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Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Volume 99, Issue 4

www.UniversityStar.com

THE DAY HAS COME

The reigning conference champion Bobcat football team kicks off its season Saturday and unveils new stadium renovations

Texas State reaches 30K enrollment, administration says By Jamie Gonzalez Special to the Star It was never a question of if, but when Texas State would reach the 30,000-enrollment mark. That time is now. The population has increased steadily during the last 15 years and after reaching 29,105 fulltime students in fall 2008, university administration fully expected to reach its goal this year and was not disappointed. The numbers are not yet final, but according to. Michael Heintze, associate vice president for enrollment management and marketing, it “is safe to say” Texas State has reached 30,000 students. “We still have a lot of ‘cleanup’ to do with the enrollment numbers, though,” Heintze said. “So we won’t know for sure until the middle of the semester.” The goal of becoming a Hispanic-Serving Institute is close to becoming a reality with record enrollment. “As of last year, full-time Hispanic students made up 23 percent of Texas State’s population,” Heintze said. “We average an increase of about one percent each year, so we fully expect to reach our goal of 25 percent within the next two years.” Hispanic-Serving Institutes (HSIs) are defined as non-profit institutions that have at least 25 percent Hispanic full-time enrollment. “To earn HSI status would provide many opportunities for Texas State, including grants and other funding that wouldn’t be available to us otherwise,” Heintze said. These funds would cover grants to the university and scholarships for students. “The 2010 proposed legisla-

Alkek library to have extended study hours

tion allows us to tap into $1.3 billion in competitive grants,” said Evelina Gonzales, senior proposal coordinator for the Office of the Associate Vice President for Research. She said some of the money would be used to help low-income or other underprivileged students. “But definitely all Texas State students would benefit from these funds,” Gonzales said. Amparo Seija, undecided health professions sophomore, said the university needs more money for grants and scholarships. “It would be really awesome,” she said. “As a Hispanic low-income student, I especially think the school needs to be able to give out more money to deserving students.” Bobby Scheidemann/Star Photo illustration The money will be allocated to different programs in the LATE NIGHT: Students will be able to work in the library until 3 a.m starting Sept. 13. university. Program officials will then allocate it as needed, whether that is for new equipment or for department scholarships, Gonzales said. University President Denise Trauth first introduced her goal of becoming a HSI in 2004, when Hispanics constituted 18 percent of the student population. Since then, Texas State has been recruiting high school seniors from towns and cities that have a high percentage of Hispanic students, including, but not limited to, Harlingen, Houston and San Antonio. All students can benefit from Texas State being a HSI. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the university would become eligible for Humani-

See “POPULATION” page 4

Today’s Weather

99°/72° Mostly Sunny Precipitation: 10% Humidity: 46% UV: 10+ Extreme Wind: SW 8 mph

Friday Isolated Thunderstorms Temp: 94°/70° Precip: 30%

Saturday Partly Cloudy Temp: 91°/7° Precip: 20%

INSIDE THIS ISSUE News…..Pages 1-4

Students smoking marijuana on, off campus face penalties Pregnancy centers allegedly misuse government funds Opinions…..Page 7 Main Point: ACTIVELY ABSENT Two-Party system limits perspective

Marijuana use on campus

Music loses uniqueness to masses Trends….Pages 8-9 Bobby Scheidemann/Star Photo illustration

By Lori Jones News Reporter

Jake Marx/Star photo illustration HIGH RISK: Students need to be aware of the penalties they may undergo if caught on campus in possession of marijuana, such as tickets, arrest.

See page 3 for the story

Students will not be able to spend all nighters studying in the library year round, but they will be able to stay later. University officials have decided to expand library hours rather than have it remain open all day. A decision following the 24-hour library pilot held for an eight-week period that started in February. The decision was made to extend library hours until 3 a.m. Sunday through Wednesday starting Sept. 13. The li-

’60s group ‘me sbrary will begin opening at 7 pilot. The survey included m e r i z e s ’ a u d i e n c e s a.m. Monday through Friday. questions about what services a c ross ge ne r a t i ons “We gathered a lot of infor- students were using and how mation in various ways during those eight weeks,” said Joan Heath, assistant vice president of the library. “We know looking back how many people were on each floor hour-byhour during the study. That was very helpful information to have.” Heath said guards at the library did a head count every hour as well as hand out surveys once a week to acquire feed back from the students using the building during the

they felt about how the program was running. “You could see in the data that after 3 a.m. the numbers of students declined, but we also decided to open a half an hour earlier,” Heath said. “There are people who do want to come in before their first class.”

See “LIBRARY” page 4

University pipe floods river with E. Coli bacteria Chase Birthisel Assistant News Editor High counts of dangerous bacteria have been discovered in a section of the San Marcos River. A hazardous amount of E. Coli was discovered in the river at the end of a water drainage pipe. The drainage pipe is near the intersection of University Drive and C M Allen Parkway and has been leaking water into the river. Pat Fogarty, associate vice president of facilities, said there is a leak in university pipes causing stagnant water to run into the river. “We are going to plug it up

because we didn’t find out about it until today (Tuesday),” Fogarty said. “What happened is there is an old drainage pipe that connects the retention ponds by the theater to the river. It hasn’t been used in years. The plug in it is leaking, but it is only a tiny leak.” Mark Brinkley, assistant director of Community Services, said he took three samples this week from the river. “The bacteria count was 150 (200 yards above the pipe); 640 (200 yards below); and 1600 next to it,”Brinkley said. “For recreational swimming, you want your counts to be 400 or less.” He said swimmers should

avoid a 25-foot by 25-foot area around the pipe. Josh Oyer, data analyst for the Texas Stream Team, said they first discovered the high count months ago while teaching students how to collect samples. “We have identified that area as a hot spot,” Oyer said. “But that is the one time that I have seen a sample so high.” Oyer said he contacted the City of San Marcos with the results of the test months ago.

See “RIVER” page 4

Former student falls in love while studying abroad

Museum exhibit teaches history not in textbooks New band makes presence known in Houston, Austin areas Diversions…Page 11 Classifieds….Page 11 Sports….Page 12-14 Football season kicks off with renovations, fireworks Bobcats ready for Rams on Saturday’s opening game

Lindsey Goldstein/Star photo DRAINAGE: Harmful amounts of the dangerous bacteria E. Coli have been located in a portion of the San Marcos River.


sports

12 - The University Star

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Bobcats stomp Red Raiders in volleyball win A record crowd of 2,389 people roared inside Strahan Coliseum Wednesday as the Bobcat volleyball team notched its first win of the season. Texas State defeated Texas Tech 3-0. The first set consisted of 12 ties and eight lead changes. The Bobcats claimed the match on a Red Raider service error 25-23. The second set was decided by a two-point margin with 17 ties along the way to a Bobcat 26-24 set victory. The Bobcats rode the energy of the crowd in the third and final set. Texas State earned its first victory of the season with a 25-21 final match score. “We just told each other tonight was going to be everything, we were going to give it everything,” said Mo Middleton, junior outside hitter. Middleton had 13 kills on the night, including the match-clinching spike. Her performance was one example of what Coach Karen Chisum wants to see with more of her players.

