Page 1

CLIMBING A MOUNTAIN

Cycling club headed to North Carolina for mountain bike nationals SEE SPORTS PAGE 14

SUBURBIA

Play discusses American dream, opens Thursday SEE TRENDS PAGE 9

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

OCTOBER 25, 2007

THURSDAY

VOLUME 97, ISSUE 28

Campus security cameras one step closer to fruition By Scott Thomas Assistant News Editor Cameras monitoring students in The Quad and other privacy issues were addressed during Wednesday’s Faculty Senate meeting. Jeb Thomas, access services supervisor for the University Police Department, said the camera system is being reviewed at the vice-presidential level and would probably be initiated. “Our main goal is to keep everyone’s dignity,” Thomas said. “No one wants to live under a microscope.”

Thomas said the proposed locations would be part of the LBJ Student Center, Strahan Coliseum’s parking lot and the area of The Quad designated for free speech. “Some faculty had expressed concern about having camera surveillance over the free-speech areas,” said Faculty Senate Chair William Stone, criminal justice professor. “And it’s an issue of balancing the interests of campus security and safety versus the rights to free speech.” Tyler Ferguson, Associated Student Government senator, at large, was in attendance for

Thomas’ presentation. “I think that campus security is really important, especially in the wake of Virginia Tech, (but) that there’s a fine line between having a secure campus and infringing on someone’s civil liberties,” Ferguson said. “And I think that we need to be really careful when implementing this camera system to make sure students’ civil liberties and their privacy is protected.” Ferguson said it is possible ASG could discuss the issue in the future. Thomas portrayed an active camera system as a useful tool

in law enforcement. He offered an anecdote of three laptop thieves that were captured when they were caught with stolen property on the San Jacinto Hall elevator camera. “You would be surprised how a 10-second flash on a camera can make a case,” Thomas said. Thomas further said the cameras would not constantly be monitored and accessed only when necessary. He said the footage would be stored for 30 days, then automatically purged unless archived. “We aren’t going to hire someone to zoom in on everyone’s

face in The Quad,” he said. Thomas said access to the monitoring system would be restricted, but gave no specifics. He said other security policies could come in the future, such as doors with electronic locks controlled from UPD headquarters and cameras in classrooms with audio and visual equipment. “Most universities since Virginia Tech have been looking at lockdown solutions,” he said. “Security is like an onion; there are layers of defense.” Thomas said cameras will be placed at the Round Rock campus because UPD’s presence there is

not constant. Currently, the policy has not been signed by the university president, and will not go into effect until then. “Once we get up and running, this system is going to grow,” Thomas said. Ferguson discussed the ASG resolution he authored which encourages the university to include gender identity and expression in the non-discrimination policy. “I want (Faculty Senate) to join us and endorse this,” Ferguson said. “(To) make sure everyone enjoys the university as much as I do.”

College Republicans strive for concealed campus Minority retention rates

cause worry for Texas State By Jackie Baylon News Reporter

Spencer Millsap and Monty Marion/Star photo illustration CONCEALMENT CONCERNS: The Texas State College Republicans, along with national organizations, support the repeal of the campus handgun ban that prohibits carrying concealed weapons on educational premises.

By Scott Thomas Assistant News Editor Citizens with a license to carry a concealed firearm should be allowed to carry it on college campuses, the Texas State College Republicans and others across the nation said. To lobby citizens and legislators for a repeal of the campus handgun ban, students are

marching with empty holsters this week. The protest is supported by organizations such as the National Rifle Association and Students for Concealed Carry on Campus. College Republicans Chairwoman Traci Adams said in an e-mail the organization supports the position, but declined to comment further. Currently the state law prohibits

citizens from carrying a firearm onto educational premises — public or private — as well as courts and poll places on Election Day. A citizen in Texas must be at least 21 years old and receive a license from the state to conceal a handgun. “We feel that individuals who have undergone the training, testing and background checks required to acquire a handgun license would show discretion

and good judgment on college campuses,” said Scott Lewis, media coordinator for Students for Concealed Carry on Campus. “The only people you’re disarming are the good guys.” Lewis used the Virginia Tech massacre as an example for support of the repeal. He said Cho See GUNS, page 4

The retention of minority college students is a persistent, nationwide problem. Retention and graduation figures over the last 40 years have not improved despite efforts put into providing programs and support services to help retain students. According to the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, it is particularly true for Hispanic students. The study reported 68 percent fail to reenroll at a university in consecutive terms while 48 percent of Caucasians do not return. “Demographic information shows that the minority population in the United States is growing at a faster rate than the majority,” said Alan Seidman, editor of The Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice. “It is imperative that educational institutions find ways to help improve retention rates for all students, but particularly minority students.” Amaury Nora, director of the National Center for Student Success at the University of Houston, said Hispanic students are dropping out of college for many reasons. “The degree of academic under-preparedness for college, the lack of a social support system like family and community and inadequate financial aid information and awards are but a few of the reasons why Hispanic students leave college before graduation,” Nora said. According to the Texas State Institutional Research Office,

695 first-time and full-time Hispanic freshmen enrolled in fall of 2006. Only 72 percent of those students reenrolled. The university’s Hispanic retention rate was down 3 percent from the fall of 2005. Transfer students, those in pursuit of an associate’s degree and part-time or graduate students are excluded from the calculation of retention rates. Nora said some theories have provided findings that can be used to help improve retention rates among minority students. He said one of those theories focuses on the notion of student engagement, both in and outside of the classroom. “The more that Hispanic students are brought into the academic and social life of the university, the higher the chances for student retention,” Nora said. Seidman, executive director of the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, said in a report the institution, if it wants students to be successful, must be willing to provide programs that will help them become more involved. “For intervention programs and services to be successful, they must be powerful enough to effect change,” Siedman said. Jennifer Beck, director of retention management and planning at Texas State, agreed. “It is not only about offering a whole variety of things for students to be a part of, but then also promoting the programs and encouraging the students is See DECLINE, page 4

Scheduled power outage affects 33 buildings By Allen Reed News Reporter On the heels of last week’s campus blackout, another power outage is scheduled for Saturday from approximately 5 a.m. to midnight. Thirty-three buildings on campus will be without power and seven will have limited or no air conditioning. Joe Ellis, facility management work control supervisor, said there are two reasons for the outage this weekend. It was originally planned as part of the cogeneration expansion, a routine utility development to keep up with campus growth. Ellis said they would be adding new equipment to produce additional utilities. “The city of San Marcos Elec-

trical Utility will be here on Saturday to de-energize some circuits,” Ellis said. “They will then relocate these circuits for the COGEN expansion.” The second reason, Ellis said, is because of a major circuit feeder that failed Oct. 16, causing a campus blackout that, for some buildings, lasted from approximately 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. “This outage is not just planned, but necessary,” Ellis said. “Rather than have a planned outage and then another planned outage, we’re going to do them both at once. The failed feeder makes this procedure more urgent.” Last week’s power failure further caused the list of affected buildings to change. The day before the power failure,

Today’s Weather

Mostly Sunny 73˚

Precipitation: 0% Humidity: 60% UV: 7 High Wind: NNW 14

a campuswide e-mail was sent discussing Saturday’s planned power outage. But things changed the next day when there was a fault in a major circuit, cutting off power throughout half of campus. Ellis said this unexpected outage resulted in a last-minute change of plans for facility operations. “When that damage occurred last week, it completely changed our plans,” Ellis said. “Instead of being able to prioritize buildings, we now have to turn off buildings associated with that underground circuit.” Some students who live in the affected dorms are concerned about the blackout. Ty Halford, computer science freshman and Bexar Hall resident, said he is concerned with everything

Two-day Forecast Friday Sunny Temp: 78°/ 46° Precip: 0%

Saturday Sunny Temp: 77°/ 50° Precip: 10%

from the visibility in his dorm’s stairwells to his grooming appliances. The most pressing issue for Halford is how he will procure food. “The food in my refrigerator is going to be ruined,” Halford said. “I’m going to have to buy new milk and new cheese. My microwave won’t work either and the stoves in the dorm are all electric. Harris is also going to be closed because of the power outage, and I don’t know what I’m going to eat.” For specific information, students can consult the Oct. 19 campuswide e-mail concerning the power outage. Students livGreg Richards/Star photo illustration ing in residence halls should IN THE DARK: Power will be cut to 33 Texas State buildings Sathave received an additional email from Rosanne Proite, di- urday starting at approximately 5 a.m. for upgrades and repairs to the campus power system. Electricity is expected to be restored at rector of residence life. midnight. For a list of the affected buildings, see News page 4.

Inside News ..... 1,2,3,4,5 Opinions ............ 6 Trends ..... 7,8,9,10

Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Diversions ........ 11 Classifieds ....... 12 Sports ......... 13,14

To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2007 The University Star


PAGETWO

starsof texas state

Today in Brief

Page 2 - Thursday, October 25, 2007

Diana Harrell has been promoted to director of the Office of University Marketing at Texas State. Harrell brings more than 23 years of combined experience in marketing and communications to the position. During her 18-year tenure at the Texas General Land Office, Harrell held the titles of technical writ-

er, network administrator, graphic designer and creative coordinator. She was responsible for, among others, the creative materials used in marketing the Adopt-A-Beach program, Buy Recycle, oil spill prevention and response and alternative fuels. — Courtesy of the University News Service

News Contact — Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Calendar THURSDAY

TUESDAY

Texas State volleyball will play Central Arkansas at 7 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum.

The CSC will have a free lunch for all students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the CSC lobby.

The Counseling Center presents, Stress Management Techniques: The Heart of Matter, at 1 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-5.1.

Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 12:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland. For more information call Lynn, (512) 357-2049.

Career Services presents the Fall Construction Job Fair from 1 to 4 p.m. in the LBJ Ballroom. Women’s Personal Growth Group will meet from noon to 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. The Catholic Student Organization will meet at 6 p.m. in the library of the Catholic Student Center. The Rock — Praise and Worship will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the St. Jude Chapel of the CSC. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting at 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. There will be contemporary worship, relevant teaching, prayer and plenty of fun. Everyone is welcome to attend. FRIDAY UMADD New Organization Interest Meetings will meet from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. in LBJSC 3.10.1. Alcoholics Anonymous Newcomer’s Meeting, River Group, will be 9:15 p.m. at 1700 Ranch Rd. 12, Suite C. SATURDAY Texas State women’s volleyball will play Northwestern State at 2 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum. MONDAY Men Against Violence meeting will be held from 5 to 6 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3.10. Sexual Assault and Abuse Survivors Group, a program of the Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center for Texas State Students will meet from 5 to 6:15 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

WAR STORIES

Facing the Fear — An Anxiety/Panic Group will meet from 3:30 to 5 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) Monty Marion/Star photo 245-2208. Keith Kay, veteran CBS cameraman for the Vietnam and Gulf Wars, speaks about his experiences working with the military Wednesday evening as part of Mass Communication Week.

