Page 1

GOALKEEPING GODDESS

IMPERMANENT ART

Paige Perriraz has found her niche in the sports world and it lies between two metal posts

“Dust” artist Scott Wade creates classic works on dirty cars

SEE SPORTS PAGE 11

SEE TRENDS PAGE 5

www.UniversityStar.com

WEDNESDAY

AUGUST 30, 2006

VOLUME 96, ISSUE 3

Mihalkanin leaves City Council after 10 years of service A.N. Hernández The University Star

Mark Decker/Star Photo VETERAN: Edward Mihalkanin, associate political science professor, resigned from the city council after 10 years of service. Mihalkanin stepped down to devote more time to research as a faculty member at Texas State University.

Texas State political science Associate Professor Ed Mihalkanin’s desk is proof he is a busy man. Everyday he sits at a paper-cluttered desk in his home in a residential neighborhood on Hopkins Street, grading exams and pondering municipal issues. On Sunday, cars whizzed by and pecan trees rustled as he explained his recent decision to resign from his Place 1 position on the San Marcos City Council. Mihalkanin said the decision to resign from city council was not an easy choice, describing the process as a struggle. “I’ve had a consistent publication schedule and my teaching evaluations are good but I was just con-

cerned I wouldn’t be able to meet people’s expectations in the future,” he said. “I just didn’t want to let people down in terms of my council work and my academic work, so I just thought now was the time to pull the trigger.” Mihalkanin, 48, moved to San Marcos in 1990. He is a self-described “Type-A person” who sees his resignation as a “way to give more time to himself.” He speaks eagerly about San Marcos as a different kind of city with “a lot of heart.” “So many other places have no heart, no center. In places like those, it’s a bunch of people who happen to live near each other, like in the suburbs, where you have very nice people in very nice houses,” he said. “If they are going to do something, they go somewhere else, but here

in San Marcos, we have the river and we have the historic downtown square.” He was elected as a city council member in 1996 with a partial oneyear term. He was then re-elected for three more terms in 1997, 2001 and 2004. Meanwhile, he taught three classes in the spring and fall semesters and worked as president of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Museum of San Marcos. His current Place 1 term was scheduled to end in November 2007, but Mihalkanin submitted his resignation letter earlier this month to a “shocked” yet understanding Mayor Susan Narvaiz. “We were shocked that it happened, but I’m not shocked that Ed wants to pursue a higher level in his career because he is the kind of person who is always educating himself

Parking permit fees increase, cover future construction costs

Looking over their tuition bills this fall, students may have noticed that their parking permit fee increased considerably. Since the 2005 fiscal year, restricted permits for staff and faculty have increased almost 200 percent, rising from $50 to $144, while commuter permits more than doubled from $35 to $72 and resident permits tripled from $45 to $130. “Students are frustrated,” said Kyle Morris, Associated Student Government president. “My message to students would be context; in that if you look at other universities of our size and in similar sized cities, we have extremely low rates relative to them.” Victor Rodriguez, international studies junior, said the price of current parking permits is too steep. “It’s ridiculous, especially if you have to park at the stadium,” Rodriguez said. “I don’t think it’s worth it.” While the sharp increase in price bothered some students, others were more annoyed that they were not warned of the rise in cost. “It’s a big change … people want to know about it,” said

See MIHALKANIN, page 4

Commissioners Court considers decision to hire legal counseling for water issues

PAY TO PARK By Nick Georgiou The University Star

so he can better educate the public, especially the students,” Narvaiz said. After his resignation is effective, Mihalkanin plans to devote his time to research the effects of President Bush’s religious beliefs on foreign policy. And, although he has published chapters in edited books, he wants to write and publish articles in journals including, International Studies Quarterly and World Politics. Throughout his decade-long civil service, he mentored a few city officials, including Mayor Narvaiz, who met Mihalkanin in 1997 when she was representing the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “When I ran for mayor in 1998, which was the first time I entered into politics, I sat in on all the

Kathy Martinez The University Star

Alyssa Johnston, advertising senior. Josh Bonds, communication design sophomore and Matt Grandits, finance sophomore, both echoed Johnston’s sentiments. “It’s not fair that they don’t tell us,” Bonds said. “Just notify me and give me a reason; a plausible one” Students did not receive an e-mail warning of the price increases, however, an e-mail was sent to faculty and staff in July with the new costs. Stephen Prentice, parking services manager, said students received information on the parking fee increases in the “literature” sent out during the spring and summer for fall enrollment, including the class schedule booklet. “It did state that there would be a few increases and that (the) information would be posted on the parking services Web site as soon as it was finalized,” Prentice said. Rodriguez, along with many others, does not believe “literature” is best way to get information to students. “How many people really get the handbooks when you can go online and register?” Rodriguez said. “The best way to inform students is to send them some kind of mail.” The parking permit fee in-

Monty Marion/Star illustration

Permit Price Increases 2005 2006 2007

Restricted $50 $96 $144

Commuter $35 $40 $72

Residential $45 $70 $130

Total increase

188%

106%

189%

creases were approved by the Transportation and Parking Committee and the President’s Cabinet. Student representatives from ASG are also part of the committee. Morris said if students felt they were not effectively given notice of the permit fees he would definitely address the issue to make sure it does not happen again. Prentice said the need for increased parking fees is to help cover the construction

costs of two new garages and an addition to a third. “The university, in terms of parking, is trying to move toward this campus master plan with more (permits), which is something I support,” Morris said. “They’re building more parking garages so we’re not as sprawled out.” “If it’s going to benefit us in the long run, I’m all for it,” Rodriguez said. “At least let me know what I’m paying for.”

THE PRICE OF PARKING: Newly increased parking permit fees hit many students where it hurt most — the wallet. The increase is intended to aid in payment for new parking garages, part of the university’s Master Plan.

The new garage construction will begin January 2007, which includes a new commuter/all zone Speck Garage with 771 spaces, a 900-plus space residence hall garage and an additional three floors will be added to the Pleasant Street Garage. “These are times of growth,” Morris said. “Parking and the effects of the parking issues that we have on campus are good examples of growing pains.”

The Hays County Commissioners Court approved a proclamation to declare Sept.10-16 as ‘Disaster Preparedness Week’ at it meeting Tuesday. Although the proclamation was created to commemorate the World Trade Center in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack in the United States, it will also serve as a time to address the appropriate preparations for unexpected natural disasters. “This is a great opportunity to shed light on past events and learn from them. I appreciate the efforts of Hays County to recognize the importance of preparation for the unexpected,” said Jim Powers, Hays County court judge. Other agenda items discussed included the possible action to approve a legal services agreement with Edmond R. McCarthy Jr. of the law firm Jackson, Sjoberg, McCarthy & Wilson, L.L.P. to provide legal counsel to Hays County for water-related contracts. Charles O’Dell, president of the Hays Community Action Network, addressed his concern with the procedures taken in deciding which firm to use as legal representation for Hays County. “I would just like to have the opportunity to explore and participate in any planning that may help bring water into Hays County,” O’Dell said. Powers explained that McCarthy’s firm has represented Hays County on many occasions, including a lawsuit with the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the early 1990s. “We are in the business of water and so we need representation with expertise in that particular area. This is very integral regional planning for the See COMMISSIONERS, page 3

Learning center provides education to campus staff By Georgia Fisher The University Star Amidst the usual flurry of students and professors on campus, a large structural element usually goes unnoticed: the university employees who help maintain, clean and fix its broken parts. Custodians and groundskeepers who help keep the university running also often lack the education central to the community they serve. And while the university offers employees General Equivalency Degree preparation, computer literacy courses and English as a second language free of charge in the Facilities Learning Center, most people are unaware the program even exists. “Many who would benefit from the computer literacy

course have never touched a keyboard in their lives,” said Roberto Renaud, sole instructor of adult education courses at the Facilities Learning Center. “These days, you need a bilingual, computerliterate workforce and we teach them everything: keyboarding, storage, Windows, Word, Excel.” In operation since 1988 and housed in the Physical Plant on campus, the program offers voluntary courses in addition to the mandatory safety training it conducts monthly. Originally designed for hazard safety, the program ensures employees are able to read warning labels for toxic chemicals. The curriculum, however, has expanded considerably since its inception, said Eva Luera, Facilities Learning Center administrative assistant of 23 years.

Today’s Weather

Mostly Sunny 98˚/68˚

Precipitation: 20% Humidity: 44% UV: 10 Extreme Wind: NNE 8 mph

“When we first started the program it was just training people here for their job duties, but now it’s expanded to better educate people,” Luera said. “It’s been wonderful and it’s grown.” Though the Facilities Learning Center is housed by the university, its costs do not affect Texas State students and half the bill is paid for by nonprofit Community Action Inc. While similar institutions exist on other campuses, the learning center at Texas State is exceptional, Renaud said. Recently, he evaluated the program alongside others in the university system and the state of Texas. “I compared our program with other programs in the Texas State University system. We were the only program that offered all three classes — ESL, GED-prep

Two-day Forecast Thursday Sunny Temp: 99°/ 70° Precipitation: 20%

Friday Mostly Sunny Temp: 101°/ 72° Precipitation: 20%

and computer literacy,” he said. “And then I went down to big, bad UT and talked to the trainer in facilities. Their’s is a good program; they offer GED-prep and computer lit on demand, but compared to all others in the system, we still have a better one.” Renaud cited a former student whose study with the learning center eventually led to a postgraduate education. “She graduated, took the GED course, took advantage and earned her masters,” he said. “My job is to instill a sense of self-esteem, to prepare them for college. It’s not an impossible mission.” Monty Marion/Star photo His greatest wish, aside from the facility gaining recognition, NEW SKILLS: Roberto Renaud helps Texas State employee Zenauda Fuentes Tuesday morning in the Facilities Learning Center. Texas State offers its faculty and staff free ESL, computer training and GED classes.

See LEARNING, page 3

Inside News ..............1-4 Trends .............5-7 Crossword ......... 7 Sudoku .............. 7

Comics .............. 7 Opinions ............ 9 Classifieds ....... 10 Sports .............. 11

To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2006 The University Star


PAGE TWO The University Star

starsof texas state

Wednesday in Brief

August 30, 2006

Anna Kennedy, political science sophomore, has been named the inaugural Mitte Laureate at Texas State by the Roy F. and Joann Cole Mitte Foundation. Kennedy, a Rio Grande Valley native, graduated summa cum laude from McAllen High School in 2005. During her high school years she participated

in constitution team, key club, the United States Amateur Jump Rope Federation and other community service projects. Kennedy is currently a member of College Republicans at Texas State. — Courtesy of Texas State Department of News Services

News Contact — David Saleh Rauf, starnews@txstate.edu

On this day...

Katrina Memorial WEDNESDAY Overeaters Anonymous will meet at 12:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland St. For more information call (512) 357-2049.

SATURDAY

30 BC - Cleopatra commits suicide

Football will play Tarleton State at 1 p.m. at Bobcat Stadium.