“Mo surprised us all,” Chisum said. “She gave us what we were looking to see.” Middleton said her performance was good, but it had a lot to do with her teammates’ contributions. “I think I did well, but it was mostly because of how my teammates played,” Middleton said. “We really communicated. It was the best we have done since preseason.” The match was close throughout with the first two sets and was decided by two points. Chisum said her team showed good focus, a will to win and the ability to pull out victories in the tightlycontested sets. “We showed mental toughness,” Chisum said. “Our players just really wanted to beat Tech at home.” Jessica Weynand, senior outside hitter, said the Bobcats came out fired up and played strong defense to beat Texas Tech. “We were excited for our first home game,” Weynand said. “We played good defense and the energy we had kept us going.” Weynand was pleased with the victory and felt the Bobcats were focused on the task

at hand. “We are excited about our first victory,” Weynand said. “We knew what we had to do to get the victory tonight.” Middleton said the night meant more to her than simply the first win of the season. She rated last night among her most cherished moments. “Honestly, this is one of the best feelings I have ever had,” Middleton said. Before the game, Chisum and the Bobcats were honored for their achievements last season. The team received a standing ovation in honor of its Southland Conference Championship title. Chisum was also commemorated for her 675th win as a head coach, ranking her eight among active coaches. Chisum returned the favor to Bobcat fans after the game by thanking every person who was essential to the Bobcats’ victory. “It was important to get the first home win,” Chisum said. “We always say it’s our home and nobody wins here. We needed the confidence, we needed to know how to win and we need those 2,300 fans to come back out and keep supporting us.”

Sept. 4 Marquette Marquette, Wisc. 2p.m.

Sept. 5 Butler Marquette, Wisc. 5:30 p.m.

Sept. 11 Texas Southern San Marcos 12 p.m.

Sept. 5 Austin Peay Marquette, Wisc. 1 p.m.

Sept. 8 p.m.

Sept. 11 Hofstra Marcos 7 p.m.

By Eric Harper Sports Reporter

Upcoming Volleyball Schedule

Baylor

Waco

7

San

Lindsey Goldstein/Star photo RECORD SETTING WIN: AJ Watlington, junior right side hitter, spikes the ball into Texas Tech’s court. The Bobcats won 3-0 with a record turnout of 2,389 fans cheering them on.

Cross country begins season on home turf By Blake Barington Sports Reporter The gun fires for the Texas State men’s and women’s cross country teams’ 2009 season Saturday at the Texas State Invitational in San Marcos. The Bobcats had a summer training program followed by fall practices, which began one week before school started. Coach Grigori Viniar said he hopes to find out where the team stands in comparison to

other Southland Conference schools and how Texas State’s summer training program fared for the runners. “(I want) to see where our summer training program put them, and how they utilize our current training program,” Viniar said. “For the freshmen, (they need) to position themselves among other members of the Bobcat cross country team.” The men’s and women’s teams placed seventh and third, respectively, at last year’s Texas

State Invitational. The first runner on the men’s team to cross the finish line was Michael Richards, political science junior, who ran the fivemile course in 29:55.8. Matt Novak, exercise and sports science junior, and Jonathan Hernandez, education senior, are returning Bobcats who finished just seconds behind Richards last year. Texas took the men’s title in 2008 with a near-perfect score of 20 points, followed by fellow

SLC opponent Texas-San Antonio, which finished with 49 points. Viniar believes his returning runners came back this year in fair shape since he last saw them. “For returners, I find most of them come back to school at a very decent level of shape compared to the middle of May when they left for summer break,” Viniar said. The women will try finishing toward the top of the pack

as they did last year. The Bobcats fell to the Longhorns and the Roadrunners who scored 23 and 43 points, respectively. The women finished with 100 points. Steffanie Armstrong, nutrition and foods sophomore, finished the three-mile course first for the Bobcats last year with 19:34. Kelly Butler, exercise and sports science senior, was the second finisher for Texas State with 19:55.3. This year’s event begins 8

a.m. at Gary Jobs Corps with the men racing first. The women will run at the end of the men’s event. Viniar said the invitational will determine what needs improvement for the next meet, which takes place Sept. 12 in College Station. “For the first race of the season they (runners) have to try their best through the whole distance,” Viniar said. “And after that we’ll see what we need to work at more particularly.”


News

Thursday, September 3, 2009

The University Star - 3

Students smoking marijuana on, off campus face penalties By Megan Holt News Reporter The number of past-year marijuana users in 2007 was approximately 25.1 million people according to the 2007 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. “It’s not uncommon for people to know someone who smokes weed,” said Josh Kearns, undecided sophomore. “It’s stupid in general that people would bring it on campus. It’s illegal.” According to the National Health Statistics Report for May 2009, approximately 21 percent of adolescents ages 12 to 17 years old have tried marijuana. Twenty-one percent of adolescents tried smoking marijuana before the age 13, and 63 percent tried it by the age 15. “Generally, people who use marijuana probably were using it before they got to college,” said Adam Rodriguez, UPD sergeant. “Only a handful of students are experimental users.” Rodriguez said students do not realize the effect marijuana has on their academic performance and the consequences they face if caught in possession. University Policy states all forms of cannabis have negative physical and mental effects. Research also shows students do not retain knowledge when they are high. Marijuana smoke contains more cancer-causing agents than tobacco smoke. The drug can then become the center of their lives, the

document states. “Students need to be aware of the consequences of being caught with any kind of drug,” Rodriguez said. “If a student is under 21 years of age, on or off campus, the university can notify their parents.” UPD’s crime statistics for fall 2008 entails that 140 students were found in drug law violations. Rodriguez said students caught in possession of marijuana face criminal charges ranging from tickets to arrest to class A or B misdemeanors and jail, depending on the amount in possession. “A class B misdemeanor is any usable amount up to less than two ounces,” Rodriguez said. “Greater than two but less than four ounces results in a class A misdemeanor and anything four ounces to five pounds is a state jail felony. Anything greater than five pounds gets you two years in jail with a state felony.” Rodriguez said, most marijuana found on campus is for personal use only. However, the university has filed state jail felonies. “Most violations are reported through witnesses,” Rodriguez said. “Sometimes it’s a roommate because they are afraid of being in trouble if they are caught with it in dorms or apartments. A lot of the times, we find drugs during regular officer duties and routine traffic stops.” Students can still get in trouble even if they are not caught with the drug. According to UPPS No. 04.04.48, the

university can and will impose a “minimum disciplinary penalty of suspension for a period of time” if students are suspected of related use, possession or distribution of illegal drugs. Students may also face disciplinary probation, suspension of rights and privileges and expulsion. “The rules on campus are bad,” said Josh Hickman, physics freshman. “I had a friend who smoked off campus, came back, didn’t have any on him and got in trouble. It’s wrong.” Aaron Sobremonte, management freshman, said resident assistants in dorms turn their backs to students who are intoxicated but enforce strict rules on those high on marijuana. “Alcohol and marijuana basically have the same effects,” Sobremonte said. “Marijuana is a lot safer than alcohol in some ways though. Driving wasted is worse than someone driving high.” Otto Glenewinkel, UPD officer, said marijuana violations do not increase at any certain time of the year. “People find better ways of hiding it later on in the semester,” Glenewinkel said. “They will get caught though. People who are new users don’t realize it has a distinct smell.” Both Sobremonte and Kearn said there is nothing UPD can do to stop students from bringing illegal substances on campus. “Kids who can’t smoke (marijuana) on campus will do it off campus,” Sobremonte said.

