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Defending the First Amendment since 1911

SOCCER SHUTOUT

Volume 99, Issue 12

WEDnEsdaY

23

www.UniversityStar.com

The Texas State women’s soccer team defeated Houston Baptist Tuesday.

Extended bar hours bring mixed reviews By Billy Crawford News Reporter

The 2 a.m. bar hours have shaken and stirred some San Marcos residents. Alcohol-related offenses in the downtown area have skyrocketed since the extended bar hours took effect, according to the San Marcos Police Department. “We’ve definitely seen an increase in offenses and callouts since the bar hours were extended,” said police Sgt. Martin Manzi. “We’ve had to put together an extra shift of four officers to work the downtown area from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m.” San Marcos City Council voted in May in favor of extending the bar hours from midnight to 2 a.m. Before that, San Marcos was the only city in Texas that contained a university with 20,000 or more students and did not allow bars to stay open past midnight. Bars like Nephew’s and Haper’s have seen an increase in business since implementing the extended hours. Both bars claimed to not only receive customers from midnight to close, but also said the crowd from 10 p.m. to midnight Jake Marx/Star photo has improved as well. EXTENSION: Alcohol-related offences have increased since bars extended hours to 2 a.m., according to the San Marcos Police. see ‘NIGHTLIFE,’ page 3

Sledge hammer, paint used in vandalism of university buildings

Alkek Library, the Agriculture building and McCoy Hall were vandalized by two suspects on Sunday between 8:25 p.m. and 9 p.m., according to University Police Department officials. The damage is estimated to be $10,000. Vandals spray painted “all over” inside walls of the library as well as in the stairwells, said UPD Officer Otto Glenewinkel. He said a sledgehammer was used to shatter a window in McCoy Hall and the Agriculture building. Additionally, the hammer was used to dent a water fountain at the Agriculture building. No tags have been found in McCoy but not all rooms have been investigated. UPD Captain Rickey Lattie said the incidents of criminal mischief are still under investigation, but believes they are linked. UPD has multiple videos of two suspects. A slideshow of stills of the alleged vandals can be found on www.universitystar.com

Donations to ‘pillars’ fall behind other priorities By Kosaku Narioka News Reporter

–Photo courtesy of University Police Department

According to a press release from Glenewinkel, “Both suspects are white males. The suspect in the white t-shirt has a goatee and mustache. The goatee is pointed at the narrow end and approximately one to two inches long.   The second suspect wearing a unique-styled hat, and appears to be wearing long blue jean shorts.” A cash reward for anonymous information about the crime has been offered. Crime Stoppers of Texas State can be reached at 512-245-7867. —Report compiled by Allen Reed

University officials are having a difficult time raising funds for a new alumni center and library expansion projects, but are recieving gifts for education, athletics and new performing arts center. The Pride in Action campaign has raised about $78 million, according to Ted Mack McKinnon, assistant vice president for development. The donations for the alumni center amounted to about $1 million, which made up 1.4 percent of the total. The contributions toward the library totaled about $1.6 million, or 2.3 percent. The campaign set five “pillars,” or the areas of focus; academic excellence, alumni center, athletics, library and performing arts. All areas but academic excellence are related to major construction or renovation projects. “The Alumni Center Pillar and the Library Pillar appear to

be the biggest challenges,” said Becky Prince, vice president of University Advancement, at the June 29 president’s cabinet meeting, according to the minutes. McKinnon said the existing alumni center no longer meets the needs of the university. He said officials are planning to build a new center that will better serve alumni. The proposed center would cost $15 million to build, according to a July 2009 project status report. Ronnovation plans do not end with the alumni center. McKinnon said students do not use the library the same way they did 20 years ago, when it was built. University officials are planning to build a repository for books and create space that meets students’ needs — namely, research on computers usage. “Everything gets old and the purpose of everything changes,” McKinnon said. Meanwhile, “gifts toward the

Academic Excellence Pillar are running significantly ahead of the other pillars,” Prince reported in the June president’s cabinet meeting. The donations for academic excellence amounted to about $57 million, or 79.2 percent of the total. The areas of athletics and performing arts gathered $4.4 million and $8 million, or 6 percent and 11 percent, respectively. McKinnon said at the moment university administration is implementing a “private phase of the campaign.” He said officials are visiting with people who they believe can make a significant gift and asking where their interests lie within the university. He said the largest cash donors in the last five years are Emmett and Miriam McCoy, Jerry D. and Linda Gregg Fields, Patti Strickel Harrison and Bruce and Gloria Ingram. see ‘DONATIONS,’ page 3

University officials address ADA compliance By Lori Jones News Reporter The rugged terrain of campus may not be the only concern for students in wheelchairs. Older buildings on university grounds do not fully comply with Americans with Disabilities Act regulations, said Michael Petty, assistant director of facilities, planning design and construction. “I think the facilities are terrible,” said Janet Dixon, administrative assistant in the graduate college. “I was appalled. There are so many little things people don’t think about until they’re in a wheelchair.” Dixon said it was an everyday struggle to maneuver herself around J.C. Kellam while restricted to a wheelchair for months after multiple knee surgeries. The wheelchair accessible bathrooms and elevators were not big enough for her to fully navigate her chair in and out of, she said.

