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SMART AS A FOX

Women’s basketball Coach Suzanne Fox is an accomplished leader and mentor for players SEE SPORTS PAGE 10

MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS Texas State responds to a growing trend SEE TRENDS PAGE 7

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

SEPTEMBER 26, 2007

WEDNESDAY

VOLUME 97, ISSUE 12

Missing soldier granted city honor at ceremony By Christine Mester News Reporter More than 100 San Marcos residents gathered Friday at the San Marcos Plaza Park on the San Marcos River to honor Pvt. Byron Fouty as part of National Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Recognition Day. Mayor Susan Narvaiz proclaimed Sept. 14 “Private Byron Fouty Day” in honor of Fouty, who has been missing since May 12 in Iraq. “It’s the knowledge that the community supports the sons and daughters of America that are fighting this war,” Narvaiz said. “There are a lot of different particulars about whether your support a war, but that is not what this is about. This is about supporting the people that have been called to duty and are far away from home and the families who wait here at home for their return. My hope is that it gives comfort to his mother.” Enemy forces ambushed Fouty and two other soldiers May 12 in Al Taqa, Iraq. He was part of the 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division of Fort Drum, N.Y. In one of his last letters home to his mother, San Marcos resident Hilary Meunier, Fouty told her when he returned home he wanted to study and work in the medical field. Meunier partnered with the Greater Austin Texas Chapter of Blue Star Moth-

ers of America, Inc. to raise money for the Fisher House and the Warrior Family Support Center to honor Fouty under the Byron Fouty Project. Blue Star Mothers of America is an organization for mothers who have had or currently have children serving in the military. “Each of us has experienced the pain of deployment, and for many of us, multiple times,” said Mary Rose Fisher, founding member and president of the Greater Austin Texas Chapter of Blue Star Mothers of America, Inc. “We support one another during these times when our beloved children are placed in harm’s way. But we’ll also tell you that our children have no greater desire than to serve the United States of America. So, we hug them tightly and let them go. And we pray often and with each other.” San Marcos residents were able to make donations at the concert, which was videotaped and will be sent to Fouty’s battalion as a message of encouragement and support. “As we commemorate our POW (and) MIAs today, we celebrate their lives and honor their sacrifices and the sacrifices of their families,” Fisher said. “Without brave ones within whom the desire for freedom outweighs self, our very own lives would be quite different.” Monty Marion/Star photo The internationally acclaimed Heart of FUNDING FOUTY: Rich Schalin of the Patriot Guard Riders stands firm during the benefit concert for Pvt. Byron Fouty Friday at San Marcos Plaza Park. The concert aimed to raise funds and awareness for Fouty, who has been MIA for more than three months. See FOUTY, page 4

Pioneer in Chicano Movement speaks

Greg Richards/Star photo HISPANIC HERITAGE: Political activist Jose Angel Gutierrez speaks to the Latino Student Association Tuesday night at the LBJ Ballroom.

By Kara Bowers Special to The University Star A prominent, influential voice of political activism and civil rights in the Chicano Movement was heard Tuesday night. Jose Angel Gutierrez, keynote speaker for Hispanic Heritage Month at Texas State, spoke to students, faculty and staff in the LBJ Ballroom. The open address took place following the Latino

Student Association VIP Leadership Dinner in conjunction with Hispanic Heritage Month. During his speech, Gutierrez said the Hispanic population is one of the fastest-growing minorities, but there is a need for unity and solidarity for those numbers to be effective. He said despite the Hispanic population doubling every 13 years along with a two percent increase in Hispanic voters, one of the most important issues facing the community is political participation.

Other pressing issues included immigration and higher education. On the issue of immigration, he attributes much of the national discourse to lack of historical knowledge. “We constantly have to prove we belong here,” Gutierrez said. “We were here before the United States was and before Texas was even called Texas.” In his speech, Gutierrez outlined Chicano history, dating from its ancestry to the time he became part of the movement in the 1970s. He discussed challenges facing Mexican-Americans during the Jim Crow era. One instance mentioned was schools following English-only policies enacting “Little Schools of 400” where students were strictly forced to learn 400 English words before attending public schools. Many of the books Gutierrez has published were on hand for attendants to look over. Gutierrez has earned numerous degrees and academic accomplishments. He is a proponent of education and acknowledged it can offer financial security and other significant opportunities. “Sure it can make you rich, but when I say rich I mean contacts, not money, although it can make you a lot of money,” Gutierrez said. “If you have an education, the sky is the limit. You can come to know how the world works and then can change the world.” Stella Silva, associate director of the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, said Gutierrez was chosen to speak because of his many accolades and achievements, including being an activist, public official, professor and attorney. Gutierrez is the

founder and past president of La Raza Unida Party and founding member of the Mexican-American Youth Organization in San Antonio, among numerous other accomplishments. “Students felt that as a pioneer in fighting for the rights of the Hispanic community, Dr. Gutierrez would be a strong role model and would be able to support their goal of maintaining a strong support system for Latino students here at Texas State,” Silva said. Ricardo Zavala, political science senior, helped to bring the powerful speaker to Texas State. Zavala, who grew up in Gutierrez’s hometown of Crystal City, remembered hearing Gutierrez’s name and about the La Raza Unida Party since he was a young child at the dinner table. Zavala reiterated the advice Gutierrez once gave to a 20-year-old. The advice was, “Get a job, get an education and paint the White House brown.” Gutierrez said in his speech he meant this advice as a way to tell young people to have a plan for the future and reiterated this idea repeatedly. “The person in charge of your problems is the person you greet in the mirror every morning,” Gutierrez said. “You have the solution, so find it.” Ashley Flores, member of the Latina Unidas student organization and mass communication junior, said she is interested in political activism and was inspired by Gutierrez’s speech. “I’ve been finding ways to get closer to my heritage,” Flores said. “It’s really empowering to see that there are people in power out there speaking for Latinos and Hispanics.”

Texas State strives to better serve Hispanic student population By Jeff Turner News Reporter A diverse group of Texas State students attended the Latino(a) Issues in Higher Education dialogue Tuesday to discuss Hispanic demographics in Texas. Israel Nájera Jr., supervising counselor at the counseling center, led the dialogue. “Almost one-quarter of the student body are firstgeneration college students,” Nájera said. “What qualifies a person to be ‘first generation’ is you’re the first one in your family to get a college degree.” Nájera started the First Generation Student Organization, which assists students in learning about college and gives them tips on how to succeed in their pursuit of higher education. Nájera said Texas State is making an effort to recruit more Hispanics because their population is growing. One of the main goals of the Texas State Campus

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Cloudy 91˚

Precipitation: 20% Humidity: 64% UV: 9 Very High Wind: S 7 mph

“A

lot of people hear that and say, ‘well why are they only serving Hispanics?’ It’s really not about that.”

—Israel Nájera Jr. supervising counselor, counseling center

Master Plan is to continue to pursue recognition as a Hispanic Serving Institution. In order for a university to be considered for the title, the school must have a minimum enrollment of 25 percent Hispanic students. Texas State’s current Hispanic population is 22 percent. Once a university becomes a Hispanic Serving Institution, it is eligible to receive additional federal grants. Pedro Gonzalez, social work junior, said he

Two-day Forecast Thursday Partly Cloudy Temp: 91°/ 68° Precip: 20%

Friday Partly Cloudy Temp: 91°/ 67° Precip: 10%

understood the additional funding would provide better facilities and programs, but wanted to know how it would directly affect him. He said Hispanics are becoming the majority of minorities and are not being adequately educated. “If we don’t educate Latinos … if you guys don’t make it, then we’re going to have a problem,” Nájera said. “We are going to have a lot of poor people. We will have a lot of people that are dependent on the state. We’re going to have a lot of problems, maybe with crime as well.” Sal Villarreal, criminal justice junior, said being a Hispanic Serving Institution would attract more Hispanic students. Nájera is part of an organization called the Hispanic Policy Network. The group which is made up of faculty and staff who work with the university president to help achieve Hispanic Serving Institution status. “We have to be careful how we present that

(Hispanic Serving Institution status),” Nájera said. “A lot of people hear that and say, ‘well why are they only serving Hispanics?’ It’s really not about that. Since the demographics in Texas are changing, it behooves everyone in Texas to make sure they educate minorities, and in particular Hispanics, because a large majority of Hispanics are dropping out of school, and African Americans, and first-generation whites, too.” Nájera said Texas State has acquired more Hispanic faculty and deans, but would like to see more in higher-level administration positions where university policy is made. “Until we have that, (Hispanics) won’t have role models (in the administration),” he said. The Latino(a) issues in Higher Education is sponsored by the counseling center. Future dialogues will include “Phenotyping and White Privilege,” “Monolingual and Bilingual Hispanics” and “Hispanic Family Values.”

