Page 1

Biased Mel

Sweet 16

Films a-plenty

SXSW offers movies for the masses/Trends/Page 6

Gibson’s translation of gospels not all it’s cracked up to be/Opinions/Page 5

Star sports staff offers their picks for NCAA tournament/Sports/Page 10

WEDNESDAY

VOLUME 93, ISSUE 65 www.universitystar.com

MARCH 24, 2004

T E X A S

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y - S A N

M A R C O S

High-tech thieves hit campus Locations & Times of Computer Theft Reports Lampasas

March 8, 7:12 p.m.

Brogdon

Academic Services

March 12, 9:40 p.m.

College of Education

Brazos

Occupational Education

Commons Hall

Retama

March 9, 7:50 a.m.

Beretta

Nueces

BOBCAT TRAIL

Laurel

March 9, 11 a.m.

Flowers

Evans Liberal Arts

Scooter Hendon/Star illustration

Technology thefts spur security measure increace

By Jennifer Warner Senior Reporter

The University Police Department is beefing up its security measures in numerous academic buildings around campus after a series of computer thefts before Spring Break.

Concert to show history, diversity By Amber Conrad News Reporter A free concert performance by some of the state’s most prominent artists will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday in the LBJ Student C e n t e r Ballroom. Te x a s M u s i c History BENSON UnPlugged 4 will host a variety of musical artists from around Texas to promote diversity through musical interaction on the Texas State campus. “It’s going to be really fun,” said Gary Hartman, Center for Texas Music History director. “We get the musicians on stage together and encourage them to just jam. It’s really a song swap in a way; they trade songs, but they all perform together.” The “post-modern king of western swing” Ray Benson, Grammy award winner and cofounder of Asleep at the Wheel, returns again this year to host the event. “Ray is simply outstanding in his ability to relate the songs and music he performs with the history of Texas,” said Eugene Bourgeois, history chair. Benson will perform along with Ruthie Foster and Cyd Cassone, who mix blues, gospel, roots and folk music to attain their signature sound. “Ruthie Foster, who is a truly

I N S I D E

Amusements....................7

gifted singer, brought the house down two years ago,” Bourgeois said. “She sang a spiritual song that had Joe Ely and Ray Benson literally tipping their hats to her onstage.” Debuting at the event this year is the Sisters Morales, that will showcase its diverse Mexican-influenced music. Another first-time performer in the concert is Chris Wall, a Grammy-nominated songwriter who uses western honky-tonk sounds to evoke the mythology of Texas through his songs. Returning to the UnPlugged stage is accordion player Joel Guzman, acclaimed instrumentalist, singer and performer. His band, Aztec, formed the inspiration for RCA’s recent Los Super Seven release. Guzman will accompany the performers on stage, providing backup as they improvise together. “The concert will really be a wonderful blend of all these musical styles, and it looks to be another standing room only event,” Hartman said. Each artist will perform songs illustrating the history and diversity of their specialization in Texas music. UnPlugged 4 is open to the general public and is free to anyone who can get past the door. Last year, about 1,100 people were in attendance with more than 100 people having been turned away for safety reasons. It is suggested that concertgoers arrive early to get a seat or spot on the floor.

GETTING HOOKED

g See CRIME, page 4

The Talon IVRS, seen here attached to a Ford Crown Victoria, is designed to hook underneath the rear bumper of a car in order to prevent or stop high-speed chases.

W

By Nikki Dawson News Reporter hile it may seem reminiscent of a Batman episode, San Marcos resident Sydney Weatherford says he created his invention from a dream he had one night. “I had a dream about a car chase and a wrecker and I dreamed that I attached a wrecker to the front end of a police car,” Weatherford said. Realizing he was on to something, Weatherford began to experiment with his idea. He eventually created the Talon, which is designed to prevent police chases or stop those already in progress. The device, which derives its name from the claws of

GENEROSITY

Comics/Crossword........7 Opinions...........................5

Voting machines to replace current election equipment

Hays County may soon move into the 21st century of voting if county commissioners approve the purchase of electronic voting machines in the coming months. “We’re required by law to