“It makes me angry that the university spends so much money on flower beds and appearance, and we can’t even take care of our students,” Dixon said. Bailey Gosda, accounting senior, is permanently confined to a wheelchair. She has also experienced difficulty commuting around campus. “The ramps don’t all follow ADA regulations,” Gosda claims. “I see other people in manual wheelchairs struggle to get up the ramps. I see people help them, but I know they wish they didn’t need the help.” People who do not physically need to use the ramp also pose a problem, she said. “I’ve gotten hit in the face multiple times by people using back packs trying to pass me,” Gosda said. Petty said university officials are doing their best to address the issues around campus. see ‘RAMPS,’ page 3

Today’s Weather

77°/65° Showers Precipitation: 60% Humidity: 63% UV: 4 Moderate Wind: NNE 13 mph

Thursday Thunderstorms Temp: 83°/67° Precip: 20%

Friday Scattered Thunderstorms Temp: 88°/68° Precip: 40%

INSIDE THIS ISSUE News…....1-3 Grade reports show fraternities fall short of GPA requirement Opinions….4 Take middle ground over controlling parties Commons has more problems than rodents MAIN POINT: Malfunctioning becomes routine Trends……...6 Parents should be wary of 9 Tantra, musicians offer ‘jazzy’ scene Texas State aviation school offers flight training for college credit Classifieds…8 Diversions…8 Sports……….10 Vince Young the man, not the football player Expectations high for men’s soccer club

Lindsey Goldstein/Star photo IN THE WAY: On most days Bailey Gosda, accounting senior, would have trouble getting up this ramp because of people and bikes in the way.


Page Two

2 - The University Star

STARS OF TEXAS STATE

Sandra Mayo, director of Multicultural and General Studies, contributed to the book “High Yello Rose” and Other Texas Plays by Sterling Houston. Dr. Mayo wrote a series of insightful essays for the book. The book will be released Oct. 1. —Courtesy of College of Liberal Arts

Texas State University – San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

ON THIS

DAY IN CRIME BLOTTER HISTORY 1846: The planet Neptune was discovered by German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle. 1930: Musician Ray Charles was born Ray Charles Robinson in Albany, Ga. 1952: Republican vicepresidential candidate Richard M. Nixon went on TV to deliver what came to be known as the “Checkers” speech as he refuted allegations of improper campaign financing. 1957: Nine black students who had entered Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas were forced to withdraw because of a white mob outside. 1999: The Mars Climate Observer apparently burned up as it was about to go into orbit around the Red Planet. Jake Marx/Star photo —Courtesy of New York Times NIGHTTIME BREW: Katherine Herbert, international studies alumna, makes her signature brew Monday at Wake The Dead coffee shop.

Officials advise isolation if showing flu-like symptoms Texas State, like many college campuses across the country, is experiencing an increase in flu-like illness. Last week the Student Health Center reported 80 flu-like cases compared to 51 cases the previous week. The university is aware students are concerned absence because of the flu might adversely affect their academic standing. The concern is leading students to ignore public health recommendations for isolation and contributing to the spread of flu to others. Academic Affairs distributed a message to the campus community last week articulating the expectation that professors adjust their absence and grading policies to accommodate a medical absence. Students with a flulike illness should contact the Student Health Center for self-care advice or an appointment. Students needing assistance in notifying professors about a medical absence may contact the Dean of Students Office at 512-2452124 or Associate Dean of Students

Vincent Morton, at vm05@txstate.edu H1N1 flu results in mild to moderate illness in most persons, but it is disproportionately infecting 5 to 24 year olds and causing a greater proportion of hospitalizations and deaths in this age group than would be expected with the seasonal flu. Seasonal flu usually kills the elderly and young children. H1N1 flu is killing children, adolescents and adults. A vaccine for H1N1 flu has been developed and is currently undergoing human trials. The early report is H1N1 vaccine will probably be effective with one shot and the side effects are similar to those of the seasonal flu — mild soreness at the injection site and sometimes a very mild fever. The H1N1 vaccine will be available in October. Vaccinations will be prioritized for healthcare personnel, pregnant women, children, young adults and those with medical problems that increase their risk for complications from the flu. Two medications, Tamiflu and

Relenza, have been shown to be effective against H1N1 flu. However, public health authorities are recommending these medications be used only in serious cases and to protect those at high risk for complications from the flu. Students might experience only mild to moderate symptoms of the flu, but if they go to class or work when sick, they may be exposing others who are more vulnerable to the flu. Even if a person infected with H1N1 flu feels better within a few days, they may be infectious for up to seven days. Students should not be concerned that they will be penalized academically for a necessary absence because of infection with the flu. A message was sent early in the fall semester to all faculty members notifying them H1N1 flu is being reported on campus and we anticipate students becoming ill from H1N1 flu. Faculty are aware students will be asked to self-isolate for three to five days in most cases. Faculty are

also aware students with mild illness will not need to see the doctor or antiviral medication — but they will need to stay home until fever-free for at least 24 hours. Only students who are very ill and seen at the Student Health Center will have signed medical excuses. Academic Affairs has also sent a message to the campus community articulating the importance of adhering to public health recommendations and establishing the expectation faculty will adjust absence and grading policies to accommodate a medical absence. H1N1 influenza vaccine will be offered to students and other priority groups as defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention beginning in October. Details of outreach events for H1N1 influenza will be posted as soon as available. —Courtesy of University News Service

Seniors offered teaching fellowships The Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color is seeking highly qualified Texas State students. Funding administrators are looking for seniors who demonstrate a clear passion for working with children and a commitment to teach in an urban or rural school for three years. The WW-RBF will select those candidates who possess qualities indicating their potential to become exceptional public school teachers. Among these are strong writing and communication skills, critical thinking, high academic performance and commitment to public education and public service through work or volunteer experience. The fellowship includes a $30,000 stipend to apply towards a master’s degree. Applicants must be in their senior year of course work and have an overall Texas State GPA of 3.0 or better. The following documents are required for application: Compose a word-processed 500word essay explaining why you desire to teach in an urban or rural high-need school.