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Today in Brief

Wednesday, September 26, 2007 - Page 2

Jacob Riddle, undecided freshman, spent five weeks experiencing the customs and culture of Norway this summer as a participant in the International Association of Lions Clubs’ International Youth Camp and Exchange Programs. He was the only American selected for the program. The programs allow participants ages 15 to 22 to

experience life in another country — either with a host family or with other campers — to develop life skills and better understand the cultures and customs of others. Lions Clubs International has been operating youth exchanges since 1961. —Courtesy of Lions Club

News Contact — Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

EN GARDE

Calendar WEDNESDAY The rosary will be prayed 6 p.m. in the St. Jude Chapel of the Catholic Student Center. Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society will have a $1 book sale in The Quad between Flowers Hall and the Psychology Building. The American Marketing Association presents Gregg Miller, director of marketing development for Round Rock Express, at 5:30 PM in McCoy Hall, Room 127. There will be free food and drinks available starting at 5:15 p.m. All majors are welcome. Dress business casual. The Association of Information Technology Professionals presents guest speaker Michael Raiford, Texas State Alumnus and CIO of Samsung, 5 p.m. in McCoy Hall, Room 127. There will be free pizza and drinks. Career Services presents “International Internships-What a Way to Go!” from 5 to 7 p.m. in the LBJSC. There will be a one-hour orientation and training session to present how to use the emWave PC biofeedback program to reduce the effects of stress. Orientation is open to university community. Sessions will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-11.1. The Network Meeting will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room 3.6. Adult children of alcoholics dealing with dysfunctional families group will meet from 5:15 to 6:45 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center will host Advocate Training and Volunteers Helping Victims of Abuse. For more information call Emily Douglas at (512) 396-3404. THURSDAY The Catholic Student Organization will meet at 6 p.m. in the library of the CSC. The Rock — Praise and Worship will be 7:30 p.m. in the St. Jude Chapel of the CSC. The Catholic Student Center will have “Coffee and a Concert,” a contemporary Christian concert in a coffeehouse setting, at 8 p.m. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. There will be contemporary worship, relevant teaching, prayer and plenty of fun. Everyone is welcome to attend. A Study Abroad Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the ASB Breezeway. Representatives of different programs will be providing information to those interested in studying, working and traveling abroad. For more

information contact the Office of Study Abroad Programs at (512) 245-1967. Women’s Personal Growth Group will meet from noon to 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room 3.4. Alcoholics Anonymous Newcomer’s Meeting, River Group, will be 9:15 p.m. at 1700 Ranch Rd. 12, Suite C. Saturday

MONDAY Sexual Assault and Abuse Survivors Group, a program of the Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center for Texas State Students will meet from 5 to 6:15 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. TUESDAY The CSC will have a free lunch for all students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the CSC lobby. There will be a presentation by the Baylor Law School Admissions Office 5 p.m. in McCoy Hall, Room 119. For more information e-mail as44@txstate.edu. Every Nation Campus Ministries will be holding a weekly campus meeting at 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, Room G-02. There will be free food, fellowship and a message exploring the person of Jesus. Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 12:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland. For more information call Lynn, (512) 357-2049. There will be a one-hour orientation and training session to present how to use the emWave PC biofeedback program to reduce the effects of stress. Orientation is open to university community. Sessions will be held from noon to 1 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-11.1. GLBQ Pride Group meeting will be held from noon until 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. Facing the Fear — An Anxiety/Panic Group will meet from 3:30 to 5 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 2452208.

Tina Phan/Star photo Erin English (right), music performance Freshman, fences with her instructor John Moreau in Jowers Monday morning.

Texas State observes Hispanic Heritage Month Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations continue at Texas State through Oct. 11 with the Feria de Texas State carnival, “What it Means to be Latino” panel discussion and a blood drive, among other events. Feria de Texas State, a fun-filled carnival event, will take place 6 p.m. Thursday at Sewell Park. The activities will be free of charge and will feature games, food booths and music provided by Salsa del Rio. The event will be sponsored and hosted by the Latino Student Association, Delta Lambda and local businesses and community members of San Marcos. A student-led panel discussion titled “What it Means to be Latino” will take place 7 p.m. Oct. 3 in LBJ Student Center, Room 3-15.1. Students will also have the opportunity to relish a variety of Hispanic dishes from Mama’s Kitchen at George’s, located at the LBJ Student Center on Oct. 4 at 12 p.m. The

the university star

food is free, but arrive early, this event is first-come, first-serve. Students can put on their dancing shoes for Salsa Night, sponsored by Texas State’s Salsa del Rio band. The event will be held at 8 p.m. Oct. 5 at George’s in the LBJ Student Center. The “In Your Hands Blood Drive” will be held from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Oct. 9 in The Quad. A quesadilla sale sponsored by the Hispanic Business Student Association will take place at 9 a.m. Oct. 11 in The Quad. An additional ongoing event is the Latinas Unidas weekly meetings. The meetings will take place at 6 p.m. every Thursday in the LBJ Student Center, Room 4-9.1. For additional information call the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at (512) 245-2278. — Courtesy of the University News Service

TSUS receives three new representatives AUSTIN — Gov. Rick Perry appointed three representatives to the Texas State University System Board of Regents. Charlie Amato of San Antonio is co-owner and chairman of Southwest Business Corporation. He is incoming chairman of the University of the Incarnate Word Board of Trustees, and past chairman of Christus Santa Rosa Health Care Corporation and the Sam Houston State University School of Business Advisory Council. Amato is a board member and past chairman of the Greater San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, and a member of the University of Texas at San Antonio Development Board. He

received a bachelor’s degree from Sam Houston State University. His term expires Feb. 1, 2013. Ron Blatchley of Bryan is the co-owner of BMB Homes, a residential construction company. He is a former mayor and city council member for the city of Bryan. He has worked in higher education for more than 20 years, which includes serving as director of student affairs at Texas A&M University and director of student activities at North Texas State University. Blatchley received a bachelor’s and master’s degree in education from Sam Houston State University. His term expires Feb. 1, 2011.

Michael Truncale of Beaumont is a senior partner at Orgain Bell and Tucker, L.L.P. He is past president of the Jefferson County Bar Association and fellow at the Texas Bar Foundation. Truncale is a member of the Texas Association of Defense Counsel and the American Bar Association. He received a bachelor’s degree from Lamar University, a master of business administration from the University of North Texas and a law degree from Southern Methodist University School of Law. His term expires Feb. 1, 2013. — Courtesy of the Office of the Governor

ASG Beat

All senate seats filled, new legislation passed to give alumni e-mail access

Anger Management: Your Plan for Real-Life Coping will be held from 5:10 to 6:25 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at The Associated Student Gov(512) 245-2208. ernment passed and prepared for new legislation. One important piece of legislation passed at Monday’s meeting titled GIVE US YOUR “Texas State Alums Online” is one that would allow graduates of Texas State to retain their e-mail address, except it would change from “AA####@txstate. edu” to “AA####@alumni.txstate.edu.” This would allow alumni to remain in the system and ASG to retain a relationship with them, pass along impore-mail suggestions to staropinion@txstate.edu tant information and invite the former students back to events

2 cents

University Police Department Sept. 21, 10:32 a.m. Criminal Trespass Warning/Sterry Hall An officer was dispatched for a suspicious persons report. Upon further investigation, two non-students were issued CTWs.

FRIDAY

Texas State volleyball will play Texas-Arlington at 2 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum.

CRIME BL TTER

and functions. An emergency piece of legislation was passed titled “Domestic Violence Awareness Month.” ASG Sen. Gutermuth is the author is this piece of legislation and has worked avidly to get flyers, posters and other publicity materials so students are aware of this issue throughout the month of October. ASG is proud to announce all 60 seats of the senate are now full. Megan Patronella, political science junior, and Courtney Strange, political science senior, were both sworn in at

Monday’s meeting. Lawrence Teis, director of athletics, and Coach Wright made an appearance at the meeting as guest speakers and encouraged the senate to continue the motivation and attendance at football games. The senate is looking forward to an exciting year for all of the Bobcat athletic teams. ASG meetings are at 7 p.m. Mondays in Room 3-14.1 of the LBJ Student Center. All students are encouraged to come and voice their concerns. — Courtesy of ASG

Sept. 21, 11:35 a.m. Medical Emergency/Edward Gary & Concho An officer was dispatched for a medical emergency report. Upon further investigation, a non-student was walking, tripped and fell down. The non-student refused medical attention and called a family member to take her to the doctor. A report was generated for this case. Sept. 21, 12:38 p.m. Displaying the Handicap Placard of Another/Tower Garage An officer was on patrol and observed an individual parked in a handicapped space. Upon further investigation, a student was issued a citation and the placard was confiscated. Sept. 21, 9:47 p.m. Driving While License Invalid/Alcohol: Open Container in Motor Vehicle/Disregard Red Light/ Nelson Center at 200 University Drive An office initiated a traffic stop. Upon further investigation, a non-student was issued a citation, arrested and transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center to await magistration. Sept. 22, 12:39 a.m. Medical Emergency/ Blanco Hall An officer was dispatched for medical emergency report. A student reported stomach pain and EMS transported him to Central Texas Medical Center for further evaluation. Sept. 22, 3:31 a.m. Alcohol: Public Intoxication/Blanco Hall An officer was dispatched for a suspicious circumstances report. Upon further investigation, a student was issued a citation, arrested and transported to HCLEC to await magistration. Sept. 22, 3:15 p.m. Burglary: Building/Mitte Art Building An officer was dispatched for a burglary of a building report. A student reported property had been taken from the building without her consent. This case is under investigation. Sept. 22, 11 p.m. Drug: Possession of Marijuana/Drug: Possession of Drug Paraphernalia/San Marcos Garage An officer was on patrol and observed five individuals standing at the bottom of the stairs. Upon further investigation, a student was issued a citation for PODP and a student was arrested for POM and transported to HCLEC to await magistration.


