Page 1

DIFFERENCE IN DELIVERY

Some may see baseball and softball as the same sport, but pitchers beg to differ

BATTLE WAGES Six bands will battle to be the top band SEE TRENDS PAGE 7

SEE SPORTS PAGE 14

DEFENDING THE FIRST AMENDMENT SINCE 1911

WWW.UNIVERSITYSTAR.COM

MARCH 29, 2007

THURSDAY

VOLUME 96, ISSUE 70

Bobcats expected to be volunteering 2,600 strong By Michael Lee Gardin The University Star The student-run initiative Bobcat Build is inviting students and San Marcos residents to help improve the city for the fifth year. The expansive community service project will be held 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Students and other volunteers will be assigned to various job sites where they will work to enhance the appearance of San Marcos. Nancy Tunell, international studies senior, is the Bobcat Build Student Planning Organization director. She said Bobcat Build is a wonderful annual project and she feels happy with this year’s expected turnout. “It is the largest community

service event at Texas State and in San Marcos,” she said. “This year, we are expecting about 2,600 students to participate and go to 105 different job sites in San Marcos.” Laura Ruiz, assistant director of Bobcat Build, said the job sites range from schools, churches and neighborhoods to community and senior citizen centers. She said this year Bobcat Build is focusing on neighborhoods. “We make the job sites feasible to students,” said Ruiz, interdisciplinary studies senior. “It is all based outside. It is a lot of painting and we are going to be part of a neighborhood clean-up.” Even though the deadline to register for the project has passed, Tunell said students are

still encouraged to sign up and participate. “The day of you can show up and go to the late registration tables and become a volunteer,” Tunell said. Students can sign up for late registration beginning 7:30 a.m. Saturday at the Strahan Coliseum Lot, located on Aquarena Springs Drive, across the street from the recreational fields. Tunell said the volunteers are assigned to job sites that best suit them. “We try to match the volunteers with the best fit job site,” Tunell said. “It depends on the job sites, what size of volunteers they request and then the size of the volunteers. The individuals usually go to one job site all to-

gether.” Ruiz said there is no reason why students should not participate. She said all students hear live music, get free food, receive a free T-shirt and gain a sense of accomplishment. “You get to hang out with your friends while doing work that is meaningful,” Ruiz said. Tunell said Bobcat Build is a great way to learn and interact with the community. She said students will be surprised at how far their work goes. “The students will gain a greater appreciation for their community,” Tunell said. “They will learn the value of service. Something that does not take a lot of effort on your part can mean a lot to someone else.”

Aaron Smith/Star file photo DOING THEIR PART: Students gather supplies outside the Bobcat Village Apartments in preparation for the 2006 Bobcat Build. Approximately 2,600 students are expected this year for the annual effort to help clean up San Marcos.

Drill sergeants impart wisdom to AFROTC By Molly Berkenhoff The University Star Practicing drills under the watchful eye of four experts meticulously surveying their every move, Air Force ROTC members marched in formation Wednesday as part of the program’s training and awards ceremony. The focus of the day was the visitation of four military training instructors from Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, more commonly known as drill sergeants. “These instructors are highly trained and highly effective,” said Lewis, who was charged with planning the agenda of the day’s events. “They give (the underclassmen) better, sharper and more intense training than we can give them alone.” These instructors worked with freshman who received a somewhat-diluted version of basic training. In a separate group, sophomores were given a heightened and more realistic simulation of the training they will face for their careers. “The main objective today is to get them proficient in basic drill movements,” said Sgt. David Drennon. “We have to build discipline which is the foundation of teamwork and basic military skills.” Held in an open field beside the tennis courts on Sessom Drive, the day was also one of See TRAINING, page 4

Faculty Senate votes against 120 hour rule By Scott Thomas The University Star

nify that change could be made. Martinez said she is from the Salinas Valley, also known as the “salad bowl of the world.” She said everything from iceberg and romaine lettuce to tomatoes and onions were collected by farm workers in the valley. Martinez’s father was a migrant farm worker. By watching her father and other workers, Martinez said she learned

The Faculty Senate voted in support of the Curriculum Committee’s proposition that no core courses should be cut to comply with Texas legislation. The legislation proposes to cut the 128 minimum course hours needed to graduate to 120. Six senators voted in favor of the proposal, five opposed and one abstained. After the vote, Faculty Sen. Michel Conroy, art and design professor, entered the chamber. Later, when new business was being discussed, she asked to officially go on record and said she had polled the faculty and had wished to vote against the proposition, which would have tied the vote. Though she was allowed to go on record saying such, the vote was not rescinded. “We met at the appropriate time and in the appropriate order, in effect you knew that,” said Faculty Senate Chair William Stone, criminal justice professor. The next item discussed by the Faculty Senate was who would be up for re-election and whose seats would be open because of resignations. The elections will start in the second week of April and the process will last two weeks. Every year, the Faculty Senate holds elections where onethird of the seats are open for change, which gives each senator a three-year term. In order to be eligible to run for a seat in the Faculty Senate, one must be a tenured associate professor or of a higher rank. Two of the seats will be open to election because the senators are resigning in order to pursue developmental leaves, which senators are not eligible to do.

See CHÁVEZ, page 4

See SENATE, page 4

Cotton Miller/Star photo FRONT AND CENTER: Sgt. David Drennon from Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio gives instructions to a group of Texas State cadets Wednesday afternoon near the Tennis Complex.

Life, legacy of César Chávez honored by faculty, students By Karen Little The University Star Salsa music, chatter and laughter could be heard from the third floor of the LBJ Student Center Wednesday as about 50 faculty and students attended an event honoring the Hispanic civil rights activist César Chávez. The Texas State Latino Student Association, the event’s host, decorated the room in black, red and white, which are

the colors of the United Farm Workers’ flag. Chávez formed the organization in 1962. The event began with an introduction from Joanne Smith, vice president of student affairs. “(César Chávez) was a common man with an uncommon vision,” Smith said. She said Chávez was a man who never owned a home and had no higher than an eighth-grade education level. But “It can be done” was his motto for life. “This Saturday is his day,” Smith said.

“It is only fitting that we take time to pay tribute to a leader that has done so much for the advancement of thousands of people.” The main speaker of the evening was Gloria Martinez, associate professor of sociology. “One thing I learned from César Chávez is the term ‘Si Se Puede,’” she said. “What I tell people is ‘Yo Pude! Tú Puede! Nosotros Podemos!’” The Spanish phrases were used to sig-

Springs Fest features water activities, celebrates newly-built Rio Vista Falls By Jessica Sinn The University Star Imagine paddling down roaring rapids and gliding through steep, rocky slopes amid refreshing sprays of whitewater. River paddling enthusiasts can experience this scenario at Springs Fest. The event, a river paddling festival, will kick off Friday and run through Sunday at Rio Vista Falls. The festival,

sponsored by T G Canoes and Kayaks and the Power Olympic Outdoor Center, will feature kayak and canoe demonstrations, competitions and paddling instruction courses. Duane Te Grotenhuis, T G Canoes and Kayaks owner, said the event will showcase an assortment of new and used kayaks and canoes for prospective buyers. “We’ll have close to 60 differ-

Today’s Weather

Scattered Precipitation: 40% 81% Strong Storms Humidity: UV: 6 High 76˚/65˚

Wind: SSE 15 mph

ent boats there, so if you want a demo, or if you’re in the mood to buy a canoe or kayak, this will be the most wonderful opportunity to give them a whirl first,” Te Grotenhuis said. “If you don’t paddle it, chances of getting the right boat are slim to none.” Te Grotenhuis said shopping around for a kayak or canoe is much like buying a car. He said he advises buyers to sample

Two-day Forecast Friday Scattered T-Storms Temp: 74°/ 64° Precip: 60%

Saturday Scattered T-Storms Temp: 78°/ 62° Precip: 50%

various boats by taking them out for test drives on the river. “This is your vehicle on water, you certainly want to get the right one,” Te Grotenhuis said. “If you pay $100 more than you thought you would pay, but you get the right one, that’s the cheapest boat you could have bought because it’s going to last you a long time and you won’t have to upgrade it.” An assortment of paddling

instructions for whitewater, flat-water, competitive and recreational river sports will be available. Te Grotenhuis said buyers should carefully select paddles before purchasing them. “I would never compromise the boat or the paddle, those are the things you want to get right the first time,” Te Grotenhuis said. Michelle and Ben Kvanli,

founders of the Power Olympic Outdoors Center and Southwest Texas State University alumni, want to showcase the new Rio Vista Falls. Their center is a non-profit paddling instruction school, geared toward raising money to train future Olympic athletes. Ben Kvanli said he hopes the event will attract San Marcos

Inside News ..............1-6 Trends ...........7-11 Crossword ....... 11 Sudoku ............ 11

Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

Comics ............ 11 Opinions .......... 12 Classifieds ....... 13 Sports ......... 14,15

See SPRINGS, page 9

To Contact Trinity Building Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708 www.UniversityStar.com © 2007 The University Star


PAGE TWO Thursday in Brief

March 29, 2007

starsof texas state Tina M. Cheatham is the recipient of this year’s Communication Studies Outstanding Alumni Award. Steven Beebe, department chair, presented the award and highlighted Cheatham’s accomplishments as a senior manager in the federal government. Cheatham graduated from Southwest Texas State University in 1989 and is currently acting communications director for the U.S. Health Resources and Services Ad-

ministration near Washington, D.C. She closed her remarks by challenging the students. “If a kid from Wimberley, Texas, who went to Hays Consolidated High School and Texas State University can go to Washington and follow her dreams, you can too,” Cheatham said. — Courtesy of Communication Studies Department

News Contact — Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Texas State University-San Marcos is a member of the Texas State University System

THURSDAY

The Stations of the Cross will be 6 p.m. in the Catholic Student Center chapel. The Catholic Student Organization will meet 6:30 p.m. in the CSC lounge. The Rock - Praise & Worship will be 7:30 p.m. in the CSC chapel. Texas State’s Fashion Merchandising Association will hold the fifth annual fashion show, themed “Passport to Fashion,” 7:30 p.m. in the LBJ Ballroom. The Philosophy Dialogue Series presents “A Good Joke Ruined? Analyzing Humor,” 11 a.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132. Meditation and Contemplation will be 4 to 5 p.m. at the Campus Christian Community Center. For more information, e-mail Micah Robbins at mr1235@txstate.edu or call (512) 878-2036. Overeaters Anonymous will meet 5:30 p.m. at the First Lutheran Church, 130 W. Holland St. For more information, call (512) 3572049. The Tennis Club will meet 6 to 8 p.m. at the tennis courts on Sessom Drive, behind Joe’s Crab Shack. All skill levels are welcome. For more information, e-mail Scott Schoenmakers, tennis club president, at SS1485@txstate.edu. Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship will hold its weekly meeting 8:30 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. There will be contemporary worship, relevant teaching and prayer. Everyone is welcome to attend. For more information, call (512) 557-7988 or e-mail mail@texasstatechialpha. com

FRIDAY

Texas State softball will play Texas-San Antonio 5 and 7 p.m. at Bobcat Field. The Texas State Opera presents Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, sung in English, 8 p.m. at the University Performing Arts Center. General admission $10, students and seniors $5. To reserve tickets, call (512) 245-2651.

SATURDAY

Texas State softball will play Texas-San Antonio 1 p.m. at Bobcat Field.

The Texas State Opera presents Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, sung in English, 8 p.m. at the University Performing Arts Center. General admission $10, students and seniors $5. To reserve tickets, call (512) 245-2651.

Red Rocket

Our apologies... The front page of Wednesday’s paper says “Thursday.” The University Star regrets the error.

CRIME BL TTER

MONDAY

The Philosophy Dialogue Series presents “Teague Lecture: Rights and Health Care Services,” with Jim Summers, health administration professor, 11 a.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132.

University Police Department March 20, 2:17 p.m. Theft under $200,000/Bobcat Stadium An officer was dispatched for a report of theft. A student reported a vehicle had been taken without consent. This case is currently under investigation.

The Sexual Assault and Abuse Survivors Group will meet 5 to 6:15 p.m. For more information and a screening, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208. An on-campus Alcoholics Anonymous meeting will be from noon to 1 p.m. For more information, call the Alcohol and Drug Resource Center at (512) 245-3601.