The audience cheered as slam poets from across the nation came to San Marcos Wednesday night to speak their verses in front of a packed George’s Lounge.The event, sponsored by SACA, had a diverse group of poets come and express their art.

“Poetry you can get more of the emotional side... Each word has a meaning, a condition to convey a certain emotion. With poetry you can stop and capture that,” Allen Gibson, Slam poetry contestant. For an exclusive video of Slam

web extra

Poetry night at George’s check out UniversityStar.com

Bridgette Cyr/Star photo Hip Hop Promo: J.P Puente, physical therapy sophomore and Sara Moffitt, English junior, hand out promotional pamphlets by the library Monday afternoon in hopes to bring in new members for Hip Hop Congress.

Pregnancy centers allegedly misuse government funds By Dj Nutter News Reporter Accusations by the National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League charge crisis pregnancy centers receiving state funding with the misuse of taxpayer money. Texas Pregnancy Care Network has functioned since 2005 as a leading provider of federal funds, aiding crisis pregnancy centers, which offer pre-natal counseling, with an accumulated $8 million in taxpayer funds. Recent information released by National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Act alleges illegal religious or denominational agendas of crisis pregnancy centers should jeopardize their candidacy for the funding because they break the Federal Charitable Choice Act. Austin LifeCare is a crisis pregnancy center that has been scrutinized for allegedly breaking Texas Pregnancy Care Network requirements. Pam Coburn, director of the Crisis Pregnancy Center, Austin LifeCare, calls the organization multi-denominational. “Austin LifeCare tries to model Christianity, rather than push or force it on our clients,” Coburn said. Currently, there are no crisis pregnancy centers receiving funding in San Marcos. Austin LifeCare has been recently approved to reinstate its Texas Pregnancy Care Network funding, Coburn said. It will begin training certification this month. The re-allocation of funds may be a cause of concern to opponents because crisis pregnancy centers are commonly associated with manipulating government funds to promote a religious agenda. “Tax-payer money has been taken from Planned Parenthood through the initiatives of Texas Sen. Steve Ogden (RBryan) and the federal funds have been allocated to Crisis Pregnancy Centers,” said Dr. David Wiley, president of

web extra

American School Health Association and professor in the department of health, P.E. and recreation at Texas State. “Crisis pregnancy centers seem interested in luring young women with free pregnancy tests to later expose their agendas are transparently Christian based.” Coburn admits mentors at Austin LifeCare invite women to church or offer Bible studies. Marywood, a licensed adoption agency located at the University of Texas, similar to Austin LifeCare, is a non-profit, partially funded crisis pregnancy center through the Texas Pregnancy Care Network. “Marywood is a major provider of services and resources for the birth mother and her child, and case managers connect them to additional resources such as food stamps and quality prenatal care,” said Anne Kay, director of Marywood. Julia Pearlman, an intern with National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League, went undercover to local crisis pregnancy centers, including Marywood. “State funded crisis pregnancy centers do not help women in need — they use taxpayer dollars to proselytize, propagate false information and breed fear and guilt into women’s lives,” Pearlman said in a report to be published later in the fall. Pearlman claims Marywood referred her to predominantly religious organizations when discussing the option of abortion. Kay’s explanation for Marywood’s reference is because the agency was merged with Life Line, Inc. in 2005, an openly faith-based organization, dedicated to “empowering women and men to make informed choices about the sanctity of life, faith in Jesus Christ and sexual health,” according to the Life Line Web site. However, others have a different view of crisis pregnancy centers. Karen Skloss’s life

benefitted from Marywood’s services, leading her to direct a documentary entitled, Sunshine, which shows how the organization gave her the opportunity to form a relationship with her biological mother she otherwise would not have had. “I would pass by the Marywood building on my bike while I was a student at UT, and I never knew how instrumental of a role it would play in opening so many doors of my past and future,” Skloss said. Skloss said her film depicts the true story of how she was adopted through the efforts of Marywood and how it affected her choice to mother a child after an unplanned pregnancy. However, concerns have been raised regarding Texas’ prevention of unplanned pregnancies. According to the recent report from the Texas Freedom Network Education Fund entitled, “Just Say Don’t Know,” the state’s abstinence-only sexuality education has an error of 41 percent in its comprehensive program. Crisis pregnancy centers administer the program to public schools for free because they receive federal funds for abstinenceonly sexuality education. The misconceptions involve basic information regarding condoms and STDs. The report concluded that 9.5 percent of Texas secondary school districts include religious content in their sexuality and health care instruction. However, Coburn said the report is factually inaccurate, because its data was not collected through the crisis pregnancy center, which administers the program, but instead used information from representatives in the independent school districts. “Austin LifeCare has invited the Texas Pregnancy Care Network to attend our program and witness our comprehensive sexuality education,” Coburn said. “We received no response.”

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news

4 - The University Star

LIBRARY continued from page 1 Ashley Garcia, elementary education junior, said she usually does her studying and homework late at night because of her job. “I really enjoyed being able to use the library at whatever time was convenient for me,” she said. However, Garcia said closing the library for a few hours is a good idea because it will encourage students to stray away from pulling all nighters. The trial was originally set to last six weeks, but another two weeks was added to ensure students would be able to utilize the 24-hour pilot throughout mid terms Heath said. “I think the pilot was really beneficial to a lot of students because mid terms can be just as stressful as finals,” said Colton Smith, history junior. Smith said students spend all night studying typically during the midterms and finals.

A big change to the library schedule will be a week-long 24-hour study hall mid-semester, Heath said. However, there is no definitive period with which professors’ give mid terms. “One thing we learned during the pilot is the university actually has set days for finals,” Heath said. “There is a time in the semester where the university says this is the midpoint, but it is totally up to the faculty whether they’re going to give a midterm.” Heath said data gathered during the pilot helped determine which week mid semester had the most traffic. The 24-hour study hall will begin Oct. 11 and will end 10 p.m. Oct. 16. Other changes will include keeping all of the floors in the library assessable throughout the day. “During the pilot floors five, six, and seven were closed af-

ter one o’clock,” Heath Said. “There was some feedback people would have liked to get to those upper floors to use the library collection in those areas.” Heath said extended hours for the library will require hiring a part time security guard and library assistant for the circulation desk to cover the extra hours. There will be student employees on the 3rd and 4th floors. The cost of keeping the library open longer will be covered by the library fee increase, Heath said. “Having done the pilot last semester helped enormously to really get an idea of what the activity would be, what people’s needs are and how to operate the building so it works well for everyone,” she said.