Sports...........................9,10 Trends...............................6

Today’s Weather

High: 75 Lo w : 62

a hawk, can also aid officers in getting drunken drivers off the road. The Talon Immediate Vehicle Restraint System consists of two large metal hooks that attach to the front bumper of a police cruiser. Weatherford created two custom designs that connect to the chassis of the car. The prototype is powered by an air tank in the trunk of the car and is activated with a control device by the driver. According to a press release, the Talon is designed to end 80 percent of all police pursuits. The system makes use of weight transfer. When the system is applied, weight is transferred from the target vehicle to the restraint vehicle, thus making the brakes g See HOOKED, page 4

Commissioners OK buying e-polls

By Kassia Micek Assistant News Editor

News.............................2-4

replace our present election equipment by 2006,” said Joyce Cowan, Hays County elections administrator. In the United States, 30 jurisdictions currently use electronic voting devices. In Texas, counties such as Harris, Tarrant, Brazos and Travis currently use electronic devices. Hays County commissioners listened to a presentation on the E-Slate voting machine during their Tuesday meeting. As a result of the controversy

surrounding the 2000 presidential election, Congress and state legislatures passed laws requiring all counties to have one Direct Recording Electronic device in each county election precinct by January 2006. Hays County has 36 county election precincts. The cost per machine is $25,000. Phillip Braithwaite, Hart Intercivic sales and business development director, made a g See E-POLLS, page 4

Air Force ROTC to hold info session By Chris Boehm News Reporter

AM Rainy/PM Cloudy

Thursday’s Forecast Cloudy 81/63

In some instances, there was evidence of forced entry into an office, but in some of the cases it was simply a matter of an unlocked door. Chapa said he believes each case may be connected, and all of the cases are currently under investigation. UPD Investigator Jeb Thomas said at this point they have a few leads, but he was not able to release that information. Measures are being taken by the UPD to minimize these crimes. The

Andy Ellis/Star photo

Classifieds........................8

Wind: From SE at 19 mph Precipitation: 30% Max. Humidity: 74% UV Index: 4 Low

The thefts took place March 8 through 12 with an undisclosed amount of computer equipment taken from offices in Commons Hall, the Nueces Building, Evans Liberal Arts Building, the Academic Services Building and Flowers Hall. “Periodically, you’ll have one or two laptops that are taken from the library or the cafeteria or the (LBJ Student Center),” said UPD captain Paul Chapa. “But over the last couple of weeks we’ve definitely seen a rise in computer theft.”

Andy Ellis/Star photo Business management junior Brianna Peterson receives a free soda from business management sophomore Heather Cook who was one of many women passing out free drinks in The Quad Tuesday. The unaffiliated group of Christian women collected donations from local vendors, then purchased and are now passing out about 115 cases of soda, CDs and books until Thursday.

On Wednesday, the Texas State Air Force ROTC detachment will host an information session highlighting a general overview of the organization and a look at scholarship and career opportunities. The event will take place

from 3 to 5 p.m. in the LBJ Student Center, Room 3-14.1. “There are many people who have varying impressions about a military career and our program,” said Brett Gibson, 2nd Lieutenant of the United States Air Force and recent product of the AFROTC. “We want to show what our cadets do in and out of the classrooms

and in their extracurricular activities.” Lt. Charles Cohoon and Capt. Marlena Fernandez will host the meeting, educating and informing the public about the ROTC program. A Q&A session will follow Cohoon and Fernandez’s presentation. g See ROTC, page 3


PAGE TWO The University Star

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Bobcat Supper is at 5:30 p.m. at the Christian Community Center. Science Fiction/Fantasy Society meets at 8 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-11.1.

Calendar of

Crosstalk meets at 8 p.m. in the Alkek Teaching Theater.

EVENTS

Bible Study meets at 8 p.m. at the Catholic Student Center.

Thursday

Wednesday

Campus Christian Community meets for free lunch and study at 12:30 p.m. at CCC.

Christians at Texas State meets at noon in the LBJ Student Center, Room 3-10.1.

Relationship Concerns meets at 4:30 p.m. at the Texas State Counseling Center.

