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EAT ‘EM UP

S OCCER SHUTOUT Late goals keep ’Cats winless in 3-0 loss to

Tailgating: 101 has good eats for the perfect pre-game party.

Texas Tech

SEE TRENDS PAGE 7

SEE SPORTS PAGE 14

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

SEPTEMBER 6, 2007

THURSDAY

VOLUME 97, ISSUE 7

‘Back to basics’

CURRENT EVENT

campaign proposed by Texas State student, hopeful councilman By Matthew Champion Special to The University Star

Spencer Millsap/Star photo The San Marcos River will be one of the main points of focus of the newest Texas State Common Experience Series “The Water Planet: A River Runs Through Us.” The series will start with the screening of the film The Unforeseen at 8 p.m. Sept. 11 at Sewell Park. For more SEE PAGE 4.

A&E falls short on agreement with students, faculty member Philip Hadley Assistant News Editor

A group of former Texas State students and a faculty member are disappointed after working with the A&E television show “Flip This House.” The show “Flip This House” with Armando Montelongo of Montelongo House Buyers Inc. of San Antonio, produced an episode during the fall 2006 semester in conjunction with a Texas State Architectural Design 3 class. According to the A&E Web site, the reality show chronicles real-estate developers who buy homes, renovate them and then “flip” them for a profit. Montelongo planned to enlist the help of the undergradu-

ate class to “flip” an empty lot at Smith Lane in San Marcos, and construct nine buildings with four condominium units

“T

he project itself was extremely well received and I’m sad to know that it won’t be aired.”

—Robert Tisdel Senior lecturer for engineering and technology

in each structure, all the while maximizing the return on his investment. The students were instruct-

At the age of 25, Texas State student Jude Prather owns three businesses and a home in San Marcos. But now he has higher ambitions — he will be running for Place 2 on the San Marcos City Council in the upcoming general election. “I love this town, and I want to focus our tax dollars on what is really important,” said Prather, public administration senior. Prather said he would like to use a “back-to-basics” approach by maintaining streets and street lights, fixing storm drainage on the south side, improving water, wastewater and electric utilities and providing the best protection possible through the police and fire departments. “It is very important to stimulate the economic development here,” Prather said, “Forty-three percent of our general revenue fund comes from the sales tax in the outlet mall.” Instead, Prather said he would like to see a heavier reliance on multiple streams of income.

ed to form teams and develop site diagrams for the project. Montelongo planned to judge the team’s work and choose a winner at the end of the show. The winner’s diagrams were then to be implemented by Montelongo at the site. Charles Carpenter, graduate assistant for the class, said students were told the team with the best diagram would win a cash prize that never materialized postproduction. “The winning team composed of six students was promised a cash prize of $500 per student,” Carpenter said. “The show was filmed, the winning team was announced in a board room scene and a check was presented to the students. See A&E, page 4

A new law went into effect this semester limiting the number of courses students can drop to six and specifies how soon they will be reimbursed for dropped classes. State Rep. Patrick Rose, DDripping Springs, said the bill originally started with three drops as opposed to the six that were eventually written into the law. “First of all, three is too low a number — I think six is more reasonable,” said Rose, who serves on the House Committee on Higher Education. “Second, there has to be exceptions for illness of a student, illness of a dependent of a student, death in the family, military service and those things. We made sure those protections were included in the bill as finally passed.” State Rep. Fred Brown,

“W

here the real effect comes in is if students get in the habit of dropping classes just to drop classes; then, other students can’t get the classes they need to graduate.”

—Fred Brown Texas State Representative

R-Bryan, introduced the language limiting the number of drops. He said up to one-third of students drop a class within the first 12 days depending on the institution. “A&M, UT and Tech all

Today’s Weather

Isolated Stroms 90˚

Precipitation: 30% Humidity: 71% UV: 8 Very High Wind: SSE 11 mph

have a policy of three Q-drops for the undergraduate experience, and we had no policy in effect for our open enrollment schools,” Brown said. “Where the real effect comes in is if students get in the habit of dropping classes just to drop classes; then, other students can’t get the classes they need to graduate.” Brown said the most important effect is that it will help the students get the classes they need in order to graduate. He said the drop limit will save the taxpayers, especially parents, a considerable amount of money. “(The amount) depends on the institution,” he said. “They’ve never had to estimate this before.” Texas State registrar Lloydean Eckley said in an e-mail the new law only applies to See DROP, page 4

Two-day Forecast Friday AM cloudy Temp: 92°/ 73° Precip: 20%

Saturday Isolated Storms Temp: 92°/ 72° Precip: 30%

See PRATHER, page 4

ADA compliance subject of Trauth, Faculty Senate meeting

New law affects number of courses students can drop By Bill Lancaster News Reporter

“If something happened to our tourism and the outlet mall, we would have a big problem,” Prather said. He said the city budget continues to grow each year, and the increased spending is carried on the shoulders of the working class and property owners. “As a homeowner and small business owner, I know that regular people have to balance their checkbooks at the end of the month,” Prather said. “I will work to limit the government’s growth to economic growth.” Prather said he wants to encourage more students to plant roots in the town and buy a home. “Our greatest export is college graduates,” Prather said. He said currently businesses do not seem to have the desire to invest their time or money in San Marcos and he would like to see that change. Prather further seeks to improve the quality of life while maintaining the town’s unique environment and vibe. “The river is the soul of our town,” Prather said. “It has the

Monty Marion/Star photo LONG WAY UP: The wheelchair ramps outside Elliot Hall pose a challenge to those who require their use.

By Scott Thomas News Reporter University compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 was brought to the table during the President and Academic Affairs Group meeting with the Faculty Senate Wednesday. University President Denise Trauth raised the issue after being asked by Faculty Senate Chair William Stone, criminal justice professor, if she had any agenda items of her own she wished to discuss. Provost Perry Moore said what the law required should only be

the minimum of what the university should do, saying it was only a foundation. Trauth invited Joanne Smith, vice president for Student Affairs, to discuss accessibility for the disabled with the Faculty Senate. “We already have an (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliance meeting,” Smith said. “They meet at least once a year.” Smith said a new group, which she described as an interactive team, was being developed by the Office of Disabilities Services, Human Resources and Equity & Access which would handle problems dealing with disabled staff when departments

lacked the funds to do so. “The department is responsible for disabled staff,” Smith said. “But if the department can’t, it works its way up the chain.” Smith said the university has an allocation of $75,000 a year to handle disability compliance issues. The allocations roll forward each year, accumulating unused dollars each year for future problems. Smith said all staff requesting accommodations should include documentation of the need, a description of the desired accommodation, an explanation of how the request relates to the disability and steps that have been attempted to address the need and possible alternatives. “Does the federal law require it in writing?” asked Faculty Sen. Gary Winek, engineering and technology professor. “Because we know from experience that if someone verbally requests it we have to comply.” Moore said the university was aware of what the act required. “I think the idea of an interactive team is fabulous,” said Faculty Sen. Audrey McKinney, philosophy professor. Further discussed at the monthly Faculty Senate meeting with the president was the new four-day schedule. “It’s a little early to say if it’s definitely working,” Trauth said. She said the new schedule was a real step forward in several ways, saying it put the university on a conformed schedule and required less commuting for students living off-campus. “I think we just need to see how this thing develops,” Moore said. “There’s always unintended consequences; so far, it’s working as intended.” Trauth said she would be giving a presentation at the next University Council meeting on the new university budget. “We’ll take the new money and show where it goes,” Trauth said. “It’s not complex, but it’s important.” At the meeting, Trauth will also discuss adjustments the university has made since the Virginia Tech massacre. “I think you’ll be happy with the concrete changes we’ve made,” Trauth said.

Inside News ........ 1,2,3,4 Opinions ............ 5 Trends .......... 6,7,8

Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Diversions .......... 9 Classifieds ....... 10 Sports ......... 11,12

To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2007 The University Star


PAGETWO

starsof texas state

Today in Brief

Thursday, September 6, 2007 - Page 2

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund has named two Texas State students as recipients of the 2007 Fellowships for minority students entering the teaching profession. Irina Gonzalez, music senior, and Priscilla Riojas, interdisciplinary studies senior, earned the Rockefeller Fellowships.

The two were among 25 students representing 16 institutions to earn the honor. Students designated as Rockefeller Fellows are eligible for scholarship grants totaling up to $22,100 beginning junior year and ending after establishing a career as a public school classroom teacher. — Courtesy of University News Service

News Contact — Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Calendar THURSDAY The Catholic Student Organization will meet at 6 p.m. in the library of the Catholic Student Center. The Rock — Praise & Worship will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the St. Jude Chapel of the CSC. “Bobcats for Life” will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the CSC. The Texas State chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists will hold a meeting to elect officers at 5 p.m. in Old Main, Room 232. The women of Mu Epsilon Theta will have informational meetings at 6:30 p.m. in the lobby of the CSC. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting at 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. Everyone is welcome to attend. Women’s Personal Growth Group will meet from noon to 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. FRIDAY Texas State women’s volleyball will play Houston at 12 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum. Texas State women’s volleyball will play Cal State Fullerton at 7 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum. Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be held from noon until 1 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3.4. Alcoholics Anonymous Newcomer’s Meeting River Group will be 9:15 p.m. at 1700 Ranch Rd. 12, Suite C. SATURDAY Texas State women’s volleyball will play Missouri at 12 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum. Texas State football will play Abilene Christian at 6 p.m. at Bobcat Stadium. MONDAY Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center will host Advocate Training —Volunteers Helping Victims of Abuse. For more information contact Emily Douglas, (512) 3963404. TUESDAY Every Nation Campus Ministries will be holding a weekly

Hays County warrant roundup Corrections

campus meeting 7 p.m. in Centennial Hall, Room G-02 of Centennial. There will be free, fellowship and a message exploring the person of Jesus. The CSC will have a free lunch for all students 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the lobby. The American Sign Language Club will be having a bake sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. in The Quad. Aa presentation by the St. Mary’s School of Law Admissions Office will be 3:30 pm in McCoy Hall, Room 119. For more information, e-mail as44@txstate. edu. The National Broadcasting Society will hold the first meeting of the fall semester 5 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. Overeaters Anonymous meets at 12:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland. For more information call Lynn, (512) 357-2049.