Thursday, September 3, 2009

POPULATION continued from page 1 ties Initiatives, which include writing and foreign language programs. Also, funds could be available for scientific or laboratory equipment for teaching, endowment funds, academic tutoring, renovation of instruc-

tional facilities and counseling programs. Grants are awarded to HSIs to assist them in expanding their capacity to serve Hispanic and low-income students. “Now, just because we be-

come a Hispanic-Serving Institute doesn’t mean the money trucks start rolling in,” Heintze said. “But it does allow us to compete with others for the funds and opportunities.”

Dianne Wassenich, executive director of the San Marcos River Foundation, said there should not be any rain runoff coming down the pipe because of the dry season. “Because of the high count sample and the water coming out of the pipe, we asked the city Water-Wastewater Department to look at that pipe,” Wassenich said. “They found that it came from the university’s ponds around the Theatre Center.” Wassenich said she asked the health department for the city to rope off the polluted area, adding children and dogs like to play in the area. Oyer said he noticed greenish, cloudy water coming from the drain. He said testing was necessary to determine if an

actual problem exists, but claimed it is an issue the city should be handling. “This is a risk everyone voluntarily takes when you jump

into a river,” Oyer said. “It’s not a swimming pool, it’s not chlorinated and there is no one who is vouching for the cleanliness of the river.”

RIVER continued from page 1

E.Coli

Photo Courtesy of Rocky Mountain Laboratories

Roomie matches made in cyberspace By Megan Twohey Chicago Tribune For Satit Koonopakarn, the gold dagger and book of chants were the first signs of trouble. His freshman roommate at the University of Illinois at Chicago pulled out the items on move-in day, explaining that he was a Wiccan and liked to practice witchcraft. Months later, Koonopakarn said, he awoke during the night to find the roommate standing over his bed casting a spell. “I was lying there thinking, ‘Please God, don’t let anything bad happen to me,’“ Koonopakarn said with a chuckle. Like most colleges with residence halls, U of I-Chicago makes an effort to pair first-year roommates who are compatible, often taking into consideration personality assessments and lifestyle questionnaires, among other factors. But some matches still result in disaster. To minimize the horror stories, a small but growing number of schools are inserting online technology into the equation. They are setting up their own social networking sites, instructing students to create a profile and select a roommate for themselves -- like Match.com for dorms. Assigned roommates have already seized on Facebook and Myspace as a way to learn more about each other. Colleges field complaints from students, and their parents, seeking roommate changes even before the school year begins. Loyola University recently heard from the mother of a student who pulled up a photo of her roommate’s house on Google Maps and deemed it too shabby. Some schools are now trying to use the technology to their advantage, but other schools are pushing forward with traditional matchmaking, insisting students need to branch out of their comfort zones and experience diversity. For the nearly 2.8 million freshmen heading off to college -- one of the highest numbers in history -- the roommate relationship may have the single greatest impact on their college experience, studies show. Students dissatisfied with their roommates are more likely to feel negative about college and suffer lower grade-point averages and retention rates. “It can make or break a student,” said Mike Schultz, director of university housing at Southern Illinois UniversityEdwardsville, who serves as president of the Association of College and University Housing Officers International. “Some students will leave a university if they have a poor experience. I’ve also seen marginal students with great student relationships succeed with the extra support.” DePaul University had used a lifestyle questionnaire when matching freshmen roommates,

striving to pair early birds with other early birds, self-confessed slobs with equally messy classmates, and smokers with those who shared the habit. But eight years ago, the university scaled back the criteria, asking only which residence hall and type of room the student preferred, said Rick Moreci, director of housing services. “When we asked more questions, the students were even more upset when we made a bad match,” Moreci explained. “With less factors at play, students don’t have as much of a basis to complain.” Starting next year, the college will take its hands-off approach further, allowing freshmen to select their roommate through an online networking site created by a company called Lifetopia. Lifetopia-designed sites allow students to post photos and details about their background and interests, then shop around for compatible classmates. Within the past several years, the company has signed contracts with more than a dozen colleges, including San Francisco State University. The California school offers the Lifetopia network to students selecting roommates for off-campus housing and a similar in-house online networking program for those living in residence halls on campus. “We’ve found that there’s less conflict when the roommates select each other,” said Philippe Cumia, the school’s associate director for administrative services. “Giving them a choice gives them a greater stake in the relationship and making it work.” Even at schools without Lifetopia, some students are selecting their roommates through Facebook and MySpace. This summer, Danielle Sterczek, 18, of Palatine, Ill., and Krysten Karns, 18, of Aledo, Ill., received random roommate assignments from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. But once they discovered each other’s profiles days later on a group of incoming freshmen formed on Facebook, they successfully sought a swap. Based on their profiles and online chats, it appeared they had a lot in common -- including playing high school sports. As long as everyone, including the original roommates, was in agreement, the college approved. But many colleges insist that by selecting roommates online, freshmen miss out on the valuable learning experience that comes from living with people of different backgrounds. “The more diverse the mix, the more interesting the conversation, thoughts and experiences that will emerge,” said Katie Callow-Wright, director of undergraduate housing at the University of Chicago.


Opinions

Thursday, September 3, 2009

The Main Point any issues have sparked political discourse during the past year.

M

These issues include healthcare, cap and trade, the economy and foreign wars, just to name a few. You would not know it from looking at our campus, though. On-campus political groups should be putting these issues into the public forum. But they are not. College Democrats and College Republicans have a duty to the Texas State community —a duty to foster political discourse. In this regard, they have failed. Let’s get the positives out of the way first. Both organizations do good things on an individual basis. They both perform community service and promote their respective ideals. But this in and of itself is not enough. Similar actions are taken by the 300 student organizations on campus. College Democrats and College Republicans tossed around the idea of a debate on the second stimulus package for a month last semester. But it never happened. How about a debate during a historic presidential election? No, that did not happen, either. The two groups did not get together to discuss politics at all during the last academic school year — there was absolutely no form of debate or public exchange of ideas. Something a university campus should have in abundance. In fact, the only calling that could bring our campus political leaders together was a “beer Olympics” last Spring. That’s right, they can do kegstands, but not discuss the ideals their organizations were founded to promote. This is embarrassing. Well, at least they can organize something. On the bright side, this organizational skill could be used for a higher purpose in the future. That being said, the leadership of both groups is strong. And their position on campus has the potential to foster a meaningful and necessary discussion. Their actions need to reflect this. Members of the organizations themselves cannot be solely to blame. Texas State has approximately 30,000 students and yet both organizations meet in rooms where there are more empty seats than filled ones. This is also unacceptable. To rise above pre-existing stereotypes, Texas State needs better performance from its political leaders and more participation from its relatively apathetic student body. Texas State cannot be taken seriously if our student leaders, in this case the political groups, fail to inspire and mobilize the student body. Our university is the rising star of Texas, but it can only rise so far with problems like these. College Democrats and College Republicans have a chance to get it right this year. And we hope they do. The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State University-San Marcos.

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building, Room 101 San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

AC T I V E LY ABSENT

The University Star - 7

Music loses uniqueness to masses

Ammie Jimenez Opinions Columnist

Zach Ashburn/Star Illustration

By Robert Beckhusen Special to The Star The curious thing about political activism on college campuses is how it can so clearly reflect the national atmosphere, and a key characteristic — the dearth of alternatives to either major party — indeed, is reflected here. In the Back to School issue of The University Star, Travis Hord’s report “Organizations encourage students get politically involved” is an excellent example not only for what it said, but for what it didn’t. Representatives from both college Democratic and Republican parties — Vice President Ryan Payne of the Texas State College Democrats and Geoffrey Geiger, vice chair of the Texas College Republicans — “encouraged” political activism by students, but as to be expected, the means to do this involve joining either party. For some reason, I don’t suspect the emphasis is striking out on one’s own.