March 22, 1:08 p.m. Information Report/UPD Lobby An officer was dispatched to the lobby for a report of harassment. A student reported another student posting a harassing Web log. A report was generated for this case.

The Alcohol and Drug Resource Center will hold the Men Against Violence meeting 5 to 7 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room 3-6.1. Alpha Lambda Omega Christian Sorority will hold its weekly Bible study 8 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room 3-13.1. Everyone is welcome to attend. Rise ‘N Shine Toastmasters Club will meet 7 to 8 a.m. at Cabela’s in Buda. Visitors and guests are welcome. For additional information, call Clark Lyman at (512) 295-7777, e-mail clyman2059@aol.com or visit risenshine.freetoasthost.info.

TUESDAY

There will be a free lunch for all students from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the CSC lobby. The Philosophy Dialogue Series presents “Opposing Views on Famine Relief as a Moral Duty,” at 11 a.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132. Lambda Omega Alpha will sponsor Night Prayer 9 p.m. in the CSC chapel. Facing the Fear: Anxiety and Panic Group will meet 3:30 to 5 p.m. and offer a supportive way to cope. For more information or to register, call the Counseling Center at (512) 245-2208.

Jennifer Williams/Star Photo Chris Gonzalez, criminal justice senior, rides his red Honda CBR around campus Wednesday afternoon. Gonzales said he’s glad to see the rain gone so he can enjoy the sunny weather.

Library Beat Children focus of newest exhibit The Wittliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican Photography opened the doors Saturday on its newest exhibition, Little Heroes. From 1930s and ‘40s images by Lola Álvarez Bravo, Héctor García, Kati Horna and Russell Lee to recent works by “poet of the ordinary” Keith Carter and tintype master Robb Kendrick, the show presents over 60 images of children by 30 photographers in the Wittliff Gallery collection and its world-class archive of contemporary Mexican photography. Connie Todd, curator, cites a visual fascination with children as one impetus behind the show. “Photographers are hunters, searching for truth, amazing revelation and beauty; and children provide all three at once—honesty, tragedy, unpredictability and the loveliness of youth,” Todd said.

“In images of children photographers and viewers search for who we once were and what we have forgotten; we project our hopes and fears for the future onto these endlessly fascinating little figures.” “Children are our barometers—our fragile extensions into the real world—and we never tire of looking at them and taking their pictures,” she said. Other artists in the line-up are Yolanda Andrade, Lázaro Blanco, Manuel Carrillo, Marco Antonio Cruz, James Evans, Miguel Gandert, Flor Garduño, Jesse Herrera, Earlie Hudnall, Jr., Graciela Iturbide, O. Rufus Lovett, Lee Marmon, Eniac Martínez Ulloa, Francisco Mata Rosas, Raúl Ortega, Pablo Ortiz Monasterio, Cathy Spence, Jack Spencer, Ángeles Torrejón, Antonio Turok, Geoff Winningham, Bill Wittliff, Bill Wright and Mariana Yampolsky. — Courtesy of Alkek Library

March 22, 5:43 p.m. No Drivers License/No Insurance/Taco Bell An officer initiated a traffic stop. Upon further investigation a student was found to be driving without a license and insurance. The student was issued a citation and the vehicle was towed. March 23, 12:11 p.m. Fire Call/Blanco Hall An officer was dispatched for a fire call report. An elevator was found to be emitting smoke in the building. The elevator was turned off until Tejas Elevator maintenance arrived. March 23, 11:20 a.m. Theft under $1,500/Alkek Library An officer was dispatched for a report of theft. A non-student reported an item had been taken without consent. This case is under investigation.

www.UniversityStar.com


NEWS

Thursday, March 29, 2007

The University Star - Page 3

Edward’s Aquifer management put into question his is a “T situation where we can’t Bill Lancaster The University Star

The sound of laughter and splashing water echo along the clear San Marcos River, a fisherman casts from the bank and a small child opens a faucet to fill a pitcher of Kool-Aid. Each act is possible because of the Edwards Aquifer, the great reservoir hidden under tons of Texas rock and soil. But there is a problem. Disputes over how to best manage and conserve Edwards Aquifer vary as widely as life in the aquifer’s ecosystem and stretch farther than its 160 miles. Glenn Longley, director of the Edwards Aquifer Research Center, said San Antonio’s abandonment of plans to find alternative water sources is the greatest challenge facing the aquifer. Raymond Slade, certified hydrologist and Austin Community College adjunct professor, said land development with its accompanying sediment and runoff is the greatest concern. Robert Potts, general manager of the Edwards Aquifer Authority, said the most important issue is maintaining the endangered species that live in San Marcos and Comal Springs. State Rep. Robert Puente, DSan Antonio, chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, said passing new legislation to increase the acceptable pumping levels from 450,000 to 549,000 acre-feet to meet the already permitted amounts is the most important issue facing the aquifer. Tom Taggart, director of San Marcos Water/Wastewater Utility, said the overall most important issue is to protect the aquifer from overuse. Annalisa Peace, executive director of the Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance, said water quality is most important because of the increase in contamination. But everyone agrees, the springs must keep flowing. NEW LEGISLATION Puente’s House Bill 1292, as well as the senate version authored by State Sen. Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio, allows increased pumping, but only one version would allow the Edwards Aquifer Authority to regulate pumping during periods of extreme draught, something they cannot do under present regulations.

have a winner and a loser. Because the loser will be a Texan, we have to have a win-win situation.”

—Robert Puente State Rep., D-San Antonio

“In a draught of record, not only would the springs go dry, downstream would suffer as well,” Puente said. In the 1950s, a long draught dried up the Comal Springs for six months. That year, only 388,000 acre-feet of water were pumped from the aquifer. The present limit is 450,000 acrefeet and is scheduled to be reduced to 400,000 acre-feet next year. However, Wentworth’s and Puente’s bill would increase the limit to 549,000 acre-feet. The law governing groundwater is adapted from an old English law that became the Texas Rule of Capture. Longley said if water flowed across or under a parcel of land, the owner had a right to do anything with it. “The number of permits issued based on historical use is about twice what is needed,” Longley said. The amount permitted for irrigation under historical use, for example, is two acre-feet per acre of land but only one acre-foot is needed, he said. The permits were granted even if the land had never been irrigated. The debate over the legislation is to decide whether to manage increased pumping or to spend the money buying out permits, Potts said. “(The Edwards Aquifer Authority) recommends that you figure out a way to manage that amount of pumping,” Potts said. “Buying out the permits would mean $1 to $2 billion and we feel there are better ways to spend those resources.” “This is a situation where we can’t have a winner and a loser,” Puente said. “Because the loser will be a Texan; we have to have a win-win situation.” SAN ANTONIO USE San Antonio has reduced its use of aquifer water to 93 per-

cent and has plans to go to 53 percent, Potts said. According to the San Antonio Water Systems Web site, the city plans to promote greater use of non-aquifer water and purchase 35,000 more acre-feet of rights by 2010. San Marcos had reduced its dependence on aquifer water to 30 percent and New Braunfels to about 15 percent. San Antonio has done a lot on the conservation front but is not as far along on developing alternative water sources, Potts said. San Antonio has abandoned the use of the standardized calculation method to show a drop in per capita water use, Longley said. It does this by including surrounding communities in their population count that are not actually served by the San Antonio Water System. “They’ve made themselves look better than they really are,” he said. San Antonio Water Systems did not immediately return University Star phone calls. ENDANGERED SPECIES In a report presented Tuesday to the Edwards Aquifer Authority by Bio-West Inc., two of the many endangered species supported by the aquifer have shown recent decreases.

The San Marcos Salamander and the Texas Wild Rice populations both showed reductions resulting from recreational use of the river. “I can’t overstate the importance of responsible recreational use,” Potts said. “People are playing and not understanding the impact of what they are doing.” He said when the river levels were low, more people were able to access the waters below the Spring Lake Dam just above Sewell Park. People built wading pools by damming the water with rocks under which salamanders make their homes by pulling up the rice. In one instance, a peace sign was created in the river using the large rocks. LAND DEVELOPMENT AND CONTAMINATION

New development with unchecked runoff and sediment harms the aquifer, said Slade, whose expertise is on the Barton Creek area of the aquifer. A plume of contamination in Leon Valley was a good example of what can happen when contaminates get into the soil, Peace said. The area has now been declared a superfund site. According to the Edwards Aquifer Web site, a superfund site “makes it eligible for immediate

attention and remediation.” “Because it is a karst system, anything that goes into the aquifer goes into the drinking supply,” she said. Karst refers to a limestone system that is created by the low acidity through years of rainwater and forms pockets of water, as opposed to a sand aquifer, and provides no filtration, Peace said. “Several measures can be taken to reduce runoff,” Slade said. “Limiting impervious cover and less dense development is a minimum. Development should be located away from recharge creeks.” He said the best places for safe development have flat slopes, soil with sand or loam and good vegetation. The Greater Edwards Aquifer Alliance advocates limiting impervious ground cover in recharge areas to between eight and 15 percent. STUDENT INVOLVEMENT “Conserve water,” Peace said. “Be aware of where you live on the aquifer.” Taggart agreed. “Be aware of the need to conserve water when we are in draught conditions,” he said. “Be willing to support rate hikes for diversifying water sources.” Slade said community mem-

bers should ban together with neighborhood associations to negotiate with developers to minimize impact. “It’s a matter of education,” Potts said. “It’s a matter of using as little water as possible and being aware of your recreational use.” Longley said students can educate themselves on the differences between surface and groundwater restrictions. When voting, they need to elect people who are concerned about fresh water. THE NEXT STEP The Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Plan is a cooperative measure to minimize the negative effects on the aquifer, Taggart said. The plan involves individuals, organizations and government entities throughout Texas and specifically in areas affected by the aquifer. The plan is a long-term solution, and the legislation is only short-term, Taggart said. San Marcos City Council is opposed to raising the cap. “Most people are not opposed to higher pumping levels when the aquifer is high, but it creates a false economy,” Peace said. “Why not hold off this session to see how the process works?”


NEWS

Page 4 - The University Star

Thursday, March 29, 2007

TRAINING: Change of leadership marks end of Air Force ROTC ceremony CONTINUED from page 1

recognition, awards and training for participants. Five scholarships were awarded during the event, a number which Brandon Lewis, cadet lieutenant colonel and geography senior, said was ‘unheard of.’ The 10 seniors in the program who will graduate in May were then given the location and date for the beginning of their Air Force

career, information they had waited four years to receive. Participants in the day’s events formed ranks as the flag was raised and saluted, followed by the ceremonial playing of reveille. The training was not only aimed at those who marched drills and took instruction; it gave equal attention to the senior leadership. The simulation allowed those closer to gradu-

ation the opportunity to learn types of mistakes to look for and how to correct them. Underclassmen who fell in line were given a taste of what they will face in their basic field training, which for some is as soon as this summer. “Field training is a four-week, all expenses paid vacation to hell,” Lewis said. “It involves 17 hour days and intense physical, mental and emotional stress. It

tests not only the decisions you know to make, but the decisions you don’t make, and helps to prepare for leadership positions.” While the Air Force ROTC department has seen dwindling numbers in recent years, the program continues to succeed, with members earning many scholarships and awards. The Air Force ROTC claims the most commissions of any school in the nation over the past six years.

This prestige created a reputation of one of the best programs of its kind in the Southwest. “Today was outstanding,” Nancy Hubbartt-Cerna, cadet and criminal justice junior, said. “I think its great to have real active-duty officers here to help us. It’s a wake up call for what these students are about to face.” The ceremony concluded with the pass and review, a tradition for the program in which the

newly-appointed leadership led the troops twice around the field in a march. The ceremony symbolizes the change in leadership. “I thought it was really nice to get out and see these young individuals hard at work,” Drennon said. “I feel it’s a great way for me to give back to the community and to have a hand in shaping the training of these people who might one day be my boss that I’ll be saluting to.”

SENATE: Promotion, tenure up for review CHÁVEZ: Film changes students’ opinions CONTINUED from page 1

For those eligible for re-election, Stone said the Faculty Senate had a fairly high incumbency rate. The senators will be voted on by faculty members, which their constitution defines as those persons who hold academic rank of lecturer or higher and are paid at a rate of 50 percent or more from funds budgeted for faculty salaries.