ASG Beat

Senate expands, receives more funds

The CSC will have Adoration Here’s what the Associated Student Government of the Blessed Sacrament from has been up to this week: 5:45 to 9 p.m. in the St. Jude The student relations committee has begun to Chapel. read and work through the complaints listed by students during the grievance session held in The Every Nation Campus Min- Quad. In the coming weeks those complaints will istries will be holding a weekly be heard and addressed on the Senate floor. ASG campus meeting at 7 p.m. in Cen- would like to extend a very large thank you to the tennial Hall, Room G-02. There students who voiced their opinions. As for those will be free food, fellowship and who missed out, ASG will be hosting another sesa message exploring the person sion before the semester is out and specific dates of Jesus. will be coming, so keep those eyes peeled. ASG, in an effort to have a more representative Peter Gruning will give a free sample and voice of the student body, has increased presentation, Franciscan Spiritu- from 40 to 60 senators. Along with this was a necesality — the way of the orders, at 7 sary request for a budget increase of $10,000, which p.m. in the CSC chapel. was submitted and passed Monday. This will allow WEDNESDAY The rosary will be prayed 6 p.m. in the St. Jude Chapel of the Catholic Student Center. Adult children of alcoholics dealing with dysfunctional families group will meet from 5:15 to 6:45 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. The American Marketing Association presents guest speaker, Hal Adams, VP of Marketing for Valero at 5:30 p.m. in McCoy Hall, Room 124. Free food and drinks available starting at 5:15 p.m. Bring a friendall majors welcome! Business casual suggested. For more information, visit www.busi ness.txstate.edu/AMA.

University Police Department Oct. 16, 4:24 p.m. Elevator Rescue/Blanco Hall An officer was dispatched for an elevator rescue. A student was released from an elevator without incident. A report was generated for this case.

GLBQ Pride Group meeting will be held from noon until 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

Anger Management: Your Plan for Real-Life Coping will be from 5:10 to 6:25 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 2452208.

CRIME BL TTER

ASG to move with more freedom and facilitate the service to the student body more adequately. Because of the voting discrepancy discussed last week, the resolution “Embracing True Diversity” was taken up for consideration again. Even though the resolution’s passage was heatedly opposed by certain members of the Senate, it passed with a simple majority vote. Remember that any and all students wishing to attend an ASG meeting are more than welcome to join us 7 p.m. Mondays in the LBJ Student Center, Room 3-14.1. Be excellent to each other this week, and remember always, today is a great day to be a Bobcat. — Courtesy of the Associated Student Government

Library Beat

Once-locked computers have new options The second floor reference area of Alkek Library is busier than ever this semester. In the past, the computer workstations were reserved for library and Internet research and accessing Blackboard or TRACS. Now students are also able to use the workstations for typing papers, creating presentations, accessing e-mail and more. The Microsoft Office Suite 2003 has been installed on most of the workstations. Furthermore, all the stations have been replaced with new Dell Optiplex 725 computers and monitors. The former computers were more than 6 years old and in order to accommodate the heavier workload expected the library decided to replace them as soon as possible. The computers in the first floor student lounge have been replaced. Although the intention is to have this area used by students who are knowledgeable and quite self-sufficient, the library has increased technical support by having student workers available who can help with printing problems and simple software questions. The

library’s fourth floor computer lab is open for students who have more complex questions or need to use other software programs such as Photoshop. Color printing is available on the fourth floor for 50 cents per page. Access to most of the workstations will now require a Texas State University Net ID and password. However, several workstations will still be reserved for users without a Net ID or who only want to do research. These machines will not have Microsoft Office available. The Alkek Library administration and staff are committed to supporting students’ academic success and hope the new computers and added functionality will contribute to that success. Reference librarians are still available for reference questions and help with research, database, catalog or World Wide Web search strategies. Students with questions can call the reference desk at (512) 245-2686. — Courtesy of Alkek Library

Oct. 16, 4:47 p.m. Theft — under $1500/ UPD Lobby An officer was dispatched to the lobby for a theft report. A student reported property had been taken from the north side of San Jacinto Hall without consent. This case is under investigation. Oct. 16, 8:06 p.m. Medical Emergency/Evans Liberal Arts An officer was dispatched for a medical emergency. A student was having difficulty communicating, was evaluated by EMS and refused transport to Central Texas Medical Center. Oct. 16, 11:41 p.m. Failure to Comply/Striking Unattended Vehicle/ Bobcat Village Commuter Lot An officer was dispatched for a hit and run. A student reported a motor vehicle was damaged while it was parked. This case is under investigation. Oct. 17, 10:06 a.m. Burglary — Vehicle/UPD Lobby An officer was dispatched to the lobby for a burglary of a motor vehicle report. A student reported property had been taken from a motor vehicle without consent. This case is under investigation. Oct. 17, 3:55 p.m. Medical Emergency/J.C. Kellam An officer was dispatched for a medical emergency. A student was found lying on the floor, was evaluated by EMS and transported to CTMC for further evaluation. — Courtesy of the University Police Department


NEWS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

The University Star - Page 3

Statue totaling $75,000 could find campus home By Amanda Venable Special to The University Star Some student leaders are proposing putting a bobcat statue in The Quad by the end of summer 2008. The Associated Student Government believes building the bobcat statue will instill a sense of pride and tradition in Texas State students. The statue would be paid through student service fees and outside fundraising and be placed in the heart of the Texas State campus. The “Bring the Bobcat Home” emergency legislation discussed at the Oct. 6 ASG meeting states the underlying goal of the statue’s presence is to inspire a sense of pride and awe in Texas State and affection for the chosen symbol. “We as the current class of students have an opportunity to leave a legacy in this bobcat statue and it’s time we did it,” wrote ASG President Reagan Pugh in an e-mail. The estimated cost to build a bronze, three times life-size replica of

a bobcat is $75,000. The student service fees will cover what outside fundraising does not. Whatever money raised that is not used to construct the statue would be left in the student service fee account. Other student organizations on campus and the Alumni Association are being asked to donate to add to the existing $11,500 already given to the project. Currently, full-time Texas State students pay $90 per semester in student service fees that go toward several university departments on campus as well as some faculty and staff salaries. The remaining funds may be used at the discretion of the Student Service Fee Committee, which is composed of a student majority who are appointed by the ASG president. “The statue will be something tangible that we can do to add to the

culture of our school,” said ASG Sen. Eddy Gomez, bill sponsor. Many students have mixed emotions, questioning whether or not building a statue is the best use of student money. Some would prefer the money from stu— Eddy Gomez dent service fees ASG senator go toward something that could more directly benefit the student body. “It’s obvious that our mascot is the bobcat — you see everyone wearing Texas State shirts with (the bobcat) on it,” said Kristy Nguyen, pre-geography sophomore. “Why should we spend $75,000 on a statue when we could be spending that money on scholarships that could better motivate students?” Pugh disagreed, saying ASG gives out almost $300,000 in scholarships a year. “Texas State University is doing

he statue will “T be something tangible that we can do to add to the culture of our school.”

FILLING THE BALLOT

Cotton Miller/Star photo Students cast their early votes Wednesday afternoon in the LBJ Student Center. Early voting for the Nov. 6 election will continue through Nov. 2 at designated polling locations.

great on the large scale, but in areas like school pride, recognition and identifying oneself with the Bobcats and our school, we are still lacking,” Pugh said. “It is our goal to have the Bobcat come home — this project is long overdue.” Still, the question of whether the cost will outweigh the benefits is an active debate for many students on campus who believe the statue will do little to increase school pride. “I think Texas State students could stand to have more school pride,” said Christian Flack, electronic media senior. “I think a statue would help some, but I don’t really know how much it would really raise school spirit.” The Student Service Fee Committee’s vote is not final, but serves as a recommendation to Joanne Smith, vice president for student affairs, who has the ability to vote yes or no on the project. If voted for, the resolution is then sent to the desk of University President Denise Trauth who will then decide the fate of the project.

It’s delicious!


CLIMBING A MOUNTAIN

Cycling club headed to North Carolina for mountain bike nationals SEE SPORTS PAGE 14

SUBURBIA

Play discusses American dream, opens Thursday SEE TRENDS PAGE 7

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

OCTOBER 25, 2007

THURSDAY

VOLUME 97, ISSUE 28

Campus security cameras one step closer to fruition By Scott Thomas Assistant News Editor Cameras monitoring students in The Quad and other privacy issues were addressed during Wednesday’s Faculty Senate meeting. Jeb Thomas, access services supervisor for the University Police Department, said the camera system is being reviewed at the vice-presidential level and would probably be initiated. “Our main goal is to keep everyone’s dignity,” Thomas said. “No one wants to live under a microscope.”

Thomas said the proposed locations would be part of the LBJ Student Center, Strahan Coliseum’s parking lot and the area of The Quad designated for free speech. “Some faculty had expressed concern about having camera surveillance over the free-speech areas,” said Faculty Senate Chair William Stone, criminal justice professor. “And it’s an issue of balancing the interests of campus security and safety versus the rights to free speech.” Tyler Ferguson, Associated Student Government senator, at large, was in attendance for

Thomas’ presentation. “I think that campus security is really important, especially in the wake of Virginia Tech, (but) that there’s a fine line between having a secure campus and infringing on someone’s civil liberties,” Ferguson said. “And I think that we need to be really careful when implementing this camera system to make sure students’ civil liberties and their privacy is protected.” Ferguson said it is possible ASG could discuss the issue in the future. Thomas portrayed an active camera system as a useful tool

in law enforcement. He offered an anecdote of three laptop thieves that were captured when they were caught with stolen property on the San Jacinto Hall elevator camera. “You would be surprised how a 10-second flash on a camera can make a case,” Thomas said. Thomas further said the cameras would not constantly be monitored and accessed only when necessary. He said the footage would be stored for 30 days, then automatically purged unless archived. “We aren’t going to hire someone to zoom in on everyone’s

face in The Quad,” he said. Thomas said access to the monitoring system would be restricted, but gave no specifics. He said other security policies could come in the future, such as doors with electronic locks controlled from UPD headquarters and cameras in classrooms with audio and visual equipment. “Most universities since Virginia Tech have been looking at lockdown solutions,” he said. “Security is like an onion; there are layers of defense.” Thomas said cameras will be placed at the Round Rock campus because UPD’s presence there is

not constant. Currently, the policy has not been signed by the university president, and will not go into effect until then. “Once we get up and running, this system is going to grow,” Thomas said. Ferguson discussed the ASG resolution he authored which encourages the university to include gender identity and expression in the non-discrimination policy. “I want (Faculty Senate) to join us and endorse this,” Ferguson said. “(To) make sure everyone enjoys the university as much as I do.”

College Republicans strive for concealed campus Minority retention rates

cause worry for Texas State By Jackie Baylon News Reporter

Spencer Millsap and Monty Marion/Star photo illustration CONCEALMENT CONCERNS: The Texas State College Republicans, along with national organizations, support the repeal of the campus handgun ban that prohibits carrying concealed weapons on educational premises.