The city of San Marcos Municipal Court and several Hays County justice of the peace courts are allowing a weeklong amnesty period for people with warrants. The amnesty period will last Monday through Sept. 14. Beginning Sept. 17, several local agencies will start seeking and arresting people who have outstanding warrants. The San Marcos Police Department, San Marcos Marshal’s Office and constables in Wimberley, Dripping Springs and Buda are participating in the effort. Rusty Grice, deputy marshal with the San Marcos Marshals office, indicated officers have updated information on defendants, including addresses, places of employment and school

schedules. He encourages defendants to avoid the embarrassment of arrest at one of these locations by appearing before the appropriate court to resolve the charges against them. Defendants must resolve their cases at the court in which their case is filed. “People who fail to address tickets at court or fail to comply with court orders are reported to the Texas Department of Public Safety for non-renewal of their driver’s licenses,” said Susie Garcia, municipal court administrator. The San Marcos Municipal Court city warrant list is posted at www.ci.san-marcos.tx.us/ cityhall/court/documents/warrantlist.pdf. The municipal court accepts

CAREFUL AIM

cash, checks, money orders, cashiers checks, Visa, Master Card, American Express and Discover. Residents may make credit card payments by phone during regular court hours by calling (512) 393-8190. Special court sessions are available without the need to post bond, from 9 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday, and Wednesday from 4 to 8 p.m. during the week of Monday through Sept. 14. The municipal court customer service window is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and until 8 p.m. on Wednesdays. Approximately 7,466 names are on the Municipal Court warrant list. — Courtesy of city of San Marcos

GLBQ Pride Group meeting will be held noon to 1:30 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. Facing the Fear — An Anxiety/Panic Group meets 3:30 to 5 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center will host Advocate Training -Volunteers Helping Victims of Abuse. For more information contact Emily Douglas, (512) 396-3404. WEDNESDAY

CRIME BL TTER

University Police Department Aug. 28, 8:31 a.m. Failure to Comply/Striking Unattended Vehicle/Elm Lot An officer was dispatched for an accident report. Upon further investigation, a nonstudent reported his vehicle had been damaged while it was parked. This case is under investigation. Aug. 28, 8:44 a.m. Failure to Comply/Striking Unattended Vehicle/UPD Lobby An officer was dispatched to the lobby for a hit and run report. Upon further investigation, a non-student reported her vehicle was damaged while it was parked at Blanco Hall. This case is under investigation.

Alpha Kappa Psi, the professional business fraternity, will begin rush for fall semester. Please visit www.texasstateakpsi.com for more information.

“Anger Management: Your Plan for Real-Life Coping” will be 5:10 to 6:25 p.m. For information and screening on groups, call the Counseling Center at (512) 2452208.

In a Sept. 4 article, The University Star reported the location of a stabbing at Lucy’s Barfish Lounge. The actual location of the stabbing was Lucy’s San Marcos.

Monty Marion/Star photo Michael Benavides, exercise and sports science sophomore, lines up his shot while practicing billiards Wednesday afternoon at George’s in the LBJ Student Center.

Psychology department will receive research funding

The Network Meeting will be 5 to 7 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room Congressman Lloyd Doggett, 3.6. D-TX, announced Wednesday Texas State is receiving $60,816 Adult children of alcoholics from the National Institute of dealing with dysfunctional fami- Mental Health for research on lies group will meet from facial expression and gaze inter5:15 to 6:45 p.m. For infor- action. mation and screening on groups, “Texas State continues to call the Counseling Center at make strides in this ground(512) 245-2208. breaking research that has exciting potential to expand our knowledge of mental health,” said Doggett, a senior member of the House Committee on Ways and Means and the House Committee on the Budget.

This grant will help fund research at the psychology department at Texas State to examine electrical brain activity when individuals view emotional and gazing faces. This research investigates changeable aspects of faces such as gaze and expression, and provides an understanding of powerful signals during social interactions. An understanding of gaze and emotion processing in healthy adults provides a baseline to determine how these processes might be disrupted by development, disease or injury.

“I would like to express my gratitude to Representative Lloyd Doggett for his continuing support for the National Institutes of Health and in particular for the grant,” said Reiko Graham, assistant psychology professor. “The ability to decode gaze and expression forms a cornerstone for higher level social processing that, when disrupted, is associated with social and emotional deficits, such as those associated with autism and schizophrenia.” — Courtesy of Wyeth Ruthven

New feature on Alkek Web site allows online renewals “Can I renew my books online?” is one of the oftenly asked questions at the Alkek Library circulation desk. That is now possible thanks to My Account. The feature is in Millennium, the integrated library management system implemented last fall. In addition to online viewing and renewing of library materials checked out to you, My Account offers the ability to place hold requests on items which are checked out, and can send notifications when they are

returned and available for pick up. The ability to save library catalog searches and receive notification when items matching the search are added to the library. Additionally, the feature can save an ongoing list of the titles checked out, and allow the viewing of fines accrued due to overdue materials and other library charges. Access My Account from the library’s Web site at catalog.library.txstate.edu. Click the “My Account” link in the top right corner of

Aug. 28, 11:41 a.m. Medical Emergency/ Family Consumer Science An officer was dispatched for a medical emergency. Upon further investigation, a student reported she had fainted, was evaluated by EMS, and transported to Central Texas Medical Center for further evaluation. Aug. 28, 4:35 p.m. Burglary: Vehicle/UPD Lobby An officer was dispatched to the lobby for a burglary of a vehicle report. Upon further investigation, a student reported his property had been removed from his vehicle without his consent. This case is under investigation. Aug. 28, 7:56 p.m. Warrant Service/Bobcat Village An officer initiated a traffic stop. Upon further investigation, a non-student had an outstanding warrant, was arrested, and transported to Hays County Law Enforcement Center to await magistration. — Courtesy of University Police Department

the page. You will be prompted for your Texas State Net ID and password. Once you are logged into My Account, you may search the library catalog as usual, or use any of the additional features as listed above. For more information regarding setting up an account or other functions offered by the My Account library system feature, stop by the circulation desk or call (512) 245-3681. — Courtesy of Alkek Library


NEWS

Thursday, September 6, 2007

The University Star - Page 3

Organization created to ease graduate school transition Fraternity By Kristen Williams News Reporter

For many, attending graduate school may seem like a dream, so one organization strives to make it a reality. Students wanting more information about applying for graduate school can attend the Saturday seminar held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater. This event is hosted by the Making Access and Participation Successful Project, an organization stressing the importance of academics, admissions and financial aid to get into graduate school. The project is aimed at Hispanic juniors and seniors or first-generation college students. The conference will address ways to manage time in school, how to write a resume, financial aid information, tips for conducting research, admissions test preparation and more.

Fatima Iscandri, business administration graduate student and mentor, said

his seminar is “T going to set the foundation for financial and academic success prior to attending graduate school.”

—Fatima Iscandri graduate student mentor

those present at the meeting will benefit by knowing what to expect in graduate school. “This seminar is going to set the foundation for financial and academic success prior to attending graduate school,”

Iscandri said. Philip Ramirez, graduate research assistant, discussed the differences between undergraduate and graduate school. “We provide a lot of orientation to the graduate process,” said Ramirez, health and administration graduate student. “It is quite different from the undergraduate process. The deadlines are different for each department. We structure our program where there is a graduate research assistant who is an expert in each department.” Admissions requirements such as a higher GPA and prerequisite exams are more demanding than undergraduate school. “Most programs require a 3.0 GPA,” Ramirez said. “We will prepare you for the (Graduate Record Examination) and the (Graduate Management Admission Test).” Though it is more difficult to be admitted to graduate school, Project MAPS

aims to help students reach their goal through financial aid. “We work with financial planning,” Ramirez said. “Graduate school is more expensive than undergraduate and there is less money available.” Project MAPS is a division of the Texas Engaging Latino Communities for Education Office. According to the Web site, the office’s vision is to “enhance the Hispanic presence at Texas State University” and “help smooth the transition to Texas State and increase Hispanic academic success.”

✯FYI To learn more about ENLACE or Project MAPS, visit www.health.txstate.edu/ cstep.

The Unforeseen set to premiere Tuesday By Kara Bowers Special to The University Star Land development versus environmental conservation has been an ongoing issue in Central Texas, an area known for its rivers and lush greenery. Local filmmaker Laura Dunn hopes to bring more attention to the issue with a screening of her film, The Unforeseen, 8 p.m. Tuesday on the riverbank of Sewell Park. Dunn’s premiere feature film was an official selection at the 2007 USA Film Festival and 2007 Sundance Film Festival. The film illustrates the importance of natural resources and problems arising as a result of pollution and depletion. Dunn said the documentary is presented in a way to reach people that would not usually be interested in seeing an environmental film. “A lot of documentaries are like lectures, kind of boring and dry,” she said. “This really isn’t that kind of film.” She said it presents information in an objective way allowing viewers to form their own opinions and incorporates beautiful

imagery and underwater footage. The conflict between land development and environmental protection involving Barton Springs in Austin serves as a case study for the larger scope of conservation issues. Urban growth taking place in the recharge zone, an area allowing water to re-circulate into the Edwards Aquifer, has resulted in ecological changes within the aquifer-fed springs in previous years. Ron Coley, director of the Aquarena Center, said these issues are relevant to San Marcos waterways. “Barton Springs is our little sister. Everything that happened in Austin can be repeated here,” Coley said. “This is a tremendous opportunity for us to learn from mistakes.” Coley said San Marcos river-goers should be especially mindful of their treatment of waterways because it is located at the beginning of the river, ahead of towns farther down such as Luling and Gonzales. He said the most effective way to contribute to a clean environment involves personal stewardship.

“It has to do with taking responsibility and picking up trash,” Coley said. “Not everyone pays attention to what happens to

“T

his is a tremendous opportunity for us to learn from mistakes.”