Compose an additional 500-word essay imagining a situation in which you are required to explain a complex concept in your specialty field to a group of students. Describe the approach and explanation you would use and explain why you feel it would be effective. A Texas State transcript indicating present status and anticipated date of graduation. A personal résumé (vitae) Two letters of recommendation from faculty who can speak in detail about your academic ability, personal qualities and potential as a teacher to serve the nation’s children Only applicants who submit all required documentation by the Oct. 9 deadline will be considered for nomination. Documents must be submitted to Gloria Chavez in the Education Bldg. 3049 suite A or to Rubén Garza, Ed. Bldg. 3020. Contact Ruben Garza at 512-7972123 or via e-mail at RubenGarza@ txstate.edu for application details and more information about this rewarding opportunity. —Courtesy of University News Service

Sept. 11, 12:30 a.m. Theft-Under $500/San Jacinto Hall Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer his personal property had been taken without his consent. The case is under investigation. Sept. 11, 1:16 a.m. Public Intoxication/ Lindsey Lot A police officer made contact with a nonstudent for suspicious activity. Upon further investigation, the student was cited and arrested for public intoxication. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center and is awaiting a court date. Sept. 11, 2:40 a.m. Public Intoxication/ University Drive A police officer made contact with a student acting suspiciously. Upon further investigation, the student was cited and arrested for public intoxication. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center and is awaiting a court date.

Sept. 11, 12:12 p.m. Burglary of Vehicle/Bobcat Stadium Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer her property had been taken from her vehicle without her consent. The case is under investigation. Sept. 11, 4:06 p.m. Failure to Comply-Striking Unattended Vehicle/Falls Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer his vehicle was damaged while legally parked. The case is under investigation. Sept. 12, 2:03 a.m. Criminal Mischief-under $500/Blanco Parking Garage A student reported to a police officer her vehicle was intentionally damaged. The case is under investigation.

Hannah VanOrstrand/Star photo TIME TO RELAX: Laura Kobylecky, English freshman, sits in the Academic Services Building breezeway Monday 0with Elisabeth Duncan, electronic media junior, and Waly Cardona, intensive English international student.

Sept. 12, 5:07 p.m. POCS Group 2 - Speck Street A police officer made contact with a vehicle for a routine traffic stop. Upon further investigation, a student was arrested for possession of a controlled substance. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center awaiting a court date. — Courtesy of University Police Department


Page Two

2 - The University Star

STARS OF TEXAS STATE

Sandra Mayo, director of Multicultural and General Studies, contributed to the book “High Yello Rose” and Other Texas Plays by Sterling Houston. Dr. Mayo wrote a series of insightful essays for the book. The book will be released Oct. 1. —Courtesy of College of Liberal Arts

Texas State University – San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

ON THIS

DAY IN CRIME BLOTTER HISTORY 1846: The planet Neptune was discovered by German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle. 1930: Musician Ray Charles was born Ray Charles Robinson in Albany, Ga. 1952: Republican vicepresidential candidate Richard M. Nixon went on TV to deliver what came to be known as the “Checkers” speech as he refuted allegations of improper campaign financing. 1957: Nine black students who had entered Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas were forced to withdraw because of a white mob outside. 1999: The Mars Climate Observer apparently burned up as it was about to go into orbit around the Red Planet. Jake Marx/Star photo —Courtesy of New York Times NIGHTTIME BREW: Katherine Herbert, international studies alumna, makes her signature brew Monday at Wake The Dead coffee shop.

Officials advise isolation if showing flu-like symptoms Texas State, like many college campuses across the country, is experiencing an increase in flu-like illness. Last week the Student Health Center reported 80 flu-like cases compared to 51 cases the previous week. The university is aware students are concerned absence because of the flu might adversely affect their academic standing. The concern is leading students to ignore public health recommendations for isolation and contributing to the spread of flu to others. Academic Affairs distributed a message to the campus community last week articulating the expectation that professors adjust their absence and grading policies to accommodate a medical absence. Students with a flulike illness should contact the Student Health Center for self-care advice or an appointment. Students needing assistance in notifying professors about a medical absence may contact the Dean of Students Office at 512-2452124 or Associate Dean of Students

Vincent Morton, at vm05@txstate.edu H1N1 flu results in mild to moderate illness in most persons, but it is disproportionately infecting 5 to 24 year olds and causing a greater proportion of hospitalizations and deaths in this age group than would be expected with the seasonal flu. Seasonal flu usually kills the elderly and young children. H1N1 flu is killing children, adolescents and adults. A vaccine for H1N1 flu has been developed and is currently undergoing human trials. The early report is H1N1 vaccine will probably be effective with one shot and the side effects are similar to those of the seasonal flu — mild soreness at the injection site and sometimes a very mild fever. The H1N1 vaccine will be available in October. Vaccinations will be prioritized for healthcare personnel, pregnant women, children, young adults and those with medical problems that increase their risk for complications from the flu. Two medications, Tamiflu and