1880 - Apache Chief Diablo is killed

SUNDAY

1945 - Hudson builds first postwar auto

There will be an Evolution, Ecology and Behavior discussion group entitled “Adult sex ratio variation in a Roosevelt elk population is influenced by habitat” at 6:30 p.m. at The Greenhouse.

A memorial tree planting for C.J. Nelson, a university student for several years who passed away July 4, will be held at noon at the Wildlife Habitat Park at the corner of Riverside Drive and Cheatham Street. Park in the city parking lot at this corner, and look for the white ribbons marking the trails and footbridge over to the tree planting site. Extra parking is along Riverside Drive across the street from Herbert’s and at the Nature Center on Interstate 35 at Riverside. The San Marcos River Foundation will plant the tree. For more information, call (512) 393-3787. All his friends are welcome to attend — casual dress is encouraged.

THURSDAY

MONDAY

The Tennis Club will meet from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the tennis courts on Sessom Drive, behind Joe’s Crab Shack. All skill levels are welcome. For more information, contact the Tennis Club president, Chris Harris, at ch1282@txstate.edu.

Labor Day, classes will not meet.

There will be an American Marketing Association informational meeting with guest speaker Denise Smart, dean of the McCoy College of Business Administration, at 5:30 p.m. in LBJ Student Center, Room 3-14.1. Students of all majors are welcome. Free food and refreshments will be provided.

Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting at 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. Enjoy contemporary worship, relevant teaching, prayer and fun. Everyone is welcome. Contact (512) 557-7988 or mail@texasstatechialpha.com.

FRIDAY Women’s Soccer will play Centenary College at 7:30 p.m. at the soccer complex.

TUESDAY There will be advocate training at the Hays-Caldwell Women’s Center. For more information contact Elizabeth Dixon at (512) 396-3404. Phi Alpha Delta pre-law fraternity will hold a bake sale fund-raiser in The Quad from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Women’s Volleyball will play Baylor at 7 p.m. in Strahan Coliseum. Go to www.UniversityStar.com and click on contact to view calendar and Stars of Texas State submission policies.

www.UniversityStar.com

1918 - Vladimir Lenin shot

1963 - The U.S.-Soviet “hot line” goes into operation 1970 - Elections held in South Vietnam 1972 - Cameron Diaz born 1974 - Train crashes into station in Yugoslavia 1980 - “On the Road Again” hits the charts 1983 - First African American in space David Purdy/Biloxi Sun Herald/MCT Gulfport Honor Guard Fireman Wade Beesley places a rose into a memorial vase in memory of those who lost their lives during Hurricane Katrina, at a sunrise one-year anniversary ceremony in Jones Park in Gulfport, Miss. Tuesday.

CRIME BL TTER University Police Department Aug. 23, 11:31 a.m. Driving while License Invalid/N. LBJ Drive An officer performed a routine traffic stop and found a student to be driving with no valid license. The student was taken into Hays County Law Enforcement Center awaiting magistration. Aug. 23, 5:22 p.m. Property Lost/Stolen/UPD A student reported to a police officer that their wallet holding check and identification cards had been lost or stolen. This case is under investigation.

Aug. 24, 5:04 a.m. Possession of Marijuana/J.C. Kellam parking lot An officer made contact with four male students. Upon further investigation, the students were found to be in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. The students were transported to HCLEC awaiting magistration. Aug. 24, 8:44 p.m. Possession of Drug Paraphernalia/Butler Hall An officer came into contact with two students driving the wrong way into a parking garage. Upon further investigation, one student was issued a citation for possession of drug paraphernalia.

Crime stoppers: UPD: 245-7867, SMPD: 353-TIPS

1984 - Beatles auction 1992 - Northern Exposure wins Emmy

Daily Beat ASG starts fall with new internships, partnerships Associated Student Government is glad to welcome all returning students back for another academic year and congratulates all new Bobcats on their decision to attend Texas State. ASG is the official voice of the Texas State student body and is here to work for you. ASG Senate meetings are held every Monday at 7 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center, Room 314.1. We will not be meeting on Labor Day. Over the course of the summer, the executive branch of ASG worked to complete several projects. ASG is proud to announce that it has engaged in a contract with Mobile Campus. Mobile Campus provides valuable coupons to students for discounts with local vendors. In the contract, Mobile Campus has agreed to share profits with ASG and in

turn, ASG will commit to utilizing those funds for new student scholarships. ASG has also launched a new freshman internship program. The Bobcat Legislative Internship program is designed to get students involved with ASG during their first year at our university. This program aims at developing the future leadership of the student body so that we can maximize our voice on this campus and beyond. Finally, ASG has implemented several new academic internships. Approved, on-campus ASG internships now exist within the department of finance and economics, the school of journalism and mass communication and the department of political science. ASG can be reached at (512) 245-1274 or by e-mail at asg@txstate.edu — Courtesy of Associated Student Government


NEWS

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

COMMISSIONERS Powers lauded for water management efforts CONTINUED from page 1

county along with roads,” Powers said. Powers said Hays County has always been progressive with water issues and will continue to be so with guidance from the court. Commissioner Will Conley, precinct 3, thanked Powers in front of the court for his dedication to bringing resolutions to the water issues. “This is a great time for the county and our goal is to provide the water resources we will need in the future and that we cherish today,” Conley said.

The University Star - Page 3

LEARNING: Three GEDs awarded last semester to Facilities Learning Center students CONTINUED from page 1

is that it help prepare students to earn a degree. “These classes do have the potential to be a feeder program into the university,” he said. “What I’m trying to do is encourage students to participate in educational programs. These courses are all college prep; people learn good study skills, are able to use a computer and Microsoft Word, BobcatMail and so on.” The majority of the program’s ESL students are Latina women. Carmelita Castillo, a custodian in the Physical Plant, is enrolled in a basic skills course. She learned about the program from other employees and said the computer training and help with spelling and writing have allowed her to become more independent. A longtime English speaker but unpracticed in reading and writing, Castillo felt uncomfortable when given notes on the job, often needing an interpreter. Now Castillo is able to communicate better and works more efficiently. “So far I have learned more spelling and reading,” Castillo said. “And I can order my own supplies. Before, it would once take much longer for me to do the supply lists — now I can do it.” A mother and grandmother, she has also learned to correspond with family members via e-mail. “I e-mailed my daughter I don’t know how many times when classes began,” she said. “I’d never done that — never

thought I’d be able to.” Grateful for Renaud’s instruction, she said he is very patient, moves slowly with the class and that many students eventually get perfect test scores. Joe Piazza, a training specialist who heads the program and teaches hazards safety, acknowledges the near-invisibility of the facilities crew. “The only time you notice our employees is when there’s a problem on campus. As long as things are going smoothly, they don’t bring attention to themselves; as long as things work properly, a lot of people don’t notice us,” he said in reference to the physical plant and its employees. “We do our job in quiet, in anonymity a lot of times.” Renaud said the students in his GED class are also responsible adults who were simply unaware they could get help or were intimidated by the educational system. “Most of them, they own their own homes, own their own cars. They have everything they need, except an education. But they come scarred, intimidated,” he said. “Some are very intelligent individuals who just didn’t get schooling.” Generally male, the GED students are also highly family-oriented, he said. “Of (last semester’s) four GED students, all have been married 20-plus years, all have families they’re raising. They’re good, strong fathers and they have stability; these guys are very settled in their lives and talk about their families constantly,” Renaud said. However, family support in

Monty Marion/Star photo NEW SKILLS: Roberto Renaud helps Texas State employee Zenauda Fuentes Tuesday morning in the Facilities Learning Center. Texas State offers its faculty and staff free ESL, computer training and GED classes.

some cases can also be limited, Piazza said. “Sometimes the encouragement is just not there,” he said. “And it’s not just on the job but at home as well. This is speaking generally of course, but a lot of Hispanic women don’t get the encouragement because men don’t want to get left behind.” Though few are aware of the Facilities Learning Center, those who take advantages of its services tend to reap many benefits. “Last semester, three of my four GED students got their GED, which is an incredible statistic for a learning center. In adult education, you may have a twenty percent retention rate

and you might have five percent attrition — which is those who actually go on to finish,” he said. “They work here and they go to school here — they’ve stuck with the program. If you offer people a chance, they’ll stay with you.” Eligible students must be university employees for six months, in good standing and have permission from their supervisors. “Due to the nature of the employees’ obligations and responsibilities to the university, supervisors may be reluctant to allow their employees to participate,” Renaud said. “Understandably, work comes first. Emotional, personal and professional advancement come sec-

ond.” The program’s directors acknowledge their limitations but are grateful for help received, especially from Texas State. “These courses validate that the university cares about the employees — it really does care,” Renaud said. “As an institution, it’s been wonderfully supportive.” For more information about the Facilities Training and Facilities Learning Center, please contact Roberto Renaud at 512-878-8966 or RR43@txstate.edu


NEWS

Page 4 - The University Star

MIHALKANIN: Professor cites teaching

as first priority, leaves city council CONTINUED from page 1

council meetings because they weren’t televised back then,” she said. During that time, she “watched and learned a lot from Ed” and was welcomed by him when she won the mayoral race. Narvaiz said even in the moments when Mihalkanin might have been on the losing side of an issue, he always stood behind the council’s consensus. “When you’re on a council, it’s seven members working together for the betterment of the community and I would say that Ed always respected that,” Narvaiz said. “He un-

derstood that it’s not just one of us; it’s all of us, even if he didn’t agree with you on something — that’s a true statesman in my opinion.” Deputy Mayor Pro Tem and Place 3 City Councilman Daniel Guerrero will miss Mihalkanin at council meetings. Guerrero, who first encountered Mihalkanin as a student at Texas State in 2000, commended him for his guidance throughout the years. “One of the first things I remember he said to me was, ‘Just call me Ed,’” Guerrero said. “He instilled in me that he is a regular person and during his ten-

ure on council he was always willing to give me advice.” The filing period for the Place 1 city council position runs through Sept. 1, until 5 p.m. Betsy Robertson and Jane Hughson filed for the position on the first day it was available, Aug. 16, but Hughson withdrew last week, leaving Robertson to run unopposed. Until Mihalkanin’s successor is elected Nov. 7 in a special election held in conjunction with the general election, he will continue to attend council meetings. “Until then,” Guerrero said, “it will be business as usual.”

Religious dorm living introduced to universities By Megan Twohey Milwaukee Journal Sentinel MILWAUKEE — Benjamin Fortin does not mince words when discussing Ogg Hall, a University of Wisconsin-Madison dormitory where he lived last year. “It was no fun,” the sophomore said with a sigh. “I was on the bad floor.” A socially conservative, practicing Presbyterian, Fortin was turned off by the drinking, smoking and general troublemaking that went on in the dorm. He craved a more serene place to lay his head. As the university’s Presbyterian ministry sees it, Fortin is not alone. The ministry, known as Pres House, is spending $17 million to build a private residence hall for the university’s students of faith. The dorm, which will offer religious programming and a possibly alcohol-free environment, is among a growing number of religiously run residence halls popping up near public universities across the country. Faced with on-campus housing crunches, universities are turning to the private sector for help. Religious organizations are among the players stepping

up. But it’s not just about housing shortages. Surveys show that a growing number of students are religious. Campus ministries view private dorms as a way to serve their expanding membership. “There’s a need for a place to grow spiritually,” Mark Elsdon, the executive director of Pres House, said last month after a ceremonial groundbreaking for the dorm, which will be built on a parking lot next to the campus ministry. “We want to provide that service.” With its 40,000 students, including nearly 6,000 freshmen, the University of WisconsinMadison is a place where it is easy to feel lost. Over the last decade, the university has created half a dozen learning communities throughout its dorms to help ease the transition to campus. The communities, which include female students of science and engineering and minority students, strive to foster camaraderie and success. With the help of a professor, members plan and participate in academic and recreational activities. They receive counseling on how to navigate the pressures of college.

