presidential elections proactive in influencing stu- were going to be doing more are normal. She said people dents to register. of that,” Domaschk said. “It’s see the impact federal issues “We registered 70 voters in a non-partisan race, so it’s have, but ignore city issues. The Quad on the last day (to reg- something that we could have “Sometimes city issues can ister) alone,” Domaschk said. really come together on.” effect them even more than However, she said many stuCollege Democrats were at federal issues,” Domaschk said.

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ASG

COFFEE BREAK: Kara Hedlund, pre geography and environmental studies senior gets a cup of hot coffee at Paws N’ Go. Allie Moncrief/Star photo

continued from page

of emotion came out of that. Thinking we’ve got this cooperation, this tie, then all of a sudden learning that without informing us at all whatsoever, they behind our backs came through with this new idea to show us on nationwide television in a negative light.” Posey said the show will not aid in breaking barriers between the students and the community. “It goes against the whole idea that we’re cooperating, that we’re trying to develop this welcoming, warm community to put a TV camera in the squad cars,” Posey said. “Which (this) is not going to

1

do anything, its not going to stop crime, its not going to develop any sort of program that is going to make kids not want to do anything.” Covo said the bill serves as a means of official representation on behalf of the students. An official letter will be sent to all members of City Council from the City Council Liaison Committee. “This is to show that on behalf of the student body as a whole, that we don’t understand,” Covo said. “That we don’t think this was a good thing for us especially since we didn’t know what was going on.” Posey said the effects of Campus PD could be severe.

“If one person watches that and decides not to come to Texas State for it, that hurts our retention,” Posey said. “If one employer sees that after considering one student, that affects the future of that student.” ASG officials said the San Marcos Police Department will not be depicted in a negative light, and the students will see the ramifications. “The university is going to look bad, the students are going to look bad, and we’re going to have to cope with that,” Posey said. “The San Marcos Police Department is going to leave with whatever benefits they acquire.”


Opinions

What’s your Opinion?

Send your thoughts to staropinion@txstate.edu The University Star – 5

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

San Marcos Police Department exploits students the main

point. A new television show

is looking to make Texas State students into reality stars. If accepting the possibility of hurting or even killing another person does not stop drunk driving, maybe being caught on video will do the job. The “ooh’s” and “ah’s” uttered in response to drunken idiots on shows like COPS could soon be said about Texas State’s students. According to an article in Wednesday’s issue of The University Star, camera crews for the upcoming G4 series Campus PD have teamed with the San Marcos Police Department to capture students and their interactions with officers on film. In the article, Howard Williams, SMPD police chief, said he was assured Campus PD’s intentions was not to make students look bad. But is it possible to look good on camera while dealing with law enforcement? All footage is susceptible to being aired during the show. Those video taped have the option to give permission to have their faces shown, if not, they will be blurred — the lesser of two evils. Therefore recognizable cars, voices and areas of San Marcos and Texas State will be shown across the nation. If the camera crews get 100 hours of tape, it will only take 30 minutes of bad footage to be creatively edited in a way that

poorly reflects on students. Perhaps the exploitation of students is legal, but it’s not moral. For a university trying to rid itself of a pesky “party school” reputation, humiliating its students on camera for peers, prospective applications and fellow Texas institutions to see is a step backwards. It appears SMPD will go to great lengths for “good publicity,” even if it is at Texas State students’ expense. Worse still, SMPD did not notify university officials about the filming. It was not until students and community members drove past cars being bombarded with cops and camera crews that word spread about a possible TV show being filmed. This is unacceptable. Luckily, University Police declined to work with Campus PD camera crews when they were approached by the producers. UPD deserves recognition for respecting students’ privacy. Sure, this opportunity may do well for the SMPD, but what good will it do for the targeted students? Only embarrassment, humiliation and shame will come from this TV show. The SMPD should be ashamed of themselves and actions should be taken by the City Council. The City of San Marcos and the university have come together to build partnerships such as the “Achieving Community Together” campaign — exploiting students might not be the best way to do that. The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Juan Ramirez/Star Illustration

L2E

Letter to the Editor President responds to open letter Dear members of The University Star editorial board:

Let me begin by thanking you for the constructive suggestions offered in your recent open letter to me. In that letter, you expressed concern about the fact my open-door days for students are currently scheduled twice a semester, and you argued more opendoor days are needed. I appreciate your suggestion and will make some changes in how open door is structured and advertised. Having said that, I want to stress the importance I give to the elected student government on this campus. As I explained to the reporter who visited with me

during my last open-door session, even when a student brings a concern to me in these meetings, the outcome is generally pursued in consultation with elected student leaders or with the appropriate administrative officers on campus. For example, I have shared your open letter with Associated Student Government and have received comments and suggestions. You also commented on the need for doing more to let students know about the dates of student open doors. You correctly observe that, in the past, I have relied on posters placed around the campus and stories published in the student

newspaper to assure students are aware of these events. For this fall’s open door, we posted 200 posters across campus. I have decided to increase that number to 300 posters for the spring 2010 open door. My only concern about your suggestion of a reminder to students via e-mail is that I also hear regularly from students who believe the university sends them too much e-mail. Before I add to the e-mails students already receive, I will take an intermediate step to assure an announcement of the next student open-door event is carried as a news story on the university Web site. You also noted my office in the J.C. Kellam building may

be inconvenient for student access. You may be correct that a venue such as the LBJ Student Center or a room in the Alkek Library would be more convenient for students, but I also know many students who come to the open door enjoy the opportunity to visit the office of the President. Open door is the only real opportunity most students have to visit this office. The number of students who took advantage of the open door was articulated as a concern. To address this concern, during spring 2010, in addition to the two traditionally scheduled opendoors, I will introduce a new opportunity for students to

meet with me. I do not agree with the implication in your open letter that the best way for students to become involved in the decision-making process at Texas State is to attend a student open-door session with me. Involvement in the decision-making process is much more likely to result from participation in student government, service on university committees, or involvement in student organizations. I also disagree with your implication student open-door sessions should serve as my primary vehicle for connecting with students. I attend an ASG meeting at the beginning of

each semester, and I meet on a monthly basis with the ASG president and vice president. Each year I host receptions for student groups such as the Student Foundation, international students, student organizational leaders, etc., in my home as another way of connecting with students. Finally, I attend numerous student events on campus during which I meet students. Thank you, again, for your constructive suggestions about improvements in my student open-door sessions.

seven, Pennsylvania has four, while Texas, the second largest state in the nation only has three. On Nov. 3, Texans have the chance to change that. A Texas Constitutional Amendment called Proposition 4 will be on the ballot. The goal is “to enable our emerging research universities in Texas to achieve national prominence, this amendment would establish a new National Research University Fund.” The amendment will not cost taxpayers anything. A dormant account called the Texas Higher Education Fund will be redirected to this effort.

However, only seven other Texas universities will be eligible to compete for these funds and Texas State is not one of them. The University of Houston, University of Texas-Dallas and University of Texas–Arlington would potentially be aided in reaching Tier 1 status. University of Texas–San Antonio. University of Texas—El Paso, University of North Texas and Texas Tech would also receive funding potentially. But the effort still warrants attention from Texas State students. It gives our university officials and student gov-

ernment a greater incentive to increase efforts and meet Tier 1 criteria. That should be the only goal of those parties, because while a football stadium goes up, other universities get closer to becoming Tier 1. The students will be affected even if Texas State does not directly participate in the research fund. If Houston, Dallas, San Antonio or El Paso all receive increases in research funding for their universities, the city economies will grow as well. Part of the current problem is there is brain drain from Texas to other Tier 1 universities

for undergraduate and graduate degrees. If a Texas State student has another chance at entering a Tier 1 university for grad school in a city that will see job growth and economic benefits, I am all for it. The decision to vote “yes” for this ballot is an obvious one even for Texas State students. The effects of Prop 4 give more students a chance to go to a Tier 1 university and provide boosts to the local economy. What is important for us though, is it gives the university one solid goal to achieve. Texas State certainly meets the “high-quality facul-

ty” requirements, but not the research spending, amount of doctorates awarded, endowment funds or even student grades. Texas State might have the chance to compete as well if we let other universities have the chance to compete for Tier 1 status. I too might have been disappointed to see Texas State was not one of seven schools Prop 4 would affect. But it means too much for the state, its universities and the future of Texas State to ignore.