Sexual Assault & Abuse Services meets at 4:30 p.m. at the Texas State Counseling Center. For more information, call 245-2208.

Public Relations Student Society of America meets at 5 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-10.1.

American Marketing Association meets at 5:30 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-14.1.

Victory Over Violence meets at 5:30 p.m. at LBJSC, Room 3-12.1.

Career Services hosts a workshop to prepare for the fair from 5:306:30 p.m. at LBJSC, Room 3-7.1. Student Volunteer Connection meets at 5:30 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-5.1.

Texas State Cru meets at 7:30 p.m. at the Academic Services Building-South, Room 315.

Higher Ground meets at 5:30 p.m. at St. Mark’s Church.

11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., Old Main, Room 320. “SpanishLanguage Radio.”

Albert B. Alkek Library Monday-Wednesday 7:30 a.m. - 1 a.m. Thursday 7:30 a.m. - midnight

Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship meets at 8 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320. Christians on Campus meets at 9:30 p.m. at the McCarty Center.

Friday NA Meeting is at noon. For more information, call 245-3601. Latter-Day Saints Student Association free lunch is at noon at 801 Chestnut Street across from Grinn’s. Students With Alternative Transportation, the organization that provides free rides home for Texas State students, operates from 11 p.m.-3 a.m.

Calendar submisions are free. Send submissions Calendar of Events Manager Paul Lopez at TexasStateCalendar@yahoo.com or call 245-3476 for more information. Notices for weekly meetings need to be submitted once. The University Star reserves the right to refuse entries or edit for libel, style and space purposes. Deadline: Three working days prior to publication.

Friday 7:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Student Recreation Center Monday-Thursday 6 a.m. - midnight Friday 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Sunday noon - midnight Golf Course Open daily 7 a.m. - dusk

2-3:15 p.m., Old Main Room 320. “The Ethics of Writing and The New York Times.” 3:30-4:45 p.m., Old Main, Room 234. “Battlefield Journalism: Covering Iraq.” 5-6 p.m., Old Main, Room 234. “Research Paper Competition.”

12:30-1:45 p.m., Old Main, Room 234. “Get a job – Panel Discussion.”

The Rock meets at 7:30 p.m. at the CSC chapel.

Hours of Operation

Sunday 1 p.m. - 1 a.m.

9:30–10:45 a.m., Old Main, Room 234. “NASA: Handling Crisis and Triumph in the Modern Media World.”

Calendar Submission Policy Sign Language Club meets at 7 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-10.1.

Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Wednesday Mass Communication Week Events

7-9 p.m., Old Main 234. Film screening, 9/11.

LOCAL UPDATES Campus

Supple Folk Music Series features Quick Step

Quick Step, featuring the musical talents of John Kirk and Trish Miller, comes to Texas State for a 7:30 p.m. performance Friday in the Music Building Recital Hall. The show is part of the Jerry and Cathy Supple Folk Music Series, co-sponsored by Century Tel, with proceeds benefiting the Reed Parr Music Endowment. In addition to Kirk and Miller, New Yorkbased Quick Step’s membership includes Ed Lowman, Sara Milonovich and Cedar Stanistreet. Lively fiddle tunes together with fancy footwork and folksongs are the calling cards of a Quick Step concert. Highlights of the program include Kirk’s fiddle skills and Miller’s dynamic clog dancing. Selections are traditional folksongs and fiddle tunes, originals and historical, sentimental and funny pieces. Since 1988, Kirk and Miller have toured throughout the United States and abroad as a duo and with Quick Step, from a school down in the Grand Canyon to Barbados, from the Dance Flurry Festival to a concert at the Academy of Culture in St. Petersburg, Russia. They are in demand as arts-in-education specialists, participating in several residence programs at schools and colleges across the United States. They have been featured on two WMHT-Public TV specials: Songs from the Heart of the Adirondacks and Christmas in the Adirondacks. Albums available include Fiddle Tunes of the North Country featuring “Quick Step,” “Quicksteppin” and “Fly Around” by Kirk and Miller, and “Not Oppressively Formal” by the Newton Street Irregulars, featuring Kirk and Miller as well as former Texas State President Jerome Supple and Cathy Supple. More information is available at www.johnandtrish.com. Ticket prices are $10 for the general public and $5 for students, with limited seating. For more information, contact the events coordinator at (512) 245-3501.