The Pres House dorm will be similar to this learning community model, Elsdon said. Residents of the 280-bed complex, which will be open to students of any faith, will be offering spiritual counseling, interfaith dialogues and other religious programming. The building will be adjacent to the headquarters of Pres House and the university’s Catholic Center, placing students of those faiths a short walk from their worship services. “We’re creating a spiritual learning community where the theme is around spirituality and faith exploration,” Elsdon said. Pres House is owned and run by The Presbyterian Student Center Foundation, a non-profit organization whose board of directors include local pastors. The foundation, Elsdon said, has long wanted to build a private dorm for the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s students of faith. It has launched a capital campaign to pay for the complex, which was approved by the university and the City of Madison. Housing cost will be comparable to the $4,700-a-year charged for on-campus residence halls.

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

A year after Katrina, New Orleans still a shadow of former self By William Douglas and Chris Adams McClatchy Newspapers (MCT) NEW ORLEANS — President Bush returned Tuesday to the city hit hardest by Hurricane Katrina one year ago to the day, accepted full blame for the federal government’s failures in its early recovery efforts and implored its citizens to come home. “I know you love New Orleans and New Orleans needs you,” Bush said in a speech at a damaged high school that’s scheduled to reopen next week. “Seeing these old saints to come marching back is what you need. New Orleans is calling her children home.” The president made his impassioned plea to a New Orleans that’s still very much a work in progress a year after levees gave way and flooded 80 percent of the historic Gulf Coast city, much of which lies below sea level. Only 235,000 people — or 45 percent — of the city’s 485,000 pre-Katrina residents have returned, according to estate estimates and utilities records. The New Orleans phone book has become a symbol of the shrunken city: It went from separate Yellow Pages and white pages last year to a single, thinner business and residential listings book this year. While Bush administration officials hailed the progress New Orleans has made, public services, housing and economic conditions are rebounding slowly. Natural-gas service is operating in 41 percent of the homes and businesses that had it before Katrina, according to a review compiled by the Brookings Institution, a Washington research center. Fewer than half of the routes for New Orleans’ buses and famed streetcars are up and running and only 17 percent of the buses are in use, the study said. Huge sections of the city were under water for up to 57 days, and many of those neighbor-

David Purdy/Biloxi Sun Herald REBUILDING THE GULF: President George W. Bush answers questions while touring U.S. Marine Inc. in Gulfport, Miss., Monday. President Bush toured the Gulf Coast for two days.

hoods are still virtually vacant. In some sections, bulldozers are tearing down houses that are too far gone. In others, homeowners plan to rebuild but for now live in government relief trailers in their front yards or have set up homes elsewhere. “A lot of work has been accomplished and I congratulate the people here,” Bush said. “But there’s more work to be done.” Though Bush spent most of his two days on the Gulf Coast touting the positive aspects of the recovery effort, he took the blame for his administration’s inadequate response to the hurricane, which killed 1,695 people in the Gulf Coast, 1,464 of them in Louisiana. “I take full responsibility for the federal government’s response and a year ago I made a pledge that we will learn the lessons of Katrina and that we will come back to New Orleans to tell you the words that I spoke on Jackson Square are true today as they were then,” he said. After his speech, the president toured the Ninth Ward, which was one of the most flooded sections after the storm. He stopped in at the Musicians’ Village, now under construction. The brainchild of New Orleans jazzmen Branford Marsalis and Harry Connick Jr., it’s designed to help restore the

neighborhood’s cultural vitality by providing rebuilt homes for musicians and others. In the Lower Ninth Ward, the president and first lady Laura Bush visited legendary musician Fats Domino’s hurricanedamaged home and gave him a new National Medal of the Arts. His original medal, which President Clinton gave him, got lost in the storm. Last September, in a nationally televised speech at the square, outside one of the city’s landmarks, Bush vowed that the federal government would do whatever it took and stay for however long it took to make the region even better than it was before. In a metaphoric moment before Tuesday’s speech, the president attended a breakfast meeting with New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin at Betsy’s Pancake House, which had 61 inches of water gush in when the levees broke. Bush encountered waitress Joyce Labruzzo, who was trying to negotiate the narrow spaces between tables in a restaurant packed with customers eager to mingle with the president. “Mr. President, you’re not going to turn your back on me?” she asked. “No, ma’am,” Bush said with a laugh and a pause. “Not again.”


TRENDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

billboardchart Billboard 200 1. Christina Aguilera Back To Basics 2. Lyfe Jennings The Phoenix

Country Albums 1. Trace Adkins Dangerous Man 2. Rascal Flatts Me and My Gang

Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - Page 5

Indie albums 1. The Panic Channel (ONe) 2. Rakim and Ken-Y Masterpiece: Nuestra Obra Maestra

Hot Modern Rock Tracks 1. AFI “Miss Murder” 2. Three Days Grace “Animal I Have Become” Compiled from Billboard.com

Trends Contact — Maira Garcia, starentertainment@txstate.edu

Dirty car artist Scott Wade brushes shading into dust on the back of his wife’s Mazda 3. Wade, who lives eight miles outside of San Marcos, creates art on the back of his family’s cars after their covered in caliche dirt from the road near their house.

Andrew Nenque/ Special to the Star

artist gets

DOWN DIRTY

&

in his line of work

By Emily Messer The University Star Scott Wade creates dirty images on the back of vehicles, but it’s not what you think. He allows his family’s cars to get sullied with the dust from the curvy caliche dirt road near their house eight miles outside of San Marcos. After the rear windows are covered in dust, Wade’s paintbrushes turn the cars into mobile art. “To me, the beauty of it is that it’s impermanent,” Wade, 47, said. “Dust is the greatest symbol of impermanence.” He first started scratching in lines with a chewed-up Popsicle stick. Since then, Wade, who works at Pixel Magic Imaging Inc. as a graphical user interface designer, has advanced to recreating the “Mona Lisa” over a Van Gogh landscape, “Dogs Playing Poker” and a portrait of Kinky Friedman with the Texas capitol in the background — all on the back of his 2003 Mini Cooper and his wife’s 2004 Mazda 3. One of his most recent pieces is Michelangelo’s fresco in the Sistine Chapel, “The Creation of Adam,” but he has squeezed his own touch between the biblical characters — the Pillsbury Doughboy. “I just thought would be hilarious to put the Doughboy up there being tickled — being touched by the almighty. If I get a lot of hate mail from the religious right, oh well,” Wade said. Because he lives above the Edwards Aquifer, which is under Stage 1 drought restrictions, Wade said he’s concerned about wasting water. “We don’t really believe in washing cars very often because it’s a waste of water,” Wade said. “So I’ve always done cartoon faces and things like that. One day I just decided that if I could get some shading into it, it’d be a really good way to draw.” Since then, a clip recorded of Wade

from Austin’s K-EYE has been shown on Good Morning America, and he’s been contacted by producers of The Tonight Show and The Megan Mullally Show. He’s recorded an interview with BBC Scotland Radio. The National Enquirer dubbed him “The Da Vinci of Dust.” Numerous Web loggers have touted his work. He’s also been contacted by several international publications, such as the German version of Maxim magazine. His Web site receives an average 150,000 to 500,000 hits per day, Scott said. “It really surprised me that people would want to look at dirty pictures on the Internet,” Wade said with a grin. His friends also love it. “I just laugh my butt off. It’s hilarious; it’s real good-feeling stuff,” said Jules Alexander, Wade’s friend and unofficial photographer. “I like the whole concept of temporary, guerilla art.” For the Michelangelo piece, Wade’s wife Robin prepped the canvas for about two weeks with daily driving. The caliche dirt, a pale hardened deposit of calcium carbonate, builds up on the cars. After that, he uses an old music stand to hold reference sheets and a set of paintbrushes to create his image. The weather can also control the car art. “It has to be prepared like a canvas,” Wade said. “And in this case, you have to drive up and down the road a bunch. It’s funny because it’s not just the dust … Humidity plays a part and a really good canvas will build up over days.” Until Wade creates his work, Robin, 46, has to make good use of the side mirrors, but it’s worth the wait, she said. When she climbs inside her car, she sees a negative of “The Creation of Adam” through her rearview mirror. “It’s a lot of fun to drive around town and have people point and laugh at me,” said Robin, a community services librarian for the San Marcos Public Library. “I

do get a lot of rubbernecking. And a lot of times, if I’m at a stop sign or a stoplight, people behind me will jump out of their car and all of the sudden, I see in my side mirrors somebody’s holding up a cell phone taking a picture of the back of my car.” Robin’s coworkers say they also look forward to seeing what new piece of art will be on the back of her blue Mazda. “I like Scott’s philosophy too, that it doesn’t have to be permanent,” said Jacqui Mohr, coordinator of the learning center at the library. “In fact, I put his Web site on the back of my car … I put Happy Halloween on the back of my car, but Scott would’ve had the witches of Macbeth.” For Wade, the biggest draw to the dust is that it only lasts until the next rain, like sculpting images in the sand, drawing pictures on the sidewalk or sand painting. It’s only dust, he says. The sun behind the mesquite trees and shrubs of the Wade’s two-acre property and the neon hues of the sky create reflections and color shifts on Wade’s dirty car art. “The whole nature of this is that it’s in flux, it’s constantly in flux,” Wade said during the sunset. Throughout the evening, Wade touches up his semi-replica of Michelangelo’s painting. With the quick swoops of his paintbrush, he talks about “dust to dust” and the tiny grain’s symbol of life, letting it trickle to the ground and revealing more of God’s hand. He emphasizes the importance of impermanence and having a fresh perspective. “I hope to start a new school of art,” Wade said. For a link to a multimedia slideshow and more photos of Wade’s work, log onto www.UniversityStar.com.

Photo courtesy of www.dirtycarart.com Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Mona Lisa” sits on top of Vincent Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” in an undated photo of Wade’s Mini Cooper.

Photo courtesy of www.dirtycarart.com C.M. Coolidge’s “Dogs Playing Poker” is one of the masterstudies that Wade has painted on the back of his car.

Andrew Nenque/Special to the Star Wade poses beside his wife’s Mazda 3 with one of his latest pieces of dust art, which depicts Michelangelo’s fresco, “The Creation of Adam,” with the Pillsbury Doughboy.

Andrew Nenque/Special to the Star Wade uses his set of paintbrushes to create the details of God’s hand in his depiction of Michelangelo’s fresco in the Sistine Chapel on the back of his wife’s Mazda 3.