Sincerely, Denise M. Trauth University President

Proposition 4 gives Texas State students goal for growth By Luis Baez Opinions Columnist Everything is bigger in Texas – but not necessarily in a good way. According to Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, Susan Combs, Texas is ranked 49th in the nation for SAT scores and 36th for graduation rates among high school students. Our Texas Legislature has one of the longest vacations any representative can ask for. It gets more perplexing. California has nine nationally recognized research institutions, New York has

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State UniversitySan Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Tuesday, October 27. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


Trends 6 – The University Star

Baseball Bash

Jay-Z and Alicia Keys will perform “Blubeprint 3” at Yankee Stadium before game one of the World Series Wednesday. Jay-Z raps “I made the Yankees hat more famous than a Yankee can” in the song “Empire State of Mind,” and he will have the chance to address that boast for the performance.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Ceramic artists display work at annual festival By Lindsey Leverett Features Reporter Cool, breezy weather, smells of barbecue and a green lush landscape set the scene for the annual Texas Clay Festival this weekend. The anunal free festival is held at Buck Pottery in Gruene the fourth weekend in October. The rows of white tents and sets of shelves display the work of participating artists. All Texas ceramic artists are welcome to submit their work to a juried show, from which 60 artists are chosen. “It’s hard to get into,” said Carl Block, artist showcased for the past 16 years. “Only the best are here.” Along with the work available for viewing and purchasing, the participants demonstrate their artistic processes. A circle of hay bails provides seating for the onlookers during one of the processes called raku firing. This consists of heating

the pots quickly in gas kilns and putting the piece in a container filled with organic materials. As the demonstration begins, the artist Ed Taylor grabs the attention of all those within hearing. The people gather to see the fire and clay combine to make Taylor’s creations. Brenda Lichman, another participating artist, enjoys giving demonstrations. “It’s really fun to interact with the crowd,” Lichman said. “The crowds are really involved in ceramics, so we have great conversations.” The festival incorporates a silent auction the artists can donate their work to, in which visitors can bid toward art pieces. Donating proceeds go to potters in need, clay_related scholarships and to fund festival events. “There’s something here for everybody,” Block said. “There are 60 different artists with 60 different concepts and ideas.” The festival included a

separate tent for children to play with clay. Linda Gossett has participated in the festival for nine years. “For me, it’s a family reunion,” Gossett said. “All my potter family is here.” Participants said they are more than fellow artists, since many come every year. “It’s cool to be among people you respect,” Block said. The artists sit by their work, waiting for questions and conversations. “Potters are pretty open,” Gossett said. The festival does not have concessions, but Gruene is teeming with riverside restaurants less than a five-minute walk from the grounds. People were venturing around the town, stopping in antique shops and enjoying the free live music at Gruene Hall. Visit www.texasclayfestival .com for more information.

Lindsey Leverett/Star photo CLAY FEST: The Annual Texas Clay Festival was held this weekend at Buck Pottery in Gruene.

‘Hide and Seek’ isn’t only game for children By Miranda Serene Features Reporter Intensity rises in The Quad every Wednesday night at Texas State. Students are mingling and making friends, yet fraternizing

with the enemy. As bandanas are passed to separate the teams, friends are slowly becoming villains. Texas State has a newly approved group this year: Hide and Seek. Hide and Seek and similar group games are played

from 9:30 to 10:30 p.m. Rachel Haverkorn, management senior, is the founder of Hide and Seek at Texas State. Haverkorn thought of the idea her freshman year. “I started talking to people,

and I eventually found some who were serious about it,” Haverkorn said. Haverkorn received approval for Hide and Seek as an organization through Campus Activities and Student Orginization.

“Once I made the Facebook group for it, the idea blew up,” Haverkorn said. “There are usually a stable 40 people who show up every game.” The boundaries of the game are from the Fighting Stallions to Old Main, and from the Bobcat Statue to the marquee. “The game covers most of The Quad,” Haverkorn said. The players wear bandanas – the hiders wear one color and the seekers another. Taggers try to acquire as many bandanas as possible. Each time a tagger finds a hider, he or she hands over their bandana. There is a system so every player eventually gets found. “Everyone must sign in,” Haverkorn said. “At the end, I text everyone to make sure they are not lost.” Logan Ahlemann, computer science freshman, said he has been playing since the first week. Ahlemann said playing Hide and Seek is a way to get his mind off of school. “It’s a stress relief,”

Ahlemann said. “We aren’t confined to doing college stuff. I always have genuine fun, and I’m not at a party.” Ruben Maldonado, undecided freshman, played for the first time Wednesday. He said the game brought back childhood memories. “I always played as a kid,” Maldonado said. “I get really pumped to play this game.” Maldonado was eager to hide, but not to seek. “Hiding is the best part of the game,” Maldonado said. Members said Hide and Seek is a game most people already know how to play because it is a popular childhood game. “This is an organization that brings students together for a child-like cause,” Maldonado said. Haverkorn said Hide and Seek is an easy way to meet other students at Texas State. “I love recruiting and watching people reach out and make friends – anyone and everyone can play,” Haverkorn said.


Trends

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

The University Star - 7

Powder Puff football SCA fights dressed up ‘geek’ persona teams compete for Members strive to be chivalrous, polite championship Thursday By Colleen Gaddis Features Reporter Members of San Marcos’ Society for Creative Anachronism chapter, the Kingdom of Ffynnon Gath, meet for armored fighting at 2 p.m. every Sunday. The Society for Creative Anachronism fighters construct their own armor and weapons to participate in armored and sword fighting. According to the socity’s Web site, members dedicate their time within the organization to recreate the society of Medieval Ages before the year 1600 AD. “In addition to the physical training, we also teach our

Lindsey Goldstein/Star photo TOUGH CHICKS: Members of Delta Gamma and Chi Beta Delta faced-off in SACA’s homecoming competition of powderpuff football Saturday evening on the intramural fields.

By Colleen Gaddis Features Reporter Despite what the name might imply, Powder Puff football is anything but dainty. According to Urban Dictionary, Powder Puff football begins innocently, but usually ends as fierce as any game of tackle football with sprained ankles, broken wrists and pulled muscles. Twenty-three teams registered for this year’s Powder Puff football tournament, held every year for Texas State’s Homecoming week. The first round was played Saturday with the second the following day. Student organizations, sororities and residence halls participated in the event, some choosing to make team T-shirts or big, wooden letters or turning their male counterparts into cheerleaders. Jillian Vidal, Pride and Traditions coordinator under Student Association for Campus Activities and director of Homecoming Activities, said she loves teams showing their spirit. “The purpose of Powder

Puff is to get different organizations spirited and pumped, and hopefully it encourages them to represent their organization at the Homecoming Tailgate and football game,” Vidal said. Each team receives spirit points for participating in or attending different homecoming events. The Spirit Award has three categories: student organizations, greek life and residence halls. An overall Spirit Award goes to the group who has the most points. Jordan Cooper, fashion merchandising junior, joined the Designated Drinkers team. “I played a powder puff game when I was a senior in high school,” Cooper said. “My favorite thing about the games are just getting to play football with friends. We have fun but do take it seriously at the same time.” First place for Powder Puff went to the Hispanic Business Student Association, and second place was awarded to the  Sigma Delta Lambda sorority. Both teams will play against each other in the Powder Puff Championships 8 p.m. Thursday at Bobcat Stadium.

Fine Arts Calendar

Tuesday

Friday

Wednesday

Saturday

Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Philosophy Dialogue Series: Philosophy and Literature, 12:30 p.m., Psychology Building Faculty Artist Series: Washington Garcia Piano Recital, 8 p.m., Music Building Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Philosophy Dialogue Series: Philosophy and Literature, 2 p.m., Psychology Building Women and Place: Two Voice, Two Perspectives, 3:30 p.m., Alkek Library

Thursday

Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Philosophy Dialogue Series: Philosophy and Literature, 12:30 p.m., Psychology Building Opening Door Dance Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Evans Auditorium Terminal, 7:30 p.m., Theatre Center Somos Musicos, 8 p.m., Music Building

Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Opening Door Dance Theatre, 3 p.m., Evans Auditorium Terminal, 7:30 p.m., Theatre Center Music Alumni Reunion Concert, 2 p.m., Music Building Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Discover the School of Music: An Overview, 10 a.m., Music Building

Sunday

Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery Terminal, 2 p.m., Theatre Center Janelle Martin and Hilary Janysek flute recital, 2 p.m., Music Building Josh Cerame senior clarinet recital, 4 p.m., Music Building “A Master’s Bassoon Recital:” Gillian Lopez, 6 p.m., Music Building Austin Clements senior trumpet recital, 8 p.m., Music Building

Monday

Jeanne Stern: Shadow Tiger, all day, Mitte Gallery “Military History: A Manual for Future Wars,” 3 p.m., Flowers Hall Ensemble Series: Texas State Horn Cats, 8 p.m., Evans Auditorium

fighters the code of chivalry and the virtues it instills,” said Evets von Drachenklaue, the Seneschal of the Shire of Ffynnon Gath. “The virtues we teach and practice carry over into the real world and not only create better people, but better societies.” The members of the organization include doctors, lawyers, local business owners and Texas State students and alumni. The Jagermeister is an annual championship event the group organizes. Around Christmas time they participate in the Yule Revel. “I enjoy fighting just like some enjoy boxing,” said Erin Avallone, pre-theatre

freshman. “There are times when I get hurt and I wonder what I was thinking, but most of the time I get a great adrenaline rush that makes me numb to any type of hit I get.” The group acts as a live action Dungeons and Dragons game but with real swords. The fighting is more intense than general role playing, but members still choose to create their own character to further escape within this realm. Members said they research extensively on their personas’ time period, customs, dress, religion and region, while others keep to a name and time period. Erin Avallone’s persona

is Elena de la Rue from Normandy in the 12th century. “I’m not a huge history nut. So creating my character is a bit difficult for me at the moment,” Avallone said. “But I like to think she is a lot like me: a fighter at heart, but a lady around the fire.” Drachenklaue said the organization teaches its members valuable lessons. “But it’s a way to get together and treat each other the way people should be treated — with honor and courtesy,” Drachenklaue said. “There is a real sense of family within the SCA where members look out for each other.”