Center for Migrant Education awarded $725,000

The Center for Migrant Education, under the College of Applied Arts at Texas State, has been awarded $725,000 by the U.S. Department of Education. The award is a modification to the current contract between the center and the USDE. The purpose of the new funds is to continue assisting the USDE, Office of Migrant Education in the support and improvement of interstate and intrastate coordination of activities, programs, and agencies concerned with the education, health and welfare of migrant children. The Center was initially awarded $538,746 for the first year of the contract, which runs through September 2005. With the additional funds, total money awarded for year one now amounts to $1,263,746. Under the contract, the center deals with a wide range of issues relating to migrant education, said Frank Contreras, director of the Center for Migrant Education. While the Center has always been active in many of these areas — including facilitating meetings on policy matters, developing materials and working to ensure quality education opportunities for “binational children” of migrant workers — those activities have taken on a

national scope. The center works closely with education officials from all 50 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and Mexico. The center also provides support services to assist state migrant education programs in strengthening coordination with the Binational Migrant Education Program, which includes a teacher exchange program. This activity continues the work that the center is doing with various states in Mexico, as well as with Mexico’s Ministry of Public Education and Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The center plans meetings to enhance parent participation in the migrant program at the national level. The current contract has placed the center — as well as Texas State — in the national and international limelight. The new award is an affirmation that the center’s work meets high standards and has earned the approval of the migrant education community at the state and national level. The assistance received from departments and offices within the University is outstanding; especially the Grants Administration Office, the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research, the Travel Office and the Accounting Office.

City

Five finalists announced as fire chief candidates City Manager Dan O’Leary has announced the names of five finalists for San Marcos fire chief, chosen from a field of 52 applicants following a nationwide search. O’Leary will interview the finalists the second week of April. The finalists are as follows: nMike Baker, fire chief, Bonham, Texas nNoe Flores, training chief, San Angelo Fire Department nRaul Reyes, assistant fire chief, Houston Fire Department nJohn Sinclair, former deputy chief, Tacoma, Wash. nDoug Templeton, division chief, Austin Fire Department “I am really pleased at the quality of candidates who have applied for the position,” O’Leary said. “These finalists have a depth of experience that will be very valuable for the San Marcos community.” The nationwide search coordinated by Waters Consulting Group of Dallas resulted in 52 applications for the post previously held by Todd Derkacz, who retired in January. O’Leary reduced the list to 16 semi-finalists who were then sent a series of questions developed in consultation with members of the San Marcos Fire Department. A group of firefighters then reviewed the responses without knowing the names or the cities the candidates represented. O’Leary also graded the responses separately with the names and cities removed. The city manager and the firefighters came up with the same top rankings of the candidates, O’Leary said. He then refined the list to eight and then to five. “All of the five finalists were in the top rankings of the firefighters as well as my own,” O’Leary said. After interviewing the candidates, O’Leary will select one or two top contenders and visit their cities. He plans to make a decision by the end of April.

CRIME BL TTER

University Police Department

March 22, 8:20 a.m. Burglary of Vehicles/Learning Resource Center Garage — An employee reported his red restricted parking permit stolen from his vehicle. This case is under investigation.

March 22, 9:16 a.m. Suspicious activity/Comanche Street — A non-student reported a suspicious banner hanging from a crane. This case is under investigation. Campus Crime Stoppers: 245-7867

Press releases courtesy of Media Relations and the City of San Marcos

San Marcos Police Department

March 22, 9:36 a.m.

Theft initial dispatch/South I-35 — Victim had unknown subject obtain cellular phone

service on her account without her consent. March 22, 2:24 p.m.

Criminal mischief under $500/200 block of Herndon Street — Victim reports that his

vehicle was shot by a BB or pellet gun and the windshield was damaged.