TRENDS

Page 6 - The University Star

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Tomás Rivera Book Award to be presented to passionate author By Jessica Sinn The University Star Dancers are the winners of this year’s Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award. A recent newcomer to book writing, Susanna Reich brought dance and choreography icon, José Limon, back to center stage with her latest book, José! Born to Dance: The Story of José Limon. This children’s book, targeted at children ages 5 to 8, chronicles the life of a young boy who dreamed big and stopped at nothing to make his mark as a world-class dancer and choreographer. “I put a lot of love into this book and it’s really wonderful to see that other people are responding to it,” Reich said. “I’m especially touched that it’s getting a Mexican-American children’s book award.” Reich is a former professional dancer, holding a B.F.A. in dance from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, studied at the Royal Academy of Dancing in London and the American Ballet Theatre School in New York. Her passion for dance inspired her to write about Li-

Colón

Reich

don’t have to be interested in dance to “Children get something out of this story.”

— Susanna Reich 2006 Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award winner

mon’s story of becoming a world-class dancer. “Children don’t have to be interested in dance to get something out of this story,” Reich said. “Being that he used his cultural background to share his art, he choreographed his dances to reflect his culture.” Reich has kicked off her relatively new writing career to a great start. With only a few books under her belt, she has already won multiple awards. Her first book, Clara Schumann: Piano Virtuoso, received the Orbis Pictus Honor, was chosen as American Library Association Notable and Best Book for Young Adults and won the School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. José: Born to Dance was also awarded the International Latino Book Award for The Best Educational Children’s Book In English by the Latino Literacy Now organization. Award winning illustrator, Raul Colón, brought the book to life with his vibrant watercolor artwork. Colón captured the grace, strength and beauty of Limon’s dancer’s physique with rich hues and detailed colored-pencil work. Jennifer Battle, associate professor of curriculum and instruction, serves on the Regional Committee for the Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Book Award. Battle recalled some of Colón’s artwork. “Colón thinks of art as being conceptual — you have to know and read a lot in order to

How your word usage can get you in trouble with the law

FRESH SOUND: The Greencards, playing in the 2006 Austin City Limits Festival, give an updated take to a classic acoustic sound. Although its members were born and raised outside the United States, they have found a comfortable home in the American music scene.

By Sean Gaffney Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

Photo courtesy of www.thegreencards.com

The Greencards to try its hand at ACL By Leah Kirkwood The University Star Austin-based folk and bluegrass trio The Greencards will play at the 2006 Austin City Limits Festival. The Greencards are Kym Warner, mandolin; Carol Young, bass and Eamon McLoughlin, fiddle. Although the band’s first album, Movin’ On, made it to the No. 5 spot on Americana music charts, none of The Greencards members were raised in America. Warner and Young were friends when they both lived in Australia. They came to Austin to find an audience in the traditional acoustic music they both liked to play. “We were very aware of Austin’s music scene, even back in Australia,” Warner said. “We wanted to come over and put a band together and we had to be somewhere we could perform for local audiences.” McLoughlin met the Aussies at a recording studio while he was working on his own project. “We knew a lot of the same music,” Warner said. “We’d all grown up with traditional American music, bluegrass and old country.” McLoughlin grew up in England listening to Irish folk music. “When I was a kid I listened to Ricky Skaggs almost exclusively,” said McLoughlin in a press release. “I really shunned pop music. As I grew up, I realized how much of an influence Irish music was. My parents are Irish and I spend a lot of time there; I try to add some of that into what we do.” The Greencards honor the music of their childhood by modernizing the acoustic sound for a new generation. They credit Bob Dylan, Ricky Skaggs and The Beatles as just a few of their musical influences. Warner said The Greencards’ music is hard to define. It is not a country band, but it’s not quite

create a great piece of art the way that he does,” Battle said. “It’s so inspirational; he surprises you in the way that he shapes the room and captures the grace of the dancer’s body.” The award ceremony will take place on Sept. 7 during a celebratory luncheon at Sylvan Rodriguez, Jr. Elementary School in Houston. This will be the first award presentation outside of the San Marcos area. The Tomás Rivera Children’s Book Award committee will continue aiming at larger cities. “By going to Houston, we want to build awareness among librarians, teachers and parents about this wonderful literature because, amazingly enough, we don’t know how many libraries carry this type of literature and how many teachers know about these books and keep them in their classrooms,” Battle said. It’s extremely tough getting published, particularly for Mexican-American writers, she said. “Editors like manuscripts that they can relate to and we don’t necessarily have Mexican-

American editors that are reading manuscripts. I’m seeing a lot of authors publishing with small presses. Once their books start to sell, they’ll pick up the interest of larger publishers,” Battle said. In 1995, The SWWC established the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award. This highly sought-after award honors Rivera for his inspirational writings about the MexicanAmerican culture and his efforts to influence education among Chicano communities. Rivera was a Texas native, a prestigious writer and distinguished Texas State alumnus. Rivera later became Chancellor of the University of California at Riverside. The Mexican-American Children’s Book Award will honor Rivera’s legacy by encouraging writers and artists to create stories and images that preserve Mexican-Amer ican culture and to promote hope and inspiration to young readers. “Tomás Rivera stands as a prime example of someone who valorized the lives of migrant workers and migrant worker children. His literature is well-loved, and I think he inspires others to write their own stories and to show honor to their ways of life,” Battle said.

a bluegrass band either. “I never feel comfortable being described as a country band, but we don’t have a five-string banjo,” Warner said. “So we’re not a bluegrass band, but we play bluegrass songs. We just play acoustic music, folk and Americana music.” The Greencards won the Best New Band award at the 2004 Austin Music Awards and ranked in the Houston Chronicle’s Top 5 Houston concerts of 2004. The Greencards’ awards and Movin’ On’s success led to shows with country music greats. “We were able to get some shows with Robert Earl Keen and Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis,” Young said in a press release. “We started getting on some festivals like MerleFest. It all started happening pretty quickly.” The Greencards played at ACL in 2004, but the festival has grown significantly in size and notoriety over the past two years. Warner said the big crowd and outdoor atmosphere don’t faze him. “It’s always a rush to play for a lot of people and this is a big festival,” Warner said. “It’s exciting; (ACL) is not an easy festival to be invited to play at and we’re very honored.” Warner said the band played many festivals this summer while touring the United States, but he is excited to return to Austin for ACL. “Austin really feels like home for us,” Warner said. “The Austin crowd is so fun; they really get music and have a good time with music and are open to anything, as long as it’s good.” The Greencards just finished recording their currently untitled third album set to be released early next year. Like the second album, Weather and Water, the new album will demonstrate the band’s growth. “I think every artist is always trying to evolve,” Warner said. “I like to hear bands record albums different from each other. It’s more exciting for the band and the listeners.” The Greencards take the Austin Ventures stage at ACL Fest at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 17.

Occasionally a product becomes so popular that its very name transcends its origin and describes an entire market. Aspirin, moxie, cola – the English language is rife with formerly trademarked words that have fallen into common usage. Google, the Internet search engine giant, is worried its trademark could suffer the same fate. “You don’t want to prevent people from spreading the word about the mark, but there is a point that, once you become big enough, you’ve got to put the brakes on,” said Eric Priest, a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Law School. Through vernacular and wide use of a term, a trademark will lose its definition as an identifier of a specific product. It becomes a general term, Priest said. But the irony is that, though such usage suggests enormous popularity, the practice is troubling to most companies because it could spell the end of their monopoly on a name: the demise of the trademark as it joins the public domain. And this is precisely what Google fears. In letters sent to media outlets, including the Washington Post, Google describes correct and incorrect use of the trademark. As quoted in the Washington Post: “Appropriate: I ran a Google search to check out that guy from the party. Inappropriate: I googled that hottie.” The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary took a different perspective when it added “google” to the dictionary last month as a verb that describes using Google to search the World Wide Web.

“Y

ou don’t want to prevent people from spreading the word about the mark, but there is a point that, once you become big enough, you’ve got to put the brakes on.”

— Eric Priest Berkman Center for Internet and Society research fellow

Also, if you Google “googled,” the first entry returned is the Wikipedia definition of the word. Though Google’s letters were met with the usual ridicule in the blogosphere, the practice is not unusual. Companies, including Kimberly Clarke Corp., owner of the Kleenex brand tissue, regularly send letters reminding the media of the trademark’s proper use. “If we see an author in a newspaper article use the brand incorrectly, we will send a polite letter to them,” said Gregg Marazzo, chief trademark counsel. Kimberly Clarke also teaches employees to use the trademark properly, he added. If a company sues over improper use of a mark, courts decide if a trademark has become common usage and should no longer be protected. Companies need to be able to demonstrate they’ve consistently enforced their trademark, Priest said. But the most important factor is public perception, which companies find harder to change, Priest said. In fact, companies try to influence public perception through advertisements that reinforce their product as a brand. But all these efforts simply might not be enough, because in the end the court is the final arbiter. The courts, however, might be on Google’s side. With most

cases that involved infringement of a strong trademark, courts have ruled in favor of the trademark holder in recent years, Priest said. That has not always been the case. The history of trademark laws has been pockmarked by strange events, such as in the early 1980s when George Lucas sued those who called President Reagan’s strategic defense initiative “Star Wars.” Lucas sued the Committee for a Strong, Peaceful America and High Frontier for using the term “Star Wars” in their commercials. Lucas lost and U.S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell wrote in his opinion that Lucas “has no property right in the use of words commonly found in the English language.” But that case differs from Google’s situation because they involved usage that was not related to the trademark’s market, Priest said. “I think it’s going to be a pretty easy call for a judge to make” if Google ever sues for trademark infringement, he added. Judges rule in trademark infringement cases based on public perception, because trademark laws are supposed to protect the producer and prevent consumer confusion. “At the end of the day, we know when someone says to you, ‘Hey, can you look this up on Google?’ you know they mean go to google.com … and not yahoo.com,” Priest said.


TRENDS

Page 6 - The University Star

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Tomás Rivera Book Award to be presented to passionate author By Jessica Sinn The University Star Dancers are the winners of this year’s Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award. A recent newcomer to book writing, Susanna Reich brought dance and choreography icon, José Limon, back to center stage with her latest book, José! Born to Dance: The Story of José Limon. This children’s book, targeted at children ages 5 to 8, chronicles the life of a young boy who dreamed big and stopped at nothing to make his mark as a world-class dancer and choreographer. “I put a lot of love into this book and it’s really wonderful to see that other people are responding to it,” Reich said. “I’m especially touched that it’s getting a Mexican-American children’s book award.” Reich is a former professional dancer, holding a B.F.A. in dance from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, studied at the Royal Academy of Dancing in London and the American Ballet Theatre School in New York. Her passion for dance inspired her to write about Li-

Colón

Reich

don’t have to be interested in dance to “Children get something out of this story.”