By Scott Thomas Assistant News Editor Citizens with a license to carry a concealed firearm should be allowed to carry it on college campuses, the Texas State College Republicans and others across the nation said. To lobby citizens and legislators for a repeal of the campus handgun ban, students are

marching with empty holsters this week. The protest is supported by organizations such as the National Rifle Association and Students for Concealed Carry on Campus. College Republicans Chairwoman Traci Adams said in an e-mail the organization supports the position, but declined to comment further. Currently the state law prohibits

citizens from carrying a firearm onto educational premises — public or private — as well as courts and poll places on Election Day. A citizen in Texas must be at least 21 years old and receive a license from the state to conceal a handgun. “We feel that individuals who have undergone the training, testing and background checks required to acquire a handgun license would show discretion

and good judgment on college campuses,” said Scott Lewis, media coordinator for Students for Concealed Carry on Campus. “The only people you’re disarming are the good guys.” Lewis used the Virginia Tech massacre as an example for support of the repeal. He said Cho See GUNS, page 4

The retention of minority college students is a persistent, nationwide problem. Retention and graduation figures over the last 40 years have not improved despite efforts put into providing programs and support services to help retain students. According to the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, it is particularly true for Hispanic students. The study reported 68 percent fail to reenroll at a university in consecutive terms while 48 percent of Caucasians do not return. “Demographic information shows that the minority population in the United States is growing at a faster rate than the majority,” said Alan Seidman, editor of The Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice. “It is imperative that educational institutions find ways to help improve retention rates for all students, but particularly minority students.” Amaury Nora, director of the National Center for Student Success at the University of Houston, said Hispanic students are dropping out of college for many reasons. “The degree of academic under-preparedness for college, the lack of a social support system like family and community and inadequate financial aid information and awards are but a few of the reasons why Hispanic students leave college before graduation,” Nora said. According to the Texas State Institutional Research Office,

695 first-time and full-time Hispanic freshmen enrolled in fall of 2006. Only 72 percent of those students reenrolled. The university’s Hispanic retention rate was down 3 percent from the fall of 2005. Transfer students, those in pursuit of an associate’s degree and part-time or graduate students are excluded from the calculation of retention rates. Nora said some theories have provided findings that can be used to help improve retention rates among minority students. He said one of those theories focuses on the notion of student engagement, both in and outside of the classroom. “The more that Hispanic students are brought into the academic and social life of the university, the higher the chances for student retention,” Nora said. Seidman, executive director of the Center for the Study of College Student Retention, said in a report the institution, if it wants students to be successful, must be willing to provide programs that will help them become more involved. “For intervention programs and services to be successful, they must be powerful enough to effect change,” Siedman said. Jennifer Beck, director of retention management and planning at Texas State, agreed. “It is not only about offering a whole variety of things for students to be a part of, but then also promoting the programs and encouraging the students is See SUPPORT, page 4

Scheduled power outage affects 33 buildings By Allen Reed News Reporter On the heels of last week’s campus blackout, another power outage is scheduled for Saturday from approximately 5 a.m. to midnight. Thirty-three buildings on campus will be without power and seven will have limited or no air conditioning. Joe Ellis, facility management work control supervisor, said there are two reasons for the outage this weekend. It was originally planned as part of the cogeneration expansion, a routine utility development to keep up with campus growth. Ellis said they would be adding new equipment to produce additional utilities. “The city of San Marcos Elec-

trical Utility will be here on Saturday to de-energize some circuits,” Ellis said. “They will then relocate these circuits for the COGEN expansion.” The second reason, Ellis said, is because of a major circuit feeder that failed Oct. 16, causing a campus blackout that, for some buildings, lasted from approximately 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. “This outage is not just planned, but necessary,” Ellis said. “Rather than have a planned outage and then another planned outage, we’re going to do them both at once. The failed feeder makes this procedure more urgent.” Last week’s power failure further caused the list of affected buildings to change. The day before the power failure,

Today’s Weather

Mostly Sunny 73˚

Precipitation: 0% Humidity: 60% UV: 7 High Wind: NNW 14

a campuswide e-mail was sent discussing Saturday’s planned power outage. But things changed the next day when there was a fault in a major circuit, cutting off power throughout half of campus. Ellis said this unexpected outage resulted in a last-minute change of plans for facility operations. “When that damage occurred last week, it completely changed our plans,” Ellis said. “Instead of being able to prioritize buildings, we now have to turn off buildings associated with that underground circuit.” Some students who live in the affected dorms are concerned about the blackout. Ty Halford, computer science freshman and Bexar Hall resident, said he is concerned with everything

Two-day Forecast Friday Sunny Temp: 78°/ 46° Precip: 0%

Saturday Sunny Temp: 77°/ 50° Precip: 10%

from the visibility in his dorm’s stairwells to his grooming appliances. The most pressing issue for Halford is how he will procure food. “The food in my refrigerator is going to be ruined,” Halford said. “I’m going to have to buy new milk and new cheese. My microwave won’t work either and the stoves in the dorm are all electric. Harris is also going to be closed because of the power outage, and I don’t know what I’m going to eat.” For specific information, students can consult the Oct. 19 campuswide e-mail concerning the power outage. Students livGreg Richards/Star photo illustration ing in residence halls should IN THE DARK: Power will be cut to 33 Texas State buildings Sathave received an additional email from Rosanne Proite, di- urday morning starting at approximately 5 a.m. for upgrades and repairs to the campus power system. Electricity is expected to be rector of residence life. restored at midnight. For a list of the affected buildings, see page 4.

Inside News ..... 1,2,3,4,5 Opinions ............ 6 Trends ..... 7,8,9,10

Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Diversions ........ 11 Classifieds ....... 12 Sports ......... 13,14

To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2007 The University Star


Page 4 - The University Star

NEWS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

Buildings affected by Saturday’s power outage Chemistry Building Old Main Derrick Hall Jackson Hall Academic Services Buildings North and South Psychology Building Taylor-Murphy History Building Centennial Hall* Evans Liberal Arts Math and Computer Science Building* LBJ Student Center*

Arnold Hall Smith Hall Hornsby Hall Burleson Hall Blanco Hall University Performing Arts Center West Campus Maintenance San Saba Hall Canyon Hall West Campus Practice Field Harris Dining Hall Student Recreation Center* Frio Building

Family and Consumer Scienes Building Child Development Center Bexar Hall Glade Theater Health Professions Building College Inn Supple Science Building* Mitte Complex* San Marcos Hall * Power will be provided to buildings with emergency generators.

GUNS: Accidents ‘not a huge concern’ CONTINUED from page 1

Seung-Hui, the Virginia Tech shooter, had no regard for the law either way. Critics of the proposed repeal are concerned about students’ maturity and judgment. “If they’re tempted to carry it and they’re given permission to carry it, there could be the temptation to use it in a situation where it may not be called for,” said Paul Paschall, English senior. “I haven’t heard of anything on campus, here anyways, that would warrant the use of a handgun.” Other students said knowing their peers were concealing firearms would make them feel uncomfortable. “I’m all for concealed handguns, but at the same time it would really creep me out knowing my fellow students might have a gun with them,” said Sarah White, electronic media junior. “You’d think a college environment is really safe and you wouldn’t need

something like that.” Kenneth Hebson, marketing junior, said having guns on campus seems like a reason for somebody to get hurt. Lewis acknowledged the ban would increase the chances, but said it would be less than what the repeal’s critics claim. “There’s always a possibility of an accident, just like there’s a possibility of an accident for people who are carrying throughout the state,” Lewis said. “But you don’t pick up the newspaper everyday and read about another license holder shooting someone at the grocery store. It’s not a huge concern.” The debate is being heard nationally, and while the issue was reinvigorated after Virginia Tech, it has been going on for more than a decade. In 1995, a San Antonio high school student brought a gun to school and admitted it when confronted. He was convicted of a federal crime under the Gun Free School Zone act of

1990. However, the Supreme Court overturned the ruling and declared the act unconstitutional, putting the debate at a state level. In 2004, the Oregon Legislature passed a law allowing concealed handgun carriers on campuses, but the state Supreme Court overturned the ruling. In October 2007, an Oregon teacher’s case was heard by the state Supreme Court to allow guns on campus, claiming she needed it to protect herself and her family from an abusive ex-husband. Lewis said this is not a debate about keeping handgun licenses out of the hands of college students. “College students can already purchase firearms — college students over the age of 21 can already get a concealed handgun license. All we’re trying to do is make it legal for individuals with concealed handgun licenses to carry on campuses the way they do virtually everywhere else.”

DECLINE: Some students feel disconnection CONTINUED from page 1

important to provide an effect,” Beck said. She said improving the retention rate for not only Hispanics, but for all ethnicities, has been one of Texas State’s goals. The retention rate has gradually declined from 2001’s percentage of 77. Susan Thompson, research analyst from the Institutional Research Office, said determining the retention of students can be difficult because of instances like stop outs, which mean they take a semester off. “Dropout numbers do not have a clean pattern,” Thompson said. “Some students that may need to work or take a break for a family emergency may want to take a semester off and be back the next. However, if they leave their freshmen year, they are counted as not retained.” One of the more prominent efforts the university is doing to try and alleviate retention problems is the 2005 PAWS Alert program. The program enables faculty and staff members to request a referral for students who may need resources to boost their scholastic performance.

Beck said students’ connection to the university and their ability to perform academically is a very large part of their selfconfidence. “Early detection is crucial so that we can help students from the beginning,” Beck said. “Through these services, they can make adjustments in academic performance, and they can seek counseling services so they can pass their classes and not go to probation.” Another program offered to help students become involved is Hometown Bobcats. “We offer this program and what it does is it targets different areas of the state that typically have lower retention high school rates, which include The Valley, El Paso and Laredo,” Beck said. “What we do is try to help students get connected with someone from home.” Beck said according to a survey given to returning Hispanic students, one of the reasons they said their friends left the institution is because it did not feel like home and they never developed a cultural connection to the campus. Ismael Muñiz, public relations senior, came to Texas

State and experienced a culture shock that made him dislike his new home. “When I first got here, I did not know anyone,” Muñiz said. “I did not think about dropping out, but I just really did not feel right being here. I could not relate to anyone culturally and it just did not feel like home until I found some programs that helped me get involved and like this place.” Muñiz is the fundraising coordinator of the Hispanic Business Association and is a member of the Latino Student Association. He said the reason he keeps coming to school is not so much because of the organizations he is in, but because he wants an education. “The programs I am in have just helped me stay involved in school and keep me busy,” Muñiz said. Beck said it is difficult and unrealistic to say one particular thing kept a student from leaving the university. “Students talk about the clubs and organizations they are in through our assessments,” Beck said. “But, since our retention rate went down 1 percent, we are now looking at some different assessment tools.”


NEWS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

The University Star - Page 5

Social sites lend helping hand in voter education By Kristen Williams News Reporter Social networking Web sites like Facebook and MySpace have partly paved the way for online interaction and now online groups supporting diverse beliefs, causes and political campaigns are banding together to create change. Recently, Katie McNeff, dance freshman, created the Facebook group “TxState Students Against Reinstating Friday Classes.” The group is fighting back against the Residence Hall Association’s recent 10-1 vote to change the 2008 spring schedule. “The goal is simply to spread awareness of what is currently being discussed among (Associated Student Government) senators and the (Residence Hall Association),” McNeff said. ”I posted the legislation along with an e-mail I received as a member of (Residence) Hall Council so that people could interpret it for themselves and have the knowledge to accurately voice their opinions.” Although some view Facebook as an unreliable tool for accomplishing goals, McNeff disagrees. “Over 3,800 people have joined since its creation only a couple of weeks ago,” McNeff said. ”Not only is that a pretty impressive percentage of our school’s population, but from those members stems even more debate and awareness among students. Now everyone seems to be talking about it.”