The Faculty Senate also discussed items to be reviewed at the upcoming President’s Academic Advisory Group meeting, where the Senate meets with University President Denise Trauth. Issues to be brought up for the meeting are the workload professors are facing at Texas State, revisions of the status and standards of promotion and tenure and what the university is planning to do to celebrate the centennial birth

of Lyndon Johnson, U.S. President and Southwest Texas State Teachers College alumnus. “It does make sense to capitalize off of that to try to promote the university,” Stone said. Also to be discussed is the 50th anniversary of the Faculty Senate in the fall and whether it should be integrated in with the Johnson birthday celebration. “Fifty years of meddling with the administration,” Stone said.

CONTINUED from page 1

the significance of having a voice and not being afraid. She said to act without fear shows courage, and that is what César Chávez stands for. Today’s farm workers earn under $10,000 a year and the average education level is sixthgrade, she said. Their conditions still lack health care, decent housing and higher rates of various infectious diseases. Martinez said when she was growing up protection from pesticide poisoning was foolishly ignored. “People think that covering their hair and face with a scarf is enough and it’s not,” she said. When Martinez was young, she admired her hard-working father. Going to school is when hurtful remarks were directed at her.

“I

think it’s surreal that one man can make a difference in this day and age.”

—Nelson Jimenez applied sociology senior

“I experienced being called a ‘dirty Mexican,’” she said. “(I was) experiencing race and class discrimination at school.” Martinez continued by showing a clip from the film entitled In The Land of Plenty, which depicted a realistic view of today’s farm worker in Watsonville, Calif. Men associated with

Chávez’ union went to the fields and farm workers’ homes to ask them questions about their everyday life and safety in the workplace. After watching the clip, Cynthia Corral, microbiology senior, said she saw workers from a different point of view. “It opened my eyes to the farm worker lifestyle, to the hard work they do so we can go to the store,” she said. “(The film) motivated me to help out and be a voice.” Nelson Jimenez, applied sociology senior, said he believes Chávez helped make a genuine impact in civil rights. “I think it’s surreal that one man can make a difference in this day and age,” he said. “It’s a positive message to see everyone united. (You) don’t have to sit on the sidelines and watch.”

Danny Rodriguez/Star photo FRUITS OF LABOR: Gloria Martinez, sociology assistant professor, emphasizes the goods and products frequently taken for granted that Latino farmhands produce. She discussed Cesar Chavez’s impact on social rights for Latinos Wednesday evening LBJ Student Center.

Got dirt?

Send your news tips to us at starnews@txstate.edu


NEWS

Thursday, March 29, 2007

The University Star - Page 5

Texas State hosts events denouncing Darfur genocide By Ashley Gwilliam The University Star As many as 400,000 Darfurians have been killed and more than 2 million have been displaced, according to the Save Darfur Coalition, in an ethnic cleansing campaign that is drawing comparisons to the killings in the Holocaust and Rawanda. Caesar Ricci, a member of the Interfaith Darfur Coalition, will discuss the political issues

involved and speak on his experience in the refugee camps in the Common Experience Event “Speaking Out About the Darfur Genocide” 7 p.m. Tuesday in the LBJ Student Teaching Theatre. The event, initially organized by the Network of Enlightened Women and the Common Experience, has become an issue of interest for many student groups. “So many students from different organizations are partici-

pating that we can’t even call it a NEW event anymore,” said Danielle Madsen, mass communication senior and Network of Enlightened Women treasurer. “It’s a movement and a stand for Darfur.” Madsen said some of the organizations that have joined forces with Network of Enlightened Women are the United Nations Student Council, Beyond Borders, the Mitte Honors Program, the College Democrats

and the College Republicans. “After the holocaust, people said this would never happen again,” said Laura Jamison, event coordinator and University Star employee. “Now it is happening again in Darfur and no one is doing anything to stop it.” Since 2003, the Sudanese government has been accused of supporting an ethnic cleansing campaign in Darfur. Jamison, print journalism senior, said although some people

Chris Boehm/Star photo CALLING FOR HELP: Steven Cooper, manager junior (left), and Kevin Beahan, math junior, talk to a group of students laying on the ground Wednesday afternoon in The Quad. Students were protesting the conflict in Darfur, calling for a stop to genocidal killings.

have said this is happening because of a farming and grazing conflict, no one really knows the root cause of all this evil. “My personal take on why the genocide is happening is that these people have a different culture,” she said. “They are a little bit darker skinned than the rest of the Sudanese.” According to the Save Darfur Web site, the majority of the Darfurian civilian refugees have fled to Chad, greatly straining the resources of the region. Thousands of refugees die each month from the effects of inadequate food, water, health care and shelter in a harsh desert environment. “These people are suffering,” Jamison said. “It is an intense suffering that is really unimaginable for most Americans. Their villages are really destroyed by men coming into camps with fire and annihilating massive amounts of people.” Although the United Nations Security Council has expressed anger over the situation and has made small attempts at stopping the genocide with the Darfur Peace Agreement and Resolu-

tion 1556, they remain unwilling to fully occupy Darfur. U.N. leaders have said they are hesitant to do so because of China’s resistance to sanctions, the unwillingness of Arab and other Islamic governments to support steps against the regime and the difficulty of military operations in an area the size of France. Jamison said although the situation is very politically complicated, that does not change the fact this genocide needs to stop. “We as Americans need to put the pressure on Sudan to let the U.S. Peace Keeping Force in,” she said. There will be a fast to stop the genocide in Darfur Wednesday. Donation tables will be set up throughout campus, encouraging the Texas State community to give up at least one “luxury item,” such as coffee, and donate that money towards health initiatives in the Darfur region. “The fast and speaker for Darfur are going to be two of the most important events that have taken place at Texas State during my years here,” Madsen said.


Page 6 - The University Star

NEWS

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Arab leaders look for solutions to Middle East’s problems By Hannah Allam and Miret el-Naggar McClatchy Newspapers RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah, one of the United States’ closest Arab allies, called the American presence in Iraq “illegitimate” Wednesday as he opened a twoday summit of the Arab League. The characterization came amid growing signs that Saudi Arabia is distancing itself from Bush administration policies in the region. The octogenarian monarch, swathed in traditional robes and speaking in a pained voice, also characterized as “unjust” the U.S.-led financial embargo of the Hamas-led Palestinian Authority and urged its end in the wake of an agreement between Hamas and the moderate Fatah party to form a unity government. Abdullah also criticized Arab leaders for infighting, which he said had caused nations to drift “further from unity than they were at the time of the founding of the Arab League,” the 22member body created in 1945. Abdullah described a region awash with blood and beset by turmoil — from the sectarian battlegrounds of Iraq and Lebanon to the unresolved crisis in Sudan’s Darfur region to brewing showdowns in Somalia and the Palestinian territories. “In beloved Iraq, blood is shed among our brothers while there is an illegitimate foreign occupation and a hateful sectarianism that is threatening to develop into a civil war,” the king said. Abdullah neglected to mention the troubles in his own kingdom, where authorities are struggling to contain a radical Islamist movement and are cracking down on pro-reform activists. “The real blame should be directed at us, the leaders of the Arab nation,” Abdullah said. “Our constant disagreements and rejection of unity have made the Arab nation lose confidence in our sincerity and lose hope.” The king’s remarks come at a time when Saudi Arabia is angling to bill itself as a regional power able to rein in warring factions and assert its authority in

the face of a growing Iranian influence in the Middle East. Last month, the Saudis negotiated the formation of a Palestinian unity government between the Fatah party and the militant group Hamas in an effort to end the financial embargo on the previous Hamas-led administration. Earlier this month, Abdullah hosted Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad for a one-day meeting in Riyadh. The summit, the league’s 19th such gathering, itself highlighted the Arab world’s disarray. Lebanon sent two delegations — one led by the Western-backed Prime Minister Fuad Saniora and one led by his foe, the Syrian-supported President Emile Lahoud. Libyan President Moammar Gadhafi boycotted the conference and told al Jazeera television that he was “divorcing” Arabs. Many attendees remained cool toward the Kurdish- and Shiiteled Iraqi delegation and groused over the unceremonious execution of Saddam Hussein, the former Sunni Arab dictator. The summit’s major business is reviving a long-dormant initiative that offers full Arab peace with Israel if it withdraws from lands it seized in the 1967 Six-Day War and finds a “just solution” to the thorny issue of Palestinian refugees. Arab leaders have opposed

any modification of the plan, first introduced at a 2002 summit, and it seems unlikely that Israel, which rejected the earlier version, would embrace it in its current form. But the United States and Europe have supported the initiative as a first step to rejuvenating the stalled Arab-Israeli peace process. As a goodwill gesture, Saudi Arabia admitted an Israeli journalist traveling with the United Nations — the first Israeli reporter allowed into the strict Muslim kingdom. While the region’s monarchs and authoritarians bickered in the ornate conference hall, Arab journalists outside mustered some unity: They staged a mass walkout to protest the restrictions on access and the lack of basic technical equipment in the tightly controlled media center. Armed Saudi guards blocked journalists from interviewing delegates, and the media room had no video or sound of the conference. The Arab world’s best-known journalists packed up their laptops and marched out, along with most Western media, including McClatchy Newspapers. They were herded onto a bus equipped with TVs and a sound system that offered better access to the event than the elaborate media center the Saudis had built for the occasion.


TRENDS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - Page 7

weekendhappenings san marcos

Thursday Lucy’s San Marcos — Jared Francis Band/ Blackwater Gospel Triple Crown — The Warblers/Lonesome Heroes/Carley Wolf Cheatham Street Warehouse —Buster Jiggs

Friday Lucy’s San Marcos — Funkotron/Mr. Brown Triple Crown — Ethereal Architect/By Any Means Necessary/Carbide Cheatham Street Warehouse —Phil Pritchett

Saturday Lucy’s San Marcos — Jackson Parten/A Reverie Whim Triple Crown — Live Electric 4th Anniversary Cheatham Street Warehouse —Max Stalling

Trends Contact — Maira Garcia, starentertainment@txstate.edu

BANDS WILL BRAWL AT GEORGE’S By Tug Ledermann The University Star The battle is on. The Student Association for Campus Activities is hosting Battle of the Bands 7 p.m. Thursday at George’s. Many bands signed up and tried out, but only six bands were chosen by members of SACA and KTSW, said SACA Vice President Tara Wilkinson. “In the fall, all the bands got to compete, but in the spring 21 bands entered, so we had judges decide on six,” said Wilkinson, public relations senior. The organization hosts Battle of the Bands each semester. Natalie Diaz, coordinator for SACA events at George’s, will manage Battle of the Bands. She said participant turnout was good this year, and the judges had to decide whom to pick based on several factors. “The judging is made considering music style, originality and the bands ability to move the crowd,” Diaz said. Diaz said she

hopes this year the winning band gets to perform at Riverfest, which will be April 25. “Last spring, the winning band was supposed to play at Riverfest, but it ended up not happening,” Diaz said. “During the fall there is a cash prize.” The six bands competing are Anderson, The Jam, Them Shakes, The Egress, Manus Manifesto and Explorers. The genres of music that will be present range from folk, punk, indie and guitar pop. Each band must perform their original music. Only one of the members of the band has to be a student at Texas State and there can be solo performances. Acoustic and cover bands were not allowed. Battle of the Bands usually brings a big crowd to George’s, with a mixture of students, fans and friends of the bands, according to Wilkinson. She said it is a way for people interested in listening to good music without having to pay for a ticket or cover charge. “If more people knew about what George’s is and that it is a free venue, I think the turnout would be a lot bigger,” Wilkinson said. Because Battle of the Bands will feature a variety of genres, it can give students the opportunity to listen to a type of music he or she may not have listened to before, Diaz said. “I expect a great turnout, good show and good times Thursday night,” Diaz said.

THE CONTENDERS:

Anderson The Band: Guitar, Harmonica and vocals Anderson Rodriguez, philosophy freshman. Drums, Chris Butterfield, music freshman. Back-up vocals Tess Hermes, undecided freshman. The Sound: Folk, punk, some indie The Facts: Anderson has been writing his own music for 1 ½ years and is influenced by politics. He will be performing in Austin for the benefit concert Food Not Bombs at the Rockin’ Tomatoes.

Explorers The Band: Guitar, vocals John Nichols, freshman premass communication. Drummer, Brad Mitchell, freshman pre-mass communication. Guitar, Alexander Beggins, freshman pre-mass communication. Bass, Foster Farmer, freshman music performance major The Sound: Indy Pop Rock The Facts: Nichols, Farmer and Alexander have played together for 5 years. They will perform at The Door in Dallas April 24.