— Susanna Reich 2006 Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Children’s Book Award winner

mon’s story of becoming a world-class dancer. “Children don’t have to be interested in dance to get something out of this story,” Reich said. “Being that he used his cultural background to share his art, he choreographed his dances to reflect his culture.” Reich has kicked off her relatively new writing career to a great start. With only a few books under her belt, she has already won multiple awards. Her first book, Clara Schumann: Piano Virtuoso, received the Orbis Pictus Honor, was chosen as American Library Association Notable and Best Book for Young Adults and won the School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. José: Born to Dance was also awarded the International Latino Book Award for The Best Educational Children’s Book In English by the Latino Literacy Now organization. Award winning illustrator, Raul Colón, brought the book to life with his vibrant watercolor artwork. Colón captured the grace, strength and beauty of Limon’s dancer’s physique with rich hues and detailed colored-pencil work. Jennifer Battle, associate professor of curriculum and instruction, serves on the Regional Committee for the Tomás Rivera Mexican-American Book Award. Battle recalled some of Colón’s artwork. “Colón thinks of art as being conceptual — you have to know and read a lot in order to

How your word usage can get you in trouble with the law

FRESH SOUND: The Greencards, playing in the 2006 Austin City Limits Festival, give an updated take to a classic acoustic sound. Although its members were born and raised outside the United States, they have found a comfortable home in the American music scene.

By Sean Gaffney Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

Photo courtesy of www.thegreencards.com

The Greencards to try its hand at ACL By Leah Kirkwood The University Star Austin-based folk and bluegrass trio The Greencards will play at the 2006 Austin City Limits Festival. The Greencards are Kym Warner, mandolin; Carol Young, bass and Eamon McLoughlin, fiddle. Although the band’s first album, Movin’ On, made it to the No. 5 spot on Americana music charts, none of The Greencards members were raised in America. Warner and Young were friends when they both lived in Australia. They came to Austin to find an audience in the traditional acoustic music they both liked to play. “We were very aware of Austin’s music scene, even back in Australia,” Warner said. “We wanted to come over and put a band together and we had to be somewhere we could perform for local audiences.” McLoughlin met the Aussies at a recording studio while he was working on his own project. “We knew a lot of the same music,” Warner said. “We’d all grown up with traditional American music, bluegrass and old country.” McLoughlin grew up in England listening to Irish folk music. “When I was a kid I listened to Ricky Skaggs almost exclusively,” said McLoughlin in a press release. “I really shunned pop music. As I grew up, I realized how much of an influence Irish music was. My parents are Irish and I spend a lot of time there; I try to add some of that into what we do.” The Greencards honor the music of their childhood by modernizing the acoustic sound for a new generation. They credit Bob Dylan, Ricky Skaggs and The Beatles as just a few of their musical influences. Warner said The Greencards’ music is hard to define. It is not a country band, but it’s not quite

create a great piece of art the way that he does,” Battle said. “It’s so inspirational; he surprises you in the way that he shapes the room and captures the grace of the dancer’s body.” The award ceremony will take place on Sept. 7 during a celebratory luncheon at Sylvan Rodriguez, Jr. Elementary School in Houston. This will be the first award presentation outside of the San Marcos area. The Tomás Rivera Children’s Book Award committee will continue aiming at larger cities. “By going to Houston, we want to build awareness among librarians, teachers and parents about this wonderful literature because, amazingly enough, we don’t know how many libraries carry this type of literature and how many teachers know about these books and keep them in their classrooms,” Battle said. It’s extremely tough getting published, particularly for Mexican-American writers, she said. “Editors like manuscripts that they can relate to and we don’t necessarily have Mexican-

American editors that are reading manuscripts. I’m seeing a lot of authors publishing with small presses. Once their books start to sell, they’ll pick up the interest of larger publishers,” Battle said. In 1995, The SWWC established the Tomás Rivera Mexican American Children’s Book Award. This highly sought-after award honors Rivera for his inspirational writings about the MexicanAmerican culture and his efforts to influence education among Chicano communities. Rivera was a Texas native, a prestigious writer and distinguished Texas State alumnus. Rivera later became Chancellor of the University of California at Riverside. The Mexican-American Children’s Book Award will honor Rivera’s legacy by encouraging writers and artists to create stories and images that preserve Mexican-Amer ican culture and to promote hope and inspiration to young readers. “Tomás Rivera stands as a prime example of someone who valorized the lives of migrant workers and migrant worker children. His literature is well-loved, and I think he inspires others to write their own stories and to show honor to their ways of life,” Battle said.

a bluegrass band either. “I never feel comfortable being described as a country band, but we don’t have a five-string banjo,” Warner said. “So we’re not a bluegrass band, but we play bluegrass songs. We just play acoustic music, folk and Americana music.” The Greencards won the Best New Band award at the 2004 Austin Music Awards and ranked in the Houston Chronicle’s Top 5 Houston concerts of 2004. The Greencards’ awards and Movin’ On’s success led to shows with country music greats. “We were able to get some shows with Robert Earl Keen and Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis,” Young said in a press release. “We started getting on some festivals like MerleFest. It all started happening pretty quickly.” The Greencards played at ACL in 2004, but the festival has grown significantly in size and notoriety over the past two years. Warner said the big crowd and outdoor atmosphere don’t faze him. “It’s always a rush to play for a lot of people and this is a big festival,” Warner said. “It’s exciting; (ACL) is not an easy festival to be invited to play at and we’re very honored.” Warner said the band played many festivals this summer while touring the United States, but he is excited to return to Austin for ACL. “Austin really feels like home for us,” Warner said. “The Austin crowd is so fun; they really get music and have a good time with music and are open to anything, as long as it’s good.” The Greencards just finished recording their currently untitled third album set to be released early next year. Like the second album, Weather and Water, the new album will demonstrate the band’s growth. “I think every artist is always trying to evolve,” Warner said. “I like to hear bands record albums different from each other. It’s more exciting for the band and the listeners.” The Greencards take the Austin Ventures stage at ACL Fest at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 17.

Occasionally a product becomes so popular that its very name transcends its origin and describes an entire market. Aspirin, moxie, cola – the English language is rife with formerly trademarked words that have fallen into common usage. Google, the Internet search engine giant, is worried its trademark could suffer the same fate. “You don’t want to prevent people from spreading the word about the mark, but there is a point that, once you become big enough, you’ve got to put the brakes on,” said Eric Priest, a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University Law School. Through vernacular and wide use of a term, a trademark will lose its definition as an identifier of a specific product. It becomes a general term, Priest said. But the irony is that, though such usage suggests enormous popularity, the practice is troubling to most companies because it could spell the end of their monopoly on a name: the demise of the trademark as it joins the public domain. And this is precisely what Google fears. In letters sent to media outlets, including the Washington Post, Google describes correct and incorrect use of the trademark. As quoted in the Washington Post: “Appropriate: I ran a Google search to check out that guy from the party. Inappropriate: I googled that hottie.” The Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary took a different perspective when it added “google” to the dictionary last month as a verb that describes using Google to search the World Wide Web.

“Y

ou don’t want to prevent people from spreading the word about the mark, but there is a point that, once you become big enough, you’ve got to put the brakes on.”

— Eric Priest Berkman Center for Internet and Society research fellow

Also, if you Google “googled,” the first entry returned is the Wikipedia definition of the word. Though Google’s letters were met with the usual ridicule in the blogosphere, the practice is not unusual. Companies, including Kimberly Clarke Corp., owner of the Kleenex brand tissue, regularly send letters reminding the media of the trademark’s proper use. “If we see an author in a newspaper article use the brand incorrectly, we will send a polite letter to them,” said Gregg Marazzo, chief trademark counsel. Kimberly Clarke also teaches employees to use the trademark properly, he added. If a company sues over improper use of a mark, courts decide if a trademark has become common usage and should no longer be protected. Companies need to be able to demonstrate they’ve consistently enforced their trademark, Priest said. But the most important factor is public perception, which companies find harder to change, Priest said. In fact, companies try to influence public perception through advertisements that reinforce their product as a brand. But all these efforts simply might not be enough, because in the end the court is the final arbiter. The courts, however, might be on Google’s side. With most

cases that involved infringement of a strong trademark, courts have ruled in favor of the trademark holder in recent years, Priest said. That has not always been the case. The history of trademark laws has been pockmarked by strange events, such as in the early 1980s when George Lucas sued those who called President Reagan’s strategic defense initiative “Star Wars.” Lucas sued the Committee for a Strong, Peaceful America and High Frontier for using the term “Star Wars” in their commercials. Lucas lost and U.S. District Judge Gerhard Gesell wrote in his opinion that Lucas “has no property right in the use of words commonly found in the English language.” But that case differs from Google’s situation because they involved usage that was not related to the trademark’s market, Priest said. “I think it’s going to be a pretty easy call for a judge to make” if Google ever sues for trademark infringement, he added. Judges rule in trademark infringement cases based on public perception, because trademark laws are supposed to protect the producer and prevent consumer confusion. “At the end of the day, we know when someone says to you, ‘Hey, can you look this up on Google?’ you know they mean go to google.com … and not yahoo.com,” Priest said.


TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

The University Star - Page 7

Riffs, Roots, Rhythms part of jazz legend’s centennial celebration Maira Garcia The University Star

REMEMBERING DURHAM: Illustrations of San Marcos jazz legend Eddie Durham hang in the Walker’s Gallery of the San Marcos Activity Center in celebration of the artist’s 100th birthday.

The quiet halls of the San Marcos Activity Center are lined with loud, jazz inspired art. The Walkers’ Gallery, which consists of the two hallways to the left and right of the entrance of the Activity Center, is currently exhibiting Riffs, Roots and Rhythms – Jazz, Jazz, Jazz. The exhibit has been up since July 14 and will come down Saturday, Sept. 1. The exhibit is part of the Eddie Durham Centennial Celebration, which celebrated the 100th birthday of the jazz legend on Aug. 18 and 19. The gallery’s curator, Linda Kelsey-Jones, who is also a professor in the department of art and design, helps organize works for the bi-monthly exhibits. “I created a jazz theme to support the Eddie Durham festival … I try to keep in touch with different things,” Kelsey-Jones said. Riffs features more than 30 dif-

Monty Marion/ Star photo

✯Star Comics

ferent artists and photographers from around the San Marcos area and had two featured artists. “(Riffs) was an open show and I invited two artists to be featured. Chuck Smart, (who) lives in Seattle, Wash., had a number of pieces,” Kelsey-Jones said. The second featured artist was Robert Hurst of Austin, known as the official artist for the Texas Sports Hall of Fame, who submitted some of his works depicting jazz and blues legends such as Ornette Coleman, Billie Holiday, Miles Davis and Charlie Parker. San Marcos artist and muralist Christopher Barnett submitted works just for the exhibition. “My wife and I are big fans of jazz and blues,” Barnett said. A black and white photograph from the photo archives at the Calaboose African American History Museum inspired Barnett’s oil on canvas portrait of Durham. “I didn’t know who Eddie Durham was,” Barnett said. “I’m a fan of people he worked with

and I wasn’t aware of that he did stuff for Count Basie. I can’t help but be a fan now.” Kelsey-Jones said it was a little more difficult to get pieces submitted, but in the end the gallery got a good show. She said that the exhibit gets a lot of high quality art. “There are a lot of professors who don’t want students to go to the exhibits … maybe they think it is not a quality show,” said Kelsey-Jones. The San Marcos Area Arts Council and the San Marcos Arts Commission sponsor the gallery. The gallery’s next exhibit, the second annual San Marcos Naturescapes Photography Contest and Exhibition, will begin Sept. 8 and will feature photographs from the Hill Country Photography Club. The exhibit is sponsored by the San Marcos Greenbelt Alliance. Contest entry forms can be found at http:// www.smgreenbelt.org/PhotoContest.htm.