McNeff said since Facebook expanded commu“Facebook groups are only one tool that can be nication, it has replaced the era of having petitions used when creating change,” Prather said. “Facesigned or passing out flyers. book groups alone cannot affect change. However, “Although that does still happen, a network- the people in the groups can use Facebook as a ing Web site like tool for communication Facebook makes and organization in the efit so easy to come fort to affect change.” in contact with so A group’s members may many different peoinvite their friends to join, ple, and quickly,” which gains more attenMcNeff said. tion to its purpose. Political candi“People join groups bedates have found cause they are enthused — Kim Porterfield or informed or interestFacebook to be effective in their University Advancement community relations director ed,” Prather said. “Facecampaigns. For book groups may further example, the Faceinterest or keep interest book group, “Hey Jude, Prather for City Council” alive. It is a great tool for communicating with has goals to inform students Prather, public ad- those people who are already interested, and for ministration senior, is running for City Council and those interested people to gain their friends’ interallow them access to its members. est as well.” “Anyone can message me or write on my wall at Another City Council candidate, Kim Porterfield, any point and that is indicative of the accessibility University Advancement community relations I will have if elected to the City Council,” Prather director, has a Facebook advocacy group named said. “Ultimately, my goal is to get the members “Kim Porterfield for Council.” to vote. The more informed voters are, the more “The goals of the Kim Porterfield for City Counlikely they are to vote. We use our Facebook group cil Facebook group are to promote awareness of to inform our fellow students and fellow voters.” San Marcos City Council elections, encourage While Facebook groups may initiate change, Texas State students, faculty and staff to vote early Prather said people must go further to bring on Wednesday and Thursday at the LBJ Student about reform. Center, to tell my story about how and why I want

“I

t has helped strengthen the organization and increase its credibility among student residents and nonstudent residents alike.”

to represent all of San Marcos, including student residents, as the Place One member of the City Council,” said Porterfield in an e-mail. Because Porterfield is a Bobcat Build adviser, she is part of its Facebook group, which helps its members coordinate events. “We can all weigh in on decisions, communicate about meetings and projects and have fun by posting pictures and other items,” Porterfield said. “It has helped strengthen the organization and increase its credibility among student residents and non-student residents alike.” Porterfield said her Facebook group would enable her to receive comments from citizens and use their views to benefit the city. “Communication is one of my main City Council goals,” Porterfield said. “The city, county, school district and university must work collaboratively to understand each other’s problems and priorities, common challenges and common solutions. Through Facebook, we can get feedback from stakeholders and share valuable information.” Not only are Facebook’s tools helpful for political candidates, anyone with Internet access can utilize the Web site as a means of communication. “In today’s world, people are so busy and it’s often hard to find time to communicate,” Porterfield said. “Facebook is on your terms, your time and is accessible just about anywhere. It’s an easy way for like-minded people to get together, share information, communicate and keep track of events.”

CNN International anchor addresses crowd at Mass Communication Week By Jackie Baylon News Reporter It was a small coincidence that brought Ralitsa Vassileva to Texas State Wednesday. The CNN international anchor and Mass Communication Week headline speaker traveled from the global headquarters in Atlanta to speak to a crowd of students about her life as a journalist. “By chance I happened to be in a hotel room (in Germany), and the only channel I could watch and understand was CNN,” said Federico Subervi, journalism professor. Subervi was lecturing at Zeppelin University in Germany where he first saw Vassileva on television. He said Vassileva captured his attention, and he immediately thought of Mass Communication Week. So he contacted her via e-mail and she responded. Vassileva’s interest was not always in journalism. “When you see an opportunity to try something different, take the time to expose yourself to it,” Vassileva said. “Sometimes nothing will come out of the opportunity you took, but you at least applied yourself and found out that you hated something that

you would not have known to hate unless you took the opportunity.” Cynthia Gámez, senior from Joseph W. Nixon High School in Laredo, said she was inspired by Vassileva’s words. “She has basically opened my eyes and made me realize to not stop and keep going until you get to where you want to be,” Gámez said. Vassileva said she was first exposed to journalism when she started working for the Radio Bulgaria English Service in 1987. She was an English translator and announcer and would later add reporting to her duties. “In a way journalism found me,” Vassileva said. “I realized that I really enjoyed doing it, and I would have known that, had I not heard on the Bulgarian radio that they were looking for a translator. I would have never known that I had some kind of talent for (journalism) and that it would become my passion.” Before joining CNN, Vassileva was an anchor and reporter for Bulgarian television. There, she helped develop a post-communist approach to news delivery and later became the country’s second highest-rated anchor. In 1990, she became a full-time national reporter.

She began her career at CNN as anchor of “CNN World Report,” the world’s only forum for international broadcasters to present news from their country before the television station’s global audience. During her speech, Vassileva showed a video of her most recent work where she had traveled to Russia and Jerusalem. She showed footage of her story about a Russian spy poisoning in addition to her interview with Mark Regev, a spokesman for the Israeli government. Lori Bergen, director of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, said Vassileva’s presentation exemplified her values and the goals of journalism. She said the role journalism plays in a society is important because to not have is would hinder freedom. “It was just an honor to have someone who is of that stature come talk come to speak to our students,” Bergen said. “The values of journalism she talked about are equally important. The importance that preservation of dignity and the people that you meet to the reliance on fairness and accuracy are important values that we want out students to have.”

Tina Phan/Star photo ANCHOR TO WORLD: CNN International anchor Ralitsa Vassileva speaks about growing out of communist Bulgaria to eventually find a job in news Wednesday as part of Mass Communication Week.


OPINIONS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Tuesday, October 25, 2007 - Page 5

onlineconnection The University Star is in the process of creating a new Web site. Check out www.UniversityStar.com in the following weeks for continued News, Sports, Trends and Opinions coverage.

A MY OF Opinions Contact — Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu

THE MAIN POINT

U

niversity Police Department Capt. Paul Chapa described the AR-15 as a tool.

Truer words were never spoken. The AR-15 naturally fits next to other tools, such as scissors and hammers, and should prove to be an invaluable asset to the UPD. For those not in the know, the AR-15 is a so-called “long gun;” a fully or semi-automatic rifle capable for firing at targets up to 600 yards away. In other words, a tool. The University Star believes this is exactly the sort of high-velocity, magazine-fed firearm the UPD needs for law enforcement. San Marcos is effectively steeped in crime. While the city boasts significantly lower rates of crimes of all sorts compared to the rest of Texas, a dangerously strong-armed approach needs to be taken when dealing with the freewheeling villains who scoff at parking zones and the devil-may-care gangsters who have neighborhood-shaking, raucous parties on the weekends. Make no mistake: this is a serious issue. While the campus may seem benign, a rash of elevator tomfoolery and fire alarm hi jinks have given The Star more than enough reason to fully back the rifle-wielding police officers of Texas State. Such nonsense can only be stopped with rotating-bolt assault rifles that can be upgraded with optical sights and heavier barrels. If you need a historical perspective, think back to the African American Leadership Conference a couple of years ago. Police had to suffer the indignity of riding in golf carts and squad cars less than a mile to reach the LBJ Student Center parking garage to break up what they interpreted to be a fight. Honestly, it’s troublesome to travel all the way from Nueces to LBJSC just to wave shotguns around in peoples’ faces. If the officers had these new AR-15s — with optional iron sights for improved, 800-round-per-minute accuracy — they could have stayed in their police station, needlessly frightening AALC attendees without stepping outside. The Star understands the difficult trials UPD officers undertake day in and day out delivering tickets and waving traffic when traffic lights break down. A weapon such as the AR-15 — a weapon prohibited under the Assault Weapons Ban and Law Enforcement Protection Act of 2007— would greatly facilitate the police in dealing with local problems. Now is a good time for the university and the city. We can all sleep a little better tonight knowing heavily armed police officers patrol the streets, ready to open semi-automatic fire on ne’er-do-wells at a moment’s notice. A moment’s notice is all it takes, however. Given the rise of campus shootings, it is a realistic necessity to have a fully equipped, knowledgeable police force so any incident could quickly be put down. While The Star finds issue with calling the AR-15 a tool and the levity some officers give the AR-15, it’s understandable a powerful force is sometimes needed when incidents arise.

Newest weapon needed in war, not San Marcos

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Justin Jackley/Star illustration

Column endorsing Bose not thought out

L2E

Letters to the editor

Your article endorsing Gaylord Bose for City Council Place 2 is an absolute disgrace to journalism in my opinion. The editorial was written with little to no research on the topic and showed very little of the attitude of the candidate towards students in general. In an election involving a student

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

against a “traditional” community member, one of the most important topics at hand should always be the way the candidate best represents the voting public. In this case, Jude Prather should be an obvious selection for any student, and you feel as if someone who has constantly taken “anti-student” stances on policies is a better choice. Gaylord Bose is on record saying he wants to change the code of laws at the municipal government. He wants to restrict the municipal judge from giving out community service hours and instead give them a blanket $1200 fine.

Editor In Chief.................................Maira Garcia, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.......................Sydney Granger, starletters@txstate.edu News Editor...................................Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor.......................Clara Cobb, starentertainment@txstate.edu Opinions Editor.......................................Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu Photo Editor...............................Spencer Millsap, starphoto@txstate.edu

Almost no student can afford that kind of a fine for something that is a typical part of college life. Gaylord Bose is on record saying the $750 fine for noise violations is not a severe enough consequence to change behavior. If students were required to pay more than $750 for something minor like a noise violation, then the college atmosphere and off-campus lifestyle of every student would be affected negatively, and would inevitably hurt the university. I would like to end this by saying the people responsible for The Star endorsing Gaylord Bose should next time

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pay more attention to their research, and maybe perhaps actually looking up someone’s voting record before they manipulate the opinions of over a thousand registered voters here on campus. Stating because the incumbent has more experience than his challenger is the best reason to re-elect him, you might as well say we should never have elections since the people in power will always have more experience. We cannot re-elect change, we need a student for city council. Brian R. Webb sport clubs supervisor