Them Shakes The Band: Vocals, guitar, Derek Blackwell, mass communication senior. Guitar, vocals Nicholas Brown. Phil Zamarripa, bass, vocals. Chris Bergamo, drums, vocals. The Sound: Guitar pop The Facts: The band played their first show in November of 2006. They are moving to New York City as a band in August. They like house shows better than playing venues.

The Jam The Band: Vocals, Guitar, Watson Parker, Marketing Junior. Drums, Andrew Albright. Bass, Chase Mazal. The Sound: Alternative rock, funk, blues and reggae The Facts: Watson and Andrew have known each other since they were 5 and have performed since age 11. Watson went to high school with members of Three Leaf, last semester� winners.

The Egress The Band: Lead guitar, vocals, Matt Pantuso, senior mass communications. Guitar, Taylor Lightfoot. Drums, Andrew Kelly, mass communication-advertising senior. Bass, backup vocals Kyle Carson, English Senior. Keyboard, backup vocals, Carrie Fiorre The Sound: indie glam rock The Facts: The band has produced their own music video availableontheirMySpace at www.MySpace.com/ theegress

Manus Manifesto The Band: Guitar, vocals Kenny Hada. Bass, Danny Barrera. Drums, John Villareal. The Sound: Funk, jazz, rock The Facts: Manus Manifesto is originally based out of McAllen.

International flavor theme of fashion show By Ashley Wilrich and Maira Garcia The University Star The Fashion Merchandising Association is taking students on an adventure around the world to see the couture influence from foreign countries. “Passport to Fashion” is this year’s theme for the annual Fashion Merchandising Association show, currently in its fifth year. The show will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the LBJ Ballroom. Fashion Merchandising Association adviser Sharon Welkey, department of family and consumer sciences assistant professor, said the show is a way to promote cultural diversity. Certain fashions may be foreign, but many have had an influence on American culture, according to Welkey. “The main thing we want to show is the influence other countries have had on fashion today,” she said. “There are pieces (in fashion) that are loose adaptation of a garment that evolved from another country.” The fashion show will exhibit different clothes that have had a direct influence from regions such as Western Europe, Asia, India and Latin America, she said. International students are encouraged to attend and wear clothing from their culture as well. The organization’s president, Ashley Ogle, a pre-fashion merchandising junior, said the runway apparel was donated by boutiques San Marcos. “A lot of the (boutique) owners are alumni of the school, so they always want to give back,” Ogle said. The Fashion Merchandising Association recruited Texas State student models for three days in The Quad. Thirty-four models of various shapes and sizes were chosen to “walk” around the world. Welkey said the theme was selected last year and the event is being coordinated with the help of her event planning class. “The students plan everything: music, visuals, the stage, lights and they sell ads,” she said. “They also get models fitted.” Ogle said the event raises money, in addition to promoting diversity. “The funding from the show will go towards the FMA Scholarship fund,” she said.

✯FYI Tickets are $7 pre-sale and $10 at the door. The “Passport to Fashion” show is 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the LBJ Ballroom.


TRENDS

Page 8 - The University Star

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Sorority helps bridge cultural gap through stepping By Maira Garcia The University Star While stepping is a tradition among black greeks, Delta Sigma Theta wants to make the activity more accessible to different groups. The Iota Omega chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority will be hosting a Non-Traditional Step Show 7 p.m. Thursday in Evans Auditorium. The step show will include a stepping and strolling contest. The winners will be announced at the after-party, held at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3413. The event will feature step groups from the Multicultural Greek Council, other universities and a high school group as well. Miyaka Griffith, interdisciplinary studies sophomore, said the step show is an effort to introduce stepping and strolling to more groups. “We want to bridge the gap between culture and racial groups through performance,”

“W

e want to bridge the gap between culture and racial groups through performance.”

— Miyaka Griffith interdisciplinary studies sophomore

she said. Ja’Nelle Rivers, Delta Sigma Theta sergeant of arms, said they also want the event to be instructional. “Some people put on shows where others can learn to step,” Rivers, pre-healthcare administration sophomore, said. “If you want to learn to step, we can help you with that.” Rivers said stepping is different from strolling. “Strolling is more like a

dance that says ‘this is who we are,’” she said. “There are specific movements that go with specific organizations.” Stepping is more structured art, according to Rivers. “Stepping incorporates more beats and precision through hand claps and stomps,” she said. “Sometimes stepping doesn’t have music because you make it with your body.”

✯ FYI The event will be hosted by DJ Hella Yella and KXXS 104.9 FM of Austin, which will be giving away tickets and other prizes. Tickets will be sold Thursday in the LBJ Mall for $10.

Jon Clark/Star photo SORORITY STEP: Members of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority practice Wednesday in the Music Building for the Non-Traditional Step Show that will be held at 7 p.m. Saturday in Evans Auditorium.

SOULSPEAK: Where the dead live By David Conrad The University Star Editor’s note: Soulspeak is the fictional prose and poetry writings of David Conrad, math sophomore. In an effort to promote creative writing and the arts, Soulspeak will be a regular section in The Star. These are not news stories. Derek Parsons 1969 – 2002 Day One The day started out just like any other day. I boarded the plane as I always did, sat down in the pilot’s chair and started fiddling with the controls. Soon after, I’d grab the microphone, make my announcements and take off. Everyday, I’d fly this plane all over the United States. Four weeks of flying, one off with he family and four more weeks of flying. It was a process I had gotten used to and one I hadn’t really thought about. At least, not until the plane

went down. I have no idea what caused the crash, and I’d rather not know to be honest. Nothing stings more like regret, and knowing that I might have been able to do something would kill me, figuratively, of course. I woke up a few hours later amidst a sea of metal; the place was a literally a disaster area. I had no control of the plane as it came down, and we ended up landing in the middle of a Georgia highway. Wreckage littered the road, along with hundreds of bodies and quite a number of cars, most in two or three pieces. A lot of the rubble had already been cleared, and ambulances had already begun to take away some of the more intact bodies; mine was still there. I sat up and looked at my hands. They were spotless with a light blue hue to them, a stark contrast to the charred black mess that was my lower half. So this is what death is like… I thought as I stood up. I left my corpse and wandered around in

my new body, so to speak, which was an opaque shell with a bluish glow about me. I was a bit surprised by how calm I seemed with all of this. Most people fear death with a passion, but within those few minutes of freefall, I realized this plane was going down, and there was nothing I could do about it. No flotation device was going to help me this time; I could only hope that it was quick and painless. Apparently, I got that wish. Other blue-hued bodies that had finally woken from their sleep were standing up around me. Some broke down in front of me, others still didn’t fully grasp what had happened and others seemed happy. Better to be dead than maimed and on life support for “X” amount of years before they pull the plug on you. I couldn’t find my co-pilot though. His body was gone, so I assumed he had already left. He See SOULSPEAK, page 9


TRENDS

Thursday, March 29, 2007

SPRINGS: Fest to feature kayak polo, races CONTINUED from page 1

residents and Texas State students to the newly-renovated river. “This is a good opportunity for folks from San Marcos to see the sport,” Kvanli said. “This is their backyard, so they’ve got one of the best resources for doing it.” Kvanli said the San Marcos-community members outdid themselves when they transformed what was once a rundown dam into a beautifully-landscaped, pristine flowing river — chock full of rapids and chutes. “It’s not just a structure that needs to be here to hold up the water,” Kvanli said. “They just set up the course for the fall training and used the best quality rocks, better concrete and just went above and beyond to really make this a quality place. It’s going to be something we’re all going to be able to enjoy for hundreds of years.” Springs Fest will feature various competitive events: whitewater slalom racing, relay races, sladeo and kayak polo tournaments. “The kayak polo is going to be in the flat water — it’s exciting too because it’s like watching water polo or basketball — but it’s in kayaks,” Michelle Kvanli said. “I think that will draw a lot of attention.” Ben Kvanli said a new sport was invented for Rio Vista Falls called sladeo, which is a combination of

Spanish-restaurant regular making its way to the U.S. By Gwen Schoen McClatchy Newspapers

Monty Marion/Star file photo OVER THE FALLS: Springs Fest, held Friday through Sunday, will be at the Rio Vista Falls. Attendees can test ride a wide variety of canoes and kayaks and get a chance to paddle down the San Marcos River.

slalom racing and rodeo freestyle moves. He said competitors are timed as they race through the rapids, and earn more time as they perform showboating tricks along the way. “The course here is perfect for sladeo because there’s a lot of really good waves and holes to play in,” Kvanli said. “It’s a lot of fun to watch, everybody has to be creative and figure out the best combination for going fast and throwing tricks.” The Power Olympic Outdoors Center will host a fund-raising spaghetti dinner 7 p.m. Friday, to raise money for equipment and travel expenses for junior Olympians and Olympic hopefuls.

Outdoor Essentials Waterproof Map - $11.95 This National Geographic map will stay dry because it’s printed on waterproof, tear-resistant, lightweight, paper-like plastic. Bending Branches Breeze Plus Telescoping Kayak Paddle - $249.99 Bending Branches Breeze Plus Telescoping Paddle weighs only two pounds, has a telescoping ferrule and a tri-axial design using aerospace T-700 carbon fiber. Tropos drytop - $208 The Tropos Helix has a customized urethane coating applied to the multi-ply nylon outer shell providing waterproof protection and breathability of the garment. HydroSkin Gloves - $31.95 HydroSkin gloves will protect your hands as you paddle with five millimeters of neoprene, a fleece inner layer, insulation, DWR outer coating and an odor-fighting antimicrobial treatment.

A crawfish boil will be held Saturday evening at the San Marcos River Pub and Grill, where Steve Daniel, author of The Texas Whitewater Manual will give a presentation.

✯FYI To pre-register for courses or demonstrations contact Michelle Kvanli at: michelle@redriverracing. org. Demonstrations are $10. Courses are $20 pre-registration and $25 at the event.

The University Star - Page 9

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — In the early evening hours throughout Spain, restaurants and bars begin serving tapas, tasty bites of interesting cheeses and canapes. It’s a festive atmosphere as neighbors stroll the streets visiting with friends and stopping at favorite restaurants or bars for a glass of wine and something to nibble until dinner late in the evening. As in Spain, tapas have become trendy in many American cities. Some restaurants here have a wonderful selection of tapas. But it isn’t necessary to go out to eat to enjoy them. Tapas are simple to make at home, and tapas parties are a perfect way to entertain friends during the mild spring weather. The origin of tapas is unclear. In Spanish, the word means “top” or “lid,” which may explain why in Spain they are often served on small plates balanced on the tops of wineglasses. Mark Helms, executive chef at Tapa the World in midtown Sacramento, said it is likely that the Spanish custom of covering a wineglass with a small dish began centuries ago as a way to keep fruit flies out of wine. “Eventually, someone probably put almonds, olives or cheese on the plate, and tapas as we know them today were born,” Helms said. Gradually, tapas turned into a friendly competition among Spanish bar owners. What started out as a complimentary piece of cheese or a few almonds became potato tortillas, squid in tomato sauce, snails in garlic butter, shrimp sauteed in white wine or piquillo peppers stuffed with cheese. Today, tapas are nearly a culinary art here and in Spain. “They are similar to appetizers, but a bit more substantial,” said cooking instructor Dionisio Esperas, who teaches several tapas classes each spring at the Sacramento Natural Foods Coop and the Shallots Cooking School in the Nugget Market in Vacaville, Calif. “In Spain, dinner is tradition-

ally eaten late in the evening, so it is customary for bars to serve tapas in the early evening with wine or cocktails to keep people from getting so hungry,” Esperas said. “Here, tapas are generally not served on small plates covering wine glasses. Instead, we serve them on platters or in small bowls, and guests serve themselves. They can be something as simple as Spanish olives, toasted almonds or sauteed shrimp served before a main course, or they can be an entire meal. Logically, the ingredients used for tapas are those commonly found in traditional Spanish cooking, such as almonds, chorizo, serrano ham, hazelnuts, peppers, saffron and smoky paprika. In Spain, recipes vary by region, but they nearly always include nuts, olives and cheese, along with crusty bread that is used to soak up juice and sauce. Some tapas are fried in a batter like a fritter. Others are

saucy mixtures similar to stew or shrimp in a wine sauce. Often they include some sort of seafood, such as anchovies, shrimp, sardines, squid, caviar or smoked salmon. Sauce is often olive oil or a rich tomato sauce. “The most popular tapas at the restaurant are traditional items such as rock shrimp sauteed with garlic, white wine and butter,” said Helms of Tapa the World. “We serve them in cazuela (earthenware dishes). We also have lamb, chicken and beef. “Vegetable tapas are also popular,” he said. “One we have on the menu for just a few weeks in the spring is a piquillo pepper that we sear in olive oil and sprinkle with salt. It’s very simple but it has a wonderful flavor.” “However you choose to serve them,” Esperas says of tapas, “they should be savored slowly while lingering with a glass of wonderful wine.”