NEWS

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

The University Star - Page 3

Governmental policies spur border-patrol group into action By Scott Thomas News Reporter The Minuteman Civil Defense Corps will be launching Operation Secure America in October in an attempt to close off a small route between the Dalgo International Bridge and the Los Ebanos Ferry, frequently used by illegal immigrants to enter the country. “A lot can’t swim and drown on the way over here,” said Clark Kirby, Texas State director for the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps, a private citizen organization patrolling the border between U.S. and Mexico. “I don’t know what’s so horrible in Mexico that they would risk their lives and the lives of their children to come here.” Kirby said the operation is an effort to attract attention to the open border as well. “A good number of female illegal immigrants are raped by the coyotes that bring them over,” Kirby said. “That means a good number of female illegal immigrants’ first experience in this country is a violent crime.” Kirby said the minutemen will be working with border patrol to coordinate efforts for maximum coverage. “We work very closely with border patrol — we’re there to be their eyes and ears,” Kirby said. “In the past six to 12 months, they’ve worked more closely with us. I think they’ve found us to be good citizens.” The minuteman standard operating procedure does not allow its members to come into contact with suspected illegal immigrants and to merely report crimes to law enforcement.

“I

don’t know what’s so horrible in Mexico that they would risk their lives and the lives of their children to come here.”

— Clark Kirby Texas State director, Minuteman Civil Defense Corps

The policy in Texas is for only minutemen with concealed handgun licenses to carry firearms on patrol. “Concealed handgun licenses are the best in the country,” Kirby said. “We’re very law-abiding people.” Despite the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps insistence it’s a lawful organization, the group has remained a source of controversy partly because of the Minuteman Project, another border-patrolling organization carrying the minuteman name and allowing members to carry firearms. Both organizations have been called dangerous and racist by opponents. The MinuteDaron Dean/Dallas Morning News man Civil Defense Corps has no affiliaBORDER BOUND: Texas Minutemen president Shannon McGauley uses a spotlight to deter people from crossing the tion with the Minuteman Project. border Oct. 20, 2005 near El Paso. “I know a few friends who said they wanted to go down to the border, hold AK-47s and shoot at illegal immigrants,” said Michelle Peters, philoso- civil defense corps. he does not agree with any sort of miliAllan Sheedy, management sophophy sophomore. “They said they had to “If I heard someone in my organi- tants patrolling the border. But he said more, said the government is merely sit through a one-hour class and then zation talking like that they would be he does agree the government is not looking to spend money rather than they got a little badge and were good immediately terminated,” Kirby said. doing enough to protect the border. actually solve the problem. to go.” “People like that should be locked up “What the government needs to do “As a true conservative, I don’t want Kirby said these men were members and the key thrown away.” is change our economic policies — not to spend money on the problem, I just of the Minuteman Project and not the Graduate student Ben Harden said build walls and fences,” Harden said. want it fixed,” Sheedy said.

Controversy lingers over use of Tasers by law enforcement By Dahleen Glanton Chicago Tribune LAS VEGAS — It was supposed to be a fun-filled weekend for Sgt. Mark England, his last before heading off on his second deployment to Iraq. But England, 38, who got into a dispute with airport security personnel, ended up on the floor of McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas last March. He was jolted with a police Taser at least three times and battered with a club, leaving fractured ribs and a head injury that has kept him from returning to war. “It was like touching an electric fence they use to keep cattle in, but instead of just where the initial shock goes in, the electricity goes through your entire body. It feels like every nerve cell is on fire,” said England, a 14-year military veteran now serving as a medic in the California National Guard. England, who filed a lawsuit this month against the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, is one of a growing number of people across the country who claim police used Taser guns on them repeatedly without adequate provocation. The incident last week involving a University of Florida student shot with a Taser at a campus forum for Sen. John Kerry has brought renewed attention to the use of the stun guns. In other recent cases, authorities defended the Tasering of an autistic California teenager who had been seen running in traffic; while in Ohio this month, a woman was Tasered for struggling in a police car after she was handcuffed.

Although human-rights groups such as Amnesty International have called for a moratorium on the weapons, which release 50,000 volts in a single shot, police departments across the country are adding Tasers to their arsenals. In the last five years, the number of lawenforcement agencies deploying Tasers has increased from about 2,000 in 2002 to more than 11,500, according to Steve Tuttle, a spokesman for Taser International. That represents about 70 percent of lawenforcement agencies in the U.S. “The Taser is not a magic bullet, but it seems to have been the missing tool in the toolbox for law enforcement,” said Tuttle. “There is nothing as effective in the police arsenal today as the 94 percent incapacitation rate of a Taser.” While critics point out in the last five years approximately 270 people have died after being shot with a Taser, law-enforcement officials have argued the weapons are still the safest tool they have for bringing suspects under control and preventing injuries to police officers. “It’s a lot more humane than the old nightstick used to be,” said Dennis Wise, president of the American Federation of Police and Concerned Citizens. “Police officers aren’t paid to be punching bags. When you hit someone with a Taser, it automatically shuts everything down and they have no desire to fight. It sends an electrical shock to the brain that it’s not used to.” Still, several high-profile cases involving Tasers have threatened to turn public opinion against the device. Many police departments are trying

to find ways to make their use of Tasers more transparent. One of the most popular methods is the Taser cam, a tiny attached camera that activates when the weapon turns on. Authorities say the cameras allow them to document each case for possible evidence to be used in a court case and provide officers with a valuable training tool. “It is good for us in the public eye,” said Sean Walker, a spokesman for the suburban North Las Vegas Police Department, which began issuing Tasers with attached cameras this year. “When you hear a news story about a suspect being Tased 14 times, the public has no idea what the officer encountered during that scenario. With the camera, it records the whole thing, and you can determine whether it was reasonable.” The Taser cam records audio and video from the time the Taser is turned on until it is turned off, said Tuttle, even if the weapon isn’t fired. The cameras are a good start, said Gary Peck, Nevada chapter executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, but they do not go far enough. One of the biggest problems, he and other critics said, is cameras would not capture all the events leading to a Taser incident, making it difficult to determine whether Taser use was justified. “Cameras are fine, but we want to know what happened before the Taser was turned on,” said Peck, whose group has a lawsuit pending against Las Vegas police and Taser International. “Video is only helpful if all the footage will be public record and not released on a discretionary basis.”

Rick Wood/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MCT FACE THE VOTE: Theresa K El-Amin casts a vote with other delegates on a resolution calling for the removal of troops from Iraq during a session of the NAACP Convention July 12, 2005 in Milwaukee. Delegates approved a resolution calling for a moratorium on the use of Taser guns.


CLASSIFIEDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

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Cost - 25¢ per word (1–6 days); Cost - 20¢ per word (7+ days); Deadline - 2 business days prior by noon All classified ads must be paid in advance, unless credit is established. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. We do our best, but please check your classified ad for accuracy. Any corrections to your ad must be made by the second day of publication. As a free service to you, all classified ads will be published on-line on our web site at www.universitystar.com. However, since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007 - Page 9 E-mail Classifieds at starclassifieds@txstate.edu

FOR RENT

ROOM/BATH FOR RENT at University Club Townhomes. Rent ASAP for $355. Contact Jennifer Bailey at (214) 883-5550 or jb1287@txstate.edu.

FOR SALE 1998 OAKWOOD MANUFACTURED HOME. Clean 17 x 75, 3BD/2BA. Includes deck and shed, all appliances included. Bike to campus. $625/mo. or $29,500 cash. Jeff, (512) 363-3696.

HELP WANTED FALL SEMESTER WORK •$13 base/appointment •Flexible schedules around classes •Customer Sales/Service •No experience necessary •Scholarships possible •Conditions apply •Call to apply (512) 392-7377 www.workforstudents.com TEACHERS NEEDED: NOW HIRING PART-TIME & FULLTIME LEAD TEACHERS. Education major/experience/bilingual preferred, but not required. Quality Child Development Center in Kyle. (512) 405-3700 or fax (512) 405-3701. www.rockinghorseacademy.com CAMPUS REPS: PART-TIME. Give away student credit cards. No experience. Your free website does it all. Residual income. www.GetCreditNow.Biz PAPER BEAR - A DOWNTOWN GIFT SHOP HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING SHIFTS: 1-6. Starting pay $6.75/hr. Pick up application in person. Must be able to work minimum 30 hrs. per week, Mon.-Sat. !BARTENDING! Up to $300/day. No experience necessary. Training Provided. Age 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 157. ENJOY WORKING WITH CHILDREN? J&R Gymnastics is looking for energetic gymnastics, tumbling and cheerleading instructors. Schedule: 430 hrs. per week. Pay: commensurate with experience. Experience preferred. Call (830) 606-0375. PART-TIME ADMIN. ASSISTANT FOR MEDICAL BILLING OFFICE. Flexible hrs. 20-30/week, occasional Sat. Must be detailed oriented & have interpersonal and telephone skills. Drop off resume at 1348 Hwy 123, Suite A. ATHLETIC, OUTGOING MEN FOR CALENDARS, GREETING CARDS, ETC. $75-200/hr. No exp. needed, (512)684-8296. CRI IS SEEKING INDIVIDUALS TO WORK AS TELEPHONE INTERVIEWERS. Flexible Schedule, Paid Training, No Experience Necessary. Within walking distance of TxState. $7-$12/hr. Call (512) 353-3627x209 today! TAKING APPLICATIONS AT SMALL COUNTRY STORE for individuals with outgoing personalities. Retail experience a plus. Call (512) 559-2642 and leave name and phone number for call back. WATERLOO ICE HOUSE NOW HIRING FOR ALL POSITIONS for our new location in Southpark Meadows in Austin. Please apply in person from 8 a.m.-11 a.m. or 2-4 p.m., M-F at the following location: Waterloo Ice House, 9600 Escarpment Blvd., Austin, (512) 301-1007.