8 - The University Star

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The University Star - 9

Thursday’s Puzzle Solution

sudoku Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk TOday’s sudoku solution

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rates & policies Cost-25¢ per word (1-6 days); Cost-20¢ per word (7+ days); Deadline-2 business days prior by noon All classified ads must be paid in advance, unless credit is established. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. We do our best, but please check your classified ad for accuracy. Any corrections to your ad must be made by the second day of publication. As a free service to you, all classified ads will be published on-line on our web site at www.universitystar.com. However, since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

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SUNDANCE PRINT AND COPY IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE POSITION. Computer skills w/ graphics software experience a plus. Apply in person at Sundance Print and Copy, 651 N. Bus. IH-35, New Braunfels. (in the MarketPlace Shopping Center)

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Sports 10 - The University Star

SOUTHLAND STANDOUTS Justin Garelick, freshman kicker, was named Southland Conference Special Teams Player of the Week for his performance against Northwestern State Saturday. Bradley George, senior quarterback, and Marcus Clark, junior linebacker, received Honorable Mentions for Offensive and Defensive Players of the Week, respectively.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Sports Contact, Lisa Carter – starsports@txstate.edu

Bobcats claw Colonels, Lions By Eric Harper Sports Reporter The Bobcat volleyball team defeated Nicholls State and Southeastern Louisiana Thursday and Saturday, respectively, to even its season record at 12. The wins pulled Texas State into a second place tie with a 6-3 record in the Southland Conference’s West Division after Stephen F. Austin defeated Lamar. The Bobcats took advantage of three consecutive matches against three of the four teams at the bottom of the SLC standings. The Bobcats turned the stretch into a three-match win streak. They went into the final seven matches of the season in a three-way tie for third in the SLC. Coach Karen Chisum said the Bobcats have built their confidence with the recent wins. “It’s huge now,” Chisum said. “We have to keep that confidence going into the conference tournament.” The Bobcats have had early leads in each match of their current win streak. They have been able to take advantage and get more players time on the court. AJ Watlington, junior right side hitter, said the Bobcats have been able to develop a positive mindset and work on new elements to use in future matches. “The win streak has kept

our confidence up,” Wat- ership and a killer instinct matches. 14 loss at home to Central their home court and build lington said. “We have to put away teams when “We like to keep our spirits Arkansas by defeating Nich- momentum heading into the been trying some new (tac- they are ahead. Watlington high,” Watlington said. “We olls State and Southeastern final stretch of the season. tics) we can show our next said the Bobcats are trying want to keep the competitive- Louisiana. Watlington said “We knew we had to get a opponents.” to stay ahead by keeping a ness going.” the Bobcats knew they had fire going,” Watlington said. The Bobcats developed a positive mindset throughout Texas State avenged an Oct. to bring energy to take back “We had to find a spark.” balanced attack on offense in their victories against the Colonels and Lions. The Bobcats saw six players total 10 or more kills in the two weekend matches. Chisum said the passing game has been a key to the Bobcats getting more of the players going strong. “We distributed the ball to everyone. We were moving the ball around,” Chisum said. “I am feeling pretty good about where we are right now.” The Bobcat defense made it difficult for opponents to score all weekend, allowing an average attack percentage of .061 in Texas State’s two matches. Chisum said the improvements seen on defense in recent matches have started with an increased presence in the middle along with a strong return game led by Lydia Werchan, freshman defensive specialist. Werchan recorded 16 digs against the Lions, while the Bobcats registered nine blocks as a team in the last two matches. “Lydia did an outstanding job,” Chisum said. “We are doing a better job of blocking as well.” Ben Rondeau/Star photo Chisum said she wants the Bobcats to develop lead- ANOTHER KILL: Matti Schumacher, freshman outsider hitter, lays down a kill on the on the Southeastern Louisiana Lions Saturday.

Women’s soccer ties for season title By Cameron Irvine Sports Reporter The Texas State women’s soccer team is looking for its second consecutive conference title and the goal is only one game away. The Bobcats clinched a tie for the regular season title Sunday with a 4-0 win against Sam Houston State. They earned a 1-0 overtime victory Friday against Stephen F. Austin. The Bobcats’ only conference blemish on their record was a tie at 0 against Southeastern Louisiana, who they might see again in the playoffs.

“We definitely have to beat (Texas-San Antonio) first,” said Britney Curry, junior forward. Texas State has never defeated UTSA. However, the Bobcats currently have a better record than the Roadrunners. Curry leads the Bobcats in goals scored. She scored her 16th goal of the season Sunday in the 58th minute of regulation. Curry said winning begins with the team. “It definitely starts with our defense every time,” Curry said. Four Bobcats scored during Sunday’s game. Andrea Grifo, senior midfielder, got her first goal of the season in the 11th

‘We were looking at a team hungry

minute. Curry, Taylor Person, freshman defender, and Serena Hines, freshman forward, each got their third goal of the year. Texas State controlled the tempo in the game, outshooting the Bearkats 19-4, and leaving Mandi Mawyer, senior goalkeeper, making two saves all day. “We were looking at a team hungry for a win (Sunday) and I think they pulled it off,” said Coach Kat Conner.” Mawyer recorded nine saves Friday, shutting out her sixth conference opponent. Hines kicked her first game-winning goal to lift the Bobcats and keep

for a win (Sunday), and I think they Stacie Andrews/Star photo KICKING IT: Taylor Person, freshman defender, goes in to steals the ball Friday against Stephen F. Austin.

pulled it off.’

—Coach Kat Conner

Soccer Standings

the undefeated streak alive. “I knew it would be a hard battle,” Conner said. “Second half I think we just began to work the field and wear them down.” Texas State outscored its opponents 16-2 in conference play. The Bobcats have the best attendance in the Southland Conference to date and have the conference’s leading goal scorer in Curry. Conner believes the best is yet to come. “I don’t think we have seen our best yet,” Conner said. “We are still trying to find our true balance, but I believe we are getting to the balance we want.”

SLC Record

Texas State S.e. Louisiana Stephen F. Austin UTSA Sam Houston Northwestern McNeese Lamar Cen. Ark. Nicholls State

Overall Record

7-0-1 5-1-1 4-2-1 4-2-2 4-3 3-4 3-4 2-5 1-6 0-6-1

12-5-1 11-4-1 7-8-1 9-8-2 7-8-2 10-8 7-9-2 3-12-1 7-9-1 4-13-1

Bobcats prepare for homecoming against Lumberjacks By Keff Ciardello Sports Reporter The Bobcat football team left Louisiana with its head held high, defeating Northwestern State 20-17, thanks in part to two, fourth quarter field goals by Justin Garelick, freshman kicker. Garelick has come a long way since the Bobcats lost 5150 to Southeastern Louisiana three weeks ago. Garelick shook off his freshman jitters and kicked two

field goals in the fourth quarter against the Demons. He tied the game with a 28-yard kick and then took the lead on a 21-yard field goal. The Demons kicked a field goal to take an early 3-0 lead. The Bobcats answered back when Bradley George, senior quarterback, found Da’Marcus Griggs, junior wide receiver, in the end zone for a 5-yard touchdown. Griggs leaped above a Demon defender to make the touchdown catch.