Relenza, have been shown to be effective against H1N1 flu. However, public health authorities are recommending these medications be used only in serious cases and to protect those at high risk for complications from the flu. Students might experience only mild to moderate symptoms of the flu, but if they go to class or work when sick, they may be exposing others who are more vulnerable to the flu. Even if a person infected with H1N1 flu feels better within a few days, they may be infectious for up to seven days. Students should not be concerned that they will be penalized academically for a necessary absence because of infection with the flu. A message was sent early in the fall semester to all faculty members notifying them H1N1 flu is being reported on campus and we anticipate students becoming ill from H1N1 flu. Faculty are aware students will be asked to self-isolate for three to five days in most cases. Faculty are

also aware students with mild illness will not need to see the doctor or antiviral medication — but they will need to stay home until fever-free for at least 24 hours. Only students who are very ill and seen at the Student Health Center will have signed medical excuses. Academic Affairs has also sent a message to the campus community articulating the importance of adhering to public health recommendations and establishing the expectation faculty will adjust absence and grading policies to accommodate a medical absence. H1N1 influenza vaccine will be offered to students and other priority groups as defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention beginning in October. Details of outreach events for H1N1 influenza will be posted as soon as available. —Courtesy of University News Service

Seniors offered teaching fellowships The Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color is seeking highly qualified Texas State students. Funding administrators are looking for seniors who demonstrate a clear passion for working with children and a commitment to teach in an urban or rural school for three years. The WW-RBF will select those candidates who possess qualities indicating their potential to become exceptional public school teachers. Among these are strong writing and communication skills, critical thinking, high academic performance and commitment to public education and public service through work or volunteer experience. The fellowship includes a $30,000 stipend to apply towards a master’s degree. Applicants must be in their senior year of course work and have an overall Texas State GPA of 3.0 or better. The following documents are required for application: Compose a word-processed 500word essay explaining why you desire to teach in an urban or rural high-need school.

Compose an additional 500-word essay imagining a situation in which you are required to explain a complex concept in your specialty field to a group of students. Describe the approach and explanation you would use and explain why you feel it would be effective. A Texas State transcript indicating present status and anticipated date of graduation. A personal résumé (vitae) Two letters of recommendation from faculty who can speak in detail about your academic ability, personal qualities and potential as a teacher to serve the nation’s children Only applicants who submit all required documentation by the Oct. 9 deadline will be considered for nomination. Documents must be submitted to Gloria Chavez in the Education Bldg. 3049 suite A or to Rubén Garza, Ed. Bldg. 3020. Contact Ruben Garza at 512-7972123 or via e-mail at RubenGarza@ txstate.edu for application details and more information about this rewarding opportunity. —Courtesy of University News Service

Sept. 11, 12:30 a.m. Theft-Under $500/San Jacinto Hall Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer his personal property had been taken without his consent. The case is under investigation. Sept. 11, 1:16 a.m. Public Intoxication/ Lindsey Lot A police officer made contact with a nonstudent for suspicious activity. Upon further investigation, the student was cited and arrested for public intoxication. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center and is awaiting a court date. Sept. 11, 2:40 a.m. Public Intoxication/ University Drive A police officer made contact with a student acting suspiciously. Upon further investigation, the student was cited and arrested for public intoxication. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center and is awaiting a court date.

Sept. 11, 12:12 p.m. Burglary of Vehicle/Bobcat Stadium Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer her property had been taken from her vehicle without her consent. The case is under investigation. Sept. 11, 4:06 p.m. Failure to Comply-Striking Unattended Vehicle/Falls Parking Lot A student reported to a police officer his vehicle was damaged while legally parked. The case is under investigation. Sept. 12, 2:03 a.m. Criminal Mischief-under $500/Blanco Parking Garage A student reported to a police officer her vehicle was intentionally damaged. The case is under investigation.

Hannah VanOrstrand/Star photo TIME TO RELAX: Laura Kobylecky, English freshman, sits in the Academic Services Building breezeway Monday 0with Elisabeth Duncan, electronic media junior, and Waly Cardona, intensive English international student.

Sept. 12, 5:07 p.m. POCS Group 2 - Speck Street A police officer made contact with a vehicle for a routine traffic stop. Upon further investigation, a student was arrested for possession of a controlled substance. The student was transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center awaiting a court date. — Courtesy of University Police Department


Opinions

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

4 - The University Star

Malfunctioning becomes routine the main

point. I

t takes a while for one to be desentized to something.

Humans are not born with a natural apathy toward violence, but children raised in broken homes are all too acquainted with it early in life. Nor are people in the developed world inherently familiar with distorted body images presented by the media. It takes years of watching glorified celebrities to install that in the psyche. So it has taken students a while to no longer view the flashing blue light on top of the emergency phones on campus as no big deal, but it is happening. According to the Sept. 15 issue of The University Star, UPD officials reported the lights on campus emergency stanchions were going off without being touched. When the stanchions are functioning properly, the strobe is an indicator that a call has been sent to 911 and an emergency response is in progress. After the situation is resolved, the light should stop flashing. However, as students have seen around campus, some of the lights are going off indiscriminately. The good news is the phone is still operable, so anyone who uses the stanchion can still quickly get into contact with a 911 operator. Furthermore, this is happening on four of the 37 emergency phones across campus. So most of the machines are still functioning

the way they are supposed to. Considering the main function of the stanchions is working, and only a few have the defect, this may seem like an inconvenience at worst. However, students have observed the constantly flashing strobe lights and their faith is now shaken in the stanchion as a whole. The blue light is supposed to signify an emergency. Now, the only thing the lights are communicating to students is “I’m a broken machine.” Students will not know the phone works as well. In the case of an actual emergency this could exacerbate an already bad situation. There is a reason the stanchions are supposed to call attention to themselves when an emergency call has been placed: it is supposed to alert the casual passerby so hopefully someone will come to aid in the situation. Now, even if a legitimate call is placed and emergency personnel are on their way, a Good Samaritan who could have aided in the situation might simply ignore the flashing light. After all, why should we pay attention to something that has become a common occurrence? UPD Sgt. Robert Campbell said new stanchions are on their way. He said in the future, instead of trying to diagnose the problem, UPD officials will replace the stanchion. Hopefully this will restore students’ faith in the emergency stations and they will know once again help is only a phone call away. The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Zach Ashburn/Star Illustration