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L2E

Letters to the editor

Border compared to Berlin Wall causes confusion for both sides I am writing this letter in response to last Thursday’s letter to the editor from the representative of the College Republicans. I am frustrated at the fact he misquoted me in his recent letter; it’s a shame the College Republican representative, in his letter, clumped me, the Democratic leadership, political pundits and the media in one group. Nowhere in my presentation did I link the comparison of the Berlin Wall to my personal views or the views of the Democratic leadership, I was simply quoting Mexican President Felipe Calderon during a recent tour in Canada, “The decision made by Congress and the U.S. government is deplorable; humanity committed a grave error by constructing the Berlin wall, and I am sure that today the U.S. is committing a grave error in constructing a wall along our northern border.” The reason why I quoted the Mexican President is because certain candidates in the Democratic party believe a successful border policy includes discussion with the Mexican government, and it is important to know the opinions of our southern neighbors. Democratic presidential candidate and Governor of New Mexico Bill Richardson said, “building a fence will not increase security, just as attempting to deport 12 million illegal immigrants is not feasible or reasonable.” Richardson believes realistic immigration reform will not only stress border security, but will include engaging Mexico in the reform process, and improving our current immigration quota system. One thing myself and the College Republican representative do agree on is the anonymous opinion writer for The Main Point of The University Star, Oct. 16th edition, should not make claims on a forum he or she was not present at. It was the goal of the Phi Iota Alpha Fraternity to not only register young voters, but inform them as well. To make a claim this forum does nothing for the immigration debate is wrong, you can ask myself and every other panelist about our time spent after the forum discussing immigration policy with the audience members; this forum achieved its goal of creating student interest in this topic and in turn possibly establish a solution from our generation in the near future. Hopefully, and for the last time, I clarified this whole misrepresentation of the comparison between the Berlin Wall and the fence on our southern border. Once again this comparison was neither my personal view nor the view of the Democratic leadership. I would like to thank the efforts of the Phi Iota Alpha Fraternity and their president Mark Hernandez for hosting a forum on this complicated issue and their attempt to register students to vote. I am sure everyone agrees the only way to make change and be heard is to go out and vote. Marisel Saucedo College Democrats’ Secretary

✯ The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright October 25, 2007. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


TRENDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Page 7 - Thursday, October 25, 2007

getinvolved Being an Alumni member doesn’t mean you have to be a graduate. The Texas State Alumni AssociationStudent Chapter gives students the opportunity to participate in Alumni events, mixers and socials. The organization promotes involvement and school spirit. The Student Chapters sponsors Trade Up Days and has a drawing for a free member parking space on campus. Student members receive a member package including local-merchant discount card, flip flops, T-shirt, discounts on class rings and receive exclusive invites to Alumni events. For more information, visit www.txstatealumni.org or stop by the Trade Up Days tent in The Quad this week for more information on becoming a member.

Trends Contact — Clara Cobb, starentertainment@txstate.edu

Perfect Halloween

starts at home Todd Schaaf Senior Features Reporter

Despite owning and running a shop that sells costumes, Flanagan said she understands some people chose to make their own. This is the time of the year where half of students’ “That’s fine if they want to make their own costumes. thoughts are on midterms and the other half are on I don’t discourage people from doing that,” Flanagan trying to figure out what to be for Halloween. said. “A lot of times they start making it and realize that Rather than peruse the aisles of the neighbor- the vision in their head isn’t quite so easy to make.” hood costume shop, think homemade like Wyatt When one is making their own costume, Dodds said it Dodds, communication design senior. Instead of is important not to be too cliché. Halloween stores, Dodds “Sexy cop girl is over said he buys components done. I think the girls need of his costumes at a more to step it up a bit with the versatile venue. sexy costumes, it’s just “Goodwill, thrift shops getting to be a lingerie mainly,” Dodds said. “I show-out,” Dodds said. “I think you should definitely think you can be sexy and put it together yourself.” be more suggestive, guys Dodds’ costume last think things are sexy othyear was a perfect examer than the French maid. ple of thrifty shopping, Like a chick dressed up — Wyatt Dodds household items and a like a mechanic, specificalcommunication design senior little ingenuity. ly a diesel mechanic, that “Last year I dressed up might be hot. Or maybe a as an old lady. We put curlcaddy, like a sexy, naughty, ers in my hair and rollers saucy little caddy.” and sprayed about a gallon of Aquanet in my hair, so In addition to avoiding the over-done costume I looked like an old woman,” Dodds said. “I worked ideas, Dodds also said it is important not to be really hard for two weeks to try to grow a mustache lazy. and it looked awful. And I got the greatest church“I’ve seen Avril Lavigne as a Halloween costume lady dress — I was at Goodwill for an hour trying on before. That doesn’t take any work — that’s just a dresses. It was disgusting.” trip to Hot Topic,” Dodds said. “I think a HallowSomeone who knows a thing or two about cos- een costume is something that you put a little more tumes is Bert Flanagan, owner of Costumed Oc- thought into.” casions. Flanagan said she enjoys the Halloween Dodds said if someone chooses to dress in a highseason. ly recognizable costume, they should go all out. “Halloween is the time to wear costumes that you “I’m sick of seeing guys dressed up like Tome don’t normally wear,” Flanagan said. “I think being Cruise from ‘Risky Business,’” Dodds said. “Undercute and sexy is OK, or being gross or a zombie is wear, socks and a shirt do not constitute a HallowOK. It only comes once a year.” een costume. And they usually go in boxers. If they Flanagan said she enjoys helping people create go in whitey tighties, I’ll give them respect there.” the perfect costume. Dodds said sexy Halloween costumes should stop “If people come to me early enough they can with women. bring me a picture and we can generally make it, “I think guys that try to dress in sexy Halloween and that’s the creative side that I like about this costumes are completely ridiculous and should be business,” she said. mocked mercilessly.”

exy cop girl is over “S done. I think the girls need to step it up a bit with

the sexy costumes, it’s just getting to be a lingerie showout.”

Jenny Polson/Star photo HOMEMADE FOR HALLOWEEN: Angelene Gallini, political science graduate student, works on her homemade Halloween costume at Hobby Lobby Tuesday.

‘Less is more’ mentality could not be more wrong By Cheryl Jones Trends Columnist Whether intentional or not, it seems the risqué Halloween look is in. What’s with the costumes? Why has the demented holiday now swung to the “see how slutty I can come across” day? As I write this column, I can’t help to feel a twinge every time I use the word “slutty.” I’m not quite sure what else I should use. Scantily clad? Breasty? Raunchy? Yecchy? I know, I know, I was shocked it was a word too! For my ease of heart, I think I’ll go with … “immodest,” — I digress — but I guess I’m old-fashioned. So, whether you’re the Racy Referee, Army Nurse, ever-present School Whor … Girl, or French Maid — you know who you are — what’s the deal? I recently went to Costumed Occasions, Target, Wal-Mart and Hot Topic in San Marcos to see if I could find out the attraction and thought process when people look for that perfect Halloween outfit. Costumed Occasions, of course, had more Halloween costumes and even had a specific section for the costumes I am dealing with. The duds were buy-only, and I would certainly hope so. I think out of the entire section, the brand Dress Up America is most impressive, primarily because of its costumes’ names: Ally Catraz, Dr. Anita Lay or the Princess in Prison, a.k.a. Paris Hilton. The latter had “Property of the LA County Prison” stamped across the back and included celebrity sunglasses, a prisoner dress, hat, purse and toy dog. While I was roaming the racks at the shop a mother and her two daughters walked in and went to the area under observation. The two daughters were definitely not college-aged and looked to be no more than juniors in high school. I was shocked, to say the least, the mother was actually going to allow her daughters to buy whatever costume they set sight upon. James Martin, alumnus, is a veteran at Costumed Occasions where he’s worked for 10 years. He said working at the store can be amusing when it comes to the customers. “A lot of girls come in and say, ‘I want something sexy but not slutty’ or ’slutty but not cheap,’ they seem to try and negotiate with themselves. It’s an interesting line, and it’s amusing to see,” he said. “I think the market is bigger than we can accommodate, but we try by showing people what we have and not passing judgment.” At Hot Topic, I found the selection surprising. I walked by the window, saw a couple of the costumes, and went in. I just wasn’t expecting them to carry so much. Target and Wal-Mart’s costume array lacked besides the everpresent fake eyelashes, nails and clown make-up. I’m sure if you wanted to go cheaper than Costumed Occasions and are petite enough, you could probably pull off wearing a child’s normal outfit and make it look “immodest” if you really tried. “I think a vast majority are not trying to upset the civil propriety. A small percentage really want to put it out there, and the rest I

don’t think really deliberately try to do it in bad taste,” Martin said. What made me a bit sad at heart was the cartoons I grew up with being turned into an “immodest” costume. A knock-off of a Rainbow Brite outfit (whose skirt was already short in the cartoon) and Peter Pan’s fairy friend Tinkerbell are just a few of my run-ins. Maybe I don’t know what the point or fun of wearing these types of costumes is because I’ve never really worn one. I haven’t ever wanted to. The closest I ever came was showing my midriff in my Judy Jetson outfit in third grade — actually, I don’t even know if I showed that because it was cold. I read on an Internet forum Halloween is believed to be the only time where, “girlys get to dress up all slutty and get away with it.” To me, I look at it this way: do the “girlys” really think they get away with it? I mean, after the party, you’re not going to

be remembered as the goody-goody if you wore the thonged Cat woman outfit — I’m just saying. Amber Panko, marketing junior and employee at Costumed Occasions, wore one of my so-called “immodest” costumes last year. “It was a little short, but that’s not why I bought it,” she said. “I wore shorts underneath. I just thought it would be fun. They are more fun, and it really is the one time of the year that you can do what you want and get away with it.” Agree to disagree, I suppose. We all have our own views, which makes everything we do that much better. For those of you who are going out, have fun and be safe, and here’s a tip for this Halloween. According to Martin, the “Sexy Gangster or Mob” look is the fashionable sell-out with the Sexy Referee, immodest Military and cutie Cab Driver close behind — literally.


Page 8 - The University Star

TRENDS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

Interracial couples find difficulty in college By Kayle Barnes Oklahoma Daily (U. Oklahoma)

NORMAN, Okla. — While animosity toward interracial dating is not widely apparent on a daily basis, it is still a reality for some college students. Collegiate interracial relationships came into the spotlight in January when Boise State running back Ian Johnson — who is black — proposed to his then-girlfriend Chrissy Popadics — who is white — on national television at the end of the Fiesta Bowl. The couple soon after found themselves in the pop-culture spotlight and told The New York Times six police officers attended their wedding because of the race-based threats they received. Dominique Davis, University of Oklahoma political science senior who is black, has a boyfriend, John, who is Bolivian and Mexican. She, too, has experienced hostility from outsiders about her relationship. Davis said, at first, John’s family was not accepting of her. She recalls one particularly upsetting situation with his family last year. “I made plans to visit (him) in San Antonio because his graduation was at the end of the month,” Davis said. “His mom’s side of the family received word of that and refused to come.” When Davis arrived at her boyfriend’s graduation, relatives who had planned to go skipped it, having told John they would do so if Davis attended. Only his father, mother and one of his brothers went. “Although his mom was respectful and did not show her discontent, I could feel it,” Davis said. “I noticed it through subtle gestures.” Other interracial couples have similar experiences. Jonathan Nimo, a political science senior who is black, met his girlfriend, Michaela Buedcher, a German exchange student, at Africa Night this year. “I thought it was kind of cool and unique to see a white person at the show with traditional African clothing on. So I approached her and asked her who made it, and she said she did, so that really blew my mind,” Nimo said. The two started dating shortly after. Like with Davis, family expectations were hard for this couple to overcome. “I know in the beginning, my parents, especially my mother,

Katherine Jones/Idaho Statesman WEDDING FIESTA: Chrissy Popadics’ bridesmaids help her into her wedding dress, necklace and earrings. Popadics and Johnson were married in Boise, Idaho, July 28.