SOULSPEAK: Trip home CONTINUED from page 8

was the only one I really knew out of them all… So now what? I was a dead soul wandering this crash site, and I had some time to kill. Oh, the irony… It was then that I remembered my last thoughts as the plane came down: my family. There was only one thing I wanted at that moment, and

that was to see them one last time. Of course, I was here somewhere in the middle of Georgia, and they were back in Austin, Texas. It was going to be a long trip. Although there was one option… so I started walking for the nearest airport. I chuckled at the irony of the situation once again, and hit the road. Man, I can’t wait until I get my wings…


TRENDS

Page 10 - The University Star

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Ensemble gears up for two-day mariachi festival By Todd Schaaf The University Star Big plans are in the mix for Mariachi Nueva Generación, Texas State’s mariachi band. The group, who will perform Thursday at Evans Auditorium, will host a music festival at the end of April. John Lopez, associate professor of music and director of multicultural ensembles, said the idea of a mariachi band at Texas State came from students. “Students just kind of started playing in the lobby here in the Music Building in the fall of 1996, just playing,” Lopez said. “It officially became a class in the fall of 1997, and it’s been growing and growing ever since.” Lopez said mariachi has been growPhoto courtesy of Texas State Media Relations ing in popularity not only in Texas, but also all over the country. He said FESTIVAL DE MARIACHI: Texas State’s Mariachi Nueva Generación will host a mariahe is excited about the festival. chi festival at the end of April with workshops and concerts for middle and high school “Our yearly mariachi festival is mariachi bands. coming up at the end of April. It’s a

THURSDAY Lonesome Dove Revisited The exhibit is located in the Southwestern Writers Collection on the seventh floor of Alkek Library. Exhibit hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday; 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call (512) 2452313. Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature The exhibit is located in the Southwestern Writers Collection on the seventh floor of Alkek Library. Exhibit hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday; 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call (512) 2452313. Little Heroes Featuring children as subjects, this exhibition reflects the breadth and depth of the Wittliff Gallery’s permanent collection, including its worldclass holdings of contemporary Mexican photography. The exhibit is in the Wittliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican Photography on the seventh floor of Alkek Library. Exhibits are free and open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, and Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday.

All-Student Juried Exhibition An annual competition for students hosted by the department of art and design. Selected student work is surveyed by a guest juror. Galleries I and II are located on the second floor of the Mitte Complex. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Battle of the Bands Texas State’s best bands battle for first place 7 p.m. at George’s. Mariachi Nueva Generación The band will perform under the direction of Marcos Garcia 8 p.m. at Evans Auditorium. Tickets are $2 for the general public and $1 for students.

Welcome to the Sandbox The department of theater and dance presents Welcome to the Sandbox, a new play about the War in Iraq written by Adam Musil, theatre graduate student. The play will be performed at the Theater Center, Room 209. This is a free event. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2:00 p.m. Sunday.

SATURDAY Lonesome Dove Revisited Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature Little Heroes All-Student Juried Exhibition

FRIDAY

Die Fledermaus

Lonesome Dove Revisited

Welcome to the Sandbox

Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature

Bobcat Build (Texas State Community Service Day) Participants come together for Texas State’s annual community service event. The Kick-Off Rally begins 7:30 a.m. at Strahan Coliseum Parking Lot.

Little Heroes All-Student Juried Exhibition Opera Workshop presents Die Fledermaus Join The Texas State Opera Workshop for its spring production of Johann Strauss’ timeless masterpiece. The performance is 8 p.m. at the University Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $10 for the general public and $5 for seniors and students. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information.

weekend of mariachi,” Lopez said. The festival, scheduled for April 28 and 29, is an opportunity for middle school and high school mariachi bands from across the state to come together to compete and play music alongside one another. In addition to performances, the first day of the festival will be a day of workshops and learning. The second day of the festival is a competition for all visiting bands. Lopez said the afternoon of the second day is a time for Texas State mariachi to shine. “Sunday afternoon is when the big mariachi concert goes on,” Lopez said. “Our Texas State youth mariachi does a performance and then the Texas State mariachi comes out.” Kayla McGuire, who plays violin in Mariachi Nueva Generación, said the festival is a good time for both the musicians and audience. “Its not like an orchestra concert where you sit with your hands folded in your lap the whole time and clap at the end,” McGuire, music senior,

said. “It’s something you get involved with, you can dance to, you can throw gritos, which is like a yell, and stuff like that.”

April 1 – performance at Tanger Outlets April 11 – performances at both H-E-B locations April 14 – new uniform fundraiser at Wal-Mart for youth mariachi April 22 – more performances at both H-E-B locations La Feria Del Mariachi April 28 – mariachi workshops and salsa at Glade Theater April 29 – competition culminating in a grand finale concert 3:30 p.m. at Strahan Coliseum

Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature

Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature

Little Heroes

Little Heroes

All-Student Juried Exhibition

All-Student Juried Exhibition

Welcome to the Sandbox

Oscar Perez Horn Recital Oscar Perez, a student of Steve Hager, performs 6 p.m. in the Recital Hall. This is a free event. Call (512) 245-2651 for more information.

Mayan Hieroglyphic Workshop Third Annual Composition Competition Concert The concert is 4 p.m. in the Music Building recital hall. This is a free event. For more information, call (512) 2452651.

MONDAY Lonesome Dove Revisited Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature Little Heroes All-Student Juried Exhibition

Mayan Hieroglyphic Workshop The anthropology department presents a workshop 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The two-day event costs $50 and includes all workshop materials. For more information call (612) 245-8272.

Wendy Faris Reading and Book Signing Join author Wendy Faris for a reading 3:30 p.m. followed by at question-and-answer session at 5 p.m. in the Southwestern Writers Collection on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library. This is a free event. For more information, call (512) 245-2163.

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

Lonesome Dove Revisited

Lonesome Dove Revisited

Mariachi Nueva Generación events:

Texas State MFA Student Readings Creative writing graduate students read their poetry and fiction as part of this semester’s First Tuesday series. The readings are free and open to the public 5 p.m. in the Southwestern Writers Collection on the seventh floor of the Alkek Library. Call (512) 245-2313 for more information. Darfur Join this lecture and discussion about efforts for relief and the fate of Darfur 7 p.m. in the LBJ Teaching Theater.

Farmers Market Shop for fresh fruit and vegetables 3 to 6 p.m. at 104 S. C.M. Allen Parkway. For more information, call (512) 3938400.

WEDNESDAY Lonesome Dove Revisited Hecho en Tejas: Celebrating Texas Mexican Literature Little Heroes All-Student Juried Exhibition First Annual Native American Cultural Awareness Conference: Reflections and Hope on Native America: Past, Present and Future The conference is 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center. Rising Stars Performance Series Renowned music historian Bill Malone will begin the series 7 p.m. at the Aquarena Center.

TV SCHEDULE for Channels 17 &19 Tuesday 5 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. Wednesday 5 p.m. 6 p.m. Thursday 5 p.m. 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m.

Zilo: Week 6 Hr 1 (Ch. 17 only) French in Action Lesson 12 French in Action Lesson 24 TKL Lecture Series: Yiyun Li Zilo: Week 6 Hr 1 (Ch. 17 only) ASG Student Senate Meeting Zilo: Week 5 Hr 2 (Ch. 17 only) French in Action Lesson 36 French in Action Lesson 49 Entrepreneurship: William Cunningham


Thursday, March 29, 2007

TRENDS/DIVERSIONS

The University Star - Page 11

✯ Sometimes Web-only is the way to go Web. My pick for While I am eagerly this is found at www. awaiting a new batch handdrawngames. of Wii games to hit com/DesktopTD/, but the market (I’m not you can just as soon going to buy Happy run a Google search on Feet, after all) I’ve “tower defense” if you’d been forced back onto BILL RIX prefer another version. my computer for gamStar Columnist If you have less ing. Unfortunately, time to dedicate, try nothing terribly intersome more casual games like esting is out right now, as I am the ones at Orisinal (www. not too interested in Oblivion ferryhalim.com/orisinal/). Exand S.T.A.L.K.E.R. is still a bit tremely well-designed, Orisinal too expensive. Additionally, offers several dozen easy, quick Huxley isn’t out yet, so what’s games, good for lunch and durthe point? ing class downtime. Web-only games are a lifeA modern classic is Line saver in situations like this. Rider (www.official-linerider. Web-only doesn’t just mean com/play.html), created by a your average, humdrum games Slovenian college student and over at PopCap Games, but originally shown on Devianalso more advanced fare like tART. Meteoric success led to a fully 3D first-person shooter the purchasing of the game by (www.rasterwerks.com/game/ InXile Entertainment shortly phosphor/beta1.asp). It’s Haloafter it was released, and for esque, which may or may not be your thing, but it’s still a full good reason — it’s almost impossible to quit playing, as evi3-D shooter you can start up denced by the tons of videos on in Firefox, so it’s a start in any YouTube dedicated to the little event. scarf-festooned rider. If you are more strategyWith games like this gaining minded, there are a few variground, it’s essential to see ants of the Warcraft/Starcraft user-made map, Tower Dewhy they are growing. fense, floating around the People’s downtime is de-

creasing, while at the same time the need for escape is on the up-and-up. Casual and passive gaming is filling the void. What does this boil down to? We need small, easy-to-play games to fill the little spots of free time. Well, ‘need’ might be a bit much, as some people don’t care for gaming, but for others it helps pass the time even if it’s only a few minutes. It’s easy to see why the market for such games is exploding, and rightfully so. Where it would take a big team months, even years, to make one of the larger-scale products seen on store shelves, these types of games can typically be made by only a few people over a month or less. It’s good for would-be game designers, as now the power to reach large markets is in the hands of the individual rather than the team. This makes it easier for designers and programmers to get their names out. As more consumers (and investors) take notice, more products of this caliber will begin to pop up and a new breed of game — and gamer — will emerge.

© Pappocom

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3-by-3 box contains every digit from one through nine inclusively.

Wednesday’s solutions:

Wednesday’s solutions:


OPINIONS P FACEBOOK FALLACIES onlineconnection

THE UNIVERSITY STAR

The Texas House and Senate are currently reviewing House Bill 8, which includes a mandatory minimum of 25 years in prison and lifetime monitoring of adults convicted of sexual acts against a victim younger than 12 years old. What do you think? Go to www.UniversityStar.com to vote in our online poll. Results will be published in next Thursday’s issue of The University Star.

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - Page 12

*This is not a scientific poll

Opinions Contact — Emily Messer, staropinion@txstate.edu

Letter to the Editor

THE MAIN POINT

osting incriminating information on the Internet is apparently a subject The University Star needs to revisit every couple of months. It’s clear there are still people out there who don’t think the information they post on sites such as MySpace and Facebook will be scrutinized. This is not the case. The information you post on any Web site can come back to haunt you in the future. The Star begs its readers to please be careful when allowing information to go on the Internet. Anyone who attends a job-finding seminar will be told to delete their MySpace and Facebook accounts to avoid having future employers learn incriminating information. In a February 20 story about a jobinterviewing workshop, The Star quoted Kurt Schafer, director of career services, who warned about social networking sites. “Employers don’t want to see pictures of you partying all over the Internet,” Schafer said. “They want to know they’re hiring someone they can count on to be sober and prepared to work on Monday morning.” Students who do this risk losing potential jobs or internships because of their posts on social networking Web sites. They even risk having their information from Facebook or MySpace used as evidence against them in court. In a July Main Point, The Star told students that employers will access Facebook and MySpace accounts to check out potential employees before hiring them. The Star also wrote two news stories in the fall in which employers and people from Career Services warned students of the repercussions of postings. Simply put, the Internet is public domain. Discovering information about other people is the main purpose of these sites. If you don’t want someone to access information on public domain, then don’t create a Facebook account. If you are applying for a job, temporarily delete the account. Students must also remember that Facebook retains the rights to any images or information you post on it. Essentially, your Spring Break photos belong to Facebook, not you. Not only does The Star take Facebook posts seriously, but reporters from major newspapers have contacted The Star looking for information available on Facebook. The reporters use the Web sites to gather information for a story or find someone’s phone number. The Star practices this as well. Discretion is the best policy. If you don’t want a future employer to see something, don’t post it on the Internet.