There are good reasons for this from the party perspective. As the student wing of a national organization, campus political organizations function as a recruiting ground for street soldiers and grunt-work activists. It’s also a critically important zone for future party loyalists and careerists. One famous example: Karl Rove, as a young man, headed the College Republican National Committee. This should serve as a warning, not because of Rove’s politics — I don’t intend to upset conservative readers — but because it is an example of how the party system serves best those who care mostly about increasing their own power. If I had not grown so accustomed to the status quo, I would be shocked at the stability of the two-party system in light of record low poll numbers of Congress’ approval rating. Gallup and other polling organizations have recorded the number hovering below 20 percent. Yet our representatives sail to re-election

while third-party choice is practically nonexistent. From the two-party perspective, it is nonexistent. Proscriptions regulating everything from formal debates to campaign funds, in addition to the welldocumented political gerrymandering of congressional districts has effectively gamed the system. It’s been monopolized, or perhaps “biopolized.” Now, on campus at the moment, besides the Democrats and Republicans, there are only three other active choices listed by the university (if I’ve left anyone out, no offense meant): the Young Americans for Liberty at Texas State (a libertarian organization), United Nations Student Alliance (students focus on world issues) and the leftist antiwar group CAMEO (Campus Anti-War Movement to End the Occupations). It’s a good start, though one could speak of a paucity of ideas among even the radical set. The leftist group is a bit, I don’t know, single-minded? The International Socialist Or-

ganization, a sort of Trotskyist sect, meets on the campuses of the University of North Texas, Texas at Austin, and the University of Houston. Ah, but not here. I must admit the absence of a hot-blooded communist organization on campus with relevance beyond a single issue to be a bit disheartening. One could also apply this to the San Marcos chapter of NORML, the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, now inactive. So perhaps it’s not entirely the fault of the two big parties. Perhaps the independentminded should step it up, but I don’t think it’s entirely wise to say the parties don’t have an interest in keeping opposition muted. So let’s see a plethora of ideas and parties: socialists, capitalist libertarians, Greens, anarcho-trekkies and the Texas State Crazy Loony Party. I think it would make campus a bit more interesting, in the best traditions of political life and activism, and make for a great deal of fun.

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The music industry is a machine that mass-produces artists so quickly it is easy to become overwhelmed by new names and new songs. Popular radio stations begin to play songs so repeatedly the chance to hear anything outside of “what’s in” becomes slim to none. In a way, the content radio stations and music channels play tends to be a reflection of what the audience demands. It becomes an ugly cycle of feeding the public the same content they are requesting because it is being put out. The problem is in this “brilliant” plan true musicians get ripped off because they do not fit the current on-demand niche. Not only that, but the art in the music begins to fade and the trend of songs becoming generic gets stronger. Songs lose their individuality as do the artists and suddenly instead of different music you have a blob of songs sounding all the same. People as a responsible audience should learn to truly listen and demand quality out of music outlets. It is sad when people receive the title of musician and it is not rightly deserved. A musician is a person who creates and feels music. Music is a part of them and an extension of themselves. True musicians do not limit their creations to what is popular or on demand. Another tragic fad continuing to increase is the electronic altering of vocals to such an extent musicians do not sound the same when performing live, sometimes it’s worse. They trade in the essence in their music for vocals that are more pleasing only to sound almost like frauds in front of live audiences. Even if audiences forgave those musicians such flaws, the truth is they merely become shadows behind their true musical talents, continuing to modify their work to fit a certain standard placed by music outlets. Corbin Govers, of the Texas State band, said he felt there are certain “musicians” who do not deserve such a title. “Yes, the people who require electronic aid to have a musically acceptable voice,” said Govers, English sophomore. Of course by no means am I condemning those who record in studios and have slight sound alterations. Only those individuals who do it so extensively it is almost shameful do I consider fake musicians. In an interview with the Austin-American Statesman, David Suisman, author of Selling Sounds: The Commercial Revolution in American Music, said “the music industry was a dirty business long ago.” The dirtiness of the business persists today in how it classifies true musicians and real music. The only way to stop this growing trend of idolizing fake talent is to be a responsible audience as a whole. To do away with labels such as genres and really listen to music for its uniqueness and what it’s truly worth. That is the only way that true musicians can have a chance at being heard and be given the appropriate praise.

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State UniversitySan Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright Wednesday, September 3. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


Trends 8 - The University Star

Supergroup Soundcheck

The Foo Fighters and Queens of the Stone Age have been two of the most successful rock bands for the last decade. The two creative forces behind the projects have teamed with a member from another little band called Led Zeppelin to form Them Crooked Vultures. The band has been at work on their debut album, which fans are expecting to be out by early 2010. Them Crooked Vultures will also be embarking on a national tour that will begin at Stubbs BBQ in Austin on Oct. 1.

Trends Contact – Ashley Dickinson, starentertainment@txstate.edu

Thursday, September 3, 2009

’60s group ‘mesmerizes’ audiences across generations

By Leslie Peters Trends Columnist

The music of Crosby, Stills and Nash reflected the social rebellion taking place in the ‘60s. How does this relate to our day and age?

About 40 years later, Crosby, Stills and Nash are still mesmerizing audiences and sending their own messages through harmonies and melodies. The folk-rock group played at the Municipal Auditorium in San Antonio Thursday. This was one of two stops they made in Texas, including Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion in Houston. The stage was lit with a cloud of blue and green lights, switching back and forth with purple and brown haze. The musicians, Bill Crosby, Steven Stills and

Graham Nash, emerged as the crowd grew louder and was brought to their feet. They began with the first song from their 1974 hit record, So Far, titled “Déjà vu.” This song is mystified by the chilling harmonies and peaceful melodies from the acoustic and electric guitars. They played other hits, including “Wooden Ships,” “Teach Your Children,” “Find the Cost of Freedom,” “Woodstock,” “Our House,” “Guinnevere,” “Suite Judy Blue Eyes” and more. They reached back to preCSN years when they were

in their former bands, including The Byrds and Buffalo Springfield, and played a couple of hit songs they wrote during that time. The artists also played a few songs from their newest album that was released this year, which is a compilation titled Demos, including demo versions of some of the band’s songs from 1968 to 1971. The band did not play songs from their days when Neil Young was a part of the band, but Young was, however, an essential part of the group. He wrote “Ohio,”

a song based on the events that occurred at the Ohio Stateshootings, in which four bystanders walking to class were shot in the midst of the National Guard opening fire on protestors, which was a common event occurring in the ’60s. The event gave enraged inspiration to the songwriter and soon it was a hit playing across the country. Crosby, Stills and Nash electrified the audience of long-time fans who have stuck with them throughout the years, as well as younger generations who have been exposed and really enjoy

this band. Not only did each song and guitar solo get a generous applause, they got a standing ovation after almost every song. The musicianship and the mesmerizing connection the listeners have to those musicians, as a collective, is amazingly free, peaceful, loving, understanding and intensely moving. For generations to fully understand this music is to actually emerge themselves in it and submit to the rhythms, harmonies and lyrics that are intense, emotional, thoughtful and relative.