SU DO KU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively.

Yesterday’s solutions:

© Pappocom

Yesterday’s solutions:


Wednesday, August 30, 2006

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The University Star - Page 8


OPINIONS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

onlineconnection What do you think about employers checking potential eployees’ MySpace, Facebook or Friendster accounts when they apply for a job? Go to www.UniversityStar.com and vote in our online poll. Results will be published in the Thursday issue of The University Star.

Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - Page 9

*This is not a scientific poll

Opinions Contact — Emily Messer, staropinion@txstate.edu

While the intention of Parking Services is to create more spaces for the growing population of faculty, staff and students, better planning and scheduling could have been the key to lessening tensions.

Anger fueled by lack of information regarding parking permit fees

DRIVEN MAD

THE MAIN POINT

P

arking Services implemented yet another rise in rates for the 2006-07 school year. It appears that these rate increases have done nothing more than add to the frustration of finding parking spaces on campus, which have been decreasing in number every semester.

Lack of parking spaces means more fines and parking violations, which increased from $25 to $35, for anyone attempting to park on Texas State property. Adding to the frustration will be the loss of two parking lots to construction and rezoning. Earlier this summer, the first floor of the Woods Street Parking Lot was changed to red permits only in a zone previously for students living in resident halls only. In addition to violation fees, the largest rate increase was in parking permits for staff, faculty and students. While faculty and staff were sent an e-mail concerning the rise in parking permits, students were left in the dark in regard to how much the rate increase would be. The students who took the biggest hit are those who live on campus. It is likely the university is trying to clear out all those dorm parking spots to make room for faculty and staff who will be pushed out of the parking lots that will shut down this winter. Parking Services said that students were informed about the increase in rates in “literature” sent by the university, particularly the class schedule booklet. However, this was probably was not the best place to alert students of the rate changes since typically students refer to the booklet just for class registration. More information could have been sent in a mass e-mail or a mailing, such as faculty and staff received during the summer, rather than in just one place. These changes were drastic and warranted more attention. According to the Transportation and Parking Philosophy and Guiding Principles section in the appendix of the 20062015 Campus Master Plan, the parking system is entirely self-supporting. This means that Parking Services is funded entirely by permits and parking violation fees. Therefore, Parking Services bears any construction costs as outlined in the Master Plan.

Outlined in the philosophy is the idea that parking on the campus is “a privilege granted by the university and is not an inherent right of any faculty/ staff member or student.” The major fault of this socalled parking “philosophy” is that it considers parking to be privilege rather than a necessity for the large number of faculty, staff and students who commute to campus. That is an incredibly expensive privilege. And while the university has been able to provide transportation from student-populated apartment complexes to the campus, it fails to realize that everyone cannot ride the bus everyday. Students can ease the burden on themselves and others by avoiding parking on campus. We do pay for a bus system and there is ample student housing near campus. The university would still need to be more accommodating to those who drive to school. It would be ideal if everyone could make it to the bus on time for class or work, but there are days when students who wouldn’t normally drive their vehicles to school must do so. A better solution to the issues concerning parking costs could be to begin construction on parking garages at times when fewer students are on campus, such as at the end of spring semester. Starting construction in January will only bring more confusion, frustration and parking violations. While the intention of Parking Services is to create more spaces for the growing population of faculty, staff and students, better planning and scheduling could have been the key to lessening tensions. The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State UniversitySan Marcos.

Mike Wood/Star illustration

Attacked by taxes: Who really benefits from citizenry burdens? Right now you’re more money toward it. If probably being taxed it were their money, that and you don’t even would be fine. But most know it. That’s OK, of the time, they want to though, because in be clever with our money. some cases, taxes are Take for example the good. Our taxes keep actions of the Hays Trinthe roads running, ity Groundwater ConSEAN WARDWELL our state functionservation District. They Star Columnist ing and our nation are a body established safe. We don’t have by the legislature to, in to like being taxed but we can their own words, “…promote agree that most of the services conservation, preservation, our tax dollars fund are well recharge, and prevention of worth it. groundwater waste within However, there are more western Hays County.” That’s than a few taxes that exist only a laudable goal, considering because someone got a bad the drought we are currently case of what I call “the clevers.” facing. Usually these are the kind of Why do they need a new tax people who think any problem to do it though? can be solved by shoveling According to the Hays Coun-

ty Commissioners Court, the HTGCD is seeking an ad valorem tax of up to 50 cents per every $100 that are evaluated through a property appraisal. This tax would then be applied to all property owners. The HTGCD has been at the throat of the Commissioners Court for more authority in dealing with property owners as well. I think I smell an agenda working here and it has something to do with a favorite of the Central Texas left — namely, hating on developers. I don’t know why developers are suddenly the bad guys. True, some will engage in underhanded tactics to get what they want. However, they do provide a needed service.

We all need someplace to live, work and shop. I know many in the environmental movement think we can return to some agrarian paradise if we just stop building things, but that’s never going to happen. That paradise never existed in the first place anyway. Why is it that with these people, humans are always last on their list? They’ll break spines to save a blind salamander but could care less about people getting good-paying jobs. Look at the recent controversy regarding development in Austin for confirmation of that. If they can’t get power over your property, they’ll take it however they can and this proposed tax is just that: taking

power. When the legislature authorized the HTGCD they did not grant it taxing authority. Why do they want it now? Why the power grab? They already get a flat $300 fee for establishing wells in this area so they are funded through a reasonable levy. Will new taxes make the rain come any faster? Will new taxes to the HTGCD make anyone’s life better? What will this new tax do? The answer is simple: It’s more money for the sake of more money. Taxes won’t make the rain come. Taxes won’t break the drought. Taxes won’t do anything to lessen the animosity between the environmental community and

developers. If anything, I worry that this tax will keep the HTGCD coming back for more. A good rule with any public entity is that there is no such thing as enough funding or authority. This proposed tax is not a public service. It’s just another group of people that want to tell you what you can or can’t do with your own property and they’ll try to get there piece by piece. Our tax dollars should not be used for developer bashing though and that is a very real possibility. Let’s stick to what we really need instead. Wardwell is a communication studies junior.

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every other Wednesday of Summer I and II with a distribution of 6,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright August 30, 2006. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


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All classified ads are charged 20¢ per word. Ads may be emailed to starclassifieds@txstate.edu. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. Classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. Refunds will only be given when a classified ad has been paid by credit card. The Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, and discontinue any classified ad at any time without prior notification. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. Classified ads that do not note heading, will be put under the appropriate heading. All classified ads are published free, on-line at www.universitystar.com. Since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

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ANNOUNCEMENTS GUITAR WORKSHOP/RETREAT FOR WOMEN - October 6-8, Hill Country. http://www.guitar-instruction-video. com/workshops_retreats.htm (512) 842-1435. SIGMA ALPHA LAMBDA, A NAT’L HONORS & LEADERSHIP ORG.WITH OVER 60 CHAPTERS IS SEEKING MOTIVATED STUDENTS TO SERVE AS FOUNDING OFFICERS/MEMBERS TO BEGIN A CAMPUS CHAPTER at TEXAS STATE. CONTACT: RMINER@SALHONORS.ORG

FOR RENT LANGTRY APARTMENT SUB-LEASE, 2BD/2BA. Move in ASAP, no deposit, flexible rent $640. Call Mason at (979) 245-9593 or email masonfields@hotmail.com MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED, 3BD/2BA MH, outside SM toward Martindale, $275/mo.+1/3 utilities. Contact Ryan (361) 293-1869. 239 CRADDOCK. 2BD/1BA with W/D included. $565 per month. On shuttle route. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 665-0350. 811 BRACEWOOD. 2BD/1BA with w/d included for $525 per month. Great deck with a view. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 665-0350. 1/1.5 LOFT. 700 sq. ft. 2BD/1.5BA, has backyards, includes W/D. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. $0 DEP., $345, MOST BILLS PAID. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. BIG 2 BEDROOM 900 SQ. FT. $585! Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. BIG DOGS OK! 1/1 - $450 & 2/2 $450, pay partial water, free cable. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. PRIVATE BEDROOM AND BATH AVAILABLE, W/D & computer accessible, 2 meals furnished, $450/mo. Call (512) 396-0748. FIRST MONTH FREE! 3/3 1/2/2 Sagewood duplex. $795/mo. Pets OK. (512) 587-2660 or (210) 324-0285. LOOKING FOR FEMALE ROOMMATE ASAP, for a 2BD/1BA, new apartment, walking distance to campus, $375 all bills paid but electricity, needs to be pet friendly. Call (832) 878-3104. 611 BRACEWOOD. Just reduced to $595 per month. 2BD/2BA. New carpet, vinyl and paint with water and waste water paid. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 665-0350.

FOR RENT $199 TOTAL MOVE-IN! 1 bedroom, $460. 2 bedroom, $525. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. CALL THE ROOMMATES! 3 master suites, plus 1/2 bath. All appliances, including microwave and W/D. Rent $1,025. 916 or 918 Sagewood Trail. (512) 342-9567 or (512) 826-6208 (Austin). Prime Properties. APTS. OR HOUSE next to campus, roommate matching, wooden floors, good condition, free internet and cable, $250-$350 per person. Call (512) 757-1943. 707 BRACEWOOD has 2/1’s beginning at $475 per month. W/D connections. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 665-0350. 1108 A COLUMBIA AVE. 2/1 with large backyard. Newly remodeled. $775 + $500 deposit. Pets OK. (512) 799-4738. APARTMENT IN WIMBERLEY-Light and spacious 2/1, 1,000 sq. ft., built in 2002, with fireplace, large kitchen, balcony, sunset hill country views, free health club membership, available asap. Ideally suited for professor, married couple or grad student who appreciate beautiful quiet serene surroundings. Quick easy access to Austin and San Marcos, near RR12 on RR3237. $850/mo. Call (512) 560-6761, e-mail ironsarah@aol.com TOWNHOME 4-2.5, All bills paid, W/D included. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 0 DEPOSIT, 0 APP. FEE. 1 month FREE! Cable, internet, water, trash paid. W/D included. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. DUPLEXES FOR RENT. First month free with this ad. (512) 422-0903. SINGLE ROOM LEASES IN 3/3 1/2/2 DUPLEX. $300/mo. First month rent free. Pets OK. (512) 587-2660 or (210) 324-0285. $1-1 $375. 500 sq. ft.! Some bills paid. Cheapest in town. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. $149 TOTAL MOVE IN! 1 bedroom, $420. 2 bedroom, $525. On TXState shuttle. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. FURNISHED ROOM IN KYLE, W/D, kitchen privileges, cable, $325/mo. and $100 deposit. Call (512) 295-8657.