—Ron Coley director, Aquarena Center

that empty beer can, that candy wrapper or that dirty diaper.” The screening of The Unforeseen is a part of this year’s Common Experience “The Water Planet: A River Runs Through Us,” which is intended to create community awareness and participation. Pam Wuestenberg, Common Experience

co-chair, said the film is closely tied to this year’s theme because it is dealing with conservation and the use of water, a prominent feature of the Texas State campus and San Marcos. “As we start to develop the land around San Marcos, a vibrant conversation must take place about protecting the water and at the same time allowing development,” Wuestenberg said. “This movie is about what happened in Austin, so maybe we can learn something from the film to help us create a strong vision for our community.” Dunn, whose mother was a botanist, was asked to make the film by producer Terrence Malick. It is co-produced by Robert Redford. Dunn said she was excited about the chance to make a movie that hits close to home for her and with such an important message. “It should be a meditative experience to make us stop and think about how water is important to each of us,” Dunn said. “We need to make ourselves consider what we can do to protect it and save it for future generations.”

members accused of beating By Alex Herring News Reporter

Texas State student Blake Taylor was badly beaten allegedly by at least three Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity members inside his garage early Sunday morning. Taylor, public relations senior, was rushed to the Central Texas Medical Center to have reconstructive surgery on part of his nose, which was ripped during the fight. Taylor said the confrontation was a result of a miscommunication. He said the fight started when at least three members of the fraternity backed him into his garage and beat him. Taylor said Ryan Cobb, marketing sophomore, and Eric Hudson, healthcare administration junior, were among the group that left him bleeding in his garage after the incident. Brian Henretta, a friend of Taylor’s, said the fraternity has not been cooperative in giving the names of the others who were seen leaving the garage with ‘bloody shirts’ yelling threats. Henretta, European studies junior, is acting as a mediator between the two groups along with San Marcos city councilman Chris Jones, who arrived at Taylor’s home after the incident. No arrests have been made. The case is expected to go to Hays County District Attorney Sherri Tibbe this week.

For the latest news, visit our website at www.UniversityStar.com!


NEWS

Page 4 - The University Star

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Foiled terror plots in Europe may be linked to al-Qaida By Matthew Schofield McClatchy Newspapers A potentially “massive” terrorist attack against U.S. installations in Germany — linked to al-Qaida — was doomed to fail from the day anti-terrorism police broke into a rented garage in Germany’s picturesque Black Forest and found barrels of bomb-making chemicals, police said Wednesday. Police found the garage by tracking the movements of three men after one of them, a German national who converted to Islam, was spotted in December casing a U.S. military barracks at Hanau, in central Germany, they said. Authorities suspected this man, another German national who’d converted to Islam and a Muslim Turkish resident were the core of the German cell of the

Islamic Jihad Union, a terrorist group set up in Uzbekistan in Central Asia that

he nine had “T international contacts, including

leading members of al-Qaida.”

—Jakob Scharf officer, Danish Police Intelligence

has ties to al-Qaida and training camps in Pakistan. Twelve blue barrels that police found in July contained a solution with 35 percent hydrogen peroxide, enough to make a bomb with the power of 1,200 pounds of TNT. To avoid tipping off the

suspects that they were under surveillance, police drained the barrels and replaced the contents with a 3 percent solution — the same stuff found in first aid kits, essentially useless as a bomb component. As police monitored their travels, the suspects moved one of the barrels Saturday from the forest-hiding place to a tourist cabin in Medebach-Oberschledorn, a village of 900 in central Germany, and allegedly began constructing bombs with what they thought was an explosive chemical. This week, they learned why their experiments weren’t going the way they’d anticipated, police said. After a chance encounter with a traffic cop, they lost their nerve and decided to flee, police said. At 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, 600 anti-terrorism police moved in and arrested them, making them the latest

in a long line of homegrown European terrorism suspects to be caught before they could act. In Copenhagen Wednesday, Danish police announced the arrests of nine people on charges of plotting terrorist attacks. Danish Police Intelligence officer Jakob Scharf said the nine “had international contacts, including leading members of al-Qaida.” Although the two cases don’t appear to be directly linked, in both instances the alleged plotters are said to have connections to Osama bin Laden’s organization. U.S. officials described the attempted bombings in Germany as a significant plot. The al-Qaida network is thought to have re-established a presence in recent months — including training camps — in northwest Pakistan along the border

with Afghanistan. U.S. officials also allege that the German plotters were aligned with the Islamic Jihad Union. “There are connections” between al-Qaida and the Islamic Jihad Union, according to a senior U.S. intelligence official who requested anonymity because the issue is classified. The group, which splintered from the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, is on the State Department’s list of foreign terrorist organizations. In Berlin Wednesday, Wolfgang Schaeuble, the German interior minister, warned of a new wave of “homegrown terrorism, not just here but across Europe.” “The fact that they had obtained military fuses tells us they were not semiprofessional, but fully trained terrorists,” Schaeuble said.

DROP: State reps. claim rule will help students A&E: Students yet to receive money CONTINUED from page 1

CONTINUED from page 1

freshman entering higher education during the fall 2007 semester and later. “We will distribute copies of the law and exceptions to all of our new freshmen students within the next few weeks,” Eckley said. “Students need to be sure to check their Texas State e-mails.” The purpose of the original bill was to bring reimbursement for dropped summer classes into harmony with the already established guidelines for long semesters, Rose said. “Our universities have sophisticated systems, and there is nothing wrong to have the checks written in a timely manner,” Rose said. “It’s more of a burden on students if they’re not reimbursed in a timely manner than on the universities requiring them to do so.” The new law does not change the amount of

money universities refund for dropped classes, Eckley said. The university is considering adding more exceptions to the six-drop rule in addition to the four listed in the statute. “We will work with our students to be sure they understand the law and the manner in which exceptions may be granted,” Eckley said. “We want to make sure state resources are being used wisely, but also that this law does not negatively impact the student’s progress to graduate.” The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board will create rules implementing the new law, Rose said. “I think there is a desire to direct as many dollars as possible to student aid and to decreasing the cost of college education,” Rose said. “As we move forward with finding ways to drive more dollars into students’ pockets through scholarships, grants, loans and other things — particularly for middle class families — we are going to do that.”

The students later found out that the check was only a prop and could not be deposited.” Robert Tisdel, senior lecturer for engineering and technology, said for business reasons Montelongo decided not to buy the property, and therefore the show was never aired. “The project itself was extremely well received and I’m sad to know that it won’t be aired,” Tisdel said. “Montelongo decided not purchase the land that the project was supposed to sit on. Because the land was not purchased, A&E did not have an ending to their show.” Tisdel said a former student

contacted him and told him Montelongo has recently agreed to pay the student; however, to his knowledge the students have still not received their prize money. “I have been told that Armando has been contacted by an attorney and it is my understanding that he has now agreed to pay the students,” Tisdel said. “Currently, the money has still not been paid to the students.” Carpenter said he was disappointed the students never received anything for their hard work. “The way the contest was presented it seemed that at least the winning team would receive something for their troubles,” Carpenter said. “In the real world, you’re paid for your work,

PRATHER: CONTINUED from page 1

potential to promote several untapped industries.” Prather is no stranger to politics, having worked in 2005 on the campaign for councilman Chris Jones, who became the second Texas State student in history to be elected to the City Council. “Jude is one of my best friends and basically a brother,” Jones said. “Through thick and thin he will stand behind you. He is the kind of person who would give you the shirt off of his back.” Jones said Prather has a true vision for the future of San Marcos that extends beyond the interest of one group. “Jude’s vision encompasses the entire city and all of its citizens,” Jones said. “Our wonderful city has suffered at the hand of leaders with their group’s interest in

and it’s upsetting that someone can promise those students a prize and not follow through. I think the students invested more time and money in this class than would normally be expected of them.” Tisdel said the architectural design class relies heavily on the public to provide real world projects for the students. “While it is wrong that Montelongo did not pay the winning team, I don’t want this one situation to discourage people from seeking out Texas State students for their help with projects,” Tisdel said. Both A&E Television and Armando Montelongo did not return The University Star’s phone calls.

Councilman Jones endorses Prather

mind — Jude is not one of those leaders.” Prather’s opponent, Gaylord Bose, who could not be reached for comment, once sought to raise the minimum age to run for city council from 18 to 21. “I find raising the age requirements to be personally offensive,” Prather said. “If kids can lead platoons in Iraq then they certainly should be able to come back and run for city council.” Mathew Golding, Prather’s campaign manager, said Prather has received wonderful preparation for becoming a city council member. “All of this is just a precursor of what’s to come,” said Golding, political science senior. Prather said there are 2,000 doors in the city of San Marcos, and he plans to knock on every one of them. To help garner the student vote, Prather and his colleagues have

been registering students to vote. “Texas State will become nationally known for politics,” Prather said. “The number of voters under the age of 25 has been significantly increasing.” Prather said he does not expect to receive support from the Associated Student Government. “I think what they are doing is great, but I wouldn’t want them to help with an open campaign,” Prather said. “It should be a fair playing field for all our candidates.” ASG President Reagan Pugh said Prather is one of the hardest workers he knows. “When he sets his mind to do something, it will be done, and it will be done well,” Pugh said. “Alexis and I could not have won our campaign if it were not for the hard work and dedication of Jude.” The general election will be held Nov. 6.


OPINIONS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

onlineconnection For news updates throughout this semester, check out www.UniversityStar.com.

Thursday, September 6, 2007 - Page 5

Opinions Contact — Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu

THE MAIN POINT

O

ut of the more than 27 thousand students enrolled, approximately 30 percent identify themselves as non-white. While whites account for more than 19 thousand of the registered students, the other eight thousand or so students — a number growing annually — are misrepresented. The Quad, for example, is rife with greek organizations being promoted this time of year, but only a few tents and stands represent less “traditional” student interests. A cursory skimming reveals only a sparse amount of groups outside such as the Hispanic Business Student Association, Muslim Student Association, Black Men United and Lambda, giving out information and signing people up. The almost complete lack of their presence gives a false notion of the identity of Texas State as a university and aside from keeping those potentially interested in such organizations in the dark about their existence, the scarcity of diverse representation casts a dark light on those unaware of the institutions on campus. How can you join an organization if they are not front and center, notifying people of its existence? Lines of diversity are drawn along a wide axis. There exist myriad ways of categorizing a person. Obvious extensions include race, gender, lifestyle, culture and sexual orientation; but these fall short of the innumerable ways people may identify themselves. There are groups on campus welcoming anyone who fits the bill. No one should feel alone or an outcast because of real or perceived differences when so many groups abound. And so many groups there are: More than 250 registered organizations are indexed under Texas State’s Student Organizations directory. Unfortunately, some groups are by nature exclusionary, but the lion’s share of inclusive groups means a better educational and social environment for all students, faculty and staff at Texas State. All organizations, groups and assemblies benefit from a diverse driving force. Not immune to this is The University Star. When a publication comes together — in this case a newspaper — for the purpose of informing the public as a whole, it is of utmost importance to ensure all voices are heard, regardless of community apportionment. This is why all sections of The Star — Trends, Opinions, News and Sports, but advertising, accounting and copy as well — are eager to hire persons from all walks of life. Only by having an assorted group can a news outlet become a respected, reliable source of information and maintain that position. The Star advises all groups, regardless of affiliation or creed, to adopt ethics making themselves open to people from all spectrums. By acting as a mirror, publications like The Star are able to entirely embody the whole of the reading public they serve — the very support of such communication associations. And when these factions exist, operate under and deal directly with a university such as ours, it’s even more important to reach out and ensure everyone is involved.