Commons has more problems than rodents Kaycee Toller Opinions Columnist Anyone who has lived on campus long enough knows about the Commons sprint. The Commons sprint is that mad dash from the dining hall table to the dorm restroom made by students with gurgling guts. The worst part? That meal that was just lost to the toilet

god costs a whopping $8.25. It seems Chartwells has finally put all the money earned from expensive meal trades to good use. Commons Dining Hall has recently closed its doors for some much-needed renovating to confront a major rodent problem. It’s awesome Commons is taking care of its furry little diners, but it seems Chartwells could be doing more for the health and safety of human customers. The problem is rats are only one health risk on our campus menus. Campus dining halls serve a big helping of the freshman 15 with a side of

sophomore squishy stomach. Chartwell’s has posters in its eating facilities that boast about student nutrition. The posters encourage students to go to their Web site and learn about the food they serve in order to plan healthy meals. “We place a very high importance on (student nutrition)” said Paul Shiro, director of LBJ Student Center’s food court, The Lair. “All our nutritional information is available online for students to look at,” Shiro said. Trying to find nutritional information on the Web site, www.dineoncampus.com/txstate, is a tedious and time-

consuming process. Students are asked to make an account, and are prompted to search for examples of foods from a USDA Web site. A disclaimer informs students that they may not find foods served on campus. After creating a diary of a meal, students can calculate its nutrition facts. Unfortunately, many of the popular foods found at Commons were not available on the site. Finding the nutrition facts for a typical meal at Coyote Jack’s in the Lair was a little easier. A popular meal trade there consists of a cheeseburger,

medium fries and a 20 oz. Coke. The calculated nutritional value reveals this one meal contains 1,269 calories, 57 grams of fat and 0 grams of sugar. Wait, no sugar? We all know there’s a ton of sugar in the Coke alone. There’s something fishy about this site. McDonald’s is always in the spotlight for serving meals with poor nutritional value. Gathering nutrition information for their products is literally a two-click process. A cheeseburger, medium fries and a 20 oz. Coke has 890 calories, 31 grams of fat and 65 grams of sugar.

The meal from McDonald’s isn’t very healthy, but at least anyone can find that out. Chartwells has taken a great first step in promoting student health by shutting down a rat-infested dining hall. The next step towards better campus dining should be to make nutritional information available to help students make healthy food choices. The Commons sprint is now a thing of the past. Perhaps, with better health information, the freshman 15 will go down in history as well. –Kaycee Toller is a journalism senior.

two of what was supposed to be “study time.” Invariably when these arguments occur the parties split into two sides: left and right. This Left/Right paradigm is a microcosm of what is wrong with politics in general. We have let political parties get the best of us. These parties enjoy the monopoly of political thought and dialogue, and use small issues and hidden agendas to divide and conquer us. They have a stranglehold on American politics that would make George Washington roll in his grave. For instance, according to the organization “Independent Texans,” which is based out of Austin, candidates have to muster 30 times more signatures than their

Republican and Democratic opponents to get on the ballot for President of the United States. Carole Keeton “Grandma” Strayhorn, an Independent, had to sue to get on the ballot during our previous Governor race. Does that sound democratic to you? Or what about the redistricting fiasco that has been plaguing Texas politics for decades? Why has Sen. Jeff Wentworth (R-25) been practically the only person fighting against both parties as they redraw districts in order to manipulate your votes for their party’s benefit? The answer is simple. These party politicians don’t really care. Both parties are growing famous for signing bills without even reading them. The USA Patriot Act is the outstanding example here. The USA

Patriotic Act authorizes warrantless wiretaps, which contradict the privacy rights granted to us in the Constitution. This violates left wing ideology because it tramples individual rights and restricts freedoms, and this also violates right wing ideology because by disregarding the Constitution it breaks with American tradition and the rule of law. The left doesn’t care about you, and neither does the right. According to an article by Laylan Copelin in the Dec. 25, 2007 issue of the Austin American-Statesman, congressmen in the Texas House of Representatives fail to even attend to vote on pieces of legislation. Instead, they have other congressmen vote for in their place. Because of the unrecipro-

cated loyalty of the people to their parties, and the lack of any real alternatives when election time comes around, in most cases a candidate from one of the two major political parties will win. It is difficult to change this, even from the grassroots level. I remember attending the San Antonio Tea Party protest, which I was invited to by Libertarians, only to find thousands upon thousands of people there repeating right wing catch phrases, herded and organized by the police, and entertained by FOX media moguls and hand-picked Republican speakers. We are university students. History has often depended

on us to change the status quo. We need to stop bickering amongst ourselves about left versus right, and put our house in order. Quit being loyal to your party, and remember George Washington himself said political parties “serve to organize faction, to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put, in the place of the delegated will of the nation, the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community.” –Kristopher Floyd is an English senior.