wanted me to be with a Ghanaian girl since I’m Ghanaian,” Nimo said. “But after meeting a lot of my previous dates or girlfriends or flings, she sees that I will date anybody, regardless of race, and that it is ultimately up to me to decide who I want to be with.” Dara Jones, journalism senior, is in an interracial relationship. She is white and is currently dating a black man. “There’s no person that’s one pure color or another,” Jones said. “I think I’m colorblind.” Jones said she doesn’t believe interracial dating produces any substantial problems. “It is easier to sympathize but not empathize with a person of another race,” Jones said. Peace Ossom, a psychology junior who is black, dates a white man. “I hear many girls who say they couldn’t date a white man because he wouldn’t ‘understand’ what she goes through as a black woman,” she said. “I feel that men in general don’t understand what I go through as a woman, and that hasn’t affected any of my relationships. It only makes sense that race hasn’t either.” Openness in any type of relationship is important, Ossom said. She said looking only at certain aspects of a person, such as race or culture, can prevent people from finding true love. “I’ve gotten the chance to date guys who really match me

on important things, instead of the color of their skin or what their primary language is,” Ossom said. Ossom said her willingness to date outside her race gives her a larger pool to choose from. “There are many men and women who fall outside of these typecasts, and you may be missing out on a great relationship — friends or more — if you assume how they will be like before meeting them,” Ossom said. Students involved in interracial or intercultural relationships disagree on how accepting OU’s environment is. Nimo said she believes diversity at OU helps make for a more tolerant environment. “We are now in college, where there is so much diversity, so then the issue of interracial relationships isn’t quite a big taboo anymore,” Nimo said. Ossom, however, believes OU is still segregated by race, mainly due to the choices people make. “It might be hard, but it’s definitely possible,” Ossom said. Interracial dating isn’t as common at OU as other areas of the country, Davis said. “I seldom see two people of different ethnic backgrounds interlocking hands and exchanging kisses in the South Oval,” she said. “Norman is homogeneous, and interracial dating would be a culture shock for the masses — not all, but most.”


TRENDS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

The University Star - Page 9

American Dream

Theatre department exhibits search for

Early 20-something-year-old angst and disdain come to fruition in Eric Bogosian’s “Suburbia,” opening Thursday. Prior to delving into the project, Amanda Tapia, theatre graduate director for the play, said one of the key themes of the play she focused her research on was the different perceptions of the American Dream to those living in suburban settings. “For many people, the American Dream means to move on, to make a statement for yourself, to have a purpose in life,” she said. “Everyone’s outlook on that is completely different. In this small town, it means to get out and move on with life.” “Suburbia” addresses the sacrifices made for the American Dream. Tapia said the play was revised in 2006. It now includes a character who recently returned from the war in Iraq and presents the difficulty he faces assimilating back into society. “A lot of what is referenced is a soldier’s outlook of coming home and feeling alone and abandoned from what it was that he fought for,” Tapia said. Tapia is hoping people, particularly students, will be able to connect with “Suburbia.” “These kids are battling against their own demons to try and move out of not only the town but the state of life that they have found themselves in,” she said. “Everyone will recognize someone, whether it be themselves at one point or another, someone that they’ve met or left behind.” The play will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Theatre Center. Stephen Wood, pre-theatre sophomore and stage manager for the production, said most students will be able to relate to the characters in some fashion. “Its one of those shows that will make people think and everyone can relate to this in some way,”

Wood said. “I think people will really enjoy it.” He said the play is relatable to students. “Suburbia is about a group of graduated friends living in a small town, but they still haven’t gotten out of that town,” he said. “It’s about all of their frustrations about being stuck in this town and wanting to get out but not being able to.” Tapia said she chose to direct “Suburbia” for her graduate thesis because it mirrors her own experience of growing up in La Marque, a city outside of Houston. “This is relevant to a lot of people living in small towns all over Texas,” Tapia said. “Most of us come from small towns right outside of a huge city and it’s always your dream to move somewhere bigger and better.” She said she is an admirer of Bogosian’s work and has experience working with this play before. “I read this play for the first time about seven or eight years ago and I had done a few different scenes from it in my undergrad work and I never really let go of it,” she said. “Anybody who knows me in the department knows that I’m obsessive about the playwright. It’s one of those things where I can’t move on until I’ve done the entire play.”

THE BIRDS AND BEEBEE: (Right) Walter Miranda, pre-psychology junior, and Roberta Colindrez, theatre senior, rehearse for the show “Suburbia.” In the show, Miranda and Colindrez play Buff and Beebee and become love interests.

Jon Clark/Star photo

By Hayley Kappes Assistant Trends Editor

to /Star pho

Jon Clark

EXCHANGING LINES: (Above) Pre-theatre freshmen Devin Finn and Ashley Rountree rehearse for “Suburbia,” which opens at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Theatre Center.

Filmmakers, artists from all over convene in Seguin By Brett Thorne Features Reporter

— Courtesy of MCT

At first glance, Seguin may seem like any other Central Texas town. However, the community will show off its creativity this weekend as it hosts the third-annual Seguin Film and Arts Festival. The festival showcases artists from all over the country and attracts audiences from Texas and other states. “What we really want to say through the art festival is that art is for everyone and that you can find art in a variety of places,” Denise Crettenden said. “We want people to be involved in the artistic process — even people who wouldn’t consider themselves artists.” According to a news release sent out by Crettenden, president of the Seguin Cultural Arts Foundation, highlights include “Trade Days in Central Park” on Saturday and Sunday, “Hats off to Juan Seguin” on Saturday night and a variety of other historical and cultural events and displays. The event, which features films from drama, comedy, documentary and animation categories, encourages residents of the local community to get involved in the arts.

“Each year we hold a community art contest during the festival,” she said. “This year we chose to make it a photography contest.” Involvement, Crettenden said, is one of the fundamental purposes of the festival. “This year we have over 25 films screening,” Crettenden said. “There is one feature, The Princess Bride and the rest are shorts — 20 minutes or less.” The festival features entries by directors from as far away as New York, Massachusetts and Wisconsin. One of those directors, Julia Radochia, is no stranger to film festivals. Her entry into the Seguin Film Festival, entitled I Just Want To Eat My Sandwich, won numerous awards at other festivals, including Best Comedy at the Pencil Head’s Dusk Til Dawn Film Fest and Audience’s Favorite Comedy at the Route 66 Film Festival. Selecting the Seguin festival seemed like an interesting choice for someone living almost 2,000 miles away. “It is so competitive to get into festivals that I spend time looking for festivals that I feel might like my films,” Radochia said. “I’m fascinated with different parts of this country, and I was also interested in seeing Seguin for its ‘Land of Pecans.’ I’m just kind of intuitive in selecting which festivals to

apply to. It felt right.” A.J. Garces, a veteran filmmaker from San Antonio, hopes the festival will allow him to promote his greatest passion. “I want to expose my film to as many people as possible, and a good way to do that is through film festivals,” Garces said. “The feedback is invaluable to anyone telling stories through the media.” Garces knows his film’s screening at the festival could impact his future work. “Most filmmakers at film festivals are also hoping to collaborate with others in the business by finding financing or the opportunity to work with others on independent projects,” he said. “Filmmaking is all about collaboration, and festivals are a great place for that kind of interaction.” Crettenden said some may be ready to dismiss Seguin as any other small town. She is quick to point out the exciting — and often overlooked — creativity there. “Seguin actually has a pretty vibrant arts community,” Crettenden said. “We don’t always get a lot of recognition for it. With Texas Lutheran University here, we are blessed with students, professors and alumni who contribute a great deal to the cultural life of the community. It’s pretty rare for such a small town to have such a great cultural life.”


TRENDS

Page 10 - The University Star

Live music calendar THURSDAY Phil Stevens, 6 p.m., Triple Crown Mark Jungers and Scott Nolan, 7 p.m., Gruene Hall Brandon Rhyder, 8 p.m., Cheatham Street Warehouse Carley Wolf, 9 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos Enemy Of Mankind, Hor, This Way To Infinity, 9 p.m., Triple Crown Nikkoli Kade Kubena, 9 p.m., Riley’s Tavern * The Gougers, 11 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos FRIDAY Highly Likely, 6 p.m., Triple Crown Eli Young Band, 8 p.m., Gruene Hall Hayes Carll, 8 p.m., Cheatham Street Matthew Wright, Everyday People, Bernie Calcote Band, 9 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos Sean Castillo and The Hubcaps, 9 p.m., Riley’s Turbo 350, Winter Dance Party, 10 p.m., Triple Crown SATURDAY Erik Hokkanen and Friends, 1 p.m., Gruene Hall Hal Ketchum’s Fifth Annual Gruene Reunion with special guest Robin English, 8 p.m., Gruene Hall Lucky Tomblin Band, 8 p.m., Cheatham Street Devo, The Misfits, Turbonegro, 9 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos Joel Hofmann Band, 9 p.m., Riley’s Robbie and the Robots, Buttercup, Falcon Buddies, 10 p.m., Triple Crown

SUNDAY Porter Davis, 12:30 p.m., Gruene Hall The Band of Heathens, 5 p.m., Gruene Hall Luckenbach Cultural Exchange, 5 p.m., Cheatham Street Melting Social Project, 9 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos MONDAY Gerry’s Kids, 6 p.m., Triple Crown Big John Mills, 8 p.m., Cheatham Street Bryan Brazier, 9 p.m., Riley’s TUESDAY Eric Hisaw, 6 p.m., Triple Crown Band of Thieves, 9 p.m., Riley’s The Dedringers, 9 p.m., Triple Crown Colour Wheel, 9:30 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos WEDNESDAY Erickson, 6 p.m., Triple Crown Grant Ewing Band, 8 p.m., Cheatham Street Halloween Party with Electric Mayhem, 9 p.m., Lucy’s San Marcos Lechuza with The Skeletons, 9 p.m., Riley’s Pink Elephants On Parade, Green Mountain Grass, The Bluehit, 9 p.m., Triple Crown

Thursday, October 25, 2007

Tracking Tr e n d s

I’m sure readers are just as sick of fire alarm noises. A fire had started in their reading Britney Spears gossip as I am home. Flames destroyed the dining room, writing about it. The same goes for Paris kitchen and bedroom, but Conwell, his son Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, Kid Rock ... the and the heroic parrot made it out unharmed. list carries on. I try to mix things up a Conwell contributes their safe escape to bit by writing about Evander “Real Deal” their precious parrot saying, “If it weren’t grills and such, but the truth of the matfor the parrot, we probably wouldn’t be here ter is that these celebs lead such uncontoday.” Jessica Jacobs trolled lives they overshadow almost all Trends Columnist other gossip. What is an entertainment DANCING FOOL writer to do? I’ve decided I’m going to Need some new dance moves? Snowball switch gears for this issue and write the cockatoo can really drop it like it’s about something a little deeper and more fulfilling, hot. If you need singing tips, though, better check like a dancing bird and a gigantic pumpkin. somewhere else because this bird could really use some pitch lessons. If you want to shake your tail feather then fly on over to www.youtube.com/ watch?v=N7IZmRnAo6s. POTTER OUTTING

Take down your Dumbledore posters, ladies. According to CNN, Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling announced this week the master wizard Albus Dumbledore is indeed homosexual. Rowling brought the character out of the closet Friday night in an appearance at Carnegie Hall. Rowling said she realizes her book is not well-liked by everyone — most likely referring to Christian groups — and this will give them another reason to dislike her best-seller.