IN ACTION Texas State’s minority population underrepresented

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

Julie Sheah/Star illustration

Terrifying actions: U.S. denial of poetry for Guantanamo prisoners perpetuates fear By Sousan Hammad The Daily Cougar (U. Houston)

HOUSTON — Is it possible for prison walls to disappear? For the hundreds of detainees who are confined to cells in U.S. Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, poetry has given the prisoners hope to believe they will one day witness their cell wall’s disappearance. Though it is unclear how many detainees are being held at Guantanamo, Amnesty International estimates that 430 were being held as of late 2006, but the U.S. has convicted only two of criminal offenses. Of the hundreds who are being illegally detained in the torturous environment, 17 have recently created a book of poetry, which was compiled and edited by their lawyer Marc Falkoff. The Pentagon has refused for years to declassify the writings of the book, Poems from Guantanamo: Detainees Speak, and after the book’s publication, the Pentagon refused to clear any additional poems. The poems, officials say, could be a “risk,” for they could be encoded with terrorist messages. The prisoners, however, were initially denied the use of paper and pen, so they stitched their words with pebbles onto plastic foam cups. Eventually, with the help of Falkoff, they were allowed to receive the necessary supplies from time to time. Meanwhile, across the world, Israeli officials have banned the import of paper into the world’s largest virtual prison, Gaza Strip. Ironic? Officials say they recently decided to ban the import of the product because it could be used to print books containing Hamas’ ideology. It is quite peculiar how both Israeli and U.S. officials claim the reason they find paper and words a threat is because it could potentially implement terrorist ideologies in the minds of individuals. The United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East is calling the absurd act a violation of human rights. Approximately 200,000 students began the new school year Sept. 1, but without textbooks, paper or books. It’s that simple. For some of the prisoners, however, who have been held for more than five years, they have found a comforting way to voice their sorrows. Some are devoid of love, while others passionately write of it. They remember the feeling of love, even if it is but a slight memory, for their remembrance is what keeps them from disintegrating into Guantanamo’s treacherous air of nothingness. One detainee wrote, “When I heard pigeons cooing in the trees, hot tears covered my face. When the lark chirped, my thoughts composed.” Apparently the Pentagon is threatened by pigeons and tears. How is it possible that detainee Sami al-Hajj, an Al Jazeera cameraman, encoded the words above with “terrorist” motives? Or is this another way for the U.S. government to propagate and instill fear into the minds of Americans? According to Amnesty International, in October 2006 the Military Commissions Act was passed, stripping U.S. courts of jurisdiction to hear habeas corpus appeals challenging the lawfulness or conditions of detention of any non-U.S. citizen held in Guantanamo. Whether the prisoners are guilty is moot; it is unfair and unjust to deny them the right of poetry. It would be an entirely different story if their writings were politically motivated, but their writings are but a mere story, an art form to describe their feelings. Pablo Neruda, the Chilean poet, wrote he never searched for poetry; it instead was in search for him. For prisoners — whether in Guantanamo Bay or in the Palestinian territories — poetry helps ease frustration. It helps to break up the structure of time, and it helps to give prisoners hope that maybe, just maybe, their prison walls will one day disappear.

Legal Guy: Reading fine print helps students maintain financial aid

With the beginning anyone should be of the academic year, able to accomplish many students are this Herculean task. receiving the remains Many times of their financial aid. students run into However, a significant problems not with amount of students the application itself, every year have difbut with other docuficulties in navigating ments or processes the dangerous and that must also be complicated mine field completed to rethat is the financial ceive financial aid. CARSON GUY aid process. The probStar Columnist One such process lems many students is that of verificaface in trying to attain tion. According to financial aid is only one half of the Financial Aid Office’s frethe story. On the flip side, many quently asked questions Web students have problems with site, “verification is a process staying eligible to receive finanby which the university reviews cial aid. the student and parental inforFilling out and filing a fimation reported on the Free nancial aid application can be Application for Federal Student cumbersome and excruciating. Aid.” The site goes on to specify Like almost any government “selection for verification does document, there are countless not imply that you have made blanks that must be filled with an error or made false stateboring numbers most students ments.” Aside from a form, the probably do not even know. financial aid office will require However, with the help of parstudents to submit a copy of ents and perhaps an accountant, their tax returns as well as their

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

parent’s tax returns, unless they are considered legally independent. To be independent in the Financial Aid Office’s eyes, you must be born before Jan.1, 1984, working on a master’s or doctorate degrees, be married, have children you support, be a veteran of the armed services or have been a ward of the state until you were 18. If you cannot answer yes to any of these questions, then you cannot and should not file as an independent. Another problem students run into is not knowing the deadlines for submitting their financial aid applications. For the long academic year, the deadline is April 1st. For the students not having problems with attaining their financial aid, often the biggest difficulty is determining how they can pay for their tuition. An interim solution for many students is an emergency tuition loan. Emergency tuition

Editor In Chief.................................Maira Garcia, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.......................Sydney Granger, starletters@txstate.edu News Editor...................................Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor.......................Clara Cobb, starentertainment@txstate.edu Opinions Editor.......................................Bill Rix, staropinion@txstate.edu Photo Editor................................Spencer Milsap, starphoto@txstate.edu

loans provide money for the bare minimum of your tuition. These loans are good for 90 days, which should give a student without all the proper documents time to organize all of their information so they can officially complete their financial aid application. Many students who use emergency tuition loans have been chosen for the verification process. The process used to be relatively simple, but still requires people to show up in person to apply for an emergency tuition loan. However, the Financial Aid Office offers emergency tuition loans online. Undoubtedly, this addition to the Texas State Web site will help countless students avoid delays in paying for their tuition. Another obstacle students face in dealing with financial aid is maintaining their eligibility. There are a few reasons why someone would lose their eligibility: First and foremost, if students are unable to satisfy the

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satisfactory academic progress guidelines, they will be unable to receive financial aid. The Satisfactory Academic Progress guidelines require a second-year student maintain at least a 2.0 GPA. However, there are other requirements as well — students must not surpass 160 credit hours and must complete the minimum number of new hours each semester. The amount of new hours necessary varies. Keep in mind repeated classes do not count toward new hours. Once a student has lost their availability, they must accomplish two tasks to once again be eligible. First, a student must go one semester without financial aid. Second, they must meet the minimum criteria set forth in the Satisfactory Academic Progress guidelines. The first requirement of going a semester without financial aid can be devastating to students and can prove difficult to overcome. There are many facets of the financial aid process. Because of

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the complexity of the system, it is easy for things to fall through the cracks. However, taking chances with your education is never a wise idea. The financial aid department at Texas State exists to help students, so the resource should be used. The prospect of losing your financial aid is a daunting one that should compel any student to make certain their application is complete. Carson Guy is a political science senior. His column tackles legal quandaries. E-mail questions to Guy at staropinion@txstate. edu. The content and opinions contained herein are in no way meant as legal advice. All information is general in nature. Do not rely on information within this article when trying to resolve a specific legal issue. All situations are unique and require specific legal advice from competent counsel.

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright September 6, 2007. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


TRENDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

covercatch Frances Wittenburg, exercise and sports science freshman, can be found on the cover of Saltwater Fishing Magazine. The fish, which she displays on the cover, was caught outside of Bay City in the coastal waters of Matagorda Bay. Wittenburg released the fish after the picture was taken.

Thursday, September 6, 2007 - Page 6

Trends Contact — Clara Cobb, starentertainment@txstate.edu

Tailgating 101: A football fan’s guide to gameday Several simple steps ensure optimum pre-game partying ou’re not in High School anymore. Proper tailgating “Y begins the Thursday before a Saturday game.”

— mattp868, www.espn.com

By Susan Rauch Features Reporter Inquiring football fans get top advice from seasoned tailgaters: How does one throw the perfect pre-party? At the first tailgate of the season Saturday tailgate veterans agreed pre-game success requires preparation, food, activities, essentials and school spirit. PREPARATION Most veteran tailgaters agree set-up should begin between 7:30 and 8:00 a.m. the day of the big game. In order to get a spot in tailgate alley, groups and organizations need to register with the Student Association for Campus Activities (SACA). John Headrick, political science senior and Phi Delta Theta recruitment chair, agrees getting to the tailgate location first has its perks. “Arrive early to get a good spot close to the music — and port-a- CHILLIN: T exas S Bobca potty,” he said. tate ts take on No seniors tailg The Hispanic Business . 15-ra a Aus nked C te, as they g Students Association et read tin Byrd/Star Ph al Poly oto y to S a (HBSA) uses committurday at Bob watch the tees in order to plan and make cat Sta dium. the event run smoothly, said Javier Ortiz, business management junior and public relations officer for the organization. He stressed the importance of “mem- chair of Omega Delta Phi aid he is the master cook, and spends ber participation and prepping the his game day overseeing the enormously large barbecue pit. night before” and “being ready to “It is essential to have a nice, large pit and good cooks,” he go.” BobcatFans Magazine tent has said. a successful tailgate every year beHolman cooks 5 racks of ribs, 40 pounds of chicken quarters, cause of its BobcatFans message 15 pounds of sausages and several beer-can chickens on average. board, said Chad Brown, anthro- He said the ribs and beer can chickens are a tailgate favorite. pology senior. These items require at least 6 hours of prep time the morning-of “Because of the communication and 3-4 hours cooking time, he said. Another favorite tailgate on the board, everyone brings their own food stop is the Athletic Alumni, whose signature food is hot food and invites their friends, fans of all wings. ages just hanging out together,” he said. ACTIVITIES FOOD Tailgaters agree providing games add to the perfect pre-party. All tailgaters emphasized the importance When fans stop by to play games, they end up hanging out and of having good food and good drinks. A spokes- have a good time. Saturday found fans playing washers, beer person for Omega Delta Phi said its tailgate pong and flip cup. mega-menu keeps the fans coming back every year. Ladder golf made its first appearance at the opening tailgate. The organization is one of the most seasoned tail- The game consists of two golf balls attached to each end of a gaters. This is its ninth year throwing pre-game par- string, thrown at a distance similar to that of washers, landing ties. Eric Holman, finance junior and treasurer/rush onto ladder rungs for points. ESSENTIALS Major essentials for a successful tailgate include providing couches, good music and a TV setup to keep tabs on the other college sports that day, said Joe Porter, public administration junior and president of the Non-Traditional Students Organization. He said another essential is a “a good quality tent.” Porter was happy to have one after Saturday’s downpour of rain. Jamie Blair, business management junior and vice president of The Loud Crowd, said the club has a successful pre-party by having an alcohol-free tailgate and a good pit. Zac Hanson, manufacturing engineering senior, said he built the organization’s two unique pits. “Everyone wants a keg,” he said. Despite the alcohol-free party Hanson said the pit made of kegs gives tailgaters what they want. SCHOOL SPIRIT The most repetitive response for successful tailgating is to show school pride and to come out to support the Bobcats. Lauren Miller, public relations junior and SACA Pride and Traditions coordinator, agreed. “SACA prepares two to three months in advance to Photo get ready, down to the last detail, with the help of comr ta S / Byrd mittees in order to pull off a successful tailgate,” she Austin food e h t s said. “The main essentials for a successful tailgate are epare e an, pr sophomor m h school spirit, having fun, giving out free food and stuff s e r . f n ly s io s t s u nica sine nxio and making sure students are taking part.” u u a b m it , t a m d o w