Former student falls in love while studying abroad By Brittany E. Wilson Features Reporter

As Kari Brong walked past the La Chupiteria on Valentine’s Day 2009, she had no idea she would encounter the person who would change her life. Brong, Texas State 2009 graduate, was studying abroad in Valladolid, Spain for five months as she finished her international studies degree. Brong and her friend Brittany Wilson, also a Texas State 2009 graduate, arrived in Spain in January 2009. According to the Texas State Study Abroad Office, approximately 500 students study in a foreign country each semester. As one of those students, Brong was looking forward to learning Spanish and immersing in the culture during

her time in Europe. The school excursion that Valentine’s Day weekend involved a one-day trip to Salamanca, Spain, about three hours from Madrid. Brong and Wilson liked the city, so they decided to explore the nightlife and stay an extra night in a hostel. The girls had not planned on going in the shot bar, but after seeing a crowd of people exiting, plans changed. Soon after, a “handsome” man started chatting with Brong. “Francesco came up and started speaking to me in Spanish. He’s from Italy, so his Spanish is more like ItalianSpanish, and I didn’t understand him at first,” Brong said. The two hit it off and exchanged information to find each other on Facebook. “I remember walking away

“I remember walking away from the bar that night and Kari telling me she had met the cutest guy. I guess she knew from the beginning that he was something special.” Brittany Wilson Texas State 2009 Graduate from the bar that night and Kari telling me she had met the cutest guy,” Wilson said. “I guess she knew from the beginning that he was something special.” Francesco Salomone did find Kari on Facebook, and for the duration of the semester, Brong and her new

beau communicated via social networking and iChat to stay close, despite the physical distance between them. A few weeks into the relationship, Brong decided to visit Francesco at his apartment in Madrid. She brought Wilson along for moral support. “He has a great group of

friends, and it was a really good experience to actually make friends abroad rather than just hanging out with Americans,” Wilson said. “We got to meet people from all over the world.” Brong’s semester abroad ended and she headed back home, and Salomone decided to visit his girlfriend in the United States. “His first time to the U.S., Francesco spent two weeks in Texas. He came to San Marcos and he loved floating the river,” Brong said. “Francesco spoke English the whole time and loved that everyone was so friendly. People would just come up and talk to him.” Brong said the two-week visit really solidified the couple’s relationship. “That was really the point when she knew she had to go

back and give the relationship a chance to grow,” Wilson said. Brong will be moving to Madrid in September to live with Salomone while he finishes his master’s degree in aeronautical engineering and Spanish. She has applied for several internship positions and is also interested in teaching English. Looking back, Brong thinks it was fate that brought both students to Salamanca and into the same bar on Valentine’s Day. — Editor’s Note: Brittany Wilson who is interviewed in the story has no relation to the writer, Brittany E. Wilson.


Trends

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Entertainment Calendar Sept. 3 to 6 Thursday Scott Wiggins Band with Texas FX, 9:30 p.m., Cheatham Street Warehouse Thad Beckman Trio, 7 p.m., Gruene Hall Amber Lucille, 10 p.m., Gray Horse Saloon Ricky Stein, 6 p.m., Spank, 10 p.m., Triple Crown Friday

Ben Danaher, 9:30 p.m., Cheatham Street Warehouse Chris Knight, 8 p.m., Gruene Hall Opie Hendrix, 10 p.m., Gray Horse Saloon Wasted Youth, 6 p.m., Eleven Fingered Charlie, Rook, 10 p.m., Triple Crown Saturday

Curtis Grimes, 9:30 p.m., Cheatham Street Midnight River Choir 1 p.m, Charlie Robinson, 9 p.m., Gruene Hall Matt Begley & Bitter Whiskey, 10 p.m., Gray Horse Saloon Word Association, 10 p.m., Triple Crown Sunday

The Two High String Band, 4 p.m., Cheatham Street Stonehoney, 1 p.m., Charlie Robinson, 8 p.m., Gruene Hall Island Time Karaoke, 10 p.m., Gray Horse Saloon

The University Star - 9

Museum exhibit teaches history not in textbooks By Elizabeth Barbee Features Reporter Mexico’s contribution to Texas culture, though well documented on local restaurant menus, is infrequently noted in the state’s history books. The organizers of the Tejano Son of Texas exhibit, opening at the LBJ Museum of San Marcos Sept. 16, hope to correct this “injustice” by concentrating on the role one Hispanic man played in shaping the Lone Star State. Rudi Rodriguez, director of San Antonio’s Texastejano. com, said he first heard of Jose

Policarpio “Polly” Rodriguez at a family gathering, when his relatives began talking about an ancestor who served as a guide for the U.S. Military and was a Texas Ranger, gunsmith and Methodist minister, among other things, during the late 19th to early 20th centuries. “At first I thought it was some conjecture of my aunts’ and uncles’ — my tias’ and tios’,” Rodriguez said. Rodriguez, after discovering the information was factual, continued with the research on Policarpio Rodriguez, which now comprises the bulk of the Tejano Son of Texas exhibit.

“The Hispanic experience has been emitted from the history books,” Rodriguez said. “Hopefully this exhibit will help complete the picture and provide a hero for the Tejano population, just as Crockett provides a hero for the Euro-colonists.” Bobcats and community members can visit the LBJ Museum at no cost to view arti facts like official documents belonging to Polly Rodriguez, photographs and eight freestanding panels inscribed with historic information, from Sept. 16th to Oct. 15th, during National Hispanic Heritage Month. “The exhibit’s main purpose

is to reach out to the Hispanic community, both locally and abroad, and to bring diversity to San Marcos tourism,” said Scott Jordan, LBJ Museum director. “Students will learn more about Texas History and come into contact with primary sources.” Opening night will feature hors d’oeuvres and the music of Casa Maria regulars, the San Marcos Mariachi Academy, under the direction of Frank DeLeon and Armida Medrano. “One of the things we teach at the Mariachi Academy is to embrace the Hispanic culture, so we teach a lot of history,”

DeLeon said. “I thought this would be a great opportunity for the students to share with the community what they have learned.” DeLeon, in addition to the band’s performance, will give an informative presentation on the history of Mariachi and lead a “mini-workshop.” The music director said students could benefit from attending the exhibit. “The Hispanic culture here, I think in this part of Texas especially, is so vibrant and so alive,” DeLeon said. “You cannot get that anywhere else.”