*Indicates a CD release party If your live music event does not appear on the calendar, e-mail starentertainment@txstate.edu. Next week’s deadline is Monday. Music events must be within a 20-mile radius of the San Marcos campus. Most venue and band names are provided by venues, which are responsible for maintaining correct information.

FLYING GOURD Trick or treat — Halloween is approaching and with it comes the colder weather, spooky decorations and bizarre costume designs. What harvest festivity is complete without an underwater pumpkin carving contest or dropping a thousand-pound version of the fruit onto a suspecting bus? Visit www.yahoo.com/ s/714794 and www.break.com/index/worlds-largestpumpkin-falls-on-bus.html to watch these fascinating fall treats. Maybe you will be inspired to start some silly traditions of your own.

SITES FOR THE SAVVY SURFER Looking for some cool sites on the Web? Surf on over to www.9.yahoo.com. Everyday, host Maria Sansone counts down 10 cool Web sites for Internetlovers to visit. From games to science, you never know what you will find. It’s a great place to kill time or even learn a thing or two.

BIRD OF SAVIOR Birds are some of the most vibrant and unusual creatures on this earth, but some of them have some entertaining or even helpful talents. According to The Associated Press, Shannon Conwell and his son were awakened by their pet parrot imitating

--- Photos courtesy of MCT

“REAL” PROTESTERS Finally, on an episode of “Real Time with Bill Maher,” the host himself had to help kick some 9/11 protesters out of the audience. The show airs live and was rudely interrupted by audience members who continually yelled protest chants during the show’s broadcast. Maher walked into the audience as security walked over to escort the activists out of the set. This is a can’t-miss clip, so journey on over to www.break.com/index/bill-maher-ejects-911-truth-losers2.html view this one yourself.


TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

Thursday, October 25, 2007

The University Star - Page 11

Pass time in line with cell phone games The first cell phone I ever owned, Mac. A phone must have Internet acin early the 2000s, came with a cess and be able to download files. handful of games. Installing the game can be treacherous They were terrible, truthfully, as well. but while waiting for the bus or Controls are a matter of irritation, during a lonely lunch outing, they usually, as tiny number keys don’t afproved invaluable resources for ford the greatest control. wasting a few moments until real Control shouldn’t be an issue, howBILL RIX business started again. ever. Cell phones are the perfect outlet Trends Columnist Now, however, it’s a different for gamers and non-gamers alike to story. Many modern cell phones don’t offer play for a few minutes whenever they have the any games, and when they do, they are often chance. It’s the ideal format for passive and useless trial versions. It’s easy to become fruscasual gaming, yet some companies bend over trated when a new phone leads to boredom at backward trying to offer titles with the hottest a bus stop, but be careful before you begin to graphics and intense story lines. blame anyone. If I am stuck in the library, I don’t want to The fault lies not with the phone hucksters play a 2 by 3.5 inch version of Final Fantasy VII. or manufacturers. Unlike computers and video Well, I would, but it’s unlikely anyone else would. game consoles, mobile devices — excluding the There’s no reason to develop mobile ports of inPSP and DS, which have their own base of pubdepth PC and console games when simple, Javalishers and developers — often jockey for the based Snake and Pac-Man clones will do just fine. attention of programmers. Cell phone gaming is about playing Tetris while Programmers have a tough time as well, as waiting in line for food, not learning complex essentially all mobile devices have different cod- button combinations on a tiny mobile. ing bases, meaning if a game designer makes Game companies need to follow the lead of a game for a certain wireless carrier’s phone ringtone companies. Short, yet irritating TV model, porting it to another make or model ads get the point across and the companies could be impossible without recoding the entire make the acquisition process as pain-free game from the ground up. This is partly the as possible. The ringtone empire is growing reason it’s difficult to acquire games, but other steadily, raking in untold amounts of money looming forces add to the issue. each year. A game distribution business would Getting games onto a cell phone isn’t nearly conceivably work just as well if marketed and as easy as downloading something to a PC or distributed correctly.

Joy, Strife & College Life

by Cecilia de Jesus

Pub hosts anniversary concert

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively.

10/24 Solutions:

Sean Patrick’s is celebrating its anniversary with live music. The Freddy Scott Band, which is made up of Texas State students and alumni, will play 9 p.m. at the pub. There is no cover at the show.

10/24/07


CLASSIFIEDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Page 12 - Thursday, October 25, 2007

RATES AND POLICIES Cost - 25¢ per word (1–6 days); Cost - 20¢ per word (7+ days) Deadline - 2 business days prior by noon All classified ads must be paid in advance, unless credit is established. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. We do our best, but please check your classified ad for accuracy. Any corrections to your ad must be made by the second day of publication. As a free service to you, all classified ads will be published on-line on our web site at www.universitystar.com. However, since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

E-mail Classifieds at starclassifieds@txstate.edu

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PERSONALS LOST YOUR PET? If your pet is lost anywhere in Hays County, please check the San Marcos Animal Shelter (512) 393-8340 which is located at 750 River Road off of east Hwy 80. All strays from the Kyle, Wimberley, Dripping Springs, Driftwood, Uhland and some of Buda (non-city) areas are taken to San Marcos. Hours: Mon. and Fri. 11:30 to 5:30; Tues., Wed., Thurs. 11:30 to 4:30; Sat. 11:30 to 4:30. Please go in person rather than call, you are the only one who can identify and reclaim your beloved pet! Remember, an ID tag is a ticket home! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------$5,000 PAID. EGG DONORS. +Exps. N/Smokers, ages 19-29, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

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SERVICES WWW.STUDENTATTORNEY.COM ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------YOGA CLASSES STARTING SOON AT SAN MARCOS SCHOOL OF YOGA. www.sanmarcosyoga.com or Call Kelly (512) 665-3713. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------WE DO B-DAY PARTIES! Super fast adult karts & kids karts. FAST TRACKS SLICK TRACK & INDY KART RACING. Located on I-35 in San Marcos. (830) 627-8400.

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WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell, (512) 353-4511. THE UNIVERSITY STAR IS NOW HIRING! News reporters Must be able to report on university and local news, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Trends reporters/columnists Reporters must be able to report on university and local arts, entertainment, social and cultural events, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Columnists must write original columns on specific subjects for weekly publication and come into the newsroom for editing. For more information, please contact Maira Garcia editor-in-chief at stareditor@txstate.edu.


Thursday, October 25, 2007

SPORTS

The University Star - Page 13

Soccer’s consecutive losses limit SLC tourney hopes By Carl Harper Senior Sports Reporter The Bobcat soccer team looks to redeem itself on the road this weekend in two huge matches at Northwestern State and Central Arkansas. Texas State (3-10-1, 2-2-1) has dropped their last two conference games to Stephen F. Austin and Texas-San Antonio and must find themselves in a winning situation if they are to make the Southland Conference Tournament. With two wins this weekend, they would be back in the mix of things. Northwestern State (10-5-1, 3-2-1) is currently on a two-game skid after falling to Sam Houston State and SFA on the road. They were victorious in nine of their last ten matches, including wins at Tulsa, Louisiana-Monroe and Louisiana-Lafayette. The Demons, whom the Bobcats play Friday, have posted a 5-1 home record this season and outscored their opponents 36-19. Senior forward Erin Hebert is the only Demon who has started every game and leads the team with 10 goals on 35 shots. She ranks atop the squad with six assists, along with teammate Chelsey Gibbs, sophomore forward, who has seven goals on 31 shots. “Erin loves to turn and go one-on-one with her opponents,” Bobcat Coach Kat Conner said. “With our defense, we will have to limit her surface. We have to make sure that we are not allowing her to turn and make those runs. But if she does, then we will have to get coverage behind the one-on-one matchup.” Demons’ sophomore forward Kayce Schultz has contributed seven goals and 29 shots. Senior goalkeeper Johnna Klohoker has done most of the work this season in net for Northwestern State, posting 80 saves and starting 15 of 16 games the Demons have played.

“Northwestern plays the same type of game that we do,” Conner said. “They are a good team to play.” Texas State will meet with Central Arkansas Sunday for the second time in school history. Last season, the Bobcats shut out Central Arkansas, 4-0, at Bobcat Soccer Complex. The Bears (7-7, 4-2) have won five or their last seven matches after edging SHSU in Huntsville last Sunday, 4-3. Four different players scored, leading Central Arkansas to their fourth conference win. The Bears have outscored their opponents this year despite being outshot 238-182. Junior forward Ashley Line leads the way for her team with 12 points and five goals. She has 27 shots, second behind freshman forward Randi Condley’s team-leading 37. Condley and senior midfielder Lauren Carter are making a difference on offense, both playing every game and scoring four goals on the season. Junior goalkeeper Heather Joye has played every match in the box for the Bears while posting 71 saves in 1,276 minutes. She has recorded two shutouts, which came against Lamar and Southeastern Louisiana. “They (Central Arkansas) are the same hard working team they were last year,” Conner said. “They stick around in games and can pull off wins. They are a very dangerous team, but, ultimately, works well together, and their record is evident of that.” This season, the freshmen Bobcats have provided a majority of the offense. Freshman forward Britney Curry leads the team with five goals on 26 shots and 12 points. Freshman midfielder Audra Randell has recorded one goal on 18 shots with two assists. Sophomores Andrea Seledee, midfielder, and Lindsay Tippit, forward, each have two goals on 18 and 16 shots, respectively, while senior forward Jerelyn Lemmie has posted two goals on 15 shots.

Chirs Vidrine/Star file photo PUSHING FORWARD: Freshman midfielder Audra Randell moves the ball around a Stephen F. Austin defender Oct. 14 during the Bobcats’ 2-1 overtime loss. The Bobcats will head to Natchitoches, La. Friday to take on Northwestern State.

Conner said she would like to see her forwards start to work more with the midfield in upcoming matches. “The forwards can’t just stay in one stance; they need to do their runs but make sure the defense plays in front of them,” she said. “We (coaches) are asking the forwards to use the midfield more. They need to step up and realize

we need them to work with the mid-forwards.” Texas State is seventh in the conference standings, behind Central Arkansas and Northwestern State, who are fourth and fifth, respectively. The top six teams in the SLC will advance to the conference tournament, which begins Nov. 8.

and is emerging as a go-to player for the Bobcats. “It’s nice to see a freshman just go as aggressive as Melinda is going, and nobody has been able to stop her yet,” Chisum said. With three straight losses, the team is now 1210 overall and 5-5 in the Southland Conference. Chisum has tempered the goals for the team this season. “We are not going to win the conference,” Chisum said. “We’re going after the conference tournament championship.” The Bobcats are glad to be back at home, but they will immediately face a tough challenge. Central Arkansas will come to town riding a seven matchwinning streak. The match is 7 p.m. Thursday at Strahan Coliseum. “All I can tell you about them is they’re feisty and confident,” Chisum said. “We went down there last year and lost 3-0, so they are a quality team.” Chisum played freshmen — libero Ally Buitron and outside hitter/middle blocker Stephanie

Puckett — and sophomore outside hitter Ashley Emanuel against UTA late in the match. Until then, the freshmen had seen limited action. Chisum was pleased with the spark they gave the team and said there is a good chance they will see playing time against Central Arkansas. The Bobcats will look to stop the trio of middle blocker Chloe Smith, outside hitter Amicha Williams and middle blocker Camila Scapini. All three have at least 240 kills on the season. Scapini leads the Bears with a .320 hitting percentage. “The Brazilian kid, Scapini, is (6 feet 2 inches) and hits well out of the middle and right side,” Chisum said. “They attack the right side very well, so we’re going to have to block the left side much better than we’ve been doing.” During the five-match road trip, the Bobcats won the first two and lost the last three, the team’s first losing streak of the season. Chisum summed up the their collective attitude when she said, “I’m just glad to be back at Strahan Coliseum.”