HELP WANTED

MOVIE EXTRAS. New opportunities for upcoming productions. All looks needed no experience required for cast calls. Call 877-218-6224. TEKA MARKETING is looking for help with light office work. Starting pay is $8 an hour. Call (512) 805-0020 to set up an interview. EARN $800-$3,200 A MONTH to drive brand new cars with ads placed on them. www.AdCarClub.com UNDERCOVER SHOPPERS. Earn up to $150 per day. Under cover Shoppers needed to judge retail and dining establishments. Exp. Not RE. Call 800-722-4791. MAKE UP TO $75 EACH TAKING ONLINE SURVEYS. www.CashToSpend.com

MISCELLANEOUS BOBCATSNEEDJOBS.COM. Paid survey takers needed in San Marcos. 100% FREE to join. Click on surveys.

PERSONALS LOST YOUR PET? If your pet is lost anywhere in Hays County, please check the San Marcos Animal Shelter (512) 393-8340 which is located at 750 River Road off of east Hwy 80. All strays from the Kyle, Wimberley, Dripping Springs, Driftwood, Uhland and some of Buda (non-city) areas are taken to San Marcos. Hours: Mon. and Fri. 11:30 to 5:30; Tues., Wed., Thurs. 11:30 to 4:30; Sat. 11:30 to 4:30. Please go in person rather than call, you are the only one who can identify and reclaim your beloved pet! Remember, an ID tag is a ticket home! $5,000 PAID. EGG DONORS. +Exps. N/Smokers, ages 19-29, SAT>1100/ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

SERVICES WWW.STUDENTATTORNEY.COM

WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell, (512) 353-4511.

WANTED News reporters Must be able to report on university and local news, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Trends reporters/columnists Reporters must be able to report on university and local arts, entertainment, social and cultural events, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Columnists must write original columns on specific subjects for weekly publication and come into the newsroom for editing. Sports reporters/columnists Reporters must be able to report on university and local sports, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Columnists must write original columns on specific subjects for weekly publication and come into the newsroom for editing. Opinions columnists Must be able to write thought provoking columns on university, local and state events and come into the newsroom for editing. Illustrators Must be able to work with the editorial staff to create original editorial cartoons and illustrations for stories. Comic artists Must be able to create an original and entertaining comic strip to be published three days a week. Graduate students are welcomed to apply for any position, but undergraduate students are preferred because of class schedules. For more information, please contact Maira Garcia editor-in-chief at stareditor@txstate.edu or call (512) 245-3487. Applications are available at the Trinity Building or at www.universitystar.com.

THE UNIVERSITY STAR IS NOW HIRING! Since 1911, The University Star has served as the main source for information for and about Texas State. As a nationally acclaimed student newspaper, The Star provides reporting of campus and community events; along with coverage of state, national and international news. Also included is opinion commentary and sports, entertainment and features, as well as advertisements of interest to the college community. From presidents (Lyndon Baines Johnson) to professional athletes (Reggie Rivers), The Star has been home to hundreds of dedicated student journalists, sales and administrative staff, designers and photographers. Launch your career in journalism, advertising, design or get involved with campus life by building your portfolio at one of the premiere collegiate newspapers in Texas. The University Star is Texas State’s official newspaper, which is created and edited entirely by students. We are looking for individuals to fill openings in many areas areas.

Place your classified ad via email at starclassifieds @txstate.edu


Page 4 - The University Star

NEWS

Wednesday, September 25, 2007

DRAWING WITH SOUL

Cotton Miller/Star photo Julio Mendez, studio art senior, works in the Jo Ann Mitte Art Complex. Mendez is preparing for the senior Thesis 1 and 2 art shows, which will be Nov. 26 and Dec. 3, respectively, in the Mitte Gallery.

FOUTY: Donations collected at area stores CONTINUED from page 1

Texas Chorus headlined the event. Other performers included Abby Bowers, Debbie Daniels, Chris Williams and the Citywide Worship Band. The Texas State Student Volunteer Connection decorated the park with yellow ribbons and balloons in preparation for the concert. The San Marcos Parks Department set up the concert. “The purpose of the event was to promote an awareness that while we all go on and live our every day lives, other people’s lives are on hold in certain ways,” Narvaiz said. “I think most of us get desensitized. We turn on the TV and flip the switch until we get something that entertains us for the next few minutes. I think (the concert) is a way to say, ‘Hey, stop for at least today and give a few

minutes to someone else.’” The San Marcos Police and Fire Departments collected donations Friday at Sam’s Wholesale Club and Wal-Mart. They presented the earnings to Meunier at the concert. The Texas State Army and Air Force ROTC set up booths in The Quad and collected $550 for the Byron Fouty Project. “I think it’s important to show the support we have, not only for Byron’s family, but for our servicemen,” said Andrew Freeman, ROTC member and public administration senior. Narvaiz said the concert is about more than just collecting money. “I think that the warm embrace of the community says more than any money,” Narvaiz said. “It is a message of support and remembrance for his family and for Byron Fouty.”


OPINIONS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

onlineconnection For news updates throughout this semester, check out www.UniversityStar.com.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007 - Page 5

Opinions Contact — Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu

THE MAIN POINT

Stand up, speak up

T

he 1950s is often referred to as the “wonderful years.”

The amazement of this decade is detailed in venerable books like The Catcher in the Rye and is heard through musicians like Perry Como and Frank Sinatra. The glamour of this time shines in glossies of Audrey Hepburn and Grace Kelly. A cursory glance reveals it was a spendthrift, golden time for the U.S., but the pain of these years — with the truth hiding behind the records and Hollywood blockbusters — is revealed in texts like Malcolm X and heard through voices similar to Martin Luther King’s. The reality of this time in American history is one seldom talked about. The big cars, houses in verdant neighborhoods and “I Love Lucy”-style living conditions were available only to the privileged class, those upper crust white families who had the means to afford the sought after living conditions. For blacks, however, these wonderful years meant something else entirely. Whites used the blood and sweat of black Americans to build economic empires. Many black citizens languished in poverty shackled in the South by brutal, unceasing racism. It is nothing short of astounding such overt racism seen in the ’50s still exists — thrives — even in the South. The events leading up to the Jena 6 controversy showcase the unbelievable hatred still alive and well in an era seemingly stuck in a perpetual era of bigotry and unbridled, unchecked hatred. To civilized, conscious citizens of the world, the incidents in Louisiana are deplorable. In a time when man is busy sending spacecraft to observe Mars and endeavoring to erase cancer, one must stand back in sheer awe when a group of white students hangs nooses from a tree to intimidate their black classmates. Is this really, in 2007, indicative of the progress being made? Has nothing changed since the colonists first shipped millions of blacks from the Dark Continent? Roy Breithaupt, LaSalle Parish school system superintendent, dismissed the nooses as an “adolescent prank,” a phrase showing the fantastic depth of the psychological and mental environment of unadulterated hate some in the South embody. The University Star views these actions and statements with a sort of numb sadness. The surrealism of the events is almost too unbelievable. To those dedicated and embroiled in the struggle of taking out the systems of hate in the South, whose tireless efforts bent on tearing down the centuries-old institutions of hatred leave them dumbstruck after events like the Jena 6, The Star encourages you not to lose sight in the human rights struggle. Make no mistake — human rights are at stake here. Civil rights are still a dream to those who have yet to achieve basic human respect.