n athe ass c att Ar K: M ylor, pre-m ior Chris M C I P a n YOUR Charles T ertising se TAKE us dv n a m d lu n a a while e Ramos, u iq n o M

Omega Delta Phi’s Recipe for Beer-Can Chicken The beer can chicken is very easy to prepare: 1.

First, with a whole chicken, clean out any insides, like the liver and heart.

2.

Next, season it any way you desire. The common seasoning is Season All or chicken rub. You can also pour some beer on it, or honey or juices, if you desire.

3.

Plug the top with a half lime or use the neck of the chicken. Then open a beer with it about 3/4 to 1/3 full and stick it up the back side of the chicken and put it on the grill sitting upright. (Omega Delta Phi has a special tray for that).

4.

Then, when inside of the meat is about 180 degrees it is done. You can put BBQ sauce on it and let it sit in the grill for about five minutes or until it glazes over.

There are many different ways to prepare chicken so it isn’t the same at every tailgate, but this is a very basic way to can prepare it. Spenser Millsap/Star photo


TRENDS

Thursday, September 6, 2007

The University Star - Page 7

Open audition gives students chance to act By Clara Cobb Trends Editor

Hector Casanova/The Kansas City Star

Calling all actors: Alex McDonald and Claire Sappington are looking for talent. Sappington, directing senior, is producing the play “The Mercy Seat.” “It’s based after 9/11,” she said. “It’s about a girl and a guy, Abby Prescott and Ben Harcourt. They’re lovers, and Abby is also Ben’s supervisor at work.” When the tragedy happens, the pair begin to revaluate their lives. “After 9/11, they’re thinking about dropping everything in the past and starting over,” she said. The catch, she said, is that Ben already has a family. “The phone keeps ringing throughout the show,” she said. “He keeps wondering if he should answer it and go back to his old life.” The setting of the play is Abby’s one-bedroom apartment, where during the production, Ben’s cell phone keeps interrupting the characters’ conversation. The play revolves around Ben and the choices he has to make.

The play, she said, focuses more on post-9/11 humanity than history. McDonald, acting senior, is producing “Anthem: Culture Clash in the District,” which needs actors as well. He said the play, written by comedy trio Culture Clash, is half non-fiction and half fiction. “While most of (the trio’s) stories revolve around Latino culture, this one takes place in D.C. after 9/11,” he said. “These plays that Claire and I are trying to present show how people try to deal with the real world.” The play opens with Richard Montoya, a member of the trio, talking to a grief counselor. Both are on their way from the West to the East Coast in the aftermath of the tragedy. “The counselor tells him, you have to find this anthem, this message,” McDonald said. “It has to be continuous. We have enough chaos in the world already.” During the course of the play Montoya finds his peace among the chaos. “He realizes here in America, no matter what happens to us, we will always keep moving, we

will always persevere,” McDonald said. “That’s the American spirit. When he stops hearing chaos, it becomes this anthem of music.” He said the productions do not take political sides but portray American culture in the Information Age. “I know it’s a metaphor, but it’s really spiritual,” McDonald said. “The delivery is so deep it makes you think about the real world.” The At Random Theater organization at Texas State, chaired by Woody Wood, selected the two students to present their chosen plays. Being selected is one of the highest honors in the department. In order to make the production happen, McDonald needs four to six actors. He is looking for four men and one to two women. McDonald’s play requires a diverse cast of characters, and he encourages students from all walks of life to come to the audition. Sappington’s requires two actors, a man and a woman. “I am looking for very strong actors who can bring the show to life,” she said. “I want everyone

to see the hard work we put into this production and the outcome of that.” Interested participants may be chosen at the open casting call 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday in the Theater Center lobby. Sappington said she is excited to direct the play. “This is my senior year, so this is one of my last things to be doing (in college),” she said. “It was an honor to be chosen.” Sappington said she was honored to be selected to direct the full-length production. “I am a directing major, so every experience helps me grow,” she said. “It’s pretty big for us. It’s a big deal. We have a passion for the arts.”

✯FYI “Anthem: Culture Clash in the District” Oct. 12 and 13 Theater Building, Room 209 “The Mercy Seat” Nov. 2 and 3 Theater Building, Room 209

The big (dog) house: Program teaches man, his best friend life lessons By David Casstevens McClatchy Newspapers VENUS — Bradley Waltermire is serving five years for manslaughter. He has known all kinds in prison. Many convicts are quick studies, but his new cellmate — a loner type, quiet, nervous, withdrawn — was an enigma. He wasn’t sure how they would get along. As the 27-year-old offender talked about those first tentative days this summer when they began sharing Cell 12 at the Sanders Estes Unit, his roommate crossed the 8-by-10foot cubicle without speaking and, in an egregious breach of etiquette, even for state prison, began lapping thirstily — and loudly — from the toilet. “She doesn’t like her (water) bowl,” Waltermire said, in defense of his new best friend. The happy dog padded back to her favorite resting place, a bathmat outside her crate next to the inmate’s narrow metal bed. Jenny is part of a program in which neglected, abused and abandoned dogs are paired with carefully selected members of the prison population who are taught to train and care for them. Inmates feed, groom and take the animals outdoors on schedule, four times daily. Inside the concrete walls, behind high fences topped with razor wire, dogs that once appeared unsociable, some cowering, others too fearful to make eye contact, respond to the attention and love. In two months these animals become friendly, loyal, obedient companions. “Dogs forgive quickly,” said Gayle Justice, the volunteer trainer. “And love eternally.” Like their prison caretakers, each animal has a history, a hardluck story. Jenny, about 5 years old, is guilty only of trusting others to protect and provide for her. Rescued by Camp Wolfgang, a dog shelter in Ennis, the purebred German shepherd suffers from hip dysplasia, a condition that can cause pain and lameness. For two years she has been overlooked many times for adoption, rejected because her left ear droops. “I thought, ‘Eight weeks. I won’t get attached to a dog,’” Waltermire said. “I was wrong.” He gives Jenny one aspirin, twice a day. In turn, she makes her handler’s time in lockup pass more quickly. “She’s right there, at the (cell) door,” he said, smiling at the image of the prancing, tail-wagging greeting that awaits him at the end of his workday. Their time, the inmate regrets, is almost over. Jenny soon will be paroled and adopted. Dogs are called “man’s best

friend” for a reason. For the incar- being put to sleep. cerated, they help alleviate feelMidnight’s previous owners ings of loneliness, boredom and were moving. They surrendered isolation. Inmates chosen for the the black Lab mix to Camp Wolfprogram — a privilege that is lost gang. if they commit any disciplinary inAll six dogs inside the prison fraction — feel empowered as they came from the Ennis shelter, where learn a new skill. Many speak of most of the 200-plus residents are experiencing a measure of rehabili- full-blooded German shepherds. tation themselves. Some become After escaping death row, Abe more empathetic and caring as a fell ill with distemper, and an upresult of being responsible for an- per respiratory infection develother living being. oped into pneumonia. The camp’s One offender expressed how a owner, Wally Swanson, and his staff dog named Skye has changed him. lovingly nursed the 2-year-old Great “I’ve had anger problems all my Pyrenees-Australian shepherd mix life,” said Michael Hollie, 46, who back to health. is in prison five years for drug-reNow Abe lay contentedly at the lated charges. feet of Donnie “In this program, Stowe, who is in you have to have prison for violatpatience. These ing a protective dogs came here order. with issues. They “He’s a good didn’t come here dog,” the inmate to be abused fursaid. “What I call ther. So you start a hanging-out —Michael Hollie working on your dog. He likes to prison inmate be with you. He temperament. Then, it starts to learns real fast. show with other people. I’ve honed I’m the baby sitter. My cellie” — he some skills I haven’t used in a long acknowledged the inmate next to time.” him — “is the trick master. Abe’s He smiled at the husky-Austra- learned lots. He can sit, lie down, lian shepherd mix dozing at his shake hands. We’re teaching him to feet. `pray.’“ “Having a dog is about as close The men smiled at their gentle to being on the outside as you can pupil with big paws and a long, get,” Hollie said. “When I have a coarse white coat. bad day — and we all do in here — I A veteran professional dog traincan just close off in my room with er — the aptly named “Ms. Justice” her. She’s a sweetheart. She likes — meets with the handlers three country music. I’ll put it on and mornings each week. (troubles) kind of go away.” The inmates attended a twoEstes Unit is the third Texas pris- week training class before the dogs on to implement Paws in Prison. were placed in their care. The program, at no cost to taxpayJustice had never been inside a ers, is run by Machelle Gaconnet, prison and felt reservations the first K9 manager with the GEO Group, time she entered the minimuma private company that operates 20 security facility, a solemn sterile penal facilities in Texas. Gaconnet concrete structure southeast of evaluates the criminal history and Fort Worth that houses 1,000 male prison-conduct record of each ap- inmates. plicant and interviews those who “Oh, my goodness. It was qualify for consideration. All the gloomy. Intimidating,” she recalled. inmate-trained animals, more than “I thought `This is going to be very 100, have found new homes. tough on the dogs.’“ David McComis, Estes warden The dogs slowly adapted to prisand a pet lover and whose pet Kiwi on life. They grew calmer and more is a 3-pound miniature Chihuahua, responsive. Each learned to obey first observed the program’s suc- basic verbal commands. cess at a prison in Kyle. During a training session seven “Other wardens call and tease weeks into the program, the six me. `You’re runnin’ a kennel over students lined up in a row in a hallthere,’“ McComis said. “I’ve had way and lay down, a few feet apart. them mail me Kibbles `n Bits. But Each dog took turns playfully hurI’ve seen what it does for the dogs, dling over the others. It was like a and I’ve seen what it does for the circus act. The inmates, beaming offenders. with pride, rewarded the dogs with “People can say whatever they praise and affection. want. The transformation is pretty Near the end of the two-hour peamazing.” riod, Justice glanced at her watch. Abe was rescued five minutes “You guys want to go outside before he was to be euthanized at now?” she asked. “It’s past pottythe Ellis County SPCA. break time.” Judy was found running with Accompanied by a uniformed her mother as a stray and removed guard, the inmates and dogs exited from Dallas animal control before a thick door that opened onto a