FOR RENT-APTS $785, 2BD/2BA WINDMILL APARTMENTS. 3 blocks from TxState. Move-in today! Free HBO, Road Runner, full-size W/D. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans & prices. (512) 396-4181.

FOR RENTCONDO/TOWNHOME CONDO IN GREAT LOCATION! 2BD/1.5BAtwo-story, W/D included, on shuttle route, $550. Call (512) 750-8151.

FOR RENT-DUPLEX 2 UNITS AT 903 & 905 HILYER ST. Each unit has 3BD/2BA, fireplace, dishwasher, microwave, W/D & refgr. Nice wooded setting with large backyard. $1,030 per mo., discounted to $990 with long term lease. Call (559) 568-1015, or (559) 723-1676 ask for Teri or Don. 500 CREST CIRCLE. Country living. 2BD/2BAwith w/d connections. 1 car garage and fenced yard. REDUCED to $800 per month. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy, (512) 665-3321. TWO STORY DUPLEX, 3BD/2.5BA, 2 car garage. Near university area in Hughson Heights. Freshly painted and ready for tenant, $895/mo. 1/2 month free. Call (512) 829-2015 for quick move-in. $765, 2BD/2BA WINDMILL DUPLEX. 3 blocks from TxState. Movein today! Free HBO, Road Runner, full-size W/D. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans & prices. (512) 396-4181. DUPLEXES FOR LEASE OFF OF SAGEWOOD! 3BD/3.5BA; two-car garage/Internet access. Call today! (512) 913-8028. 900 HAZELTON. 3BD/2BA/1 carport for a REDUCED $925. W/D connections. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy, (512) 665-3321. DUPLEX. 2/1. FENCED YARD. $585/mo. Contact Carmen at (512) 878-2995. 1BD/1BA, ceiling fans , hardwood floors, W/D, pets OK, $600/mo. 557-0961. NICE 2BD/1BA, fireplace, fenced yard, pets OK. $650/mo. (512) 392-2443.

FOR RENT-HOUSES 2 ROOMMATES NEEDED. 2,600 sq. ft. house, 1 mile from university. $450+ utilities. Call (210) 422-0577. 2010 NEVADA. 4BD/2BA. Newly painted. $1,000 per month. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 558-2651. BRAND NEW 3BD/3BA HOUSE ON 2 ACRES, large deck and shade trees, $1,500/mo. Call (512) 557-1831. FOR RENT-3/2 HOUSE W/ LARGE DECK. 1.5 miles from TxState campus. $1,050/mo. $800 deposit. 2020 Ramona Circle. Call Nik at (512) 964-6251. 118 QUAIL RUN, 3BD/2BA, 2 car garage, fireplace, CH/CA, ceiling fans, patio, $950/mo. (512) 353-2684. 2904 PHILO FOR LEASE. 3/2/2 for $1,250 per month. Visit legacyrealestate.biz and call Legacy Real Estate, (512) 665-3321.

FOR SALE SOUTHWEST STYLE COUCH AND OVER-SIZED CHAIR, red, green and browns, $275. Call (512) 393-2004. PARAKEET WITH NICE CAGE, food/treats, and toys $40. Call (512) 715-2157 or email fo1003@txstate.edu. SCOOTER: 2005 KYMCO PEOPLE 50. $1,750 includes helmet, chain, and lock. Work day (512) 353-7480; nights/weekends (512) 396-7047.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

TEACHERS NEEDED : Quality childdevelopment center in Kyle needs teachers for our preschool & afterschool programs. Hiring young men and women. Must be fun & energetic. Must be able to work M–F, 2:30–6:30. www.rockinghorseacademy.com; (512) 405-3700 or fax( 512) 405-3701. THE TAP ROOM is now accepting applications for kitchen help. We offer a competitive salary, great perks, and a fun working environment. Interested parties should apply in person at The Tap Room after 3 p.m. CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR ONE SCHOOL AGED CHILD. Fall Semester, Tuesday & Wednesday from 6 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Education major preferred. Call (512) 587-8296. CHILDCARE NEEDED FOR TWO SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN (Kindergarten and 3rd). Fall and Spring Semesters, Mon.-Fri., 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Education or Early Childhood Development major preferred. Call (512) 353-3707. TEKA MARKETING INC. is now expanding and looking to fill several FT/PT positions, very flexible hours and casual work environment. For more information call (512) 805-0020. ATTENTION STUDENTS! POSITIONS AVAILABLE •$13 Base Appointment •Flexible Schedules •Customer Sales/Service •No Experience Needed, will train •All Ages 17+ •Conditions Apply Call today (512) 392-7377 www.workforstudents.com SUGAR’S IS SEEKING AM/PM, PT/FT, WAIT STAFF & ENTERTAINERS with a fun loving attitude who enjoy working in a party atmosphere. Flexible schedules. Great $$$! Great Back to School Job! Apply at Sugar’s, 404 Highland Mall Blvd. E., Austin (near Highland Mall). (512) 451-1711. RAILROAD SEAFOOD STATION. Now hiring top bartenders, servers, managers. (210) 361-3944, ask for Alex. ATHLETIC, OUTGOING MEN for calendars, greeting cards, etc. $75-200/ hr. No exp. needed, (512) 684-8296. SALES POSITION AVAILABLE at local bicycle shop, sales experience and active lifestyle preferred. Please email resume, tamara@tamaracampbell.com or call (512) 203-0810. POSITIONS AVAILABLE-chef, cooks, prep cooks, and waitstaff, both shifts. Apply in person. Juan Henry’s Restaurant, 500 River Road, Wimberley. EQUESTRIAN AND PHOTO MODELING OPPORTUNITIES. Apply on-line @ www.texasarabianhorses.com BOBCATSNEEDJOBS.COM. We need Paid Survey Takers in San Marcos. 100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys. TECHNICAL SUPPORT REPRESENTATIVE - teleNetwork is currently seeking TSRs to provide technical support for dialup and DSL customers. Full or Part Time positions available with flexible scheduling at our Austin and San Marcos call center locations. More information and online application available at http://www.telenetwork.com/careers CRAIG ‘OS PIZZA AND PASTARIA is now hiring delivery drivers for morning or night shift. Apply at Craig ‘Os 690 Centerpoint Rd., next to Starbucks across from the outlets. (512) 558-2220.

!BARTENDING! Up to $300/day. No experience necessary. Training Provided. Age 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 x 157. TUTOR/NANNY POSITION AVAILABLE in San Marcos for two girls ages 8 and 11 from August 28, 2006 through May 16, 2007. Pick up children from school; assist with & monitor homework for an accelerated Christian based academic program. Transport children to/from extracurricular activities. Must be active, hands-on and enjoy teaching. This position is 15-18 hours/week Mon.–Fri. (2:45 p.m. to approx. 5:45 p.m.). Prefer Interdisciplinary Studies/Education Generalist 4-8 major with GPA of 3.0 or greater. Non-smokers only. Pays $7+/hour depending on experience plus bonus opportunities. Call (512) 787-7609 for an application. More info on Jobs4Cats #5123. Interviewing now! ESTIMATING ASSISTANT PT/FT. Must be proficient in typing, Internet Explorer, Excel, and Word. Blueprint experience a plus. Flexible hours. Fax resume or info. to (888) 622-6402. ATHLETIC MALE MODELS WANTED for physique photography in Austin. $200-$1000 per session. Call Wu at (512) 927-2448. ENJOY WORKING WITH CHILDREN? J&R Gymnastics is looking for energetic gymnastics, tumbling and cheerleading instructors. Schedule: 4-30 hrs. per week. Pay commensurate with experience. Experience preferred. Call (830) 606-0375. COTTON EYED JOE’S part-time position available. Must be able to work flexible hours including evenings, weekends and holidays. Apply in person. 1680 Hunter Rd., Historic Gruene District. ATTENTION BUSINESS MAJORS, store manager needed immediately in Buda, P/T, flexible hours, phone skills, people person. E-mail resume as a Word document to betrulock@onr.com or mail to Barbara Botkin, 150 Paintbrush Path, New Braunfels, TX, 78132, (512) 415-7433. PART-TIME PRE-SCHOOL TEACHER NEEDED. M/W 1:30-5:45 pm. Email work history and hours available to ddelgado4@austin.rr.com. (512) 268-2326. GRUENE ANTIQUE COMPANY part-time positions available. Must be able to work flexible hours including evenings, weekends and holidays. Apply in person. 1608 Hunter Rd., Historic Gruene District. PT DELIVERY DRIVER FOR J-CO JANITORIAL SUPPLY CO. Flexible hours 12-5 preferred. Must have own full sized truck, pleasant personality, good driving record. $7.25 per hr. plus 45¢ per mile. Contact phone (512) 392-7765, fax (512) 395-8895, email jcosupply@grandecom.net NANNY POSITION AVAILABLE, 20 hrs./wk., afternoons. Education major required, call Tamara (512) 203-0810. NANNY/BABYSITTER NEEDED. Afternoons only, will pay well to pick up 3 daughters from school and take home, (512) 757-3833. Evenings(512) 353-5912. PETE’S DUELING PIANO BAR is seeking friendly, outgoing cocktail waitresses with big smiles and hardworking doorman. We are open and accepting applications Tue.-Sat. 6:30-8:30 at 421 E. 6th St., Austin, Texas. POOL AND SPA COMPANY NOW HIRING. PT, no experience necessary, (512) 754-0662.

WANTED: VOLUNTEER COACHES FOR SAN MARCOS YOUTH SOCCER. Training available. Fun community service opportunity for soccer players. Contact Michael Colca, colca@io.com, (512) 847-5238. GROUNDSKEEPER/LIGHT MAINTENANCE: Full-time position available immediately. Start at $9.25. Duties to include: grounds, light maintenance and make readies. Landscaping experience desirable. Excellent benefits and paid vacation. Background and drug screen required. Leave message @ (512) 396-4181. COLLOQUIUM BOOKSTORE. Accepting applications for a FT shipping & receiving clerk. Visit bobcatbooks.com for more details.

LOST & FOUND LOST CELL PHONE, CINGULAR SERVICE, SILVER FLIP TOP. Please call (512) 245-3483 or (512) 964-7065.

MISCELLANEOUS HORSE PASTURE FOR LEASE, 1.8 acres with pond, max. 2 horses, will assist with feeding. $175/mo. Janel (512) 392-5066. NEEDS LOVING HOME, 1YR. OLD MALE BOXER, has all of his shots, loves kids. Call (432) 770-0745. AFFORDABLE HEALTH INSURANCE FOR INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES. Choose from many plans and deductibles. Replace expensive COBRA plans. Dependent-only coverage is available. Call Mike Pope, 1-800-285-3444 or e-mail mpope@gvec.net for a FREE, no-obligation quote. Short Term Medical Plans are also available. Plans underwritten by Golden Rule Insurance Company. Policy Forms C-0063 or C-0064.