Take middle ground over controlling parties By Kristopher Floyd Special to the Star

It isn’t hard these days to get into a knock down-drag out argument about politics. These arguments appear seemingly out of nowhere. Someone mentions something about gun rights, or wears a pro-Obama T-shirt. Anything can spark a fierce debate. Some Texas State students (myself included) have even found this is a useful way to kill an hour or

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Visit The Star at www.UniversityStar.com

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State UniversitySan Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Wednesday, September 23. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


Wednesday, September 23, 2009

public service announcement

Public Service Announcement courtesy of The University Star.

The University Star - 5


Trends 6 - The University Star

“Cops” rock MySpace

The winner of the “Rock the Space” contest hosted by Toyota and MySpace, was an electro-pop rock band from California named Call the Cops. The competition gave unsigned artists a chance to win a record deal with MySpace Records. The band’s song will be available to download on the MySpace music page and Call the Cops will receive a musical instrument prize package from Fender. The contest received more than 18,000 submissions.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Texas State aviation school offers flight training for college credit By Elizabeth Barbee Features Reporter Many children dream of becoming pilots, but Lowell Diagle actually made it happen. Diagle enrolled at EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla. to pursue flying after graduating high school in 2004. He later made the decision to move to San Marcos where he received his pilot’s license and is now a criminal justice senior at Texas State. Currently, Diagle works as an instructor at the university’s Flight Training Center. “No one knows San Marcos has an airport, much less aviation classes,” Diagle said. “It is actually a retired military air force base — a really huge airport.” Interested students can take an aviation class as an elective for three credit hours. At the end of the course, participants could be certified in recreational, private or commercial piloting,

depending on their area of focus. The Flight Training Center also offers instruction in instrument and multi-engine rating. One aviation student expressed his enjoyment of the Texas State’s flight training program. “Lowell and all of the other instructors I have dealt with have been very nice and knowledgeable,” said Brand Wylie, criminal justice senior. The Flight Training Center’s location was a plus to Bobby Hall, management senior. “It was good for my first license,” Hall said. “The airport is pretty close to campus.” Courses are open to community members, as well. “Most of our students come from Texas State, but I’ve taught everyone, even a few professors,” Diagle said. “You just have to have a passion for it. A lot of people don’t realize how fun it is and how easy it is to get hooked.” The first Friday of every month Diagle hosts a BBQ at

the airport, open to anyone who loves or wants to learn more about aviation. “There are a lot of pilots in San Marcos,” Diagle said. “I am trying to get a community going.” For those who prefer being passengers, The Flight Training Center offers hill country tours and “Champagne Flights,” which people take to celebrate special occasions. “I can take you anywhere you want to go,” Diagle said. “A lot of people want to see downtown Austin. Sometimes I will fly them over Canyon Lake and get close to the water.” As a full time student and aviation instructor, Diagle manages a tight schedule. He said there have been times when he has been in a different state in the morning and flown back to make an afternoon class. “Sometimes I get to the airport at 8 a.m. and don’t leave until midnight,” Ben Rondeau/Star photo Diagle said. “It is something I really enjoy. It is peaceful up TAKING FLIGHT: Lowell Diagle, criminal justice senior, is an instructor at the university’s there.” Flight Training Center.

Tantra, musicians offer ‘jazzy’ scene Parents should be wary of 9 By Miranda Serene Features Reporter Every other Wednesday, jazzy tunes entertain customers at Tantra. The coffee house is a place where customers can relax, study and listen to live music. Jazz Night invites artists to perform a live show on Tantra’s outside stage. A small crowd unwound in the courtyard Sept. 16 and listened to the rhythms. The unnamed four-member band consisted of a drum, piano, guitar and bass player. Guitar player Jimmy Smith, jazz studies senior, has been playing guitar for 15 years. He said the band loves the open atmosphere Tantra offers. “We can play louder here than other bars,” Smith said. Tantra lures in a variety of people, whether they are drinking coffee, studying or enjoying the environment. Daniel Keltner, creative writing graduate student, enjoys the Bobby Scheidemann/Star photo atmosphere during Jazz Night. SNAZZY JAZZ: Texas State University students entertain viewers with jazz classics at Tantra Coffee “It’s outdoors and it’s differ- House. ent,” Keltner said. “The music is at a good chill volume so people band took breaks to get a drink for jazz and is glad she can en- majors. can still have a conversation.” and listen to those on stage. joy it locally. “The music program at Texas The jazz band played a few The crowd hung around ta“It’s relaxing to be able to sit State has an amazing faculty. hours, swapping out musicians bles placed under colorful string outside and listen to jazz mu- They are real professionals,” throughout the evening. lights illuminating the yard. sic,” Hudiburg said. Smith said. “Jazz Night is open Guest horn players someEdythe Hudiburg, commuMost of the musicians who and free. You can be anyway times joined, often performing nication studies junior, said play are Texas State students you want here as long as you a solo. Some members of the she has a strong appreciation and, like Smith, are music aren’t bothering anyone.”

By Brent Vickers Trends Columnist Death, destruction, postapocalypticism and animated dolls riddle the environment created in the new feature 9. The film’s components were indeed childish, the shear brutality of the environment and the fact that dead human bodies provided much of the miseen-scene of the film make it tough to determine the true demographic of 9. The story, at base level, was not hard to grasp — there were plot elements that would indeed go over children’s heads. Also, of the amount of death in this feature should make some parents wary of taking their children to see it. However, despite the “adult” themes of the film, character traits and development followed rather conventional archetypes. In the film, there is the hero, the gender-defying badass chick, the knowledge seekers, the medic and his assistant, the fearful leader and his bodyguard and the prophetic artist — all of which are animated dolls.