San Marcos Crime Stoppers: 353-TIPS(8477)


By Chris Mondics Knight Ridder Newspapers

WASHINGTON — As Osama bin Laden stepped up his campaign of terror in the late 1990s, the Clinton administration had reports of his whereabouts but didn’t attack on at least three occasions because it was concerned about the reliability of the intelligence on his location, an independent panel reported Tuesday. In one instance in December 1998, the U.S. military prepared for cruise missile strikes against bin Laden. But senior officials decided against an attack because bin Laden had dropped out of sight for several hours, said the panel, which is investigating the Sept. 11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In another case, White House officials ruled out a missile attack because of concern that officials of the United Arab Emirates, a U.S. ally, were staying near bin Laden, the panel said. Bin Laden had been visiting a hunting camp in eastern Afghanistan used by the United Arab Emirates officials and had been meeting with them. Officials decided against a third potential strike because they worried about civilian casualties. “There were frequent reports about bin Laden’s whereabouts and activities,” the panel said in a staff statement. “The daily reports regularly described where he was, what he was doing, and where he might be going.” That information often didn’t reach senior decision-makers until after bin Laden had moved on. The disclosures about potential missed opportunities were included in a staff report released during hearings Tuesday on the response of former President Clinton and President Bush to the terror threat posed by bin Laden. The panel heard testimony from Secretary of State Colin Powell, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, former Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright and former Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. Each outlined steps taken to confront the growing threat by bin Laden’s al-Qaida terror network at a time when the full nature of the threat wasn’t fully understood by either Americans or U.S. allies. Their testimonies and the staff report showed sharp differences in the approaches taken by the Bush and Clinton administrations. But there was agreement on a key point: Both administrations considered more aggressive military strikes against bin Laden and the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, but ruled them out because of doubts about whether Americans would support such an action.

“When the embassies were blown up, that was the worst day,” Albright said, referring to the al Qaida bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania on Aug. 7, 1998. But while the Clinton administration launched a cruise missile attack on bin Laden training camps in Afghanistan 13 days later, the administration had difficulty identifying other targets for reprisal. There were no further military strikes against al-Qaida. That prompted sharp criticism from panel member Bob Kerrey, a former Democratic senator from Nebraska, who said the Clinton administration relied too heavily on law enforcement to curb terror and was too timid in the use of military force. “I think it would have been very difficult to assess what the targets would have been to have bombed at random,” Albright said. “It would have created a situation that would have made our lives, American lives, more difficult in the Muslim world.” Amid sharp criticism of the Bush administration’s response to the threat posed by bin Laden, Powell defended President Bush’s actions in the months before the attack. Powell testified that the Bush administration decided early on that the United States would need to take a more aggressive approach toward bin Laden and the Taliban government of Afghanistan. By Sept. 4, 2001, Powell said, the administration had developed a plan to topple the Taliban regime through military means if diplomatic efforts failed. Under questioning from commission members, Powell argued that there wouldn’t have been sufficient public support for invading Afghanistan before the Sept. 11 attacks galvanized public opinion and created a consensus in Congress. Powell’s testimony came after counterterrorism official Richard Clarke, who served in four administrations, accused President Bush of failing to adequately address the Taliban threat and focusing obsessively on Iraq. Clarke contends there was no evidence that Iraq was involved with al-Qaida. That claim was disputed by John Lehman, a panel member and former Navy Secretary in the Reagan administration, who argued that Iraq had for years harbored one of the plotters of the first World Trade Center attack in 1993. The Bush administration has made the same charge, but neglected to say that Saddam Hussein offered to turn the man over to the FBI. The commission report suggested that the Clinton administration emphasized diplomatic means over military might to dislodge bin Laden, even as the terrorist was attacking American facilities abroad.

NEWS

f the week

Alisa Pekar/Star photo This male cat's name is King. If you are interested in giving him a good home, please contact the San Marcos Animal Shelter at 393-8340. His animal control number is 21275.