MEAGAN SINGLETARY Star Columnist

Meagan Singletary Star Columnist

Jena 6 controversy highlights society’s dark side

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Julie Sheah/Star illustration

Intersection of justice, journalism causes hazy representation of news By Kia Makarechi Daily Bruin (UCLA) LOS ANGELES — When “Dateline NBC” reporter Chris Hansen confronted pedophiles on “To Catch a Predator,” viewers watched as 23 men gave pathetic excuses for their behavior before being cast as society’s “bad guys” and being put behind bars. Or so they thought. ABC’s “20/20” news magazine recently featured a biting expose on “Dateline’s” biggest failure: They filmed a Murphy, Texas, sting in such a negligent manner none of the men featured on the show could be convicted. The show’s final suspect, a local district attorney, committed suicide when the show’s producers directed police to take their hunt to his house. “Predator” had been hailed as the new face of investigative reporting — pushing journalism into new frontiers of modern, aggressive and honest programming. But this incident highlights some major problems in the still-emerging relationship between investigative journalism and criminal justice. Police should make all efforts to ensure 100 percent of the work they do on film is necessary. In this particular case, the men had already committed the crime of soliciting a minor for sex when they engaged in lewd instant message conversations. All the tackling

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suspects, pointing guns not only at suspects but at other officers acting in confusion and all of the Chris Hansen segments were for show, for entertainment. Additionally, the police must control the handling of any suspects no matter the cost. “Dateline” signed a contract with Perverted Justice, an organization supplying the decoys who became the would-be victims. It was the organization that identified the suspects and kept records (many of which were incomplete) of the online conversations. Since the evidence was spotty, entrapment could not be ruled out and the men were freed. Finally, reporters must adhere to the ethical codes governing journalism. The Washington Post’s Standards and Ethics maintain its reporters will “not misrepresent their identity” while “gathering news.” In the “Predator” series, Hansen often waited to identify himself as a reporter until the end of his “interviews.” As the cameras were all hidden, these men could have thought they were talking to the child’s father or any other man in the household. As such, their confessions and comments are not admissible in court. These self-incriminations were violations of the Fifth Amendment, and theoretically, the pedophiles could sue for the damages their reputations have incurred. Pedophilia is certainly a pressing issue — not only in America, but specifically in West Los Angeles. Selfproclaimed pedophile Jack McClellan was arrested

Editor In Chief.................................Maira Garcia, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.......................Sydney Granger, starletters@txstate.edu News Editor...................................Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor.......................Clara Cobb, starentertainment@txstate.edu Opinions Editor.......................................Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu Photo Editor...............................Spencer Millsap, starphoto@txstate.edu

on the University of California, Los Angeles campus just weeks ago. According to the Megan’s Law sex offender registry, there are at least four other convicted pedophiles living in Westwood. And in Beverly Hills, two pedophiles live one block away from Beverly Vista Middle School, in the immediate vicinity of both a church and a temple. No matter the value of the cause or the possible efficiency coming with having a media giant finance an operation, there must be concrete boundaries between what NBC claims to be “cutting-edge journalism” and cut-and-dry police work. There are many laudable journalistic endeavors merging media and government forces. Most notably, the viewpoint of soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan has been brought to TV and newspapers around America, resulting in fresh, more candid reporting. Interestingly, it seems absurd to even think of reporters in war zones doing the job of military commanders. So “Predator” is not only engaging television, but also a sad comment on what it takes to capture America’s attention. The show has taken the formula “Cops” created years ago and not only added a disturbing, sexual twist, but distorted the reality of law enforcement. To undermine the legal foundations regarding both criminal and media law in order to make 23 men register as sex offenders is ultimately a regression. Justice cannot come at the cost of democratic law.

Sports Editor............................Scott Strickman, starsports@txstate.edu Copy Desk Chief.......................Colm Keane, starcopychief@txstate.edu Design Editor................................Daniel Currey, stardesign@txstate.edu Systems Administrator............Les Stewart, starsysadmin@txstate.edu Advertising Coordinator......................Jodie Claes, starad1@txstate.edu Advertising Sales Manager...........Jackie Pardue, starad2@txstate.edu

Account Executive...............................Scott Lynch, sl1148@txstate.edu Account Executive..................Samantha Manley, sm1299@txstate.edu Account Executive...........................Krystal Slater, ks1429@txstate.edu Publications Coordinator..Linda Allen, starbusinessoffice@txstate.edu Publications Director..............Bob Bajackson, stardirector@txstate.edu Visit The Star at www.UniversityStar.com

Bitch. Virtually every woman has been called this nasty word at one time or another. Whether it is because you’ve done something that might warrant it or you just said things people didn’t particularly care to hear, being called something other than your name can be hurtful and often shows a lack of maturity on the part of the person doing the name calling. Before you begin to agree too strongly that men’s use of this word to refer to women is despicable, please realize you aren’t innocent victims in this matter. We have all used this charming little euphemism to refer to other females. Everyone knows this word has a negative connotation, but my question is: Why is it used so frequently to describe headstrong women? Why is a woman who speaks her mind automatically the b-word while a man who does the same is praised for “having balls?” I have had first-hand experience with this dilemma. I have never been one to be afraid to say what I’m thinking and it’s often given people the wrong idea about me. (It’s gotten me in some trouble, too). Instead of crying about it, I wonder about it. I came to a conclusion upon examining instances in which someone called me a bitch. I’m either an awful, mean-spirited person who lives for the satisfaction of angering people, which is doubtful, or I think saying what needs to be said, even when it’s not the popular thing to do, is worth it. If it’s important, poignant and relevant I think it deserves to be heard. Why is this such a bad thing? If I were a man, would people react the same way when I said something they didn’t agree with, or would they politely disagree and yet think me brave and fearless for holding fast to my convictions? Sadly, I think more often than not it’s the latter. There is a cruel double standard at work here. Qualities men are encouraged to possess — being outspoken, bold and refusing to back down — women are ridiculed for. Women possessing these qualities are thought to be arrogant and to not know their place. They are told they should stop behaving like men. For some reason, there are people who like their women like they like their doormats: timid, meek and readily available for walking over. What is it about a strong woman that scares people so much? There probably is not much one can do to change people’s perspectives on this matter. No matter how many articles are written on this topic, the fact will remain not many are capable or willing to deal with a powerful woman. My advice, though, is to never back down. Don’t let what some people say or think about you keep you from expressing what’s on your mind. No, I’m not advocating speaking without thinking first or saying whatever stupid thing pops into your head. Words are far more powerful than they are given credit for and they can cut to the quick. However, holding back something that needs to be heard is censoring yourself and believe me, there are plenty of people paid to do that for you, so don’t waste your time. So ladies — next time someone calls you a bitch for being out-spoken and standing up for what you believe, simply smile and say, “Why, thank you.” The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright September 26, 2007. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


TRENDS

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

The University Star - Page 7

Latest Halo incarnation gives fans reason to stay awake all night

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CT

By Nathaniel Zablan Daily Titan (Cal State-Fullerton)

Monty Marion/Star photo ASSEMBLED FOR BATTLE: Students and San Marcos locals wait in line Monday evening outside GameStop on Highway 80 while waiting for the release of the third game in the Halo series. GameStop stayed open past midnight in order to release the game.

Tracking

Trends By Jessica Jacobs Trends Columnist

Sloppy Spears

Celebrity gossip is the name of this game, and most us of play along, whether we want to openly admit it or not. This summer was packed full of juicy celebrity mishaps to sink our teeth into, and who better to start off with than the queen of catastrophe herself, Britney Spears. As if Britney’s train wreck of a performance at the “MTV Video Music Awards” didn’t bring her enough publicity for the remainder of the year, she’s made the headlines once again. This time, her former bodyguard has alleged Spears abused drugs on multiple occasions. Even if those charges don’t come to trial, the pop tart is being slapped with offenses for a hit-and-run accident and driving without a license. The incident occurred Aug. 6, and the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office sent her a letter Sept. 21 notifying Spears of the two misdemeanor charges she faces. Fortunately for those involved in the parkedcar incident, Spears was not wearing her VMA wardrobe, which greatly aided in cleanup efforts. Our hearts go out to those women and men brave enough to drive the same streets in Hollywood that Spears, Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton frequent.

Juice is loose It’s pretty safe to say O.J. Simpson ruined the summer of 1995 for kids everywhere when he went on trial for the murder of ex-wife Nicole Brown and her friend, Ronald Goldman. July of that year marked sweltering, record-setting temperatures in the Southwest, leaving most children stranded indoors with their parents watching the O.J. trial. Twelve years later, children across the U.S. once again quiver in fear at Simpson’s Sept. 16 arrest in Las Vegas on allegations of armed robbery, kidnapping and assault. For the sake of America’s youth, let’s hope — Photos co urtesy of M for a mild 2008 summer. CT