Social networking comes with huge price tag

ASG’s referendum not given what it deserved In the March 21 Main Point, The University Star asked students to vote “no” on four items. What good would this do? The Star claimed it would send ASG a message. I don’t know what kind of message. The ASG is doing something very progressive here. They send a ballot before the students once or twice in an academic year. I don’t know of another student government that does this. They make it very simple to vote by sending the ballot via e-mail. In response to students claiming ASG does not inform us, they sent out, also via e-mail, a list of the items on the referendum nearly a week or two before the voting date. It takes nearly 30 seconds to vote. I want to commend ASG and the 970 students who choose to participate in our university’s student government system. I found no reason to vote “no” on any issue. I think it is irresponsible for The Star to want the students to send a message by voting “no.” The real “main point” is that ASG is working to get more students involved not only by e-mailing a yearly referendum, but by the items before us. With the passage of the reapportionment, a suggested “no” by The Star, many more students will be able to be a part of ASG. This will help ASG truly serve the student body. I, for one, would like to see an article by The Star explaining how students can get involved in ASG and the many new seats available. Wouldn’t this better serve the students than bashing the ASG and encouraging a “no” vote? Jakob Grothe geographic information science junior

Online Poll Results Binge drinking

D

o you think binge drinking is a problem at Texas State? Yes 44% No 38% I don’t know 19%

The Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State University-San Marcos Student Media, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication or Texas State UniversitySan Marcos.

Justin Jackley/Star illustration

Results compiled from The University Star Web site online poll. This is not a scientific survey.

LEGAL GUY: Alcohol after hours could result in a hefty fine College students may a.m., every day except not risk turning into a for Sunday morning pumpkin after midnight. — which is better known But they could be fined as Saturday night — on for drinking alcohol when which you can consume the clock strikes 12:15 alcohol until 1:15 a.m. a.m. The crime element If students are drinking CARSON GUY comes in when a person, alcohol past 12:15 a.m., after these designated Star Columnist they could be looking at times, has the intent to fines not to exceed $500 and a consume or does consume an Class C misdemeanor. The law alcoholic beverage in a public in question is not part of the place. San Marcos city ordinances. The most ambiguous part of Instead, it is part of Texas’ Alco- this law — “in a public place” — holic Beverage Code, §105.06. has been argued between scores This law divides areas into of students and police officers. two types: extended hours areas Because of this vague language, and standard hours areas. For many police officers simply example, our beloved Square notify people they are in violacloses at midnight, while Austion and issue a verbal warning tin’s 6th street closes at 2 a.m. without writing a citation. AlEssentially, the state law is dethough the language of this law termined by the city ordinance. may work in a resident’s favor, The law that applies to us many times it can work against restricts the consumption of them, sometime disastrously. alcoholic beverages after 12:15 For example, a citation could

The University Star 601 University Drive Trinity Building San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

be issued to people in their backyard because the gate was open, therefore making them accessible in public. This can be stretched to include hallways of apartment complexes and porches with open doors. The law specifies a violation of the allowed hours for consumption in a public place is a Class C misdemeanor. In old copies of the Texas Legislature, this particular law called for a fine not to exceed $50. The current code, however, has eliminated this portion and simply left it as a Class C misdemeanor. As a result of this small housecleaning measure, people have been exposed to what could amount to a $450 increase in the maximum fine. The Texas Penal Code §12.23 regarding Class C misdemeanors states, “An individual adjudged guilty of a Class C misdemeanor shall be punished by

Editor In Chief...................................Jason Buch, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.........................Emily Messer, staropinion@txstate.edu News Editor..............................Nick Georgiou, starnews@txstate.edu Trends Editor....................Maira Garcia, starentertainment@txstate.edu Photo Editor...................................Monty Marion, starphoto@txstate.edu Sports Editor..................................Chris Boehm, starsports@txstate.edu

a fine not to exceed $500.” What this means to you is that you could be charged up to $500 if issued and convicted of drinking in a public place after hours. Many times, the best way to deal with a situation in which a citation for after-hours consumption could result is to work with the on-site police officer. They have to make a judgment call on whether or not they can issue a citation at all, and, if so, then decide whether they will or not. Their decision might be based on how you conduct yourself. Unless you are able to commit to mounting a defense to avoid paying up to $500, then it is advisable to keep tabs on the time and where you are when you drink alcohol. Another intriguing question is how different cities and counties are chosen to either be extended hours areas or regular hours areas.

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These exact questions are addressed in §105.05 of the Alcoholic Beverage Code: If the city or county in question has a, “population of 800,000 or more, according to the latest federal census, or 500,000 or more, according to the 22nd Decennial Census of the United States,” as of March 12, 2001. This immediately disqualifies us because, according to www.census.gov, our town of San Marcos is projected to have had 46,111 people residing within the city limits in 2005. The only other way for the extended hours to apply to San Marcos, or another similar incorporated city or county, is if the extended hours are adopted by an ordinance of the governing body of the city or town. In this case, it would be the San Marcos City Council. For San Marcos, joining other cities and counties that are ex-

Account Executive...........................Jackie Pardue, jp1271@txstate.edu Account Executive.....................Krystal Slater, ks1429@txstate.edu Publications Coordinator..Linda Allen, starbusinessoffice@txstate.edu Publications Director..............Bob Bajackson, stardirector@txstate.edu Visit The Star at www.UniversityStar.com

tended hours areas would mean The Square could stay open until 2 a.m. every night, as well as moving the consumption hours from 12:15 a.m. everyday except Sunday to 2:15 a.m. everyday. Because San Marcos is far from surpassing the 500,000population mark, the only chance of this law being changed rests solely with the city council. Carson Guy is a political science senior. His column tackles legal quandaries. E-mail questions to Guy at staropinion@txstate.edu. The content and opinions contained herein are in no way meant as legal advice. All information is general in nature. Do not rely on information within this article when trying to resolve a specific legal issue. All situations are unique and require specific legal advice from competent counsel. The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the fall and spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday with a distribution of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright March 29, 2007. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


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��������������������� ad policiesand costs

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - Page 13 Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - Page 33

All classified ads are charged 20¢ per word. Ads may be emailed to starclassifieds@txstate.edu. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. Classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. Refunds will only be given when a classified ad has been paid by credit card. The Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, and discontinue any classified ad at any time without prior notification. Classified ads will be edited for style purposes. Classified ads that do not note heading, will be put under the appropriate heading. All classified ads are published free, on-line at www.universitystar.com. Since this is a free service, posting is not guaranteed. While The University Star attempts to screen ads for misleading claims or illegal content, it is not possible for us to investigate every ad and advertiser. Please use caution when answering ads, especially any which require you to send money in advance.

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AUTO 2006 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GT, 12,500 miles, FULLY LOADED. Sport Pkg., spoilers, leather, moon roof, Rockford Fosgate sound system. $23,000, obo. (512) 557-6295.

FOR RENT $495, 1BD/1BA, ON TSU SHUTTLE. FREE internet. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 1BD/1BA, $450. 4-PLEX, 500 SQ. FT. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 1BD OR 2BD. Great view, on the square, spacious. GL, (512) 878-2233. $410 EFFICIENCY, DOWNTOWN & CLOSE TO TSU. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 3BA/2BA QUIET, LUXURIOUS COMMUNITY! Huge closets. GL, (512) 878-2233. ASAP MOVE-INS! 1BD, $425; 2BD, $500; 3BD, $650. GL, (512) 878-2233. NEWLY RENOVATED URBAN COMMUNITY, cable/Internet PAID. GL, (512) 878-2233. NEXT TO CAMPUS-BALCONES APTS. 1BD, 2BD, 3BD, roommate matching. Pre-lease for May or Aug. Now updated w/ wooden floors and ceramic tile. Economical w/ bills included. Most rooms $300-$375. 1BD/1BA with electric, cable and Internet, $620/mo. (512) 392-2700. LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION. Walk to class. 427 Lindsey St. Apts. Priv. 1BD/1BA. Very nice. Tile floors, ceiling fans, w/d. $675/mo. Adjoins campus at Lindsey and Academy St. James K. Wise Real Estate, (512) 396-8400. $0 APP. $0 DEP. $199 total movein. 1BD/1BA, $475; 2BD/2BA, $570. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. !!!MAY SPECIALS!!! Pre-lease NOW! Most bills paid. GL, (512) 878-2233. 2BD/2BA. River access, most bills paid. GL, (512) 878-2233. 4BD/2BA, $279 P.P. Most bills paid. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 3BD/2BA HOUSES FOR RENT. Kyle and San Marcos. GL, (512) 878-2233. HOUSES NEXT TO CAMPUS. For more information, call (512) 392-2700. 2BD/1BA AVAILABLE NOW! Newly remodeled, great neighborhood. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. FREE APARTMENT INFO. GL, (512) 878-2233. 3BD/2.5BA w/ walk-in closets and w/d included. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. SPACIOUS 3BD/3BA in small apartment community, very private. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. PERFECT APARTMENTS FOR YOUR MONEY! GL, (512) 878-2233.

FOR RENT-APTS ENJOY SPRING BREAK YEAR ROUND! $379 pp. GL, (512) 878-2233. ALL BILLS PAID! Student property. Call today! GL, (512) 878-2233. NOW PRE-LEASING FOR MAY ‘07 AND AUGUST ‘07. Call Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. 1BD/1BA AVAILABLE! Water paid. GL, (512) 878-2233. AWESOME DEAL! 2BD/2BA, 974 SQ. FT. $696. w/d included. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. ALL BILLS PAID! 1, 2, 3, 4 bedrooms available. w/d included. Walk to school. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. MOVE-IN TODAY!!! $785 2BD/2.5BA townhouse, 3 blks. from TSU. Free HBO, free Road Runner, full size w/d, SMALL, CLEAN AND QUIET COMMUNITY. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans and prices. (512) 396-4181. AUGUST AVAILABILITY! 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms. GL, (512) 878-2233. LARGE 1BD WITH HUGE WALK IN CLOSET! GL, (512) 878-2233. ASAP MOVE-INS. Call GL, (512) 878-2233. $785 PRE-LEASE NOW FOR 5/20 OR 8/20. 2/2.5 townhouse, 3 blks. from TSU. Free HBO, free Road Runner, full Size w/d, small, clean and quiet community. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans and prices. (512) 396-4181.

FOR RENT-APTS

FOR RENT-HOUSES

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

2BD/1BA. $750, walking distance to campus! GL, (512) 878-2233. HUGE 2BD/2BA 810 sq. ft. for $575/mo., beautiful pool and private patios. Contact Apartments To Go for more information, (512) 353-3733. FOUR PLEX APT available now, $525/mo., $150 deposit. 2BD/1BA, 1,000sq.ft., shuttle route, Paul (512) 557-0305 or (512) 353-7367. 3 ROOMMATES??? No problem! Duplexes available. GL, (512) 878-2233. APARTMENTSTOGO.COM. Free list of apartment prices and amenities or visit our office on The Square! (512) 353-FREE. BEST PRICE! Large 4BD/2BA with wood floors. GL, (512) 878-2233. GREAT DEAL! $499, all bills paid, with full size washer/dryer. Close to campus. ATG (512) 353-3733. 4BD/4BA, $350 A MONTH. Internet/ cable w/ HBO/phone/trash pd. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. $575, 2BD/2BA, 810 SQ. FT. $200 OFF 1st month rent. Apartment Experts, (512) 805-0123. FURNISHED 4BD/4BA STUDENT PROPERTY. Great price! GL, (512) 878-2233. PERFECT ROOMMATE DESIGN, bus route, includes w/d. GL, (512) 878-2233. BEAUTIFUL 2BD/1BA in downtown San Marcos with parking. Call (830) 609-6162 or (830) 832-4914. AFFORDABLE GATED SECLUSION, cable/internet paid. GL, (512) 787-2233.