ROTC: Information session teaches perspective members g Cont. from page 1

“Most of the questions will be answered by me,” Fernandez said. Topics will range from career planning and jobs to myths people have about the ROTC. “One of the myths people have is that joining the AFROTC is the same as joining the U.S. Air Force,” Gibson said. “Another is that everyone in the program will need to shave his or her head. These are only a couple of examples, but we will dispel many more.” “We are trying to clarify any misconceptions,” Fernandez said. “Many impressions people have come only from today’s movies and entertainment.” Cohoon and Fernandez also plan on discussing various scholarships available to both current and entering college students. “There are a lot of qualifications for the different scholarships,” Fernandez said. “For example, the four-year scholarship available right away to high school students is easier to get than one for a current college student, who would need at least a 2.5 GPA to be eligible.” Fernandez also said scholarship winners tend to have good leadership qualities and must pass various tests for mental and physical capabilities. The scholarships are

available for all majors. Despite the obvious draw this “free” money may have, Gibson warns of signing up for the wrong reasons. “The decision to join the AFROTC is not one to be taken lightly by any seriousminded college student,” he said. “While scholarship possibilities are enticing, one needs to be conscious of the time and energy required by the necessary classes and other weekly activities.” Established in 1951, Detachment 840 of the AFROTC currently has 75 cadets from all grade levels, including the undergraduate level. It is one of four ROTC programs on campus, including the Army, Marine Corps and the Navy. Both the Air Force and Army ROTC programs have detachments where students attend specific classes, according to Gibson. The Marine Corps and Navy students attend the university as well as training programs outside the college setting. Gibson welcomes all students to the session, expecting a full room. “AFROTC will have a lifelong impact on those in the program,” Gibson said. “However, AFROTC’s strongest impact is one that will help people find their future path with programs designed to both educate and equip them with the tools necessary to be successful in all aspects of his or her life.”

News Briefs

The University Star - 3

Author to testify about his Bush book

WASHINGTON — Richard A. Clarke and his allegations in a new book about President Bush’s handling of counterterrorism were called “the elephant in the room” by a commissioner at hearings Tuesday investigating the attacks of Sept. 11, and the charges by the former White House official provoked questions for the president, first lady Laura Bush and Secretary of State Colin Powell. Officials in Washington lavished attention on Clarke as he was giving interviews in New York. With White House officials seeking to discredit his account, he had been described only the day before by Vice President Dick Cheney as “out of the loop.” security adviser National Condoleezza Rice said Clarke was uninvolved “in most of the meetings in the administration” when he was still on the job as Bush’s counterterrorism expert. Clarke, who is to testify today before the independent commission looking into the attacks, said in a telephone interview that CIA Director George Tenet used his morning briefings to warn Bush “over and over” beginning in June 2001 that al-Qaida would “almost certainly” stage a major attack. Clarke said the CIA believed it was “most likely” to occur overseas.

Salty sea once covered parts of Mars, scientists say Portions of the Martian surface were once covered with an ancient salty sea, NASA scientists said Tuesday, announcing a discovery that transforms the image of the now frigid and desolate planet. Evidence of the body of water, possibly covering hundreds or thousands of square miles, was found near the landing site of the Opportunity rover in Meridiani Planum near the Martian equa-

tor. The rover has been exploring the planet since Jan. 24. “This dramatic confirmation of standing water in Mars history builds on a progression of discoveries about that most Earthlike of alien planets,” said Ed Weiler, NASA associate administrator for space science, at a news conference in Washington announcing the discovery. NASA scientists announced earlier this month that they had determined that water had once existed on Mars, possibly during the early history of the planet 3 billion to 4 billion years ago. But they did not know if the water was percolating in underground reservoirs or actually flowed on the surface in lakes, rivers or seas.

Bush backs Israel on self-defense

WASHINGTON — President Bush Tuesday defended Israel’s “right to defend herself from terror,” one day after a spokesman said the administration was “deeply troubled” by the assassination of Sheik Ahmed Yassin and concerned it would derail efforts to jump-start the peace process. Bush made his remarks to reporters shortly before the U.N. Security Council began a debate on the Israeli action and as a group of Israeli officials met with White House officials to discuss Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s plan to unilaterally separate from the Palestinians. Bush announced that next week a team of senior U.S. officials will likely make their third trip to Israel in two months to continue discussions on the Sharon plan. Bush said the Middle East is “a troubled region and the attacks were troubling. There needs to be a focused, concerted effort by all parties to fight terror.” He expressed hope that Israel “keeps consequences in mind as to how to make sure we stay on the path to peace.” Briefs are from wire reports.