The setting of the film takes place immediately after the apocalypse caused by a man vs. machine war. The 9 animated burlap sacks are seemingly the only survivors of this war, but we soon discover evil machines are still at large. The visual effects of the film were, in my opinion, its forte. The color contrast and dark imagery certainly create a feeling of despondence and fear, which is another thing that may not sit well with parents. The voice actors were also good, but I found myself being unconvinced by John C. Reilly’s character, as well as Elijah Wood. Most of the film was spent imagining what they looked like recording their voice in the studio, and it made the character’s unbelievable. Instead of being a hero doll, it was a cartoon character voiced by Wood. Overall, the film was great, but it was obvious by the plot lines and the story setting that the creators were trying to follow a darker path already set by Wall-E. I believe the angst-ridden junior high to high school Hot Topic crowd will love this film, but I can’’t see it being a big hit with other demographics. I would recommend it, however, I must put a disclaimer: Parents afraid of exposing their children to the subject of death should avoid this film. I give it a B-.


Wednesday, September 23, 2009

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Wednesday, September 23, 2009

TUESDAY’s Puzzle Solution

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Classifieds

rates & policies Cost-25¢ per word (1-6 days); Cost-20¢ per word (7+ days); Deadline-2 business days prior by noon All classified ads must be paid in advance, unless credit is established. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. We do our best, but please check your classified ad for accuracy. Any corrections to your ad must be made by the second day of publication. As a free service to you, all classified ads will be published on-line on our web site at www.universitystar.com. However, since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

Classifieds Contact – starclassifieds@txstate.edu

Announcements TRANSFORMING STRESS: Using the Heart-Brain Connection to Reduce Stress

Announcements Mon., Sept. 28 12:00-1:00PM Wed., Oct. 21 3:00 - 4:00PM Tues., Nov. 10 3:00 - 4:00PM

Announcements •Control emotional stress reactions more effectively! •Improve mental functioning & concentration! •Reduce the harmful physiological effects of stress! All workshops will be held in LBJ Student Center 3-14.1 For more info or accommodations due to disability call 245-2208 or check www.counseling.txstate.edu.

For Rent

2 BEDROOM BLOWOUT. There are 2 bedrooms all over town, $609 and up! (512) 396-8978. TexasStateLeasing.com

For Rent–Apts WE HELP YOU FIND AN APARTMENT FOR FREE. Then we GIVE you $50, beer*, and pizza! (512) 396-8978. TexasStateLeasing.com *Must be 21 for beer.

For Rent– Townhouse/Condo

TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT ON HOPKINS, 2BD/11/2BA, $595/MO. Water, trash, W/D included. Contact Lynsy at (512) 917-1014.

Help Wanted

!BARTENDING! UP TO $300/DAY. No experience necessary. Training Provided. Age 18+ OK. (800)965-6520 ext. 157.

Help Wanted ASSISTANT COACH WANTED for high school girls lacrosse team. Call (512) 924-9201 or email knitroscoach@yahoo.com.

ATHLETIC, OUTGOING MEN FOR CALENDARS, GREETING CARDS, ETC. $100-200/hr., up to $1,000/day. No exp. needed, (512)684-8296. SOCCER COACHES NEEDED ASAP! San Marcos Area Youth Soccer Organization needs volunteers NOW for 2009 season. Experience helpful, but not necessary. Training provided. Background check required. Contact Dennis, (512) 738-1206. STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM Paid survey takers needed in San Marcos. 100% FREE to join. Click on surveys.

Personals $5,000 PAID. EGG DONORS. +Exps. N/Smokers, ages 19-29, SAT>1100/ ACT>24/GPA>3.0 Reply to: info@eggdonorcenter.com

Roommates

ROOMMATE MATCHING. 2, 3, and 4 bedrooms. Free cable and internet. On bus route. (512) 396-8978. TexasStateLeasing.com

Wanted

NURSE AIDE TRAINING. Registering for classes. Contact Comfort Connection Nurse Aide Training (512) 392-4663.

SEMEN DONORS NEEDED! $150 per specimen, healthy college students age 18-39. For application go to www.123donate.com


Wednesday, September 23, 2009

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Sports 10 - The University Star

PLAYING IN PINK

The Texas State volleyball team will host its “Dig Pink” event to raise breast cancer awareness during the match against Texas-Arlington Oct. 9. Anyone wearing pink will be admitted to the match for a discounted price of $2 and donations will be accepted for the breast cancer and treatment organizations associated with the Central Texas Medical Center. Additionally, the players will wear pink hair ribbons, shoelaces and warm-up shirts in honor of the event.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Sports Contact, Lisa Carter – starsports@txstate.edu

Expectations high for men’s soccer club Vince Young the man, not the football player By Anthony Medina Sports Reporter