ROOMMATES ROOMMATE NEEDED, Christian, non-smoker, female, $450/mo. plus cable and electric bill. Call (830) 377-7508. ROOMMATE WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO BE A CARETAKER FOR A DISABLED MALE. Free housing possible, 20 miles from San Marcos in Luling. Ideal for someone wanting to cut routine drive from San Antonio or Austin. Would take care of yard and some housework in nice home. Call Bill at (830) 875-6933. NEED FEMALE ROMMATE to share 2bd/2.5ba townhome, 2 blocks from campus, w/d, includes cable and internet, $395/mo. Call (214) 726-6998. ROOMMATE WANTED at the Exchange Apartments, 1/2 of first and last months rent free. Call (713) 522-0012. 3BD/2BA. Need one roommate for a newly built fully furnished house. $550/mo., bills paid, 2 miles to campus, W/D. Call Clint at (512) 576-4422. FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED, 2BD/2.5BA townhome, $392 per mo., plus 1/2 water and electric, close walk to campus. (281) 793-3083. ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3BD/2BA house, $350/mo., 1/2 utilities, dog friendly, responsible. Call (512) 357-0171 or (512) 665-3305. ROOMMATE NEEDED for 3BD/2BA house in Martindale. Available Sept. 1. $300 plus 1/3 bills; large fenced yard; pets OK. (512) 558-2603 or (512) 665-2872.

SUBLEASE HILLSIDE RANCH 2BD/2BA. New carpet, cable and internet included. Call (512) 665-2961 or (210) 710-8783.

WANTED TRAVEL THE U.S. AND ABROAD making money as a promotional models for TEXAS BIKINI TEAM. Call (512) 263-0009, or visit www.texasbikini.com WORK AT THE STAR!!! Pick up an application at the Trinity Building, or download one at www. universitystar.com. You can also call (512) 245-3487 for more information. HEALTH CLUB-OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK. Part-time positions, front desk, must be working on a related degree, $5.50 per hour. Ideally suited for kiniesology/physiology major looking to develop into a full time professional fitness trainer upon graduation. E-mail resume to fitnessdoctors@AOL.com and call (512) 560-6761. USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell. (512) 353-4511.


SPORTS

BobcatBlowout

THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Get ready to rumble! Check out Thursday’s edition of The University Star for our Fall Sports Guide. Get yourself ready for the season with previews on your favorite team and awaken the true fan inside you.

Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - Page 11

Sports Contact — Chris Boehm, starsports@txstate.edu

Perriraz Posting Saves Soccer player from Schreiner comes to keep goals at Texas State By Carl Harper The University Star Imagine being a gymnast as a child, putting your heart and passion into basketball, softball and volleyball for four long years in high school and then changing your athletic abilities once you get to college. Senior goalkeeper Paige Perriraz of the Texas State soccer team experienced exactly that, and she and her teammates are happy she did. Why did she play three sports for four years — mainly using her hands — and switch to using every part of the body minus the phalanges? “Well, I did play soccer when I was young at the age of nine or 10 years old,” Perriraz said. “Then once I got to high school, I felt that I wanted to do it all and really just ended up feeling burned out in all the sports there.” A native of Robstown, Perriraz attended Calallen High School where she lettered and was nominated first-team all-district for basketball, softball and

volleyball. Soccer was practically the only sport she did not participate in as a high school athlete. Once Perriraz finished high school and was on her way to college, she decided to once again try the fast-paced world of soccer. “I had a couple of friends that told me they were going to play for a school and talked me into coming with them,” Perriraz said. “I wanted to play soccer, but didn’t want to do a lot of running. So I picked the goalie position.” In 2003 Perriraz took the soccer field at Schreiner University, the first time since childhood. During the season she earned second-team all conference honors and had 172 saves along with one goal. “We didn’t have a winning season that year, but the good thing about Schreiner is it gave me confidence on defense,” Perriraz said. “Texas State is a better program and is higher in competition. But playing at Schreiner, I gained experience.” Coming into San Marcos in 2004,

Photo courtesy of Megan Ramey DUTY TO PROTECT: After trying her hand at gymnastics, volleyball, softball and basketball, Paige Perriraz chose soccer upon entering college. The senior was the third-ranked goalkeeper in the Southland Conference a season ago.

Perriraz actually only played in one game for 23 minutes against Texas Southern. But last year, the true athlete in Perriraz returned. She played in 15 of the 19 games for the Bobcats and became the third-ranked goalkeeper in the Southland Conference with 5.67 saves per game. “She comes in and works hard for us,” said coach Kat Conner. “She has this God-gifted talent of athleticism and is a smart player that loves to learn and knows the game.” As goalkeeper, Perriraz will be competing with fellow senior Brittany Beltramini and freshman Samantha Fraser for playing time. But as of now, the starting nod at goalkeeper is a weekto-week issue. “Paige is a hard worker that will be competing with Brittany and Sam,” said teammate Kristy Collison. “But I think

this will be good for them to push each other and help each other out.” Perriraz’s thoughts about the competition were nearly the same as Collison’s. “We’re not really competing with each other, but more of rooting and pushing for each other,” Perriraz said. “We are setting high standards for ourselves. My personal goal is to start and I want more shutouts this season.” Perriraz is one of nine seniors returning from last year’s third-place team, helping make it easier to back one another in a final push for the NCAA tournament, where they ended the 2004 season. “Paige is very athletic and has a strong personality,” said midfielder Ashley Brown. “She has no fear in helping us out and getting the job done. She has been a great goalkeeper.” Through the flattering remarks of the

coaches and team, Perriraz looks forward to the season that lies ahead. “It is great to hear the comments coming from my coaches and the players but I don’t see it for myself,” Perriraz said. “I see it as helping my confidence to be as of help for the team.” In the exhibition game against St. Mary’s, Perriraz had to deal with a hyper-extended thumb, but the x-rays came back negative. She was also held out of the first regular season game against Oklahoma State, but just as precautionary measure. Perriraz is majoring in exercise and sports science with an interest in pre-physical therapy. She hopes to own a physical therapy clinic one day, but until then, she’ll be playing her heart out on the field as a Bobcat. “Her ability to come in and be dedicated has been great for us,” said senior Natalie Holder.

k o You’re a star: Bailiff post-game o b e t o N show to broadcast two nights a week l l a b t o Fo By Chris Boehm The University Star

Odom’s season finished early Sophomore running back Mitch Odom was lost for the season after suffering an injury in two-a-day practice. “We lost our starting tailback,” Coach David Bailiff said. “That’s the second year in a row; you just feel so sorry for that kid.” The former all-district selection at Alief Elsik High School missed all of last season due to a knee injury sustained in March of 2005. He just rehabbed so hard to get back,” Bailiff said. “So to hurt his other knee the same way, your heart just goes out for him.” Freshman wide receiver Andre McCorkle is questionable for Saturday’s opener. “We’ve just got to check his progress (Wednesday).” Senior wide receiver Ronnie Miller (knee), who had been held back in fall camp, was cleared Tuesday to play Saturday. “How about that — just got cleared today,” Bailiff said Wednesday. “He was a big-play guy for us last year and was just coming into his own when he got hurt. It’s good to have him back; his personality on the field is electrifying.” Bailiff to light up the small screen San Marcos has a star in the making. Texas State coach David Bailiff will be the center of a pair of broadcast productions stamped out for this year’s football season, in addition to the recentlysigned contract with Fox Sports Network to air Southland Conference games. The David Bailiff Radio Show will air live from 5 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays at Johnny Carino’s,

hosted by Brant Freeman for KGNB Radio 1420 AM out of New Braunfels. Thursday will mark the first edition of the show, as the two-year Bobcat coach will help lead fans up to the season opener Saturday at home against Tarleton State. Time Warner Cable’s News 8 Austin will air The David Bailiff Television Show twice a week, providing highlights of the weekend game and more in its 30-minute time slot. The show can be seen Sunday at 10:30 p.m. as well as Monday night at 7:30. Bailiff will break down the previous week’s game on his show, hosted by former Bobcat football player and Bobcat alumnus John Hygh. “I actually coached John when I was here with Coach (Dennis) Franchione,” Bailiff said. “I know John very well, enough to make fun of him every time I see him.” First airing is Sunday on News 8 Austin and News 8 Austin on Demand.

Texas State reunites with coach TURF TAKEOVER: Former San Marcos High School standout Alvin from ’83 title team Canady (22) could see extended action following the news that starting tailback Mitch Odom will miss the entire season. Canady

When Tarleton State coach redshirted last year after ending his Rattler career with 3,898 yards Sam McElroy steps onto the turf at Bobcat Stadium on Saturday, rushing and 56 touchdowns. it will be on familiar territory. McElroy, in his second year as coach of the Texans, is a Texas when the ball is free kicked the Walk-on mania State alumnus, having served game clock will start and will be on the staff from 1983 to 1985. stopped once the ball is marked Bobcat football held walk-on He was a graduate assistant on dead. The former ruling did not tryouts Aug. 23, the first day the team that won the Lone Star call for the game clock to start back for the fall semester. BaiConference crown under Jim O’ until the receiving team touched liff and company brought their Hara. the ball. The Bobcats recently squad number to a total of 110 “I know him very well,” Bailiff held a practice with the new players. said. “I haven’t talked to him in changes as the focus. “This was actually a highabout a year, though. He and I The second change says that quality walk-on that we attractused to recruit together at other on a change of possession, the ed,” Bailiff said. “There’s some schools. He’s a really good guy.” clock will start on the ready men that probably won’t help for play signal, not when it is the program this year, but they Season opener marks first run snapped, as was the case before. will down the road. We’re excitwith new rules Critics suggest the changes ed about some of these men.” will take approximately 10 to 77 students tried out this year The NCAA changed two rules 20 plays out of a game, making for the scout team, whose job it for the 2006 season, aimed at it more difficult to break estab- is to prepare the regular playspeeding up game time. lished records. ers for the weekend’s upcoming One new rule states that game.

Chris Boehm/Star photos IT’S SHOWTIME: Football coach David Bailiff gets his own TV show this fall, which will air Sunday and Monday nights. Hosted by Bobcat alumnus John Hygh, the broadcast will recap Saturday’s gridiron action.

“Everybody’s got a role on the success or failure of this football team,” Bailiff said. “They’ll actually meet and watch the videos (on the opponents) and try to duplicate everything they see on film, just to get us ready for Saturdays. Sophomore wide receiver Adrian Thomas, who caught a 42-yard touchdown in last year’s semifinal against Northern Iowa, was originally a walk-on and eventually moved from the scout to the travel team. Paper or plastic? This season, H-E-B is the place to be Friday nights.

That’s where Bobcat players will be sacking groceries from 4 to 7 p.m. in an effort to continue positive relations with the community. “We’re going to use the redshirt freshmen and the guys that aren’t playing in (Saturday’s) game,” Bailiff said. “We’re just going to be carrying groceries to the cars for families. Dubbed the ‘Sack Party,’ the players will be working at the store located on the corner of Hopkins and Thorpe. “It’s a way we educate the community a bit more on what we are as a football program,” Bailiff said. “I think it’s going to be a lot of fun.”

08 30 2006  
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