3BD/2.5BA AVAILABLE IN KYLE AREA, NEW HOUSE! PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. 3BD/2BA HOME AVAILABLE ASAP! Great neighborhood, 1,600 sq ft. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. KYLE. 3BD/2.5BA/2 LIVING PLUM CREEK. New school, parks, & pools. Two-story, 1,750 sq. ft. Sm. pets OK. $1,100/mo. Mike (512) 695-6117. 2BD/1BA HOME ON 5 ACRES. 6 miles south of San Marcos, $600/mo. plus deposit. Call (512) 357-6271 or (830) 660-0787. 2BD/1BA, CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT. Fenced backyard. $625/mo. Available now. (512) 396-1717.

OVERHEAD LINE WORK! Line Tech is now hiring all positions including A, B, and C lineman as well as foremans and operators. Employer providing new equipment, new tools and excellent pay and benefits. Employment opportunities available for complete crews. All inquiries please call (512) 321-6655. RESTAURANT IN WIMBERLEY looking for morning shift waitress staff 10a.m.- 3p.m. Call (512) 847-0742 or (512) 847-1625. Ask for Eva. TEACHERS NEEDED: NOW HIRING PT TEACHERS. M-F 2:30- 6:30 p.m. Education major/experience/bilingual preferred, but not required. Quality Child Development Center in Kyle. (512) 405-3700 or fax resume to (512) 405-3701. SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS POSITIONS-ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS APRIL 3RD Camp Counselor positions available at Camp Weequahic, a co-ed children’s sleepaway camp in northeastern PA, about 21/2 hours from New York City. WE WILL BE AT THE UNIVERSITY ON TUESDAY, APRIL 3 TO CONDUCT INTERVIEWS AT THE LBJ STUDENT CENTER; PLEASE CALL (512) 245-2645 FOR INFORMATION. YOU CAN SIGN UP ON LINE AT JOBS4CATS, THROUGH CAREER SERVICES. WALK INS ALSO WELCOME. Positions are available for all areas of sports, including tennis, gymnastics, baseball, softball, roller hockey, golf, basketball, soccer, lacrosse and others, as well as waterfront, including swimming, canoeing, sailing, windsurfing and waterskiing. We will pay for training and certifications where required. Other positions may be available in hobby areas such as archery, dance, aerobics, theater, piano accompanist, rocketry, woodworking and ceramics. Salaries start at $200 per week, plus room, board and travel expenses. Please visit our website at: www.weequahic.com for more information and to FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION. We will get back to you as soon as we have received your application and look forward to meeting with you on the 3rd of April. You may also email us at newsweeq@aol.com to set up an appointment or with any questions. UPSCALE RESTAURANT IN KYLE hiring experienced server, dishwasher and busboy. Call (512) 268-3463, Bordeauxs.net TEXAS HEALTH & RACQUET CLUB now hiring FT/PT. (512) 353-0789. !BARTENDING! Up to $300/day. No experience necessary. Training Provided. Age 18+ OK. (800) 965-6520 ext. 157. BABYSITTER NEEDED FOR 3YR.OLD. Saturday & Sunday only 10a.m. to 8p.m. E-mail jax@txstate.edu. OMA’S HAUS RESTAURANT. Hiring all positions. Apply within between 2-5p.m. 541 Hwy. 46 South, New Braunfels.

CITY OF KYLE SUMMER JOB OPENINGS: The Parks & Recreation Dept. is now accepting applications for Summer Camp Staff, American Red Cross Lifeguards and Water Safety Instructors for the Summer Day Camps and Kyle Pool. Competitive pay for all positions! Recreation and Education degree seekers preferred for Camp Staff. Applications available at www.cityofkyle.com/kyle-employment. php. Contact Program Coordinator at programs@cityofkyle.com for camp positions. Contact Aquatic Supervisor at (512) 262-3936 for pool positions. PETE’S DUELING PIANO BAR is seeking friendly, outgoing cocktail waitresses with big smiles and hardworking doormen. We are open and accepting applications Tues.-Sat. 6:30-8:30 at 421 E. Sixth St., Austin, Texas. LOCAL BUSINESS LOOKING TO FILL SEVERAL FT/PT POSITIONS. Duties include light office work. Please call (512) 805-0208. NANNY NEEDED for two children in the afternoons and this summer. Elem. Ed major preferred. Call Tamara at (512) 203-0810 or come by 217 E. Hopkins, Pedal Power Bicycles to fill out application. SUMMER JOBS– Receive contact information now for summer employment at US National Parks, Western Dude Ranches and Theme Parks. You must apply early. www.summerjobs-research.org HELP WANTED AT ROSE GARDEN. Please apply in person. Call (512) 805-0880. LICENSED REAL ESTATE AGENTS WANTED for the #1 apartment locating service in San Marcos, Apartment Experts. Full and Part time available. Call Greg at (512) 805-0123. SUMMER CAMP JOBS ON LAKE TRAVIS. Salary, room & board provided. Experience not necessary, love of children essential and willingness to learn camp life required. Contact camptexlake.org or (512) 264-1044. DIRECT CARE OPPORTUNITIES: CORE Health Care is looking for individuals that want to work along side caring professionals and skilled supportive supervisory staff. Our treatment facility is a non-aversive, active and individualized approach in pleasant, home-like surroundings. Work with psychiatric or brain injury individuals. Opportunities in Dripping Springs. Looking to fill weekend and overnight shifts. Candidate must be 21 years of age, have satisfactory driving record. Drug screening and criminal background check required. Pay begins at $8.50, but commensurate with experience and education. If eligible there is a sign on bonus of $200. May also qualify for health insurance, PTO, 401K and monthly gas reimbursements. Please fax resume to (512) 858-5104 or call Kerri (512) 894-0701 ext. 219, or e-mail kalvis@corehealth.com. Please visit our website at www.corehealth.com MAKE UP TO $75 each taking online surveys. www.CashToSend.com

WIENERCHNITZEL NOW HIRING. Immediate openings for all areas. Must have food handlers card. FT/PT. Will work around schedule for students. (512) 392-7077. UNCLE BILLY’S SMOKE HOUSE AND BREWERY is the newest addition to Barton Spring’s restaurant row. Uncle Billy’s is now accepting applications for all positions. No exp. required. Please apply in person at 1530 Barton Springs (next to Austin Java), Monday through Friday 1 p.m.-5 p.m. CORRECTIONAL OFFICER $9/HR. Lockhart Correctional Facility has immediate openings for persons seeking a career in corrections. Paid benefits and training. Must have a high school diploma or GED and a valid TDL. Must pass drug screening, physical, and background check. Apply in person at: 1400 Industrial Blvd. Lockhart, TX EOE/m/f/d/v. LOOKING FOR LEAD CARETAKER. Must have medical experience, seeking female with trusting and respectable disposition. M-F possibly some weekends. $9/hr., 20-30 hr. weekly. Please call Melissa at (512) 557-6113. ONLY SERIOUS APPLICANTS NEED APPLY.

FOR RENT-CONDOS/ TOWNHOUSES 2BA/1.5BA PET FRIENDLY TOWN HOMES! $575-$625. GL, (512) 878-2233. $785 PRE-LEASE NOW FOR 5/20 OR 8/20. 2BD/2.5BA townhouse, 3 blks. from TSU. Free HBO, free Road Runner, full Size w/d, SMALL, CLEAN & QUIET COMMUNITY. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans and prices. (512) 396-4181. TOWNHOME COMMUNITY. Some bills paid. GL, (512) 878-2233. FOR LEASE. Immediately. 2BD/1BA condo at University Place. One block from campus, covered parking, quiet complex. Call (830) 832-9404 for details.

FOR RENT-DUPLEX ROOMMATES NEEDED for 3BD/3.5BA duplexes. (512) 587-2660 or (210) 324-0285. $765 2BD/2BA DUPLEX, 3 BLKS. FROM TSU. Pre-leasing for 5/20 or 8/20. Free HBO, Road Runner, full size w/d, SMALL, CLEAN & QUIET COMMUNITY. www.windmilltownhomes.com for floor plans and prices. (512) 396-4181 2BD/1BA fourplex with w/d connections. CLEAN. Only $500. GL, (512) 878-2233. SPACIOUS 3BD/2.5BA! Garage, w/d included. GL, (512) 878-2233. AVAILABLE NOW! 3BD/3BA, w/d included, cable and trash paid. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. 3BD/3BA AVAILABLE NOW! Quiet complex, $650/mo. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. DUPLEX-3BD/2.5BA/2 CAR GARAGE on bus route, w/d, $1,050/mo., pets ok. Call (512) 587-7559. FOR LEASE 2BD/2BA DUPLEX APARTMENT at 911 Allen St. in San Marcos. Carport, fenced backyard, pets allowed, $775/mo. Available June 1. Call Steve at (830) 832-5644. AVAILABLE NOW! 3BD/3BA, cable, w/d included. GL, (512) 878-2233. 3BD/3.5BA ON TSU BUS ROUTE, w/d included, big backyards. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. SPACIOUS 3BD/2.5BA WITH GARAGE AND W/D. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. 2BD/2BA DUPLEX AVAILABLE NOW! Large living area and backyard. PRIME PMC, (512) 878-2233. DUPLEX. 2BD/1BA. Fenced yard, peaceful neighborhood, near campus. (512) 558-1445.

FOR SALE 3BD/2BA MOBILE HOME in the Saddlebrook Mobile Home Park. $37,500. Call (254) 876-3205 or (254) 749-5984. CAP & GOWN, size 5’6”-5’9”. Call (210) 566-6688.

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WANTED USED CARS, TRUCKS, VANS. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell please call Willis Mitchell. (512) 353-4511.


SPORTS THE UNIVERSITY STAR

gridirongames Texas State football continues its spring schedule with its first full-scale scrimmage, slated for 1 p.m. Saturday. The Bobcats will hold a light workout Friday. The scrimmage marks the end of week two for spring practice, which concludes with the annual Maroon and Gold Classic April 14.

“You don’t know how fast this team is going to adjust to the changes,” said Coach Brad Wright. “We’re making good practice and will continue to get better.” — Courtesy of Media Relations

Thursday, March 29, 2007 - Page 14

Sports Contact — Chris Boehm, starsports@txstate.edu

STRETCH IT OUT

Approach to pitching a factor in ballplayer’s health By Jacob Mustafa The University Star In case you had not yet noticed, baseball pitchers and softball pitchers go about their business on the mound a little bit differently. Despite this, recently, senior pitcher Sarah Lancour’s experience with softball has seemed an awful lot like what with many baseball pitchers have to live through. “It’s been hard because I can’t even finish my own game,” Lancour said. “I’m getting used to it, but I don’t like it.” Lancour recently went down with a shoulder injury, which is precluding her from playing as a usual softball starter. Like many baseball hurlers, she’s on a pitch count. She cannot finish games. And she’s a bit annoyed about it. This can be shown in contrast to the baseball team’s Friday starter, Mike Hart. The sophomore standout opened this season with five innings of no-hit baseball against the then-ranked Oklahoma Sooners. Yet, he was pulled be-

cause he went over his pitch count. “I didn’t mind coming out because I knew it was the first week of the season,” Hart said. “Earlier in the year, you don’t want to go out there and hurt yourself by trying to be a superhero.” And therein lays the ultimate difference in the two sports, even though softball is the direct descendant of the national pastime. Baseball pitchers are among the most protected commodities in sports, allowed to do only so much. Texas State baseball pitching coach John Maley thinks the practice began years ago, when MLB pitchers’ checks began to inflate. “It started in the professional game when they started paying pitchers so much money,” Maley said. “Now they had this huge investment in these guys and they had to start babying them a little bit.” This is never an argument in softball because many softball pitchers throw complete games and stay in as long as they’re doing well. This could be connected to the longstanding argument underhand pitching contains more of a natural movement of the arm,

therefore causing less damage to a player’s arm. The same cannot be said for overhand baseball pitchers, which perhaps bring up the question why more players are not submarine or sidearm pitchers. Bobcats closer Eric Weaver, junior, has been a submarine pitcher since his stay at Alvin Junior College. “Throwing from the submarine style, it’s sort of been easier on my arm,” said Weaver. “The only real place I get sore is on the back of my shoulder.” According to Lancour, her shoulder injury simply has come from the regular wear and tear of pitching since she was eight, but recent complications to her recovery have been the result of throwing overhand. “The overhand throwing is what hurt me,” said Lancour. “Throwing to first and that kind of thing. But I know the shoulder was from underhand pitching over the years.” Softball starting pitcher Ragan Blake, a junior who has pitched 11 complete games this year, agrees even

the limited amount of overhand throwing their pitchers do can have an effect on the pitcher’s arm. “It actually hurts my arm more in warm-ups to throw overhand, so the majority of the pitchers on our team practice overhand throwing very little,” Blake said. Despite their protected nature, senior starter Justin Fiske thinks the current amount of safety with which the baseball pitchers are handled makes sense, particularly on a college team full of young arms. “I’d much rather we do it this way it is so we’re not blown out by the end of the season,”

Fiske said. According to softball coach Ricci Woodard, there is a reason there are so many great baseball pitchers throwing late into their careers. General practice protects younger baseball pitchers when compared to their softball counterparts. “In softball, you can get a lot more mileage out of the pitchers earlier in their careers than later,” Woodard said. “Some of that’s because we sometimes do that to females. We pitch them and pitch them and pitch them from the time they’re 10.” Still, Hart wishes he had the ability to do what softball pitchers do. “I think what they can do is great, to be able to throw everyday,” Hart said. “If I could do it without getting sore, yeah, it’d be great.”