“H

aving a dog is about as close to being on the outside as you can get.”

fenced rectangular yard. Moments later they returned to X-pod, a 40inmate housing unit nicknamed the “Dog House.” Since the animals moved into Xpod, there has seen a 63 percent drop in disciplinary incidents, McComis said. The graduating class of Paws in Prison didn’t wear mortarboards and gowns. Still, there was an atmosphere of formality in the prison’s visitation room. The warden, dressed in a starched white shirt and necktie, was all smiles, even though a week earlier he privately had expressed mixed emotions about the impending graduation day. “Some of these guys,” he had said, “are going to be distraught when they have to give their dogs away.” Deputy warden Michael Ringer welcomed those present — prison staff, families of the offenders, Camp Wolfgang’s director (who provided bowls, food, collars, leashes and crates for the program), and the guests of honor, the adopters. The program’s adoption fee ranges from $150-$200. All the dogs except Jinx, who suffers separation anxiety, would go to new homes. Ringer then introduced the graduates seated together, dogs at their sides. “Offender Mario Perez ...” The roll call continued. “Offender Paul Dixon ... Offender Rodney Ryker ...” As each man stood, he was greeted with applause. In the back of the room was a refreshments table, with a tray of Rodger Mallison/Fort Worth Star-Telegram cookies and a decorated sheet cake LOCKED-IN LOVE: Inmate Bradley Waltermire shows concern for that read “Bone-afide Graduate!” One by one, the inmates stepped Jenny who suffered a seizure at the Sander Estes Unit of the state forward and asked their dogs to prison system in Aug. 8 in Venus . perform, demonstrating the results of obedience training. Each man received a certificate with a photograph of himself with his dog. Dressed in institutional orange and unaccustomed to expressing themselves publicly, they overcame their self-consciousness and shared what the program meant to them. “I’ve been incarcerated three years,” Perez said. “You get into a routine. With these dogs, it’s new every day. I find myself waiting sometimes for Midnight to wake up, so I can have something to do, whether to train him or groom him — somebody to talk to. “These guys are pretty good listeners,” he said, drawing laughs. “They’ll listen all day long.” through the double doors and out of the gray prison — the three of them — into the fresh air and sunshine. They crossed the parking lot. Excited, her heart full, Sarah Farmer couldn’t contain her joy. “Mister Abe,” she said, “you’re free. You’re freeeee.”


Page 8 - The University Star

TRENDS

Thursday, September 6, 2007

THURSDAY September 6

SATURDAY September 8

MONDAY September 10

Molly Hayes Triple Crown Live, 6 p.m.

Tracie Lynn Gruene Hall, 1 p.m.

Joel Hofmann Band Triple Crown, 6 p.m.

Hill Country Mess Around Cheatham Street, 8:30 p.m.

Texas Uproar Lucy’s, 9 p.m.

Reckless Kelly Gruene Hall, 9 p.m.

Doomsday Advice Triple Crown, 10 p.m.

Harry Bodine Gruene Hall, 7:30 p.m. Wade Bowen Cheatham Street Warehouse, 8:30 p.m. Mochate Triple Crown, 9 p.m. Jared Francis Band Lucy’s San Marcos, 11 p.m. FRIDAY September 7 Los Gallos Triple Crown, 6 p.m.

Lil’ Bot & The Customatics Riley’s 9 p.m. Black Water Gospel Lucy’s, 10 p.m. Enemy of Mankind, Mr. Lewis & the Funeral Five, Shit City Dream Girls Triple Crown, 10 p.m. Mike McClure Lucy’s, 11 p.m.

Bill Bacon & The Forbidden Pigs Gruene Hall, 7:30 p.m.

SUNDAY September 9

CRI Party Lucy’s, 8 p.m.

Sunday Gospel Brunch Gruene Hall, 10:30 a.m.

See It Now Lucy’s, 8 p.m.

Bret Graham Gruene Hall, 12:30 p.m.

Grant Ewing Cheatham Street, 8:30 p.m.

Ryan Bingham Gruene Hall, 5 p.m.

Brennen Leigh Riley’s Tavern, 9 p.m.

Big John Mills Cheatham Street, 8:30 p.m.

Wasted Youth Triple Crown, 9 p.m.

Open Mic with Pat, Holly and Nate Triple Crown, 9 p.m.

This Way To Infinity Lucy’s, 9 p.m. Facing Fiasco Lucy’s, 10 p.m.

Open Mic with Glenn Allan & Kim MacKenzie Riley’s, 9 p.m. Mesamora Lucy’s, 10 p.m.

TUESDAY September 11 Nathan Daniel Band Cheatham Street, 8:30 p.m. Texas Uproar Riley’s, 9 p.m. WEDNESDAY September 12 Kent Finlay’s Songwriter’s Circle Cheatham Street, 8:30 p.m. Amanda Pearcy Riley’s, 9 p.m.

* Indicates a CD release party.

If your live music event does not appear on the calendar, please e-mail starentertainment @txstate.edu. It is the policy of The University Star to publish music events happening within a 20-mile radius of the San Marcos campus.


Page 9 - The University Star

TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Fruit of technology: Apple making big strides in electronics

By Bill Rix Trends Columnist

It’s been a good year for Apple, and it’s only looking up from here. While the iMac has been the only desktop to see any groundbreaking revisions this year, the plucky player out of Cupertino hit the ground running in the second quarter with their oft-lauded iPhone. The iPhone gave Apple some breathing room as it prepared to release some refreshed products into the market. Up first is the iPod Touch, an iPhone look-a-like sporting a widescreen display, Wi-Fi access and a version of Safari, OS X’s browser de facto. The sixth-generation iPod comes in either an 8 or 16-gig flash memory flavor and, well, just looks slick. The couture accessory for fall is expected to be available “worldwide in a few weeks,” according to Steve Jobs in his keynote address. The other iPods — sure to be laughed at once everyone has an iPod Touch — now sport widescreen displays. Even the Nano has dropped it’s tall structure for a squat, albeit still polished, form factor. The iPod shuffle is still playing the outfield, only receiving a splash of new colors on the models currently found in stores. A (PRODUCT) RED version will accompany the new hues, and portions of the profits of this model — as well as the iPod Classic,

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively.

which is getting the RED treatment — will go toward combating AIDS in Africa. Speaking of the iPod Classic — the name given to the old stand-by, mid-range iPod — Apple is giving the mp3 player its fair share of upgrades. While these models are still hard drive based, the products can now hold up to 40,000 songs thanks to the new 160-gig hard disks. Additionally, the casing is now anodized, so you won’t have to worry about scuffing your new $349 mp3 player. Battery life is on the up-and-up as well. You can bang out to Broken Social Scene for 30 hours and watch The Office for five hours on the Classic model. If Apple can continue making its line of handhelds as innovative as possible, its dominance in the field of mobile entertainment should only continue. Sales for the iPhone and iPod lines are astounding, soundly thrashing competitors such as Sansa and Sony and making it difficult for lesser-known competitors, i.e. French electronics company Archos, to even establish a foothold. The future is bright for those in the portable electronics industry as new, striking innovations are always on the horizon. Engineers and physicists alike are working constantly on new ways to deliver efficient power to our small devices. The headway being made in the field of battery technology is baffling. Novel advancements will make it possible one day, hopefully sooner rather than later, to fully charge a device in only a few seconds or minutes. Capacities are growing all the time, guaranteeing less downtime for our gadgets. While science and industry continue to push the envelope on portable devices at breakneck speed, older devices won’t be discarded or left on shelves. Now would be a good time, for instance, to snag that iPhone 4G, as it’s rumored it will to be discontinued soon, which will likely trigger a fall in price.