New band makes presence known in Houston, Austin areas By Kassie Kitchen Special to The Star The group of 20-something, small-town, big-dreamer musicians is armed and ready with a boxy, hot rod DeVille, an array of overdrive and effects pedals and a tough-asnails will to turn heads and change lives. Heroine Stereo is Josh Homme meets a younger, more hostile version of Patti Smith by unleashing a traditionally rough sound with a new technique. Casey Horn, lead vocalist and guitarist, and Thom Truver, guitarist and additional rock provider, have been mak

ing the purest form of rock music together practically since they could walk. They went from The Gentlemen’s Club to Shake Shake to their current and most notable project, Heroine Stereo, give or take a few other bands. Now, teamed with drummer Robby Fruge and bassist Kevin Higgins Jr., the boys are back and ready to feed every mind, body and soul willing to listen with a profound, raw alternative sound that still motivates listeners to get down on the dance floor. The foursome is recording their first six-track EP and plan to have a full-length album out by December.

Horn, also the songwriter, said Queens of the Stone Age, Deftones, Spoon and The Toadies heavily influenced him in style. There are definite similarities in sound and lyric content, but Horn adds enough of his own touch to wow his devout listeners. Horn shows a softer side in comparison to the raw, edgy melodies with lyrics such as “don’t it make you sad that we’re just chemicals waiting for connection/ We’re all wandering around our lives waiting for a speck of attention,” from the song titled “This is the Night.” Guitarist Thom Truver said his favorite songs to play are

“The Bronze Age,” “Stones and Glass Houses” and “You Must Be an Alien.” “Those three are the best, mostly because we can, and have been able to, play them with our eyes closed and can spend more time entertaining the audience, such as the ladies,” Truver said. Heroine Stereo formed in June of this year is unsigned, but has played a number of shows, most of which have taken place at the newly founded Trash Bar Texas in Humble. Horn said he thinks the shows have drawn in a fairly large crowd for such a new collaboration. As far as upcoming shows,

the band is scheduled to play again at Trash Bar Texas this Friday and at Super Happy Fun Land in downtown Houston Saturday. They recently booked a show in Austin for Sept.18 at The Parlor on East North Loop Boulevard and plan to schedule more in the Austin and San Marcos areas during the next few months. Heroine Stereo may be a new band, but each member has been playing some form of music from early on. Truver said he loves to entertain and hopes the right people notice them, but for now, he’s just having fun jamming with his best friends and partaking in his passion.


10 - The University Star

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Thursday, September 3, 2009


diversions

Thursday, September 3, 2009 FOR RELEASE APRIL 30, 2009

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

4/30/09

By Dan Naddor

DOWN 1 “Batman” blow 2 Cockamamie 3 Initiates action 4 Deadpan Stein 5 Assayer’s substance 6 Union station? 7 McCain, e.g.: Abbr. 8 Pond organism 9 Snake oil salesman 10 Really dig 11 Enter again 12 Where the action is 15 1% alternative 19 Like some highlighted text: Abbr. 21 Paris possessive 25 Received 26 Wine bouquet 30 Slugger Mel 31 Song spelled with arm motions 32 Composer Khachaturian 33 USPS delivery 34 Q.E.D. part 36 Dash

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2009 Tribune Media Servies, Inc.

37 Feminine suffix 38 __-dokey 41 “Xanadu” rock gp. 43 Ancient Italian 44 Corporate VIP 45 Norway’s patron 49 Rand McNally staff 50 Co-pay, for instance 51 Tolkien henchmen

4/30/09

53 M.’s counterpart 55 1970 Poitier title role 56 Talk show giant 57 Flora’s partner 59 Hankerings 60 Red suit wearer 61 Ham it up 62 Uncertain 64 Transmitted 68 Crow family bird 69 Seoul soldier

c rossw ord

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Supplies case 4 Grille cover 7 African hot spot 13 Santa __ winds 14 Rock band with a fishy name 16 One that got away 17 LPGA star Se Ri __ 18 *“Unforgettable” singer 20 Fit for drafting 22 Pace 23 Goodyear’s home 24 *Cold War European 27 Nintendo rival 28 Any day now 29 Spoils 31 *1940s-’60s Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback 35 Den music setup 39 G.I. food in a plastic pouch 40 *Branch source 42 *Florida city near Fort Myers 46 Reno-to-Boise dir. 47 Heineken brand 48 *House speaker before Newt Gingrich 52 Wander 54 Gaseous: Pref. 55 Vegan’s purchase 58 *Covered with black dots 63 Bridge call 65 Spring 66 Formal intro? 67 *1976 Olympic decathlon champ 70 Soft shoe, briefly 71 Fruit in a split 72 Houston pro, to fans 73 Word that homophonically forms a familiar word when attached to the end of the answer to each starred clue 74 Crude cabin 75 “Shoot!” 76 “L.A. Law” actress

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The University Star - 11

sudoku

sudoku solution rates & policies Cost-25¢ per word (1-6 days); Cost-20¢ per word (7+ days); Deadline-2 business days prior by noon All classified ads must be paid in advance, unless credit is established. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. We do our best, but please check your classified ad for accuracy. Any corrections to your ad must be made by the second day of publication. As a free service to you, all classified ads will be published on-line on our web site at www.universitystar.com. However, since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance. Contact — starclassifieds@txstate.edu


sports

12 - The University Star

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Bobcats stomp Red Raiders in volleyball win A record crowd of 2,389 people roared inside Strahan Coliseum Wednesday as the Bobcat volleyball team notched its first win of the season. Texas State defeated Texas Tech 3-0. The first set consisted of 12 ties and eight lead changes. The Bobcats claimed the match on a Red Raider service error 25-23. The second set was decided by a two-point margin with 17 ties along the way to a Bobcat 26-24 set victory. The Bobcats rode the energy of the crowd in the third and final set. Texas State earned its first victory of the season with a 25-21 final match score. “We just told each other tonight was going to be everything, we were going to give it everything,” said Mo Middleton, junior outside hitter. Middleton had 13 kills on the night, including the match-clinching spike. Her performance was one example of what Coach Karen Chisum wants to see with more of her players.

“Mo surprised us all,” Chisum said. “She gave us what we were looking to see.” Middleton said her performance was good, but it had a lot to do with her teammates’ contributions. “I think I did well, but it was mostly because of how my teammates played,” Middleton said. “We really communicated. It was the best we have done since preseason.” The match was close throughout with the first two sets and was decided by two points. Chisum said her team showed good focus, a will to win and the ability to pull out victories in the tightlycontested sets. “We showed mental toughness,” Chisum said. “Our players just really wanted to beat Tech at home.” Jessica Weynand, senior outside hitter, said the Bobcats came out fired up and played strong defense to beat Texas Tech. “We were excited for our first home game,” Weynand said. “We played good defense and the energy we had kept us going.” Weynand was pleased with the victory and felt the Bobcats were focused on the task

at hand. “We are excited about our first victory,” Weynand said. “We knew what we had to do to get the victory tonight.” Middleton said the night meant more to her than simply the first win of the season. She rated last night among her most cherished moments. “Honestly, this is one of the best feelings I have ever had,” Middleton said. Before the game, Chisum and the Bobcats were honored for their achievements last season. The team received a standing ovation in honor of its Southland Conference Championship title. Chisum was also commemorated for her 675th win as a head coach, ranking her eight among active coaches. Chisum returned the favor to Bobcat fans after the game by thanking every person who was essential to the Bobcats’ victory. “It was important to get the first home win,” Chisum said. “We always say it’s our home and nobody wins here. We needed the confidence, we needed to know how to win and we need those 2,300 fans to come back out and keep supporting us.”