College football season is the time for tailgating, barbecues, partying and watching teams win games. However, in the midst of all the hype and fun that is college football, some people have other goals during this time of year. The Texas State men’s soccer club has its sights set on returning to, and winning, the national tournament. While students are actively involved in supporting the Drive to the Football Bowl Subdivision, members of the club are hoping for a season that will let people know they are not to be overlooked. The men’s soccer club is part of the Texas Collegiate Soccer League, which is not part of the NCAA. However, despite not being an NCAA program, the group still plays against clubs from large schools on a regular basis, even more so than some of the other athletic programs on campus. “We play a lot of Big 12 schools,” said Taylor Cavins, senior. “The more fans we get, the better it is for us.” The team held its own last season, even with the competition from the bigger Texas universities such as Baylor and Texas Tech. “We finished top 16 (in the country) last year, and I think we’re better than last year,” said Brett Georgulis, marketing senior and club president. The team advanced to the Bobby Scheidemann/Star photo national tournament last year after defeating Texas STEP AHEAD: Joel Siegmund, sociology sophomore, takes the ball from his Texas Tech opponent in regional play, but fell to Sunday at West Campus Fields. Florida in the playoffs by one penalty kick. tournament may not draw appreciate more because you clubs are run by students, Cavins and Georgulis both as much attention as another gain more respect (since) you some consider the organizahave expectations of getting athletic program would, the run the organization,” Georgu- tion as more than a team. back to the finals and are hun- achievement would be just lis said. “It’s a sense of accom“It is just a group of guys gry to win the national cham- as gratifying. plishment. We do most of the that love soccer,” Cavins said. pionship. The men agreed “All the (sport clubs) are stu- funding ourselves.” “It’s almost like a fraternity. while winning the national dent-run, so it’s something you Cavins said because sport We’re just as close.”

Vince Young has been in the news the past couple of years for negative reasons. His critics claim he can’t get the job done on the field or he is a confused and immature young man. Last week, he was just a man. Young has not been stepping up in the pocket lately while playing backup to Tennessee Titans’ starting quarterback Kerry Collins. But last week he stepped it up where it counts: in life. Young surprised the sons of the late Steve McNair Sept. 16 by arriving at their house. He took 11-year-old Trenton and 5-year-old Tyler to their school’s “Dear Dads Breakfast” at a Nashville restaurant. McNair, former Titans and Baltimore Ravens quarterback, was shot and killed July 4. He was more than just a mentor for Young — he was a father figure to him. At his funeral, Young spoke of McNair as his hero. Young stepped into a fatherly role for McNair’s sons, at least for a day. St. Paul Christian Academy, the school McNair’s sons attend, holds an annual student/father breakfast. Young accompanied Trenton and Tyler to the event. The media has portrayed Young as confused and suicidal after he was injured two years ago. He was in the news for leaving his mother’s house with his pistol and

not responding to any phone calls. Young was injured during the Titans’ game and was booed by the home crowd in Tennessee earlier that day. Young’s mother called the police out of concern for her son. As it turns out, Vince left his phone at his house and was just watching football and eating hot wings with his uncle. Since that incident, Young said he did not have any thoughts about killing himself. I wish the national media would cover the positive side of Vince Young. In addition to supporting McNair’s sons in any way possible. After all, Young is still learning how do deal with injuries and pressure. His critics conveniently forget he won the Rookie of the Year in 2006 and made the Pro Bowl. He led the Titans to the playoffs the following year. After a tumultuous offseason with the death of his mentor, Young looked much improved in the last two games of this pre-season. He is still gaining confidence and is the ultimate competitor. To me, Young has always been nothing short of a winner, a great role model and a good person. He will always be a hero in Texas for backto-back Rose Bowl victories, one of which was a National Championship over a squad many of Young’s same critics called the best team of alltime, the 2005 USC Trojans. Young will get his opportunity to make his name in the NFL, if not with the Titans, than certainly there are teams that would love to have an athlete with his talent and skill set. But most of all, any team should love to have a man like Young inside its locker room.

“It was huge to get that second goal,” said Coach Kat Conner. “(At)1-0, you don’t want to take that as the clock is winding down because the other team will just throw numbers and (shots) at you. It was good to get that second goal. The kids kept battling. They stuck to what we wanted to do and I’m proud of them.” Earlier in the game, Erica Michaud’s, sophomore forward, goal got the Bobcats on the board, thanks to a 12-yard kick that swung from left to right. However, it was not a cakewalk for Texas State in the first half, thanks to a strong game plan from the Houston Baptist Huskies (2-4-1). The Huskies outshot the Bobcats 4-3 in the first half. “It was good coaching by (the Huskies),” Conner said. “They tried to keep us from building our attack and it

worked.” Texas State responded in the second half with eight shots and finished with an impressive six of 11 shots on goal. Serena Hines, freshman forward, scored her first goal of the season Sunday and came close to scoring her second Tuesday. One in the second half of Tuesday’s game should have snuck through, but the Huskies’ goalie got her paws on the ball just in time. One game now remains for the Bobcats before Southland Conference play. Texas State, which is currently 4-5 overall, hope to finish at .500 going into the most important stretch of the season. “We need to be .500 to get our confidence that we can go in and win that conference title,” Conner said. “We are a very focused group that wants to show everybody we can be at that level.”

By Joseph O. Garcia Sports Columnist

Women’s soccer defeats Houston Baptist By Cameron Irvine Sports Reporter The weather gave the feeling of fall with cooler temperatures. It may have been the first time anybody thought about hot chocolate in the stands, during the cool weather Saturday, but it was not the first time the Bobcats shutout an opponent on their home field. Texas State women’s soccer defeated Houston Baptist 2-0 Tuesday at the Bobcat Soccer Complex. The Bobcats closed the books on the visitor and improved their record to 3-1 at home on the season. Britney Curry, junior forward, led the Bobcats on the offensive scoring end with one goal and one assist. Her one goal came in the 57th minute on a penalty kick that easily brushed the back of the net.

Jake Marx/Star photo GOOD DEFENSE: Taylor Person, freshman defender, snatches the ball from a Houston Baptist opponent Tuesday at West Campus Fields.

09 23 2009  
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