FULLERTON, Calif. — Gamers all over the world have been counting down to one of the biggest events of the year: the release of Halo 3. Anticipation for the game has increased in recent weeks, as videos of leaked copies of the game have appeared on www.youtube. com, and images of Master Chief, the main character of the Halo franchise, have appeared on cans of Mountain Dew and Burger King french fry wrappers. Video game stores have had swarms of people come in to pre-order copies of the game, anticipating long lines the night before the game’s release. “After I pick up the game at midnight, I’m going to play it ‘til about four in the morning, and any other chance I get,” Carlos Gomez said. Halo fans camped out as early as 2 p.m. in front of video game stores on the day before the game’s release. Some gamers have gone as far as staging a tailgate while waiting in line, playing Xbox 360 games from the back of a pickup truck while preparing a miniature barbecue. “This is the only game worth doing it for,” Brandon Grammatico, 18, remarked about tailgating in line. Nick Benoit, 18, and Evan This, 19, said they have made a tradition out of waiting in line for the Halo games. “We’ve been playing Halo since Xbox came out,” Benoit said. Benoit and This were the first in line at the GameStop in Brea. If Benoit’s bright red afro did not make him stand out, the fact he brought a couch to the video game store did. “We did our pre-orders about 10 months ago,” Benoit said. In August, Microsoft announced pre-orders for Halo 3 passed the one-million mark in North America. Best Buy, GameStop and even 7-Eleven have offered pre-order opportunities for the game, which is expected to fly off the shelves on the day of its release. “Halo 3 will easily hit the million mark in the first day,” said GameStop employee Matt Lanning. The story of the Halo series revolves around a character called Master Chief, a super-soldier fighting for the fate of planet Earth against an alien force called “The Covenant.” Master Chief has found the same kind of popularity Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog

have enjoyed as video game icons. The character not only defines the Halo series, but serves the purpose of making the Xbox distinct from other gaming systems. “Master Chief is a really cool character,” Gomez said. While fans of the game have enjoyed the story line, Gomez said one of the things that make Halo popular among gamers is the fact it is a complete first-person shooter with a solid multi-player interface. Gomez is excited about the new weapons and features of the game. One of the new features is the ability to customize some of the gaming environments, further enhancing the multi-player mode. Halo fans got a chance to experience the Halo 3 multi-player interface when a game called Crackdown was released for the Xbox 360. Crackdown featured access to a beta version of Halo 3, which allowed a handful of lucky gamers a sneak peak of the highly anticipated game. Another early version of the game was leaked onto the Internet to the dismay of Microsoft. Anyone caught playing the pirated version of the game was subject to having their Xbox Live accounts suspended until the year 9999, said Mark Roberts, 24, who works at GameStop, and is a Halo enthusiast. Those who aren’t familiar with the video game trilogy have probably found it hard not to find images of the game. One of the first advertisements for the game appeared during a Monday night football game in December 2006. Microsoft has made plans to sponsor a NASCAR racecar that will feature the Halo 3 logo on the front and back of the vehicle. The hype is not just about the game itself, but the products associated with it. A special version of the Xbox 360 is being released, which is branded in the signature colors of the Halo series, green and gold. The console comes with a headset and wireless controller, furbished in the Halo colors. In addition to the Xbox 360, replicas of the weapons used in Halo 3 are up for grabs, as is a statue of the main character, priced just below $100. The game will come in three different versions. The standard version comes with just the game, while the collector’s edition comes with a hardcover book and bonus disc, all in a metal case. There is also a “legendary edition” of the game, which is priced at $130, which comes with a special DVD, packaged in a replica helmet. “It’s going to be a huge hit,” Lanning said.

Texas State helps students ROCKIN’ RANDY minimize mental health crises By Aarinisha Brewer Features Reporter With an increase in the number of students with severe mental health problems, Texas State is responding with resources for preventing violence and disturbing behaviors. University staff members are among the first to interact with students. Mary Grant, assistant director of the Counseling Center, encourages more faculty involvement in students’ lives. “We advise our faculty and staff to be aware of dangerous signs, such as disturbing writings, despairing comments, missing classes excessively and looking disheveled,” she said. “We really recommend our faculty and staff to be proactive and involved in the student body.” Grant said there are certain steps staff members should take in response to a student in need. “They should follow QPR procedures,” she said. “Q is for asking the right questions, P is persuade in which we persuade them to ask for help and R is referring them to the right resource like tutoring services, the student health center or our counseling center.” University-sponsored activities, such as workshops, give faculty and staff a chance to learn new ways to assist students. These events provide information about the resources the university has to offer. “Really, sometimes the faculty does not even know that there is psychological center or the extent of the help available to the student,” Grant said. Michelle Pope, health associate professor, said the Counseling Center remains a strong force when it comes to issues regarding the student mental health crisis. “We recommend our students to speak with our counselors and seek

50 Cent might cash in

Well, ladies and gentlemen, the results are in. Finally, the moment you have all been waiting for, drum roll please: Kanye West has won the epic battle against 50 Cent, outselling him by a whopping 300,000 albums. Just in case you’ve had better things to do than keep up with the latest battle of the rappers, 50 Cent vowed to retire from his rapping career if Kanye’s album Graduation outsold his album Curtis, both released Sept. 11. Does this tragedy mark the end of 50 Cent’s rapping career? It’s doubtful. The rapper managed to survive nine gunshot wounds to the head and body — and as catastrophic as it may seem, 50 Cent should be able to recover from this ego-crippling incident as well. Even 50’s camp has yet to confirm or deny whether he plans to follow suit with his retirement. Despite significantly trailing Mr. West in record sales, 50 still has the second highest record sales of the year. Not too shabby for a guy who “walks with a limp.”

the professional help they need,” Pope said. Grant said counselors encourage faculty members to make the act of asking for help less awkward for students. “We prefer that the person that knows the student talk to them, rather than have a counselor call them out,” she said. The Office of Professional Development helps educate faculty and staff in student matters. The office offers training services like workshops for skill advancement in mental heath services. Students, faculty and staff can participate in these workshops. Mary Ann Zapata, administrative assistant at the office, said student workers serve a major function in everyday communication. “Students play an important role in the functionality of an office,” Zapata said. “A lot of our staff members send their student workers to our workshops because they deal with people on a dayto-day basis.” Student employees face pressure when completing their education while working, interning or volunteering. The office assists student employees by teaching them how to counter stressful situations while on campus. Student workers like Sarah Carlson, English sophomore, find their own ways of de-stressing. “I go out with friends and I avoid alcohol as much as possible,” she said. “I just like to dance, have fun and work out.” Students, faculty and staff may visit the Counseling Center for more information and resources at www. counseling.txstate.edu. “We all want our students to be successful and happy in their experiences here at Texas State,” Grant said. “We, at the Counseling Center, want our students to be healthy, happy and successful.”

Jon Clark/Star photo Guitarist Geoffery Hill of the Randy Rogers Band jams out with fiddle player Brady Black Monday night at Cheatham Street Warehouse.


TRENDS

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

The University Star - Page 7

Latest Halo incarnation gives fans reason to stay awake all night

—C

ou rte sy

of M

CT

By Nathaniel Zablan Daily Titan (Cal State-Fullerton)

Monty Marion/Star photo ASSEMBLED FOR BATTLE: Students and San Marcos locals wait in line Monday evening outside GameStop on Highway 80 while waiting for the release of the third game in the Halo series. GameStop stayed open past midnight in order to release the game.

Tracking

Trends By Jessica Jacobs Trends Columnist

Sloppy Spears

Celebrity gossip is the name of this game, and most us of play along, whether we want to openly admit it or not. This summer was packed full of juicy celebrity mishaps to sink our teeth into, and who better to start off with than the queen of catastrophe herself, Britney Spears. As if Britney’s train wreck of a performance at the “MTV Video Music Awards” didn’t bring her enough publicity for the remainder of the year, she’s made the headlines once again. This time, her former bodyguard has alleged Spears abused drugs on multiple occasions. Even if those charges don’t come to trial, the pop tart is being slapped with offenses for a hit-and-run accident and driving without a license. The incident occurred Aug. 6, and the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office sent her a letter Sept. 21 notifying Spears of the two misdemeanor charges she faces. Fortunately for those involved in the parkedcar incident, Spears was not wearing her VMA wardrobe, which greatly aided in cleanup efforts. Our hearts go out to those women and men brave enough to drive the same streets in Hollywood that Spears, Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton frequent.

Juice is loose It’s pretty safe to say O.J. Simpson ruined the summer of 1995 for kids everywhere when he went on trial for the murder of ex-wife Nicole Brown and her friend, Ronald Goldman. July of that year marked sweltering, record-setting temperatures in the Southwest, leaving most children stranded indoors with their parents watching the O.J. trial. Twelve years later, children across the U.S. once again quiver in fear at Simpson’s Sept. 16 arrest in Las Vegas on allegations of armed robbery, kidnapping and assault. For the sake of America’s youth, let’s hope — Photos co urtesy of M for a mild 2008 summer. CT