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All classified ads are charged 20¢ per word. Ads may be emailed to starclassifieds@txstate.edu. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. Classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. Refunds will only be given when a classified ad has been paid by credit card. The Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, and discontinue any classified ad at any time without prior notification. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. Classified ads that do not note heading, will be put under the appropriate heading. All classified ads are published free, on-line at www.universitystar.com. Since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

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WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell, (512) 353-4511. THE UNIVERSITY STAR IS NOW HIRING! Launch your career in journalism, advertising, design or get involved with campus life by building your portfolio at one of the premiere collegiate newspapers in Texas. The University Star is Texas State’s official newspaper, which is created and edited entirely by students. We are looking for individuals to fill openings in all areas. Join us for an information session 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9 in Old Main 320 to learn more about The Star and fill out an application. News reporters Must be able to report on university and local news, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Trends reporters/columnists Reporters must be able to report on university and local arts, entertainment, social and cultural events, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Columnists must write original columns on specific subjects for weekly publica-

WANTED tion and come into the newsroom for editing. Sports reporters/columnists Reporters must be able to report on university and local sports, gather information, conduct interviews and come into the newsroom to have stories edited. Columnists must write original columns on specific subjects for weekly publication and come into the newsroom for editing. Opinions columnists Must be able to write thought provoking columns on university, local and state events and come into the newsroom for editing. Copy editors Will assist in the editing of stories through fact checking, grammar, spelling and punctuation. Must have working knowledge of Associated Press style and available Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings/nights. Illustrators Must be able to work with the editorial staff to create original editorial cartoons and illustrations for stories. Comic artists Must be able to create an original and entertaining comic strip to be published three days a week. Page designers Must be experienced in Adobe Creative Suite and available Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings/nights. Photographers Must know how to use digital SLR cameras and lenses, take photos on a variety of subjects, write captions and come into have photos edited. You do not need to own a camera. Systems administrator/Web designer Understanding of hardware components, pagination and Web software programmed for Macintosh computers. Position requires working a daytime schedule, between classes. Job entails maintaining Macintosh computers at The University Star. Systems administrator will be responsible for maintaining the computer operation of the daytime operation of the newspaper including daily updating of the newspaper’s Web site. Systems administrator-evenings Understanding of hardware components, pagination and Web software programmed for Macintosh computers. Position includes an evening hour schedule maintaining the computer operation of approximately 15 computers located in the editorial area of The University Star. Applicant must be available to work Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evenings and nights. Graduate students are welcomed to apply for any position, but undergraduate students are preferred because of class schedules. For more information, please contact Maira Garcia editor-in-chief at stareditor@txstate.edu or call (512) 245-3487. Applications are available at the Trinity Building or at www.universitystar.com.


SPORTS

Thursday, September 6, 2007

The University Star - Page 11

Ultimate goal for Bobcat golf teams: Win SLC title By Javier González Sports Reporter

Monty Marion/Star photo TEE TIME: The Texas State golf teams begin their 2007 season next week as the women’s team heads to Lincoln, Neb. for the Chip-N Club Invitational and the Men’s team to the Cobb/Ferrell Mean Green Classic in Lantana.

The Texas State men and women’s golf teams start off the 2007 season with expectations and anticipation, as both squads will be displaying fresh new talent. Coach Michael Akers squad features eight new women, six of which are freshmen. Akers is confident the young members can live up to his expectations. “I don’t feel it makes a difference if someone is a freshman or senior,” Akers said. “These freshmen have played in the best junior tournaments in the U.S. and the world, so I feel they are prepared to take Texas State to the best ranking in school history. My expectations are very high for this team. We have laid out our goals for the season which include moving into the top 40 national rankings.” In addition to the freshmen, Akers has two European-born golfers. “Linn Gustafsson hails from Sweden and Trine Mortensen comes to us from Denmark,” Akers said. “They both played for their national teams, which is a huge honor as only four players from each country play in the European team championships. Both Linn and Trine will have an immediate impact on our squad as they are used to playing 36-holes in one day and also have played similar yardages that we will see in our new schedule.”

Bobcats’ prospects looking bright with win in season opener What a game last definitely going to have to weekend, huh? I know improve, which is something it’s only the first one, Coach Wright talked about but I couldn’t really have during the press conference. asked for anything more The secondary was susfrom the opener. This ceptible to some big-yard one had it all. Suspense, plays, but I don’t think excitement, long drives, there’s a whole lot they big plays, questionable could have done about that. GABE MENDOZA officiating, a decisive Jervoress Crenshaw was Star Columnist defensive stand, a coffinjust outsized by preseason nailing first down and, All-American wide receiver my personal favorite, Coach Wright Ramses Barden. If you weren’t at blowing up at a ref. It was better the game, number 11 was a nightthan what Appalachian State did up mare. His bio has him listed at 6 in Michigan. OK, maybe not, but it feet 6 inches tall and 228 lbs., but was still pretty good, nonetheless. he looked even bigger on the field. In true Bobcat fashion, it didn’t Coach Wright compared him to come easy. Luckily, this time former Bobcat wide out Markee around the good guys were able White, who now plays for the St. to pull out a win. No one really Louis Rams, but with an extra 30 knew what to expect going into pounds. There aren’t too many corthis game with several new faces, nerbacks out there that can handle a new coach and a new attitude. a guy like that one-on-one, and with But I don’t think there was anyone the secondary constantly having who believed Texas State couldn’t to watch for the option play, it was beat 15th-ranked Cal Poly. The only tough to send early help. thing that really, truly surprised But in the end, the Mustangs me was how effective the running just got too predictable. The degame was against their defense. cisive defensive hold late in the The 351 rushing yards put out by fourth quarter came down to a the backfield was more than anyone fourth and long play for the Muswould have expected. I think the tangs. Was there anyone in the contrasting styles of Stan Zwinggi stadium who didn’t know that play and Karrington Bush kept the was going to Barden? He knew it Mustangs off balance, and with the was going to him. We knew in the Bobcats running the option to near stands it was going to him. Coach perfection Saturday, there was little Wright and his staff knew it was goCal Poly could do to stop them. ing to him. I don’t care how big and How about Zwinggi after all? He talented he is, they weren’t going not only notched that school record to get that ball to him. That being 92-yard run, but ran in four touchsaid, it was still pretty close. But at downs, which is one more than he that point, the Bobcats were able had all last year. And he was our to focus on Barden. Cal Poly just leading rusher for the season. After didn’t have a second option in that this one, I’m thinking of dropping scenario. Larry Johnson to pick up Zwinggi Anyway, this one is in the books; on waivers. I would have picked up and it even boosted the ’Cats into a payload of points for my fantasy the Top 25, so hopefully the team football team with him. can build on that this weekend The only thing that really conagainst Abilene Christian. If all cerned me about this one was goes as planned, they can get an the miscommunications between easier win in this one and build Bradley George and the receivers some momentum heading toward that seemed to come up more than what should be a winnable game once. I don’t know if it was guys at Baylor in a couple weeks. Not to missing their routes or just bad overlook the mighty Wildcats, but I timing, but the passing game is can’t wait to take on Waco…

The women’s team begins play Sept. 10 and 11 at the Chip-N Club Invitational at the Woodland Golf Club in Lincoln, Neb. Following the tournament, they head Oct. 1 and 2 to Colbert Hills Golf Club in Manhattan, Kan. for the Marilyn Smith/Sunflower Invitational at Kansas State. The women’s team finishes their fall schedule on Nov. 4 and 5 in Bastrop with the Challenge at Wolfdancer. With all but one of their tournaments at away sites, Akers still welcomes the support of the student body and fans of the game for the Bobcats throughout their season. “We would greatly appreciate support at our home tournament in November,” Akers said. “We have teams coming from the Big 12, Big 10, ACC, C-USA and Sunbelt Conferences. The student body should be excited that we are stepping up to compete against schools from more prominent conferences.” Akers said he wanted a tough schedule to better prepare the team. “It was very important for us to upgrade our tournament schedule,” Akers said. “We began at (the) University of Nebraska, followed by K-State then to New Mexico State. We will face many Big 12 schools this season as well … our goal is to become nationally competitive.” With half the men’s team comprised of returning players, and the others freshmen, newly-appointed Coach Shane Howell didn’t really know what to expect from the team.

“I was really surprised and excited to see them (play),” Howell said. “We have spots one through 11 all able to play at a high level, with spots one through seven all up for grabs. We take five spots for the road (tournaments).” The players are experienced, as most have been playing either throughout the summer or various tournaments, some both. “Michael Carnes played in the Collegiate Players Tournament and other tournaments in the summer as well as Tyler Barnes-Wolf, Carson Gibson and Corey Roberson,” Howell said. “Corey (Roberson) set a school record here, so they all have that experience going into the season.” The competition looks formidable, as several of the Southland Conference teams will look to repeat last year’s performance. “Sam Houston was in the Top 50 last year while Lamar will definitely be a contender,” Howell said. “Lamar finished 3rd last year and are in the Top 25 at the start of this year. As well, Southeastern Louisiana and UT-Arlington will be tough. But each tournament is different. Some teams are harder at one and others at another.” Howell believes the incoming freshmen have adjusted well and generally get better each week. Ultimately the goal is to win the SLC title. “We’ve got to go out and beat every team,” Howell said.

Texas State Cross Country women take top honors at Islander Relays By Lisa Carter Sports Reporter The Texas State cross country teams opened the season Friday in the Islander Relays at Texas A&M-Corpus Christi. It is the same track in which the teams will compete for the Southland Conference Championships Oct. 27. The Islander Relays were different from normal cross country meets. “Last weekend was challenging because we really weren’t supposed to go all out and race,” junior Whitney Perkins said. “It was more of an opportunity to see the conference course and get in a good workout.” Texas State competed against several other schools in the state, including Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, Texas-San Antonio, Photo Courtesy of David Scheffler/The Paisano/UTSA Texas-Arlington and TexasCROSSING THE LINE: Exercise and sports science junior Samantha Evola, seen Sept. 22 during Pan American. Overall, the women’s the UTSA Invitational meet, ranked fifth alongside tandem relay partner Whitney Perkins Friday in team finished among the the Islander Relays in Corpus Christi. top competitors at the meet. Perkins and junior Samantha Evola finAccording to Viniar, this weekend’s with Viniar over the summer about their ished fifth with a time of 28 minutes, 38 meet will be important in drawing the preparation for the season. According to seconds. Sophomore Heather Bullin and baseline for the cross country program. Rosen, the team began training at the besenior Brittany Rosen finished sixth with “(This weekend) I want to see (the ginning of June, trying to improve their a time of 28:45. teams’) condition level, running style, long runs and increase their speed. “Even though we did not look for any- how they feel and how they keep the “(The women) were all able to keep in thing extraordinary, I was very satisfied pace,” Viniar said. “I don’t care about touch with each other and (discuss) how with the women’s team,” Coach Grigori how they place.” well we were all running,” Rosen said. Viniar said. “I wasn’t surprised with what The Texas State Invitational is a tra- “This really helped keep up each other’s I saw on the men’s team. We must work a ditional cross country distance meet, determination and motivated us to keep lot to have the team we used to have.” according to Viniar. Unlike the Islander training hard even though we could not Both the men and women’s team will Relays, the meet will consist of a five- all work out together.” be given the chance to show their po- mile run for the men beginning at 8 a.m., Perkins, who put in 1,300 miles of traintential at Saturday’s Texas State Invita- and a three-mile run for the women be- ing over the summer, has high hopes for tional. ginning at 8:35 a.m. the first distance cross country meet of “My goal for this weekend is to help “Both the major and backup teams will the season. out the team in any way I can,” Rosen be racing,” Viniar said. “It’s really just an “I want us all to run our best and have said. “Our team looks so strong this year introduction to see what level we’re on fun,” Perkins said. “It’s always exciting and I am really excited to be a part of now and what we need to improve.” being at home because our track team such a close group of girls.” Many of the women have kept in touch supports us.”