Sept. 4 Marquette Marquette, Wisc. 2p.m.

Sept. 5 Butler Marquette, Wisc. 5:30 p.m.

Sept. 11 Texas Southern San Marcos 12 p.m.

Sept. 5 Austin Peay Marquette, Wisc. 1 p.m.

Sept. 8 p.m.

Sept. 11 Hofstra Marcos 7 p.m.

By Eric Harper Sports Reporter

Upcoming Volleyball Schedule

Baylor

Waco

7

San

Lindsey Goldstein/Star photo RECORD SETTING WIN: AJ Watlington, junior right side hitter, spikes the ball into Texas Tech’s court. The Bobcats won 3-0 with a record turnout of 2,389 fans cheering them on.

Cross country begins season on home turf By Blake Barington Sports Reporter The gun fires for the Texas State men’s and women’s cross country teams’ 2009 season Saturday at the Texas State Invitational in San Marcos. The Bobcats had a summer training program followed by fall practices, which began one week before school started. Coach Grigori Viniar said he hopes to find out where the team stands in comparison to

other Southland Conference schools and how Texas State’s summer training program fared for the runners. “(I want) to see where our summer training program put them, and how they utilize our current training program,” Viniar said. “For the freshmen, (they need) to position themselves among other members of the Bobcat cross country team.” The men’s and women’s teams placed seventh and third, respectively, at last year’s Texas

State Invitational. The first runner on the men’s team to cross the finish line was Michael Richards, political science junior, who ran the fivemile course in 29:55.8. Matt Novak, exercise and sports science junior, and Jonathan Hernandez, education senior, are returning Bobcats who finished just seconds behind Richards last year. Texas took the men’s title in 2008 with a near-perfect score of 20 points, followed by fellow

SLC opponent Texas-San Antonio, which finished with 49 points. Viniar believes his returning runners came back this year in fair shape since he last saw them. “For returners, I find most of them come back to school at a very decent level of shape compared to the middle of May when they left for summer break,” Viniar said. The women will try finishing toward the top of the pack

as they did last year. The Bobcats fell to the Longhorns and the Roadrunners who scored 23 and 43 points, respectively. The women finished with 100 points. Steffanie Armstrong, nutrition and foods sophomore, finished the three-mile course first for the Bobcats last year with 19:34. Kelly Butler, exercise and sports science senior, was the second finisher for Texas State with 19:55.3. This year’s event begins 8

a.m. at Gary Jobs Corps with the men racing first. The women will run at the end of the men’s event. Viniar said the invitational will determine what needs improvement for the next meet, which takes place Sept. 12 in College Station. “For the first race of the season they (runners) have to try their best through the whole distance,” Viniar said. “And after that we’ll see what we need to work at more particularly.”


Thursday, September 3, 2009

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The University Star - 13


Sports 14 - The University Star

‘CAT CALENDAR’

Coach Kim Fox released the Texas State women’s basketball team’s 2009 to 2010 schedule Wednesday. The Bobcats will open the season with three games at home beginning Nov. 13 against Texas College, LouisianaMonroe and Southwest Assemblies of God. Texas State opens Southland Conference action at home against Texas-Arlington Jan. 9. Visit www.txstatebobcats.com for the complete schedule.

‘And there’s the kick’

Thursday, September 3, 2009

Football season kicks off with renovations, fireworks By Joseph O. Garcia Sports Reporter The time of year is finally here when friends and strangers alike gather in the stands with the anticipation of hearing the sound of pads crunching and whistles blowing. That’s right: it’s football season. This year is important to the Texas State football team and the athletic department’s ongoing campaign in the Drive to Football Bowl Subdivision status. The university has made changes in hopes of reaching its desired FBS status. According to Rick Poulter,

assistant athletics director, facility upgrades along with more championships, increased attendance and ticket sales, are important to the FBS move. “We are very pleased with the progress the athletic department has (had) this past year,” Poulter said. “But at the same time, we want to continue our growth and success as a department.” The university’s logo has also been changed in an effort to achieve an efficient and effective brandmark. However, the most visible and recent change is the renovations made to Bobcat Stadium. The improvements

include 15 new suites, 450 club seats, extensive stadium lighting and a Bobcat logo on the west side of the stadium. “I think it’s both impressive and necessary,” said Eric Miller, undecided junior. “A growing university and football program needs accommodating facilities.” According to the athletics department, the construction is expected to be more conducive for tailgating as well. “I plan to make it to every game that I can. Tailgating is a big part of Bobcat football,” Miller said. Game day events begin at 9 a.m. with tailgating in Bobcat Alley. The university will an-

nounce a major gift at 2 p.m. and a free concert in the East parking lot featuring singersongwriter and Texas State alumnus, Charlie Robison, will begin at 4 p.m., followed by the game kickoff at 6 p.m. A fireworks show will take place at the conclusion of the game. Fans are invited to experience the view from the new VIP suites and club seats before the game. Parking will be available at Strahan Coliseum, Mill Street commuter and Jenny Polson/Star Photo Hidden Village lots with free shuttle buses running routes. NEW BEGINNINGS: Bobcat Stadium’s new renovations include 15 Additional parking and shut- new suites, 450 club seats, new stadium lighting, and a brand new tle services will be available Bobcat logo. at the Aquarena Center.

Bobcats ready for Rams on Saturday’s opening game By Keff Ciardello Sports Reporter

The Texas State football team looks to defend its Southland Conference title against Angelo State Saturday at Bobcat Stadium. Last year, the Bobcats took home their first outright Conference Championship since 1983. Texas State made the 2008 playoffs with an 8-4 record but lost 31-13 in the first round to Montana. Texas State was picked to finish sixth in 2008’s SLC preseason poll. Now, all eyes are on the Bobcats who are predicted to finish atop the SLC standings and are ranked 21st in the nation. Texas State will begin the 2009 season against Angelo State for the second consecutive year. Coach Brad Wright said the Bobcats hope to open this season similarly to how they did last year when they defeated the Rams 2114 at home. “We expect to see the same type of football team as we did last year,” Wright said “(Angelo State) is going to run the ball, then they are going to run some play action off that. They are going to be a good football team on offense and, defensively, they are going to run that 3-4 and come get us. That’s what they do.” Despite the Bobcats’ win, Angelo State gained more

total offensive yards (306) than Texas State (288). “We’ re ready for them. We just have to treat this like we do every game, like it’s a big one,” said Marcus Clark, junior linebacker. “We’ve been watching film on them since Sunday, we know what they can do especially running the ball.” Bradley George, senior quarterback, said Texas State may have underestimated the Division II Angelo State Rams last season, but this year, the Bobcats are prepared for anything. “People don’t understand that Division II is every bit as good as we are,” George said. “There is a lot of talent in this state. They also have different rules so that older players can play longer, so they could have guys with more experience. But last year, we didn’t know what to expect from them and they ended up playing us hard. This time around, we know what we’re doing.”

fyi

Mishak Rivas, sophomore wide receiver, will not play this week because of a “non-serious” ankle injury.

Jenny Polson/Star Photo

09 03 2009  
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