FULLERTON, Calif. — Gamers all over the world have been counting down to one of the biggest events of the year: the release of Halo 3. Anticipation for the game has increased in recent weeks, as videos of leaked copies of the game have appeared on www.youtube. com, and images of Master Chief, the main character of the Halo franchise, have appeared on cans of Mountain Dew and Burger King french fry wrappers. Video game stores have had swarms of people come in to pre-order copies of the game, anticipating long lines the night before the game’s release. “After I pick up the game at midnight, I’m going to play it ‘til about four in the morning, and any other chance I get,” Carlos Gomez said. Halo fans camped out as early as 2 p.m. in front of video game stores on the day before the game’s release. Some gamers have gone as far as staging a tailgate while waiting in line, playing Xbox 360 games from the back of a pickup truck while preparing a miniature barbecue. “This is the only game worth doing it for,” Brandon Grammatico, 18, remarked about tailgating in line. Nick Benoit, 18, and Evan This, 19, said they have made a tradition out of waiting in line for the Halo games. “We’ve been playing Halo since Xbox came out,” Benoit said. Benoit and This were the first in line at the GameStop in Brea. If Benoit’s bright red afro did not make him stand out, the fact he brought a couch to the video game store did. “We did our pre-orders about 10 months ago,” Benoit said. In August, Microsoft announced pre-orders for Halo 3 passed the one-million mark in North America. Best Buy, GameStop and even 7-Eleven have offered pre-order opportunities for the game, which is expected to fly off the shelves on the day of its release. “Halo 3 will easily hit the million mark in the first day,” said GameStop employee Matt Lanning. The story of the Halo series revolves around a character called Master Chief, a super-soldier fighting for the fate of planet Earth against an alien force called “The Covenant.” Master Chief has found the same kind of popularity Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog

have enjoyed as video game icons. The character not only defines the Halo series, but serves the purpose of making the Xbox distinct from other gaming systems. “Master Chief is a really cool character,” Gomez said. While fans of the game have enjoyed the story line, Gomez said one of the things that make Halo popular among gamers is the fact it is a complete first-person shooter with a solid multi-player interface. Gomez is excited about the new weapons and features of the game. One of the new features is the ability to customize some of the gaming environments, further enhancing the multi-player mode. Halo fans got a chance to experience the Halo 3 multi-player interface when a game called Crackdown was released for the Xbox 360. Crackdown featured access to a beta version of Halo 3, which allowed a handful of lucky gamers a sneak peak of the highly anticipated game. Another early version of the game was leaked onto the Internet to the dismay of Microsoft. Anyone caught playing the pirated version of the game was subject to having their Xbox Live accounts suspended until the year 9999, said Mark Roberts, 24, who works at GameStop, and is a Halo enthusiast. Those who aren’t familiar with the video game trilogy have probably found it hard not to find images of the game. One of the first advertisements for the game appeared during a Monday night football game in December 2006. Microsoft has made plans to sponsor a NASCAR racecar that will feature the Halo 3 logo on the front and back of the vehicle. The hype is not just about the game itself, but the products associated with it. A special version of the Xbox 360 is being released, which is branded in the signature colors of the Halo series, green and gold. The console comes with a headset and wireless controller, furbished in the Halo colors. In addition to the Xbox 360, replicas of the weapons used in Halo 3 are up for grabs, as is a statue of the main character, priced just below $100. The game will come in three different versions. The standard version comes with just the game, while the collector’s edition comes with a hardcover book and bonus disc, all in a metal case. There is also a “legendary edition” of the game, which is priced at $130, which comes with a special DVD, packaged in a replica helmet. “It’s going to be a huge hit,” Lanning said.

Texas State helps students ROCKIN’ RANDY minimize mental health crises By Aarinisha Brewer Features Reporter With an increase in the number of students with severe mental health problems, Texas State is responding with resources for preventing violence and disturbing behaviors. University staff members are among the first to interact with students. Mary Grant, assistant director of the Counseling Center, encourages more faculty involvement in students’ lives. “We advise our faculty and staff to be aware of dangerous signs, such as disturbing writings, despairing comments, missing classes excessively and looking disheveled,” she said. “We really recommend our faculty and staff to be proactive and involved in the student body.” Grant said there are certain steps staff members should take in response to a student in need. “They should follow QPR procedures,” she said. “Q is for asking the right questions, P is persuade in which we persuade them to ask for help and R is referring them to the right resource like tutoring services, the student health center or our counseling center.” University-sponsored activities, such as workshops, give faculty and staff a chance to learn new ways to assist students. These events provide information about the resources the university has to offer. “Really, sometimes the faculty does not even know that there is psychological center or the extent of the help available to the student,” Grant said. Michelle Pope, health associate professor, said the Counseling Center remains a strong force when it comes to issues regarding the student mental health crisis. “We recommend our students to speak with our counselors and seek

50 Cent might cash in

Well, ladies and gentlemen, the results are in. Finally, the moment you have all been waiting for, drum roll please: Kanye West has won the epic battle against 50 Cent, outselling him by a whopping 300,000 albums. Just in case you’ve had better things to do than keep up with the latest battle of the rappers, 50 Cent vowed to retire from his rapping career if Kanye’s album Graduation outsold his album Curtis, both released Sept. 11. Does this tragedy mark the end of 50 Cent’s rapping career? It’s doubtful. The rapper managed to survive nine gunshot wounds to the head and body — and as catastrophic as it may seem, 50 Cent should be able to recover from this ego-crippling incident as well. Even 50’s camp has yet to confirm or deny whether he plans to follow suit with his retirement. Despite significantly trailing Mr. West in record sales, 50 still has the second highest record sales of the year. Not too shabby for a guy who “walks with a limp.”

the professional help they need,” Pope said. Grant said counselors encourage faculty members to make the act of asking for help less awkward for students. “We prefer that the person that knows the student talk to them, rather than have a counselor call them out,” she said. The Office of Professional Development helps educate faculty and staff in student matters. The office offers training services like workshops for skill advancement in mental heath services. Students, faculty and staff can participate in these workshops. Mary Ann Zapata, administrative assistant at the office, said student workers serve a major function in everyday communication. “Students play an important role in the functionality of an office,” Zapata said. “A lot of our staff members send their student workers to our workshops because they deal with people on a dayto-day basis.” Student employees face pressure when completing their education while working, interning or volunteering. The office assists student employees by teaching them how to counter stressful situations while on campus. Student workers like Sarah Carlson, English sophomore, find their own ways of de-stressing. “I go out with friends and I avoid alcohol as much as possible,” she said. “I just like to dance, have fun and work out.” Students, faculty and staff may visit the Counseling Center for more information and resources at www. counseling.txstate.edu. “We all want our students to be successful and happy in their experiences here at Texas State,” Grant said. “We, at the Counseling Center, want our students to be healthy, happy and successful.”

Jon Clark/Star photo Guitarist Geoffery Hill of the Randy Rogers Band jams out with fiddle player Brady Black Monday night at Cheatham Street Warehouse.


TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

101 Hedonism

✯ SULTRY SOLUTIONS SPICE UP LOVE, SEX LIFE

At the beginning of remember a loving, a relationship, faults healthy relationship are often overlooked does not just appear — he may not put the from nowhere. They toilet seat down all take work and lots of the time she may get it. It’s not enough to more toothpaste on take care of yourself the countertop than and keep the status quo ANNA TAUZIN her toothbrush. In the with your partner. You Star Columnist beginning, these little have to take action to things go unnoticed; or, better develop and nurture your relayet, it’s passed off as something tionship. cute and endearing your new There are several things you paramour does. can do to spice up a stagnant But what about the other relationship. Some of them are problems that arise when a simple. Try going to a new resrelationship stagnates? The taurant in another part of town. sex becomes predictable and See movies in a different city. infrequent. Nights are filled Take a drive into the country more with wrappers from Taco and hang around a different Bueno than Trojan. Trouble is river. Museums and theaters brewing, but in an effort to keep can be fun distractions, if only the peace, you say nothing, to make fun of the pretentious effectively avoiding conflict at regulars. the sake of your own inner hapThese changes can be made piness. on the sly without the need for A stagnant relationship is confrontation. As blasphemous easy to spot. There’s very little as it may sound, sometimes laughter. The couple does the airing every little feeling won’t same things, over and over, with make the situation better, but little variation. Emotions likely worse. The goal is to fix the run high and frustration and problem, not spend all day disdiscouragement are likely to be cussing how miserable you are. felt by both parties. If it’s your sex life that needs However, it’s important to improvement, breaking the

routine is key. Are you out of ideas for new positions? Take a visit to the adult video store and check out the first hardcore flick that appeals to you. Watching it together may seem strange at first, but once you focus on improving your reverse cowgirl you’ll hardly notice the panting of you and your partner has drowned out the ones on screen. If you’re not sure how to tell your lover something you’ve been dying to try, put it in writing. Handwrite a note to him or her detailing exactly what you’d like to do to them when they get home from work or school. Slipping it in their backpack will be a welcoming surprise during a 9:30 a.m. accounting class. Trying something kinkier would be a delicious way of steaming up your sex life, but leave the handcuffs and blindfolds on the dresser for now. Those instructions are best left for next week. The University Star does not claim Anna Tauzin is a sexpert. Tauzin and The Star do not condone or support unhealthy or unsafe sexual behavior.

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively. 9/25 Solutions:

9/25/07

The University Star - Page 8


SPORTS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

servin’it up The Texas State tennis team began its fall season last weekend at the Scarborough Specialties Classic, hosted by Texas Tech. Junior Lainy Chafitz and sophomore Andrea Giraldo of the ’Cats lost in the “Red” bracket doubles finals to the duo from Texas Tech. Sophomore Rabea Hartmann finished in third place in the “Red” singles bracket, and teamed up with senior Ali Gulida to win the consolation match of the top doubles bracket. The Bobcats head to Nacogdoches this weekend for the SFA Tournament.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007 - Page 10

Sports Contact — Scott Strickman, starsports@txstate.edu

Basketball coach a star on and off the court

✯ By George Kiel Sports Reporter

Editor’s note: This is the second segment of a four-part series featuring Bobcat coaches.