SPORTS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Thursday, September 6, 2007 - Page 12

scoringfrenzy The Detroit Shock defeated the Phoenix Mercury, 108-100, in the highest-scoring game in WNBA Finals history Wednesday night in Detroit. The teams entered the post-season with the two best records in the league this year, with Detroit at 24-10 and Phoenix 23-11. The Shock is in pursuit of its 3rd WNBA championship, while the Mercury are looking for their first. Game 2 will be held Saturday in Detroit, in the best-of-five series.

Sports Contact — Scott Strickman, starsports@txstate.edu

Texas State prepares for ’Catfight against Abilene Christian By Carl Harper Senior Sports Reporter The Bobcat football team is geared up for Division II Abilene Christian this weekend after coming off a 38-35 victory over No. 15 Cal Poly on Saturday. In a game that embraced a playoff atmosphere, the seesaw battle of offensive plays consisted of 510 total yards for Texas State and 378 yards for Cal Poly. Junior running back Stan Zwinggi was named the Southland Conference Offensive Player of the Week following his Saturday performance. He carried the ball 16 times for 159 yards and 4 touchdowns, including a 92-yard run that is now the longest in school history. “This is the third consecutive game that he has run for more than 100 yards,” Coach Brad Wright said. “He’s tough, is the fastest on our team and, fortunately, is only a junior; and it’s fortunate that Alvin Canady and Karrington Bush are capable backs because you don’t just rush without other backs and a great offensive line. We had great blocks from our receivers downfield and it was just a great night of rushing the football.” Zwinggi was pleased with the play of his peers as well. “We have a lot of speed on this team,” Zwinggi said at the post-game press conference. “We had Karrington come in and have a 100-yard game as a freshman. Alvin played well at fullback opening up holes. But we need to work on ball security.” The Bobcat defense gave up 28 of the 35 points scored by the Mustangs,

but will look to play with better technique on Saturday. “The defense will get better and will continue to improve, but they played hard and ran to the ball as well as they could,” Wright said. “I thought they did a great job for being under the lights for the first time this season.” The Wildcats began the season ranked No. 11 in the American Football Coaches Association Poll, following last year’s 8-3 record, but were shutdown by Central Oklahoma in the season opener 27-17. They have fallen to No. 24; while the Bobcats, who were unranked in the preseason, stand at No. 19. Quarterback Billy Malone, only a junior, is in the Top 7 on many ACU all-time lists, including passing yards, completions, touchdowns, total offense and 300-yard passing games. The last time Malone failed to throw a touchdown in a game was Oct. 22, 2005, and he has registered at least one touchdown pass in 19 of 21 career games with ACU. He was selected as Lone Star Conference South Division Preseason Offensive MVP. Senior wide receiver Jerale Badon is the school’s all-time leader in career receptions and now stands 123 yards away from eclipsing Johnny Perkins as ACU’s career receiving yards leader. Malone and Badon hooked up on a 68-yard touchdown pass in the season opener against UCO, one of seven receptions for Badon who also totaled 130 yards receiving. Running back Bernard Scott, who had 120 yard on 13 carries against UCO, and wide receiver Johnny Knox, who had 7 receptions for 93 yards and a touchdown, figure to factor into the

Wildcats’ offensive plans. It should come as no surprise that Wright believes ACU, led by 2006 AFCA Region IV Coach of the Year Chris Thomsen, has the potential to be a dangerous program.

“They are a scary football team,” Wright said. “After watching their tape this week they look like a Southland Conference team who is very athletic and well coached. They seem to have simplified some things on the defense, which allows them to run the ball better and open up the passing game. They will be all that we can handle come Saturday.” ACU struggled in all aspects against Central Oklahoma, as they were whistled for 10 penalties, lost three fumbles and had one punt blocked. The loss extends the Wildcats losing streak

to three games dating back to Nov. 11 of last season. In addition, ACU has lost four of their last five games after surging to a 7-0 start in 2006. ACU leads the overall series with the Bobcats 14-7-3. Saturday’s game will mark the reunion of a rivalry that dates back to 1928, when the teams first met and the Wildcats won 200. The last time the teams tangled was in 1986 with the Wildcats defeating the Bobcats in San Marcos, 38-24. “My theory is: you prepare for each game like it’s the last game,” Wright said. “It doesn’t matter who we are playing, the guys on our team can’t be up and down every week. They have to prepare to win each week by giving it everything they have in practice.”

SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE STANDINGS FOOTBALL CONFERENCE TEAM

W-L

PF

TEXAS STATE

0-0

0

McNeese

0-0

Nicholls

OVERALL PA

W-L

PF

PA

0

1-0

38

35

STK W1

0

0

1-0

35

12

W1

0-0

0

0

1-0

16

14

W1

Northwestern

0-0

0

0

1-0

41

6

W1

Sam Houston

0-0

0

0

1-0

17

13

W1

Central Artkansas

0-0

0

0

0-1

7

28

L1

Southeastern La.

0-0

0

0

0-1

14

35

L1

Stephen F. Austin

0-0

0

0

0-1

24

27

L1

VOLLEYBALL CONFERENCE Team

OVERALL

W-L

H

A

W-L

H

A

Central Ark.

0-0

0-0

0-0

8-0

1-0

2-0

Neu 5-0

Tx.-Arlington

0-0

0-0

0-0

4-1

1-0

1-1

2-0

Sam Houston

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-2

2-2

0-0

0-0

SFA

0-0

0-0

0-0

3-4

1-0

0-2

2-2

UTSA

0-0

0-0

0-0

3-4

1-0

1-1

1-3

TEXAS STATE

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-3

0-1

1-1

1-1

Lamar

0-0

0-0

0-0

3-5

1-1

0-2

2-2

McNeese

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-4

0-0

1-1

1-3

A&M Corpus

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-4

0-0

0-2

2-2

Southeastern

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-2

0-0

0-1

1-1

Nicholls

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-5

0-0

1-2

1-3

Northwestern

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-3

0-0

0-1

1-2

W-L

H

A

SOCCER CONFERENCE Team

OVERALL

W-L

H

A

Southeastern

0-0

0-0

0-0

2-0

2-0

0-0

STK W2

McNeese

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-0-2

1-0-1

0-0

L1

SFA

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-1

1-1

0-0

L1

Nicholls

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-1-1

1-1-1

0-0

T1

UTSA

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-1-2

0-0-1

0-1-1

T1

Northeastern

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-0

NA

Northwestern

0-0

0-0

0-0

1-1

1-0

0-1

W1

Central Ark.

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-2

0-0

0-2

L2

Lamar

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-2

0-0

0-2

L2

Sam Houston

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-2

0-0

0-2

L2

TEXAS STATE

0-0

0-0

0-0

0-3

0-2

0-1

L3

Cotton Miller/Star photo LEAP OF FAITH: Freshman running back Karrington Bush goes for the extra lunge during the Bobcats’ 38-35 Saturday night win against Cal Poly. The Bobcats are scheduled to play Abilene Christian at 6 p.m. Saturday at Bobcat Stadium.

Red Raiders gun down Bobcats, 3-0 By Carl Harper Senior Sports Reporter Not only was it Texas Tech coach Tom Stone’s first appearance at the Bobcat Soccer Complex Wednesday night, but the team’s as well, and a successful one at that. With the overall series between the two clubs tied at one, it wasn’t until the 56th minute that defender Sarabeth Clopton knocked in her first goal of the season after receiving a corner kick from teammate Shannon Sims. Midfielder Emmie Bennett tacked on her first two goals just 30 seconds apart in the 84th minute to seal the victory for Stone’s squad, 3-0. The Bobcats fought back against the Red Raiders’ aggression in the first half with shots coming from sophomore forward Lindsay Tippit and sophomore midfielder Andrea Seledee, but missed the net just wide. “I thought the first half we played very good,” Conner said. “The second half we came out and were doing well until they got that first goal, and then it questioned our character. Some of the players showed it, but some didn’t pull the socks up and get mad and get in there. I think that’s what cost us. When you don’t have all 11 players on the field getting ready to get that goal back, it costs you.” Texas Tech attacked early taking four shots in the first 11 minutes and outshooting the Bobcats 12-3 by halftime, but freshman goalkeeper Amanda Byrd stood her ground, recording five saves.

“Byrd did a great job tonight,” Conner said. “You can’t say that any of the goals were her fault. The corner kick was the defense not moving to the ball and the other goals was the offense changing their point of attack and she just

didn’t make the play; but she’s quick off the line, and I’m proud of what she is doing.” Zhaleh Rezaie led the Red Raiders in shots with seven while Maegan Wilber posted three. Rezaie has now taken 15 of the 40 total shots by

Austin Byrd/Star photo SEA OF RED: Junior defender Marty Wright attempts a header against the Texas Tech Red Raiders during the Bobcat’s 3-0 loss Wednesday at the Bobcat Soccer Complex.

the team but has yet to score a goal. Texas State was outshot for the third consecutive game 225, with two shots coming from freshman Britney Curry, and one from Tippit, Seledee and sophomore defender Christina Racanelli. “Curry and Tippit are going to start finding each other on the field,” Conner said. “They looked well playing together in the first half. Rikki Padia entered the game in the second half because Tippit strained her quad, so I wanted to give her some rest. It looked like Curry and Padia were going to break into the defense but unfortunately it didn’t happen.” The Bobcats showed signs of scoring in the second half when junior Reagan McNutt passed to Curry for a turnaround shot that barely cleared the crossbar. A nearly identical play occurred minutes later when Curry’s second shot of the game went wide right after receiving the pass from McNutt. Racanelli might have kept the score from being 4-0 when she made a clutch team save as goalkeeper Byrd was out of the box after making a diving save. “There has to be a will to win,” Conner said. “You have to slide, dive and do whatever it takes to get the ball in the net. Some of the players are doing it, but not everyone is doing it at the same time. It is a little frustrating, but I think it will come with time. Hopefully we will see fire under their tails come this weekend.” Texas State will go on the road for two games beginning 7 p.m. Friday in Shreveport, La. against Centenary College.

09 06 2007  
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