Diamond Divination

The University’s Star’s sports staff predicts the upcoming MLB season. Follow along all season for tons of fun!

Nathan Brooks

Carl Harper

Gabe Mendoza

Jacob Mustafa

Scott Strickman

Travis Atkins

Chris Boehm

AL East champ

Boston

Boston

NY Yankees

Boston

Boston

Boston

NY Yankees

AL Central champ

Chi White Sox

Detroit

Detroit

Detroit

Detroit

Detroit

Minnesota

AL West champ

Oakland

LA Angels

LA Angels

LA Angels

LA Angels

Oakland

LA Angels

AL Wild Card

Detroit

NY Yankees

Boston

Cleveland

Chi White Sox

NY Yankees

Boston

NL East champ

NY Mets

Philadelphia

NY Mets

NY Mets

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

NY Mets

NL Central champ

Houston

St. Louis

Houston

St. Louis

Houston

St. Louis

Houston

NL West champ

LA Dodgers

LA Dodgers

San Diego

San Diego

San Diego

Arizona

San Diego

NL Wild Card

San Diego

NY Mets

Chi Cubs

Houston

NY Mets

Florida

Chi Cubs

AL champ

Chi White Sox

NY Yankees

Boston

Boston

Chi White Sox

Oakland

Minnesota

NL champ

LA Dodgers

Philadelphia

NY Mets

Houston

Houston

Philadelphia

Houston

World Series champ

LA Dodgers

Philadelphia

NY Mets

Boston

Houston

Oakland

Minnesota

AL MVP

Manny Ramirez

Michael Young

Vernon Wells

Travis Hafner

Vladimir Guerrero

David Oritz

Alex Rodriguez

NL MVP

Albert Pujols

Albert Pujols

David Wright

Albert Pujols

David Wright

Albert Pujols

Derek Lee

AL Cy Young

Johan Santana

Johan Santana

Johan Santana

Daisuke Matsuzaka

Johan Santana

Johan Santana

Johan Santana

NL Cy Young

Roy Oswalt

Roy Oswalt

Roy Oswalt

Roy Oswalt

Roy Oswalt

Carlos Zambrano

Carlos Zambrano


SPORTS

Thursday, March 29, 2007

The University Star - Page 15

Softball team revs up to host UTSA Friday By Carl Harper The University Star While the Texas State baseball team is surging into the national polls and turning the heads of sports fans, Bobcat softball is still searching for its stride. The Bobcats have lost their last four games and currently sit in eighth place in the Southland Conference at 5-7. They are set to host a three-game series against Texas-San Antonio. The Roadrunners will make their second appearance in San Marcos this weekend, beginning with a doubleheader set for 5 and 7 p.m. Friday. The Bobcats will conclude the month of March with the series finale 1 p.m. Saturday. “Every series is important right now, but we have to come out and win this weekend,” Coach Ricci Woodard said. “We’re at the spot where we are focusing on what we need to do to be successful.” Earlier this season, Texas State got its first look at the Roadrunners while hosting the CenturyTel Softball Classic at Bobcat Field. UTSA won the first meeting 3-2 as junior pitcher Janeille Nickels picked up the win and senior pitcher Sarah Lancour claimed the loss

for the Bobcats. Sophomore third baseman Ali McCormack helped the Bobcats come back 3-0 in the second meeting going 2-for-3 with an RBI single and her only solo homerun of the season thus far. Junior pitcher Ragan Blake threw seven scoreless innings while giving up two hits to give the Bobcats their first shutout and victory of the season. “Luckily we have seen UTSA already so there really aren’t any factors they can hide from us,” Woodard said. “They are a team that puts runs on the board so we will have to score runs as well to go along with good pitching to win this series.” UTSA senior infielder Jessica Rogers gained recognition in the SLC Monday when she was named Southland Conference Hitter of the Week after helping her team to a series victory over Nicholls State. Rogers batted .545 with five runs scored, five RBI and four homeruns during the Roadrunners 2-1 series weekend defeat over the Colonels. She is currently batting .500 with nine homers and 20 RBIs in SLC play and leads UTSA in batting average, atbats, runs, hits, homeruns and RBIs. Her four homeruns over the weekend added to her SLC-

leading career record of 63. “Whoever we have on the mound this weekend will know where Jessica is in the lineup,” Woodard said. “She’s a great player in the conference and probably one of the best in the country. We’ll do what we can do to have her keep the ball in the ballpark.” To go along with the threat of Rogers is senior infielder Aimee Murray, who is batting .343 with eight homeruns and 36 RBI. Pitchers Nickels and junior Amanda Nikolenko have combined for an overall ERA of 3.24 with 148 strikeouts in 229 innings. Blake and Lancour have combined for a 2.64 ERA in conference play and have a 5-6 record. However, Lancour is uncertain she will make an appearance this weekend after leaving last week’s game against Texas A&M in the fourth frame due to re-aggravating her right shoulder. “I’m not sure if I will be pitching,” Lancour said. “But our pitchers will need to put in a good mix of pitches to keep their hitters off balanced and our batters have to take advantage of key situations. We are feeling confident.” Freshman pitchers Elizabeth

Austin Byrd/Star file photo A LITTLE HIGH: Shortstop Alex Newton Reaches for a high throw while a Texas A&M runner slides into second base during the Bobcats’ 5-0 loss to the Aggies March 21. Texas State takes on TexasSan Antonio 5 p.m. Friday at Bobcat Field.

Dennis and Megan Mikeska will have to be ready if called upon to start this weekend. Mikeska has a 2.00 ERA in conference play with one start while Den-

nis has made three appearances without a start. Dennis has given up six runs in 4.2 innings. “I don’t think (our pitchers) will worry too much this week-

end,” sophomore shortstop Alex Newton said. “They will go out and pitch their game and our defense will be there to back them up.”

Obscure sport fuses water polo with river floating By Scott Strickman The University Star Looking for an obscure sport to wet your whistle this semester? Search no further than inner tube water polo, an intramural sport catching on at Texas State. The sport involves two teams composed of four field players and a goalkeeper attempting to score goals on the opposing team, much like water polo. The catch is, players will be forced to float on tubes, rather than on their backs. Officials are still undecided on the depth of the water, but there will be lifeguards on duty and referees to supervise the physical character of the sport. While construction is still underway for the event, registration has begun.

The deadline to sign up is 5 p.m. April 5, with action kicking off the following week at the Aqua Sports Center. Inner tubes will be provided by the Student Rec Center. As for the logistics of the game, that’s nothing new. The real excitement lies in the novel tactics players will be able to use. Instead of swimming, they must remain on their inner tube, paddling to move forward. The only player who would be allowed to stand inside his or her tube is the goalkeeper. Opponents can also tip each other’s tubes in an attempt to steal the ball, or even just to generate some fun. “It’s really cool,” said Ashley McInnis, intramural sports graduate assistance. “It is different from any other intramural sport. It has a different atmosphere. It’s not as intense.”

Trevon Walker, intramurals and campus recreation assistant director, shared McInnis’ enthusiasm as inner tube water polo enters its first season at Texas State. “This is the perfect sport for the average person,” Walker said. “You don’t need a certain skill level to play; (you’re) just sitting in a tube, having a blast.” McInnis said she anticipates the sport will debut as a tournament so organizers can get an idea of how many students will be interested in participating. She also added that the tournament will not be single elimination, ensuring that each team will receive their money’s worth in terms of game action. The intramural office expects two leagues to form, men’s and co-recre-

ational, by the end of the year, with the possibility of adding a third, women’s, if the sport harvests a robust following. Walker said inner tube water polo caught on during his undergraduate studies at Central Missouri State, and foresees even greater success at Texas State. “Students love it,” Walker said. “It is the perfect climate here (at Texas State), especially since a lot of students love the outdoors.” McInnis is excited about the unveiling of a new activity that should enchant the conventional student and the unique experience it presents. “Other schools in Texas (offer the sport),” McInnis said. “It’s really picking up. It offers more variety for those not into the big sports. It offers some-

thing different.” Walker said the sport is designed for anybody. “You don’t need endurance to play,” Walker said. “You can be a couch potato and still have fun.”

✯ FYI Entry fees to participate in the sport are $30. Those interested should get applications from the Intramural Office, located inside the SRC.

Outdoor Center prepares for gulf trip By Travis Atkins The University Star

Adventure seekers from Texas State will head to the coast this weekend as part of the Outdoor Center’s Adventure Trip Program. A group of 10 people and two trip leaders will travel to the National Seashore of Padre Island and kayak in the ocean waters. Trip leader Cody Hatfield grew up on the Blanco River in Wimberley and said ocean kayaking is more intense than river kayaking. “Mainly it’s just the wave factor,” Hatfield, recreational administration senior, said. “Also the wind can push you around a little and if people aren’t used to that it could be a little challenging.” Hatfield and fellow trip leader Charlie Lee have a year and a half and two years of experience leading trips, respectively, and are well-trained in kayaking. “Our group usually meets days in advance and we hand out equipment and brief them on everything they need to know,” Lee, resource and environmental studies senior, said. This is the Adventure Trip Program’s 10th trip of the spring semester and the group has eight more planned. Many of the trips are not just for fun,

but for education as well, such as the Wilderness First Aid Certification and Mountain Biking Workshop, both held earlier this semester. During Spring Break Lisa Carter, second-year graduate student, led a group of 11 on a camping excursion to the Grand Canyon for a five-day trip. “When we got there, we did a 10-mile hike and set up camp at the base,” Carter said. “Once we were set up, we did day hikes for five days and on the last day, we did the 10-mile hike out.” While the Grand Canyon was a major trip, the group still has a bigger one planned for the end of the semester. A weeklong rafting trip in California is planned for May 14 to 20. Students must pay $400 in addition to transportation costs for the excursion. A day trip, such as one of the two rock-climbing trips, costs students $15, while a weekend trip such as the upcoming coastal kayaking costs $35. The prices increase slightly for members of the faculty and staff and the general public. Last summer, the group’s major trip was to Browns Canyon in Colorado. Lee led that trip and said it was one of the most memorable. “We did an overnighter and got to go rafting, which was re-

ally cool,” Lee said. “We did the run once and then got up in the morning and did half of it again. That was a lot of fun.” Before one can obtain tripleader status, he or she must first start as an intern and go on a trip voluntarily. On the next trip, the participant can become assistant trip leader. Then, once he or she is competent in kayaking, rock climbing and backpacking, the person can become a leader. The group averages about 10-12 people per trip, which is the maximum capacity of the vans they use. While many of the people have experience in outdoor activities, Carter said it is not required and they usually get a mix of experience levels. “We get a variety of people,” Carter said. “From beginners to advanced, and 18-year-old freshman to grad students and even community members.” The pre-trip meeting for the upcoming kayaking trip is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Outdoor Center in Sewell Park. While this one is already booked up, Hatfield encouraged anyone who is interested to sign up for trips in the future. “It’s one of the most inexpensive ways you can get out and see Texas and everything else around this area,” Hatfield said.


Page 16 - The University Star

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