Stephen F. Austin

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McNeese State

36

Sam Houston State

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S.e. Louisiana

35

Griggs has made 11 catches for 129 yards and a touchdown this season. He leads the Bobcats with 52 receptions, 601 receiving yards and five receiving touchdowns. “It’s hard to replace (Cameron Luke), but I’m doing what I can just like all the others guys out there,” Griggs said. “We’ve got a good thing going. We just have to stay with it.” Griggs’ receptions and receiving yards almost double

Daren Dillard, sophomore wide receiver, who has 26 catches and 329 yards. Dillard is second on the team in those categories. “This is the fastest group of wide outs I’ve seen since I’ve been here,” George said. Alvin Canady, junior running back, had the longest run of his college career when he broke away for a 39yard touchdown in the third quarter to give Texas State a 14-3 lead. Canady maintained a 9.1

SLC Football Results October 24, 2009

yards-per-rush average throughout the game, rushing for 85 yards off nine carries. Texas State looked as though it was going to let the game go again, allowing two, fourth quarter touchdowns. The Bobcat defense forced two more punts by the Demons to set up Garelick’s two field goals and clinching the game for the Bobcats. The Demons drop to a 0-7 overall record, 0-3 in the SLC, while the Bobcats improve to 4-3, 2-1.

Central Arkansas

42

Northwestern

17

Nicholls

13

Texas State

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Texas State will host the one-loss SLC-leading Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks at 2 p.m. Saturday in its annual homecoming game. The three-point margin marked the third consecutive year in which the outcome of this game has come down to a three-point decision. It marks the second consecutive year the ending score was 20-17 in favor of Texas State. The first three-point game was an overtime victory in 2007 by the Demons 34-31.


Q&A (continued) my blinds open and I forgot I had the suit out and some people were walking by and saw. They were like ‘what?’ and they happened to be on my floor and that’s how they found out. Q: What kind of things do you do to prepare for games? A: Actually, I’m not much of a stretcher. As I’ve been getting older, I’ve been stretching more. I run a lot. I do a lot of long distance running. I usually run about three miles a day. Unless I have a test and I have to study, then I try to squeeze it in there. I try to do a lot of endurance. Q: So I imagine it’s pretty physically demanding to be in that suit? A: See, it’s weird because running three miles is not the same thing as being in a suit jumping around. It’s completely different. I don’t know how to explain it. It’s like if I were to do short sprints with a rug on me. It’s less endurance-wise and more like physical. Q: Like power? A: Yeah power. It really takes a lot out of you. Q: How heavy is the suit? A: The suit depends. They got a new suit. I haven’t really worn that one. The old one I would say the head is maybe like 10 pounds. It’s not that bad. The body from the old one is like wearing a heavy jacket. Heavy pants and a jacket. When it gets wet it gets up to like 30 lbs. With all that sweat it gets really heavy. Q: Did you do gymnastics when you were younger? A: No. I did not do gymnastics when I was younger, but when I started (being Boko) I started doing more gymnastics stuff. I learned round offs, handsprings and back tucks. I was really scared to do back tucks though. I can do it, but one time during a basketball game I did it and I landed on my head. It didn’t hurt me because I was wearing the head so it cushioned. But after that I don’t want to embarrass Boko so I stopped doing back tucks. Q: What have been the most embarrassing moments for you personally as the mascot? A: During games? One time I was doing this thing before a football game and all the football players were messing around with these kids. You know like sometimes there’s kids who run out of the tunnel before the start of the game? Well one time before all that it was Kid Day and I was playing with these kids and they were doing this training thing where they were jumping over these cushions and then the football players would hit them with these pads. And everyone thinks it’s funny to hurt the mascot and I’m not a big guy and this one football player was a big guy. He hit me hard and my head flew off in front of all the kids. Another time I

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October 27, 2009 // Advertising Supplement of The University Star // www.universitystar.com

was at Little Rock, Arkansas for a game against Central Arkansas and I was basically surrounded by the opposing team’s fans and I was hanging out with these little kids and they were like “Do a back flip, do a back flip!” and I forgot to button the neck to the body and I did a back flip and my head flew off. I put it back on and ran off. That’s basically the most embarrassing thing that’s happened. Q: Are there any mascots you look up to? A: My first favorite mascot was Aubie from Auburn. He’s just like a cool cat. Before I even got to college I applied to Auburn and I got in, but it was too expensive. I wanted to be Aubie for half of my high school career, but then I didn’t go. Another one is Robert Bodin. He’s Clutch from the Houston Rockets. He’s really funny. Another one is Dynamo Diesel from the Houston Dynamos. When I graduate I want to try out to be Dynamo Diesel. Q: So you said that for half of your high school career you wanted to be a mascot, how did you start noticing the mascots? A: I’ve always known I had good endurance so that was one thing. I always just thought it be fun to do it. I never did it in high school. It was either being a mascot for high school or being in cross-country and I was already in my third year of cross-country. So I stayed with cross-country. Then I came to Texas State and I started doing Boko and I knew it was good because when I got in the suit I could just be goofy without getting embarrassed … except for when my head flies off. I would say my kind of personality is like Boko’s personality and that’s why I can do that so well. If I had to be somebody like Hook ‘Em I would not enjoy doing Hook ‘Em because Hook ‘Em is just a stern, not funny guy. Q: So it’s not much of a stretch for you to put on the Boko outfit and run around and be crazy? A: Yeah. And I would recommend not being Hook ‘Em. I work at uca as a mascot instructor. I go to different camps and I look over a bunch of camps and we do this whole mascot camp. I always ask them where they want to go to college and if they say University of Texas then I’m like ‘You’re not gonna like it!’ I have a couple of friends who go to ut and they tried out and didn’t make it and they’re so goofy and they can dance, but that’s not Hook ‘Em’s personality. Q: What’s the hardest part of balancing mascot life with the team? A: The hardest part about that is getting paid. We don’t get anything. It’s strictly volunteer. I had to ask somebody for gasoline money one time. I had an appearance in Seguin and I didn’t get any money for that. I have to spend a lot of money. A lot of my own money. I have to spend my money on gas and spend my time. I don’t mind doing it for free because I really like doing it.

It revolves around you.

HOMECOMING 2009

WHAT’SINSIDE SCHOOL SPIRIT p9

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Tailgate concert: Video Vamp ‘pours some sugar’ on Texas State Bobcats vs. Lumberjacks: Texas State takes SFA head on

Q&A p19 p19

Alvin Canady, Junior running back, readies for game

Boko gets Candid: Texas State mascot discusses life in front of the crowd

p10 IT’S ONLY JUST BEGUN Bobcat Stadium still expanding

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CONTRIBUTORS & STAFF

Editors Editor in Chief

photo editior

Amanda Venable

News Editor

Graphic Designers ART DIRECTOR

Allen Reed

Michelle Oros

Trends Editor Ashley Dickinson

Crystal Brown Jenna Jurica

Sports Editor

Photographers

Lisa Carter

Lindsey Goldstein Jake Marx Allie Moncrief

Copy Desk Chief Claire Heathman

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Bobby Scheidemann

Staff Writers

Sara Strict

Brittany Bemis Eric Harper Rachel Nelson Jovonna Owen Miranda Serene Jessie Spielvogel Brittany E. Wilson

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Q&A

Straight talk. Straight facts.

Q& A with the loud Crowd President, Zackary bartel

Alvin Canady, junior running back, is no stranger to the hype surrounding Texas State’s homecoming games. Canady, in his fourth season on the football team, currently leads all Bobcats in rushing and ranks ninth in the Southland Conference. The University Star interviewed Canady on his expectations for the Oct. 31 homecoming game against Stephen F. Austin.

good to go

Vendors, organizers get ready for tailgating

LOUD AND PROUD

Hello from the Trinity Building,

Loud Crowd gets enthusiastic for game-day experience BY MAURAH RUIZ

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Dueling columns

The University Star vs. SFA's The Pine Log on this year's homecoming game BY LISA CARPENTER OF THE UNIVERSITY STAR & SHELLEY TREVINO OF THE PINE LOG

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TOP TEN HOMECOMING TRADITIONS BY THEA SETTERBO

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HOMECOMING CONCERT GETS REVAMPED

‘80s cover band pours some sugar on tailgating BY MATTHEW BARNES

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Bobcat Stadium expansion is just beginning

Meet the finalists

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Distinguished Alumna/alumnus

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BOBCATS VS. LUMBERJACKS

Outgoing bobcats receive awards

Bobcats look to set new records during homecoming

19–20

Q&A: STRAIGHT TALK. STRAIGHT FACTS.