Women’s basketball has become one of the more successful programs for Texas State athletics over the past five years. Reaching the conference tournament five years in a row, the Bobcats are beginning to build a winning program. While much credit is given to the players, Coach Suzanne Fox continues to maintain a competitive team year-in and year-out. Fox heads into her 11th season as women’s basketball coach with many accomplishments and accolades. In the last game of the 2006-07 season, she collected the 125th win of her Texas State coaching career, the third most victories all-time in program history. She also coached the ’Cats to a Southland Conference Tournament Championship during the 2002-03 season for just the second time in Texas State’s history. She reached another milestone Jan. 15, 2005, when she notched her 200th victory as a collegiate coach, which included wins she earned while coaching at her alma mater Abilene Christian. Though Fox has many individual accomplishments, she gives a lot of credit to the players she and her staff bring in each year. “I expect my players to, first and foremost, be good representatives of the institution and community,” Fox said. “We ask that our players compete every game and play hard.” Senior Erica Putnam, a leader on last year’s team, believes Fox is successful because of her challenging coaching style. Putnam, who played four years under Fox, credits her for teaching more than basketball.

“Coach Fox is very communicative and motivational,” Putnam said. “She has lots of fun, but demands hard work. Playing for her is a great learning experience for any player.” Fox was an exceptional basketball player during her college athletic career. While at Abilene Christian, Fox was named FirstTeam All-Lone Star Conference, LSC MVP, All-Academic LSC, LSC Defensive Player of the Year and GTE Second-Team Academic All-America. She is currently seventh alltime on the Abilene Christian women’s basketball career scoring list with a total of 1,502 points. In her 16th season as a head coach, which includes five years at Abilene Christian, Fox tries to translate the experience of her playing days to the Bobcats she now coaches on the court. “I try to communicate to the players as much as I can since I can’t be out there anymore,” Fox said. “My competitive nature carries over because I want to win.” Fox’s players seem to understand her competitive nature and have the same attitude about winning. Brooke DeGrate, senior guard, said she clearly recognizes Fox’s thoughts during the games. “Coach Fox is very vocal,” DeGrate said. “When she gets mad, it means it’s time for us to pick it up.” Putnam comprehends Fox’s motives and said she tolerates nothing but the best. “She asks for 100 percent every time,” Putnam said. “Coach Fox can easily tell when a player is giving less than that.” Though competitive by nature, women who have played under Fox have referred to her as a “player’s coach.” A common theme players have expressed about Fox is her availability. DeGrate said Fox is just as good off the court as she is on it.

“I feel that I can go into her office at anytime and talk about anything,” DeGrate said. “From the beginning of my recruitment process, she has made me feel comfortable and that I am needed.” Putnam credits Fox for showing her direction in life and said the coach plays a big role in her academic success. Fox said she looks forward to every day’s challenges and expectations; her passion for student-athletes keeps her drive alive. “I love working with kids from age 18 to 22,” Fox said. “Everyday is different. Some of the kids’ situations are funny and some of them are sad, but working with coaching new players and working with my staff makes my job fun.” This upcoming season is no different for the Bobcats. Fox said she thinks this year’s team is one of the hardest-working groups she has ever coached. “This team has a great work ethic,” she said. “We should be successful if we carry that onto the court.”

Monty Marion/Star photo Matthew Slabaugh/Star illustration

COMING TOGETHER

Volleyball team conquers Texas Christian in three-game sweep

NFL’s unpredictable nature makes it worthy of consistent viewing Gabe Mendoza Star Columnist

You have to love how wide open the NFL is this year. You have to love how wide open the NFL is just about any year. The disparity from season to season is what makes people, like me, capable of being NFL fans. It can be tough. One year, your team is a fourth down conversion away from Super Bowl glory; before you know it they’re spending the next six years in salary-cap hell. But there is a reason the NFL campaign is by far the most popular and anticipated sports season in America: you never have to wait too long for your team to be a contender again. Teams can rebuild in a single offseason with a couple free agents and a high draft pick. With free agency and nonguaranteed contracts, player movement can make the offseason even more fun than the regular season. I’m still waiting for an offseason fantasy football Travis Atkins/Star photo league. Just wait; instead of SMACKDOWN: Freshman middle blocker Melinda Cave spikes the ball during the Bobcats’ drafting players, you’d draft 3-0 victory over TCU Tuesday night at Strahan Coliseum. By Travis Atkins Sports Reporter Texas State swept TCU, who entered the match 15-2, right out of the gym Tuesday night in three games, 30-22, 30-19 and 30-28. Four Bobcats finished with double-digit kills and overall, the team had 62 kills to TCU’s 39. Freshman middle blocker Melinda Cave led Texas State with a career-high 15 kills and a .524 hitting percentage. “Every game, me and Shelbi (Irvin), the setter, have connected more and more and I think it just all came together tonight,” Cave said. Everything seemed to come together for the Bobcats. They set a season high for hitting percentage with a .355 mark and had their most kills in a three-game match. Spreading the wealth has been a theme for Texas State this season. During their current six-match winning streak, the team’s longest since 2004, there have been four different leaders in kills. “We are five-dimensional,” said Coach Karen Chisum. “We have two really good setters and we are able to run a three-hitter attack at all times.” The Bobcats fell behind 4-0 in the first game, then fought back to tie it at 16. A.J. Watlington, freshman right side hitter, gave the team a spark off the bench with two thunderous kills and Texas State won the game on a spike by junior middle blocker Emily Jones.

In game two, sophomore outside hitter Jessica Weynand and Cave took over. The two combined for 13 kills, including eight from Weynand alone. “I haven’t been connecting very well; hopefully this is the game that will really help my confidence,” Cave said. Chisum said the game plan was to get Cave

“W

e are fivedimensional. We have two really good setters and we are able to run a three-hitter attack at all times.”

—Karen Chisum volleyball coach

and the rest of the right side involved. “They (TCU) don’t block the right side very well,” Chisum said. “We wanted to run it quick with Melinda and A.J. Melinda was blocked twice tonight but they were both on high sets and her strength isn’t her leaping ability.” The Bobcats fell behind early in the third game with four service errors. They fought back to tie the game at 27 before taking a timeout. The match ended when junior middle blocker Lawrencia Brown hammered a kill

off a perfect set. Brown finished the match with 10 kills and six digs. Last season, Brown was the focal point of the offense, but gladly takes a lesser role this year for the good of the team. “It makes us deadly,” Brown said of the emergence of her teammates. “Having the middles, right sides and outsides makes it much easier for our defense if we have the best offense.” Chisum prepared for a tough match, and thought the team made a statement with their domination of the Horned Frogs. “TCU is 15-2 and have played some really quality opponents,” Chisum said. “They underestimated us. When you come here to Strahan Coliseum, you better be ready to play ball. We made a statement tonight, I think to ourselves as much as anything else.” The Bobcats had seven aces to just three for TCU and sophomore libero Kacey Wimpy and Weynand had 15 and eight digs, respectively. “We passed extremely well,” Chisum said. “I am very proud of Lawrencia, Jessica and Kacey Wimpy. Those kids get the first contact almost 95 percent of the time and they did a great job.” LeMeita Smith led TCU in kills with eight and Nirelle Hampton had 25 assists to lead the Horned Frogs. Courtney Edwards, who had 221 kills on the season coming into the match, was held to just seven on the night. The Bobcats will host Texas-Arlington (9-6) at 2 p.m. Saturday in Strahan Coliseum.

general managers, front office people and agents. Instead of L.T. being the No. 1 pick in every league, you’d find Drew Rosenhaus at the top of every draft board. They would earn points based on impact drafts, free-agents, signing bonuses … you get the idea. Besides, where else could you imagine having a conversation with a buddy that begins, “yeah well, Matt Millen cost me last week because he took another wide receiver in the first round.” I know a few of you fantasy junkies would be all over that. But anyway, that’s just part of why the NFL is so great. The Texans, who have never done anything in this league, are being talked about like a legitimate franchise. The Packers were left for dead with Brett Favre contemplating retirement, but now look at them. They’ve started the season 3-0 and Favre has a 93.5 quarterback rating. Not to mention my beloved 49ers, which are, even with Alex Smith not knowing he’s an NFL quarterback, 2-1 and in first place in the NFC West after years of … well, things I’m still not quite ready to talk about yet. That is what makes the NFL so different. In other sports, — baseball especially — you can count on the same teams

year-in and year-out to be at the top of the standings. There isn’t an opportunity for teams at the bottom to move to the top in a reasonable amount of time. There’s no chance the Devil Rays will be a championship-caliber team in the next 10, even 20 years. Not with the Yankees and Red Sox spending hundreds of millions of dollars in payroll. But, there is not a single team in the NFL that won’t be able to compete over the course of the next 10, or even five years. The Titans are competing, the Steelers are back to 3-0 and even the Lions are 2-1. Last year’s team to beat, the Chargers, are 1-2, and the Saints haven’t even won a game. My, how quickly things can change in this league. It can get so turned around that when I looked at the NFC standings this morning, I could have sworn I was in 1995. San Francisco, Dallas and Green Bay are all leading their respective divisions and Brett Favre was all over sports-talk radio. One word of advice: If your team is winning right now, enjoy it while it lasts. Because before you know it, they’ll be battling it out for the top overall pick in the draft and dumping veterans to get under the salary cap. But even then, there will always be next year.

Travis Atkins/Star photo

09 26 2007  
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