’Cats trapped in losing streak, seeking confidence booster By Travis Atkins Sports Reporter The Texas State volleyball team’s 3-1 loss to Texas-Arlington marked their third straight defeat and capped off a frustrating road trip for the Bobcats. Unlike the previous two losses where Texas State jumped out to a lead before losing, they lost the first two games against UTA before making a run to get back in it. The Bobcats came up short in the end though, 19-30, 15-30, 33-31 and 28-30. Not being able to put a whole match together has been a theme in losses this year. “We have five conference losses, but we could just as easily be 10-0,” said Coach Karen Chisum. Texas State has not been swept 3-0 by an opponent all season, and the team believes what is keeping them from being elite is themselves. “It’s all mental,” said junior outside hitter Lawrencia Brown. “It’s errors on the court and communication. We’re kind of quiet and timid and when it

comes to that last game point, nobody goes to get up and hit between the ball or serve, so we really have kind of timid and soft players.” Against UTA, the Bobcats led in kills, assists and digs, but they had 35 errors to only 20 for the Mavericks. Thirty of the 35 errors occurred in the three games Texas State lost. “We are hurting ourselves,” Chisum said. “We are our own worst enemies, to say the least.” After losing close matches to Lamar and McNeese State, freshman setter Shelbi Irvin thinks her team may have tried too hard to beat UTA and were off their game. “After we lost those first two matches, we all really, really wanted to win that third one even more,” Irvin said. “We tried almost too hard and started making mistakes because it was all in our heads. We were like, ‘Oh God, I don’t want to mess up.’” Irvin had a match-high 46 assists, half of them to freshman middle blocker Melinda Cave. Chisum thinks Cave has been the most consistent performer

Jon Clark/Star file photo SETTING IT UP: The Bobcats scramble to their positions during a 3-1 loss to Texas-Arlington on Sept. 29. The Bobcats are scheduled to play Central Arkansas at 7 p.m. Thursday at Strahan Coliseum.


SPORTS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

teeingoff The men’s golf team will travel to Kerrville for the Sunday and Monday Roadrunner Intercollegiate. The Bobcats have been idle from competition since the Texas-Arlington/Waterchase Invitational Oct. 1 and 2 in Fort Worth. The Roadrunner Intercollegiate will be held at the Comanche Trace Golf Club and is the same course Texas State used to host the 2007 Southland Conference Championship in April.

Page 14 - Thursday, October 25, 2007

Sports Contact — Scott Strickman, starsports@txstate.edu

Football hopes to avoid hellish outcome against Demons By George Kiel Sports Reporter After defeating Stephen F. Austin for their first conference win of the season, Texas State football looks for consistency with their winning ways as they travel to Northwestern State in hopes of their first road win. The Bobcats will take on the Demons for the 25th time in school history, with Northwestern State leading the series 15-9. In the last six years, the series has been one-sided — Northwestern State has won five of the last six contests between the two. Saturday’s win against SFA put the Bobcats at 2-5 on the season and 1-2 in conference play. The Demons loss to Sam Houston State put them at 3-4 on the season, with a conference record of 2-2. Junior wide receiver Cameron Luke said the team is “extremely happy” to get a victory after five straight losses, but that is where the celebration stops. “It feels good to finally get that win, but we have to stay consistent on every drive to win more games,” he said. Luke tied a Southland Conference mark — and set a new Bobcat stadium record — with four touchdown receptions against the Lumberjacks. Though the Bobcats had much success against SFA, Coach Brad Wright believes Luke and the other receivers will have their hands full this weekend against a tough, hard-nosed Northwestern State pass defense. “They have a very physical and athletic secondary,” Wright said. “Their secondary likes to try and be physical with your receivers and get them out of the game.”

The Demons rely heavily on their defense to win games. They are last in the SLC in total offense with 320.1 yards per game, and 7th in scoring offense with 20 points per game. Nonetheless, Wright said playing at home will be a big plus for the Demons. “They are very good at home,” he said. “They seem like a different team at home as we watched them on film this week.” Northwestern State is undefeated at home this year, winning all three of their games at Turpin Stadium. This is Homecoming week for the Demons — just as last year’s matchup was for the two schools. Although Texas State will face a hostile crowd, junior defensive lineman Ray Parker said his team is coming into this game with a newfound attitude. “We used to come into games not to lose, but now we come into to the games expecting to win,” Parker said. “We’ve just been preparing ourselves more mentally now than physically.” Luke noticed a change following last week’s win, as well. He believes it has set the tone for them in practice. “Everybody has a different attitude about the season now,” he said. “We’re all working harder and even our coaches seem much happier.” As the ’Cats ready themselves for another road test, one thing always stays constant with Wright: keeping a positive outlook. “I told the guys we have something to play for now,” Wright said. “All we can do is stay focused and go down there and give it our best shot.” The Bobcats will take on Northwestern State at 2 p.m. Saturday at Turpin Stadium in Natchitoches, La.

Bobcat cross country hopes for dashingly good performance By Lisa Carter Sports Reporter

Austin Byrd/Star photo SKY WALKER: Junior wide receiver Cameron Luke comes down with his fourth touchdown reception of the Homecoming game. He finished with 152 receiving yards. The ’Cats cut down the Lumberjacks 52-29 Saturday at Bobcat Stadium.

Cycling club prepares to represent in national contest By Lora Collins Sports Reporter

Katie Allinson/Star feature photo PEDAL POWER: Pre-geography junior Cameron Howitt, Texas State cycling club team captain, rides in preparation for the USA Cycling Collegiate Mountain Bike National Championships.

Even though the odds were stacked against them, Texas State’s cycling club was able to qualify for the USA Cycling Collegiate Mountain Bike National Championships. The cycling club came away with second place at the BTU Powerpedal Oct. 13 and 14. The event, hosted by Houston, determined each team’s standing for the fall season. Texas A&M ranked first in the tournament, reigning over Texas State by 3,000 points. “A&M has twice as many guys as we do,” said philosophy senior Joseph Garcia. “But if you look back, our racers were all placing in the top 10. What happened is A&M beat us because they easily have twice as many riders as we do. If they are coming in the last 10 to 15 spots, they will amass more points than us because their racers are placing in every event.” Rewarded for ranking in the top two, the cycling team will next participate at nationals, Friday through Sunday in Banner Elk, N.C. and at the Sugar Mountain Resort. Four team members were chosen to attend the event, including Garcia, marketing senior Dan Valaperta and geographic information science senior Eric Breckinridge. “Within the conference, the top two teams get to send their ‘A’ category riders,” Garcia said. “Class A is just the long-distance (riders). They normally end up being the strongest riders and so the top 5 ‘A’ riders from each school get to go to Nationals.” Each race consists of three events: cross country, time trials and short track. The team will only compete in the cross country and short track races held on Friday and Saturday. The Saturday and Sunday events will feature downhill races, and the team believes they do not have the proper training

to participate. “It’s like a different type of athlete that does a downhill race,” Garcia said. “Primarily, we don’t do that because we don’t have the geography to do it. But places, like in Colorado, there are little centers for downhilling.” Riding up to 110 miles daily in the summer, Garcia worked with his teammates to prepare for the fall season. Garcia believes he will excel in the longer race events because of his endurance training. “I’ll probably do better at the cross country race, which is usually in the region of 30 miles in length, which comes out to a little over two hours,” he said. “I’ll be better in that event because the short track is a track where you go around it as many times as you can in 25 minutes. I’m more of a marathon person than I am a sprinter, so doing a 25 minute all-out is harder than a two hour-long race for me.” President Cameron Howitt, pre-geography junior, pointed out that time trials often are the biggest hurdles for the team. “Time trials are usually the most physically intense just because you push yourself to the limit throughout the whole time. Whereas, in a cross country or a short track race, you are more focused on strategies; and in this one you are more focused on your strength,” Howitt said. Leading up to nationals, the four riders have trained daily to increase their endurance. Although they will compete as a team at nationals, the cyclists often train alone. “We all pretty much ride on our own,” Garcia said. “It’s a team sport, but it’s very individual. You go in there as a team, but you are really racing against your teammates.” The cycling team will end the fall road races after nationals this weekend and will begin preparations for the spring.

The Texas State cross country teams will compete in their biggest meet yet Saturday at the Southland Conference Championships in Corpus Christi. Sophomore Heather Bullin said the team knows who they will be chasing and how important it is they run them down. “Lamar is our biggest competition,” Bullin said. “If we win against them, we will be that much more excited for what we’ve accomplished.” Last year, Texas State had three women place among the top 10 runners at the conference championships in Nacogdoches. Junior Whitney Perkins hopes the trend will continue. “I would like to place in the top eight and run a (time of) 22 minutes for the 6K,” Perkins said. “I really hope that everyone runs their best and stays mentally focused on the race.” Perkins is not the only runner with high standards for the conference meet. Junior Roel Elizalde hopes to place himself among the SLC’s elite as well. “I hope to get into the top ten,” Elizalde said. “I have trained hard and don’t want anything less.” A big meet brings many big challenges, such as the extra distance and pace. The weather this year may play a big factor, Perkins said. For Bullin, mentally preparing is the toughest obstacle to conquer. “If I can talk myself out of beating someone, that’s a good thing,” Bullin said. “I continue to remind myself to run as fast as I can.” Freshman Michael Richards has his own ideas about the challenges he will face in his first conference championship. “The biggest challenge will be not making any strong moves until the end of the race,” Richards said. “The Southland Conference has many good athletes, and you have to respect that. You just have to let the race unfold before you make any moves.” Perkins believes the women have emerged as a strong and united team, which will assist them in their performance Saturday. “We started off this year at a much quicker pace,” she said. “We came back strong from this summer and jumped right into hard workouts. Hopefully, that will boost our confidence (for the race).” The men have participated in vigorous workouts as well. The team has faced a number of challenges on the field this season. “This championship will hopefully be a great thing for the team,” Richards said. “The team has had to battle with a lot this year, so hopefully we can go in and make a strong appearance. If that happens, the team will feel like we have accomplished a great deal from the beginning to the end of this season.” Teamwork will be one of the biggest keys to success at the SLC Championships. Bullin hopes high morale will result in victory for the entire women’s team. “I want to stay positive for all of the girls,” Bullin said. “The girls are working hard for me, and I want to work just as hard for them.”

10 25 2007  
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