Q&A with The Loud Crowd president, Zackary Bartel BY THEA SETTERBO

TRUE COLORS

Fans use body paint to show school spirit BY BRITTANY E WILSON

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2009 Homecoming Royalty

BY KEFF CIARDELLO

MORE TO COME

BY RACHEL NELSON

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Q&A with Alvin Canady Junior running back readies for homecoming game BY TYLER GARCIA

BOBCATS LOOK FORWARD TO ‘VICTORIOUS’ HOMECOMING

The man behind the mask

BY JAKE MADDOX

BY BRETT THORNE

IN THE KNOW with Athletics Director Larry Teis Larry Teis has been the director of athletics since 2004. Under Teis’ leadership, the Texas State’s Athletics Department has won a pair of Southland Conference Commissioner’s Cups, won its seventh straight SLC Women’s All-Sports Trophies and recorded Southland Conference tournament and regular season Championships. Q: When you signed on with Texas State, President Trauth said you have the “skills, experiences and values that are exactly what this institution and this department needs.” What are some of those experiences and values, and how have they made you a good fit for Texas State? A: I had already been with Texas State for five years, so I knew the university and the athletic department and was familiar with the administration of both. I was also familiar with the San Marcos community and the campus community. Dr. Trauth and I also shared the same values, visions and goals for the department such as academic

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success, integrity, NCAA compliance and, of course, winning.

Q: In your August “First Word” open letter to Bobcats, you invited us to join you at the new Bobcat Stadium West Side complex. Now that the West Side complex is complete, do you have any other plans on the horizon for improvements or expansions to Bobcat Stadium? A: In the next year we will look at relocating the track and expanding the football stadium by 8,500 additional seats. It has already been a whirlwind year for us with the opening of the Baseball/Softball complex and the Bobcat Stadium West Side

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Q: What type of game do you think this will be? A: It’s going to be high-scoring game. Last year, I think we scored 62 points, so it should be a fun game.

By Tyler Garcia // Sports Reporter

Cover Photo: Jeremy Polsen, Star File Photo

BY LARISA MICHELLE TATE

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Q & A with Alvin Canady Junior running back readies for homecoming game

Complex. Both of these projects were anticipated to take around three years to complete, but we were able to get them finished in one.

Q: The Texas State Bobcats recently suffered a bruising defeat at the hands of your alma mater, TCU. Was there a note of bitter sweetness for you in that game? I know a lot of people who wouldn’t be able to root against the Bobcats if they were in your shoes. A: I don’t know I would call it a bruising defeat at the hands of what is now the 10th ranked team in the country. We hung in CONTINUED ON P. 6

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There have been a lot of changes taking place on the Texas State campus— construction, enrollment increases and parking problems. Well, parking issues might not be new, but there’s no debate that Texas State is an ever-growing institution. And it is a fine one at that. This weekend marks one of the most important (and fun) traditions at Texas State—homecoming. Face paint, hotdogs, music and football encompass the homecoming tradition, but it’s of course more than just the sound of helmets colliding. Homecoming is a weekend out of the year that alumni from across the country, possibly the globe, come home. Homecoming is about the student’s relationship with the university. And just like any relationship, your love must be renewed from time to time. Hence the beauty of the Homecoming experience. The game is more than a sporting event, it’s something for all Bobcats—past, present and future—to come together and share their campus experience. We feel the lost yards and celebrate the touchdowns together, because we’re all Bobcats, regardless of age. That is what community is all about. While remembering the past, it’s important to know where Texas State is going to in the future. Past students will be stepping foot on campus this weekend, some for the first time since they left years before. One of those alumni will be my mother. A student in the ‘70s—don’t tell her I told you that—my mother was news editor of The University Star when she attended what was then Southwest Texas. No doubt she, just like other alumni, will see some changes to campus. But other landmarks, like Old Main and the Fighting Stallions in The Quad, will forever be a Bobcat staple. Let’s enjoy the Bobcat memories together this weekend. Cheers, Amanda Venable Editor in Chief

By Thea Setterbo // Features Reporter Zackary Bartel is the president of the Loud Crowd and an exercise and sports science senior. Bartel has been a Loud Crowd member for four years. Q: What is Loud Crowd? A: Loud Crowd is a school spirit organization for all Texas State students. It focuses on promoting school pride for athletics. Q: Why is it important to have an organization like Loud Crowd on campus? A: To promote school spirit. We’re really trying to go to FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) and we need student support to do that. It’s a great day to be a Bobcat, so why not support some sports? Q: What is your favorite part about being in Loud Crowd? A: I’ve met so many people through Loud Crowd. It’s the best social networking organization on campus because we have so many members. You get to meet everyone, and it’s a great chance to meet new people interested in Bobcat athletics. Q: What are some of the responsibilities that come with being a Loud Crowd officer? A: We have to make sure that Loud Crowd is going in the right direction as far as encouraging people to attend games. We are also on the Pride and Traditions Committee, which is focused on starting new traditions at Texas State. We are involved in making sure the organization is doing what it can to make Texas State Athletics become what it should be. Q: What are the benefits of becoming a Loud Crowd member? A: Members get a Loud Crowd shirt, exclusive seating at games—especially football

Members of the Loud Crowd show their school spirit Bobby Scheidemann, Star Photo

games—and a chance to meet new people and make great friends. We have social events outside of athletics as well, and Loud Crowd sponsors road trips to away games, so members don’t have to pay. We’re looking into creating more Loud Crowd gear for our members. Q: How closely does Loud Crowd work with the athletic department? A: I try and meet with the department to talk at least once a week. Sometimes I bug them too much. Our advisor is actually involved with marketing at the athletic department. We just want to know how we can help push games and get more student attendance to all of the games. Q: Who should get involved in Loud Crowd? A: All Texas State students should get involved with Loud Crowd. There is no minimum GPA requirement. We want all students to come out and get involved. It’s a great way to meet people. I’ve met some of my best friends in the organization. Q: What events does Loud Crowd sponsor? A: We tailgate before football games and have theme games for volleyball and basketball. We’re trying to start tailgating before basketball games. We’re also involved in Bobcat Build in the spring. Q: How can someone join Loud Crowd? A: You can go to the athletic department Web site and follow the link for the Loud Crowd registration form, or you can come to any athletic event or meeting and register there. There is a $30 due for the whole year, and the membership benefits come with the dues. Q: How often does Loud Crowd meet? A: We meet once every two weeks, Monday nights at 6 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum’s Maroon and Gold room.

Q: After losing the first conference game at home against Southeastern Louisiana, what is your mindset going into the homecoming game against Stephen F. Austin? A: (It’s the) same as last year. We had two losses in conference and we still won conference. We’re not hurting. It hurt to lose the first conference game at home, but we know the season is not over for us. Q: How much pressure is put on you and the team to perform well for this game? A: (It’s the) same as any other game. I wouldn’t say there’s more pressure just because it’s homecoming. We want to win all our home games. Q: Would you say there is a rivalry with SFA? A: Yeah, just a little bit. So many other players we played with—or against—in high school are playing for SFA. It’s an in-state game— we’re not very far apart. They’re going to want to come in here and beat us at home, but we approach it as just another conference game that we need to win. Q: What is the key to beating SFA? A: We need to come out with a lot of energy as we’ve been doing. We know they have a good quarterback at SFA. We just have to play all four quarters. Q: Do you have any pre-game rituals or anything you do specifically to get ready for the games? A: I try not to let my emotions take over. I try to stay calm and relaxed. When I was younger, I used to get hyped up before the game and you waste a lot of energy like that. I listen to music before the game and then when it comes game time, I let it all out. Q: Texas State must average 15,000 fans in the stands at home games this season to move up to the Football Bowl Subdivision. What would you say to the fans to encourage them to come out to the game? A: Come out and support your Bobcats. It’s homecoming and we’re trying to move up to the FBS and we want to make that happen, so come out and support us.

The Man Behind The Mask

Bob Rondeau, Star File Photo

By Brett Thorne // Opinions Editor In 1920, a committee was formed with the intent of raising the lagging school spirit at Southwest Texas State Teacher’s College. The committee was charged with the responsibility of choosing an official mascot for the university. The committee decided the Bobcat would be the living representation of the university. The evolution of the mascot continued in 1964 when Beth Greenless, a sophomore from Luling, Texas, entered a competition to name the mascot. Her submission, “Boko,” was chosen from a pool of about 100 other options. Boko has received the title of National Mascot Champion twice since he was named. But who is the person behind the mask? Q: So how secretive is your identity supposed to be? A: Well, when you first start they give you a pamphlet and it says don’t tell anybody but you know. My freshman year when I was living with my roommate from high school I had to bring the suit in to leave it out to dry. One time, since I was on the first floor of Butler, I always had CONTINUED P. 20

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2009 Distinguished Alumna/Alumnus

Award Recipients

Darren B. Casey

B.B.A., 1981 National real estate developer, Casey has been inducted into the San Antonio 40 and Under Business Hall of Fame.

FRIDAY

3 PM Soap Box Derby, Bobcat Trail 7 PM Step Show Performance, Strahan Colliseum

saturday

9 AM Bobcat Tailgate begins, Stadium lot

10:30 AM Musical Performance by Video Vamp 12 PM Pre-game Prade/spirit Award Presentation 1 PM Homecoming Parade featuring Soap Box Derby winners 2 PM Football Game/Throw Outs, Bobcat Stadium Court Announcements, Halftime

Good to go

William Ross King

B.B.A., 1958 Founder and president of Crown Worldwide, Inc., the dominant poultry company in Central Asia, King is a founding teacher at Kazakhstan Institute of Management, Economics and Strategic Research and is the founder and president of Anchor Investments, Inc. and FRS Investments, Inc. King co-founded the National Program of Agriculture Privatization for the Republic of Kazakhstan.

Shawn McCormick

B. S. in Health Professions, 1985 Chairman, chief executive officer and co-founder of Zoey L.P., McCormick is the owner and president of Summit DME of San Antonio LLC, a home medical equipment provider, and is the owner and president of Pulmonary Therapies, LLC, a respiratory disease management company.

Vendors, organizers get ready for tailgating Larisa Michelle Tate // Special to The Star Thousands of students will pack into the east Bobcat Stadium parking lot to tailgate and celebrate the homecoming game Saturday, armed with coolers of beer and massive quantities of meat. Football fans may start setting up as early as 9 am on game day, pitching tents and firing up grills of all sizes and potency. “It’s usually the largest event of the year,” said Aaron Villalobos, athletic tailgate adviser, but he also said it’s hard to predict the actual turnout. Private vendors provide snacks inside the stadium, but the vast majority of people choose to bring their own grilling equipment. Officials allow grills in designated areas, even propane and coal. Event sponsor H.E.B. usually brings a trailer to games to hand out free sodas or ice cream, Villalobos said. The store’s other contributions include

a decorated golf cart and a tent, and the company is offering a $100 prize for the best tailgater to decorate their tent with H.E.B. logos and use their food. The winner’s picture will appear on the jumbo screen during the game. General Manager Bruce Schneider said he and other company employees will attend the homecoming game. “People bring dogs, couches, satellite dishes, beer pong and washer games,” Schneider said. “Every tailgate has a grill.” The store will start getting busy around 7 am, he said, with people stocking up on beer, water, ice, hamburgers, hot dogs and chips. Fajita meat is especially popular, he said. Schneider said the past three years the event has been getting progressively bigger and better organized. Other student organizations will join

the athletic department in providing food. The Alumni Association will host a pregame fajita luncheon from noon to 2 pm, including a cash bar. National Association of Homeowners and the Associated General Contractors of Texas State will also invite alumni to join their barbecue at the tailgate. They will purchase a trailer barbecue pit for the occasion, said Kimberley Porter, director of community relations. “They’re doing a big cookout to try to get alumni to the game,” Porter said. Homecoming events began Oct. 20 with the talent show, organized by the SACA, as the finale on game day. Jillian Vidal, pride and traditions coordinator, said SACA does not provide food for homecoming, but the organization brings a variety of other activities including a musical performance and award presentations.

John Moreau

M. Ed. in Physical Education, 1984 A teacher and coach, Moreau is distinguished in the field of fencing. He has been a finalist in ten Olympic Trials in two sports - fencing and modern pentathlon, receiving two silver and two bronze medals.

Wayne Oquin

B. A. in Music, 1999 Composer and professor at Juilliard, Oquin stayed connected to his alma mater, he founded “Juilliard Joins Texas State” for our Common Experience program. Courtesy of Texas State

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2009 Homecoming Royalty

2009 Homecoming Court Finalists Tommy Aguilar Dillon Burleson Megan Creason Jamie Duke Lauren Guerra Peter John Halliburton Jennifer Kraft Tommy Luna

2009 Homecoming Gaillardians George Arnold Marissa Cantu-Harkless Tameka Fraser Temitayo Gidado Kristin Guerra Michael Heredia Dale Korth Natalie McDaniel Colter Ray Staci Sellers Gordon Taylor Ariana Vargas

Photo: Gabe Garza, Courtesy of Office of University Marketing

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Loud and Proud Loud Crowd gets enthusiastic for game-day experience Zack Bartel, president of Loud Crowd, has hot dog fever. No, this is not some version of the swine flu. It is the condition used to describe a diehard Bobcat fan who loves tailgating and of course, free food. “My favorite part of tailgating is meeting all new people, getting free stuff and eating free food,” said Bartel, exercise and sports science senior. “There is nothing like being outside before a football game, eating food with other Bobcat fans and getting pumped up before the game.” During tailgates, Bartel said he can eat six hot dogs at a time. “I usually tailgate all day so I eat hot dogs for lunch and usually eat some before I go into the game,” he said. Bartel describes his craziest tail-

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gating moment as the time when he and a buddy decided to paint their chests before a bobcat football game vs. Sam Houston two years ago. Chest painting is common at Bobcat games, but this game happened to be during below freezing weather. “We thought we would be the only idiots who painted our chest(s) in the cold weather, but there were many other diehard Bobcat fans who painted their chests as well,” he said. Mitchell Otten, secretary of Loud Crowd, said the most memorable moment tailgating with Bartel was when they won nine straight games of Washers, a tailgate game similar to horseshoes. “Zack always acts goofy,” said Otten, mathematics sophomore. “Just him

Photo: Courtesy of Office of University Marketing

By Maurah Ruiz // News Reporter

being at a tailgate is pretty funny.” Bobcats have become innovative during the years with creative outfits and hair styles to show school spirit, and have even taken it as far as sitting in a pool in the bed of someone’s truck, Bartel said that is the “wildest” thing he has ever seen at a tailgate. “It’s pretty hot in Texas so cooling off during tailgating is really smart,” Bartel said. Christopher Helweg, Loud Crowd treasurer, said he remembers when Bartel did a dance to “All My Single Ladies” at a tailgate not too long ago. “Zack is just a fun guy to be around,” said Helweg, health and fitness management junior. “There is never a dull moment around him.”

Helweg said he is looking forward to the Homecoming tailgate, because it is said to be the biggest tailgate of the year, besides the first game of course. “A lot of organizations have more than enough food to share,” Bartel said. “We grill burgers, hot dogs and sausage wraps with plenty of soda and water. We have games such as ladder golf, washers and footballs to toss around.” Bartel attends both the tailgate and the game because he wants the full game-day experience. “The people who just tailgate miss out on some exciting Bobcat football and the people who just go to the game miss out on some exciting Bobcat tailgating,” Bartel said.

Bartel admits to having a realization on a recent road trip to see the Bobcats take on TCU. “After that experience, I have to say the Bobcats’ tailgate is much better than the Horned Frogs’,” he said. Bartel said he enjoys getting excited for the game with other people who are also enthusiastic about the football game. “I would definitely recommend tailgating to everyone,” he said. “Tailgating really adds to the game-day experience because you get to stand out in the Texas heat all day and then go yell your head off for the Bobcats at the football game.”

For a Q&A interview with Bartel, see P. 19

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IN THE KNOW with Athletics Director Larry Teis Continued from P. 2 there all the way until the 4th quarter when, obviously, the extra 22 scholarships TCU has for football each year had an effect on the game. Schools on the FBS level are allowed by the NCAA to offer more scholarships than schools ranked FCS, as we are currently. So, when we move to FBS we will be on the same level playing field with those scholarships. It wasn’t really a bitter sweet game for me. I have been at Texas State for 11 years now and winning the game, I don’t care who we play, is important for the entire university: for student-athletes, coaches, myself, fans, alumni, everybody.

Q: You have presided over many successes in Bobcat Athletics since you took the reigns in 2004. Is there any particular victory or achievement that stands out to you —a proudest moment, maybe? A: I am proud of many of our accomplishments. First of all, our current student-athlete graduation rate. Our graduation rate is the highest in the state, among state schools. Our student-athlete graduation success rate of 78 percent is the highest in Texas State’s history. So, our student-athletes are going to class and graduating and that is the main goal. Of course, I am also very proud of all of the championships, including the two football championships in the past four years—the first since 1982. All of the facility improvements are certainly something to be proud of, and I should definitely mention the student referendum that will take Bobcat Athletics to the next level.

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Q: As a Forth Worth native, how has life in San Marcos been different from metropolitan life? Is there anything unique about San Marcos living that you’ve grown to appreciate or enjoy? A: Living in a small town, you don’t have quite as much anonymity. All in all, San Marcos is a great place to live. My wife and my two daughters thoroughly enjoy it as well. The location is perfect. You’ve got the small town atmosphere and it’s easy to get around. However, if you need to go to Austin or San Antonio, either one is only a short drive away.

Q: The job of athletic director at an institution of this size can’t be an easy one. When you’re not on campus, how do you relax and pass your free time? A: When I am not working or attending Texas State athletic competitions, I relax and pass my free time hanging out in my backyard with my wife, my kids and my dogs or by watching sports on television. Also I enjoy spending time with my daughters during sporting events here at Texas State and at the San Marcos Academy.

Q: What are some of your goals for the future of Bobcat Athletics? A: Some of the top priorities right now are continuing to graduate student-athletes, building more facilities, elevating the athletic department to another level in terms of division and a new conference, and, I think it goes without saying, winning many, many more games.

Bobcats look to set new records during homecoming By Keff Ciardello // Sports Reporter Photo: Austin Byrd, Star File Photo

The last time Texas State hosted the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks in its annual homecoming game was Oct. 27, 2007. It was also the last time the Bobcats won their homecoming game. The two teams combined for 1,146 yards, including 447 yards rushing by the Bobcats. Alvin Canady, senior running back, rushed for 190 yards while Karrington Bush, junior running back, rushed for 187 yards. “Yeah, that was cool. That was a fun game,” Bush said. “Me and (Canady) are a good duo. Back then, that was just the start for us. Hopefully, we can keep that going.” Former Bobcat wide receiver Cameron Luke recorded seven catches for 152 yards and a careerhigh four touchdowns. The Lumberjacks netted zero rushing yards off of 14 attempts but still managed to gain 508 yards through the air—the most passing yards gained at Bobcat Stadium. The Bobcats have had several record-setting homecoming games. Former linebacker Jeremy Castillo recorded a career-high 15 tackles in the Bobcats’ 2006 homecoming victory over Southeastern Louisiana 38–17. The 15 tackles secured Castillo’s spot in Bobcat football history in which he broke the top 10 in career tackles that game. The 2006 game marked the second straight victory that season for the Bobcats, as they won McNeese State’s homecoming game, 27–17 the week before. Texas State played three straight homecoming games that season, losing at Northwestern State, 19–10. The Bobcats’ 2005 homecoming outing may be their most impressive of all. They

destroyed the Oklahoma Panhandle State Aggies, 75–7—the most points scored by a Texas State football team. Texas State scored 28 points in the first quarter and averaged over 50 yards per kickoff return, including one for a touchdown. The defense returned two interceptions for touchdowns and held the Aggies to 95 total yards. The Bobcats had five offensive starters who were unable to play because of injury. It was Texas State’s first non-conference homecoming game since beating Southern Utah in 1997. The game marked the third time in which the Bobcats have faced a non-conference opponent in a homecoming game since entering the Southland Conference in 1987. Texas State hosted Central Arkansas last season for its homecoming game. The game went down to the wire but the Bears secured the victory, 31–24. The Bobcats had won four straight homecoming games before that loss. “That was a tough loss,” said Coach Brad Wright. “I thought for sure that game was going to get us in the end. Luckily, things worked out for us and we were able to still take the conference.” That same Bears team finished the season atop the Southland Conference but was not crowned Southland Conference Champion because of a clause stating a team has to be in a conference for two seasons. It was the Bears’ first season in the Southland Conference, and they will not be eligible for the championship title until 2010. The Bobcats, in turn, were named slc Champions.

www.universitystar.com // October 27, 2009 // Satellite

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By Jake Maddox // Sports Reporter No need for lucky socks, pep rallies or hype about homecoming in the locker room. The Bobcats are merely looking for the conference win over the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks. The Texas State football team will prepare for its annual homecoming game against Stephen F. Austin as if it were any other game. The Bobcats may not have any traditions for homecoming, but when it comes to the Lumberjacks, there is one—winning. Texas State has defeated Stephen F. Austin four out of the teams’ last five meetings. “We do not make a big deal about homecoming,” said Alvin Canady, senior running back. “It is a conference game and it is important to get the win, but the fact that it is homecoming does not change anything.” Each year, Coach Brad Wright sees former players. Wright played football for Southwest Texas State and said the homecoming game is one in which his former teammates come back to watch.

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“My favorite thing about homecoming is I get to see all the old folks from back in the day,” Wright said. “I only get to visit with my old teammates from the ’70s and ’80s for a little bit after the game Saturday because my job keeps me busy Friday night and Sunday.” This year will be senior quarterback Bradley George’s last homecoming game. Central Arkansas defeated Texas State 31–24 in last year’s homecoming game. George said the game against Central Arkansas was the hardest conference match for the Bobcats last season. “I did not understand why they picked Central Arkansas for our homecoming game last year,” George said. “They were the best team in our conference.” Texas State defeated SFA 52–29 in its 2007 homecoming game. “The last time we played SFA for homecoming we beat them pretty bad,” George said. “I personally do not have any traditions for homecoming. I am just looking forward to beating SFA one last time.”

By Lisa Carter // Sports Editor Despite Texas State’s lack of success in winning football games in the beginning, the Bobcats will defeat the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks in their annual homecoming game Saturday. Texas State has been victorious against SFA with a 52–29 overall record against the Lumberjacks. Last time the Bobcats faced the Lumberjacks in their 2007 homecoming game, Texas State outrushed SFA 447–0. Though Lumberjacks quarterback Jeremy Moses set records in Bobcat Stadium for passing yards, pass attempts and completions, Texas State defeated SFA 52–29 to win its fourth consecutive homecoming game. Sure, people will remember Moses’ performance in that game, but what Texas State fans remember most is the Bobcats won. Texas State will continue winning for several reasons. One reason is Karrington Bush, junior running back, is back from a two-game hiatus. Bush is second on the team in rushing yards and will be an important factor in making key plays for the offense.

Alvin Canady has been an asset to the Bobcats this season and will continue to run up numbers in rushing and receiving yards. Da’Marcus Griggs and Darren Dillard have been vital to the offensive line as well. Griggs is the Bobcats’ leader in receiving yards and Dillard is right behind him. However, the Bobcats will have to do their job defensively against SFA. The Lumberjacks are second to the top team in the Southland Conference, Central Arkansas, in points allowed per game. Players on the offensive side of the ball for SFA have dominated the stats and will continue to do so as the Lumberjacks continue conference play. Texas State will have to face a team that was riding a four-game win streak coming into its Oct. 17 match against Central Arkansas, which was on a four-game win streak as well. SFA leads the conference in points-per-game, passing and receiving yards, which should be enough fire for the Texas State defense to get the job done. Texas State’s heartbreaking defeat to Southeastern Louisiana Oct. 10, along with its previous loss to Southern Utah, could be the real key to winning its homecoming

game. The Bobcats are riding high on emotions and looking to get back atop the SLC standings in order to defend their championship title. This year’s game against SFA may be one of the toughest for Texas State in the teams’ 82 meetings. If Texas State shows intensity and does its job on both sides of the ball, it’ll be an easy win for the Bobcats.

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Bobcats look forward to ‘victorious’ homecoming

Bobcats to defeat Lumberjacks, despite opposition talent

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Star versUs er on The UniversityLo g newspap e. SFA's The Pine oming gam this year's homec

Lumberjack offense hopes to obtain victory against Bobcats By Shelley Trevino // The Pine Log Sports Editor The matchup between the Lumberjacks and Bobcats should be an epic game this season. No doubt this is the upset game the Jacks hope to dish out at the Bobcats’ homecoming. Jeremy Moses, junior quarterback, will be leading the Jacks’ offense on Saturday and he will be sure to deliver amazing plays, as usual. Moses

made a splash in the Southland Conference against Texas State in 2007 with a record-breaking game that still echoes throughout the NCAA community. Moses had a record-setting night in his second career start by completing 41 of 59 (.695) passes for 508 yards and three touchdowns, all three marked as career-highs. The 41 completions and 59 pass attempts are single-game school records. The 508 yards passing marked only the fourth time in school history that a player has thrown for 500 yards in a game. He also completed a career-long 56-yard touchdown pass against the Bobcats. The 508 yards passing record has yet to be broken in the SLC. The Jacks’ spread offense usually gives this gunslinger a few receiving options by having three of SFA’s top running backs and receivers on the line for the team. Vincent Pervis, senior running back, has 375 yards rushing thus far in the season and is unstoppable to the Jacks’ opposing defense. Aaron Rhea, senior wide receiver, has 379 receiving yards and is responsible for five of the Jacks’ touchdowns so far. The Lumberjacks’ defense is responsible for 260 total offensive tackles with Devin Ducote, sophomore linebacker, racking them in at 25 overall. Tim

Knicky, senior defensive end, is responsible for 10 tackles and 5.5 sacks on the Jacks’ opposing quarterbacks. In an interview done with McNeese State head coach Matt Viator before its matchup against the Jacks, he displayed caution and was impressed by what the Jacks have been able to do so far against their opponents. “They have a fast breaking offense, one that will have a minimum of three receivers at one time,” Viator said, adding that he expected the Lumberjacks to throw the football at least 50 times in the game. “Their quarterback is very confident in what he does.” Viator said he felt the Cowboys would have to outscore the Lumberjacks because he didn’t figure McNeese State could keep SFA from scoring. Playing the Texas State Bobcats is a big game for SFA football fans. Texas’ little brother to the south has made an impact on the SLC by having the highest enrollment numbers out of all the schools in the division. “I look forward to playing in front of the Bobcat crowd,” Moses said. “It should be a good game this year and I’m confident going in there. We have amazing players that take the field every week and we’re definitely off to a good start in conference.”

www.universitystar.com // October 27, 2009 // Satellite

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TOP TEN HOMECOMING TRADITIONS By Thea Setterbo // Features Reporter

What’s your favorite thing about Texas State Homecoming? “The soapbox derby for the competition and bragging rights between fraternities.”

TRUE COLORS

— Jermaine Rivera, international relations senior

“This year’s homecoming is on Halloween, it will be fun to see everyone dress up.” — Daniela Estrada, exercise and sports science junior

“Tailgating … free food!”

— Cameron Anderson, marketing junior

Students often show support for their team by painting their faces and bodies with school colors. Lindsey Goldstein, Star Photo

Most students know homecoming is right around the corner, and the Bobcats are getting ready to take on Central Arkansas with help from enthusiastic, paint-ridden fans. Sherry Jeansonne, applied sociology senior and public relations officer for the Loud Crowd, has some pointers for anyone interested in painting up for homecoming. “Painting up is what I am in charge of, so I can help,” Jeansonne said. “Here are some of my tips: always make sure you are using washable paint and test the colors out on your hand before your body to make sure they look okay.” Jeansonne said painting up is important, especially for homecoming. One group of students who normally sit next to the Loud Crowd at football games are enthusiastic when it comes to displaying school spirit. “I’m painting up for home-

coming, but until I meet up with my buddies, I’m not sure what (I will do),” said Allen Ferguson, theatre junior. “I normally paint my face, but this year I’m feeling quite a bit more spirited than normal. The paint seems to enhance the whole situation and it helps get me pumped up for the game.” Jeansonne said the best place to buy paint is at Hobby Lobby, because they have a better selection of colors and they always have maroon and gold. Students can also buy temporary Bobcat facial tattoos at the bookstore. Ideas for painting could be to color the face and torso maroon to “maroon out,” coloring half of a Bobcat’s face maroon and the other half gold or painting paw prints on face or arms. “I’m not planning on painting myself, maybe just ‘Tx St’ on my face or something to that effect, but the kids in my

dorm meet up and one of our RA’s paints T-X-S-T-A-T-E on their stomachs,” said Kelsey Neiswender, interdisciplinary studies freshman. Jeansonne said when using multiple people to paint up, be careful with missing links. “If you’re spelling a word out, make sure you have enough people and you don’t leave out a letter,” Jeansonne said. Sherry said those who paint up might get sunburned around the paint, meaning they will be left with a large pale letter on their torso or back. “It’s the ultimate school spirit to have a Bobcat tanned on your face,” Jeansonne said. An alternative for those not wanting to go shirtless is to buy a white T-shirt and paint it instead. Using a T-shirt prevents the paint from running and also prevents sunburn.

“The homecoming T-shirts and seeing everyone wearing them.” — Erin Walker, fashion merchandising junior

“The concert at the end of the week.” — Emily Bradford, journalism junior

“The step show is definitely my favorite.” — Jasmine Arnold, French senior

“Drinking at the tailgate before the game.” — Gaby Valdez, public relations senior

“The Greek God and Goddess Pageant is fun to go to.” — Brooke Feldman, marketing junior

“The annual talent show is really cool.” — Johnny Cardoza, public relations sophomore

“The game!”

— Laura Hughey, marketing junior

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www.universitystar.com // October 27, 2009 // Satellite

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HOMECOMING CONCERT GETS REVAMPED ’80s cover band pours some sugar on tailgating Matthew Barnes // Features Reporter SACA is including a ’80s rock band from Austin called Video Vamp for the pregame homecoming concert, and coordinators agree they are the ticket to get fans in the mood. “I know a lot of artists they’ve brought for homecoming in the past have been country singers,” said Roman Arispe, assistant homecoming director. “This year we tried to switch it up a little by bringing Video Vamp.” Video Vamp dresses out in ’80s fashion and performs classics like Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believing” and Guns’n’Roses “Sweet Child of Mine,” which SACA members said will get the crowd more involved. “With the bands in the past, only a select few knew the songs,” said Jillian Vidal, homecoming director. “These are songs we’ve heard since we were children that we still hear all the time. I just want to see more people enjoy the band.” Sherry Bray, co-owner of Video Vamp, said the band got its name from lyrics to Def Leppard’s “Pour Some Sugar on Me Baby,” which is a song they will most likely

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play. Both the name and music exemplify their lead vocalist Jessica “Kitty” Frailin. “Kitty is the star … she’s what we built the band around,” Bray said. “She’s not limited as a female vocalist because she can sing a lot of stuff.” The bass player, Mike Watson, was a member of LC Rocks four years ago when they played Texas State’s homecoming tailgate. He is also the bass player for Dangerous Toys, a rock band formed in Austin in the late ’80s who went Gold with their debut album. Some students agree that Video Vamp was a smart choice and are hopeful it will get the crowd rowdy for their team. “It is songs everyone will know and sing to, which makes it more enjoyable,” said Erica Michaud, undecided freshman. “When we go into the game, the guys will have the feeling that it’s homecoming. When a play happens and it’s bad, you have the fans there cheering you on—it pumps you up, so the tailgate and the concert should definitely be exciting and something to talk about.”

SACA members have high hopes for the band. “They really work the crowd from what I hear,” Arispe said. “They get into what they’re performing, so people are probably going to sing along and get a little crazy. Hopefully it will really get people hyped up.” The band has played multiple UT and city parties, as well as venues like Cedar Street and House of Blues. “It’s a pretty big deal for a cover band to play House of Blues,” Bray said. “It’s a live music venue for national acts like Eddie Money with a 1,500 person capacity.” There are more than 136 ’80s tunes in the Video Vamp arsenal, but Bray said the band will be playing only their top tracks for the 90 minute set. The concert takes place Saturday from 10:30 am to 12 pm in the tailgating parking lot. They won’t be taking any breaks. “It’s just gonna be the best of the best of their songs,” Bray said, “An hour and a half straight, just the heavy hitters that get people up and going.”

www.universitystar.com // October 27, 2009 // Satellite

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By Rachel Nelson // News Reporter

The Jerry D. and Linda Gregg Fields Bobcat Stadium West Side Complex opened last month, but the over all expansion is far from finished. “We built it with expansion in mind,” said Derek Grice, assistant athletics director. “We have the ability to put another level on top so we can in the future bring the press box up to that level and put a couple additional suites on that level. Everything we’ve done has been done with the idea we are going to continue to expand the stadium.” A master plan was laid out in 2008 to expand the stadium from 15,000 seats to around 35,000. Completing the West Side Complex was the first step of that project, Grice said. The second part of the project includes relocating the current track facility to make room for a north end zone expansion. “Relocating the track facility allows us to enclose the north end zone — adding about 8,500 seats — which allows us to get the fans closer to the field, giving us a more intimate setting,” Grice said. A new track location has not yet been settled. Grice said all future construction is to be determined, but tentatively includes the north side expansion, a south end-zone expansion, additional luxury suites and club seats, a new press box and an upper deck on the east side. Another step in the expansion process includes bridging Bobcat Stadium’s east parking lot with the former location of the Hidden Village apartments. Texas State real estate specialist David Bisett said Texas State purchased the property for the purpose of expanding the stadium. The apartment complex was demolished, which Bisett said could provide a new track location or additional parking spaces. Bisett said the city recently granted an easement on a .07-acre piece of property that will allow for better connectivity. “Now the city has better options on how to connect that Hidden Village site to Bobcat Stadium,” Bisett said. “They’re continuing to look at their options.” Funding for the projects is being derived from several sources, said Athletics Director Larry Teis. “The funds to finish the stadium will come from ticket sales, private donations, other outside income such as corporate sponsorships and student service fee money,” Teis said. Teis said expanding the stadium will have an over-all benefit on Texas State. “It will help the department move the football program to Division I status with the rest of our sports,” Teis said. “This increased exposure, as a marketing tool, will benefit the entire university.” A timetable has not been set for the remaining projects, but Grice said they expect it to be a work in progress for the next several years. “We are looking at locations and what it’s going to take to do this,” Grice said. “We have started the feasibility process, so the wheels are in motion. So as we continue to look at these options, the more clear a definitive time line is going to be.” Teis said several factors, including the current economic climate, have an impact on the date of completion for the stadium.

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BOBCAT STADIUM EXPANSION IS JUST BEGINNING

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MORE TO COME

Tina Phan, Star File Photo www.universitystar.com // October 27, 2009 // Satellite

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