STORAGE SPECIAL

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ASG ELECTIONS AND BUS REFERENDUM Vote on Tuesday, March 30th or Wednesday, March 31st

•New Bus route servicing the Ranch Road 12, Craddock and LBJ areas.

•Increased level of service to the Commuter parking areas and Post Road. •Summer Bus service to Apartment routes and Austin.

•The shuttle bus fee referendum will increase the current bus fee from $42 to $52 and provide students with 5 additional route buses and 5,000 additional service hours.


E-POLLS: Come to county

4 - The University Star

g Cont. from page 1

presentation about his company’s E-Slate voting machine to a packed chamber of interested citizens. Brad Bailey, Hays County judge special assistant, said the court will likely vote to approve the purchase of the machines in the next several months. Braithwaite showed off an E-Slate to the commissioners and audience members and explained how the voting procedure will work. The machines are not a touch screen but are controlled by a dial and button. After being approved, each voter will be given a four-digit access code that will correspond to the ballot used, not the individual voter. The voter will enter the code into the machine to begin voting. There is a two-step voting process, Braithwaite said. To select an item, a voter will use the dial button to scroll up and down the selections, which will be highlighted when the dial is on that item, and a button to enter the selection. The selected item will show up in red and the screen will then go to the next section. Cowan later explained the machine in more detail. “You’re able to change (your vote) at any time,” Cowan said about the machines after the meeting. When voters are done, a summary screen will appear. “This is a summary of what

the races are and how you voted,” Braithwaite said. Voters then push the entry button to cast the ballot. An image of an American flag will appear when the ballot has been cast. If electrical problems occur, the machines have an 18-hour back-up battery to secure votes, Braithwaite said. Votes will not be lost if machines fall or break because they are saved electronically, Braithwaite said. In response to a citizen’s question, he said votes or the program cannot be rigged because there is no program to rig. Votes cannot be tampered with online because the ballot will not be online, but will only be used in the community, Braithwaite said. Cowan said there is a need for these machines in Hays County. “Our equipment is in pretty bad shape,” she said. Bailey said there are several companies with electronic voting machines, but Hart Intercivic was selected because its systems are upgradeable. Approval by the court depends upon the budget, Bailey said. “It’s pretty much already been adopted,” he said. Cowan said there will be demonstrations on how to use the machines before voting occurs. “Voter education is what I want time for,” she said after the meeting. The machines will show voters if they under voted and

NEWS

will not allow over voting. The process of voting does not change, Cowan said, but education on how to use the machines will help some people not be intimidated with an electronic voting machine. “They can print out the ballot, but it is not required,” Cowan said. She also said that during the primaries, there were no glitches with the machines in other counties. In other business, the court heard from the Rocky Road Acres neighborhood association president about the need to call a public hearing to propose reconstruction of Owl Road and Owl Hollow Road East. The court approved the measure. The court adopted a resolution to support the Texas Historical Commission’s Texas Heritage Trails program. The court also approved authorization for the county judge and the Hays County Health Department to carry out an agreement with the American Red Cross for the recruitment and management of a volunteer program. Agriculture/Natural An Resources Extension Agent was added to the county at the meeting as well. The court approved Bryan Davis to fill the position. The court also approved the purchase of equipment and software to preserve court minutes.

City of San Marcos PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT Posted - March 1, 200 The City of San Marcos needs qualified individuals to fill the following vacancies:

Summer Aquatics Program: May 17-August 14, 2004 Employees MUST be able to work a flexible schedule, including evenings and weekends. More information is available through the Parks and Recreation Department, Activity Center, 393-8280. * Employees returning to the same position will be given an additional 3% pay increase per year up to 3 years.

Job #22225 LIFEGUARD/SWIMMING INSTRUCTOR: 5 positions

$7.40 per hour

Performs lifeguard duties; instructs swimming lessons; ability to learn and administer first aid and CPR; enforces safety rules; cashiers; and maintains pool area. Must be at least 16 years of age and possess both Lifeguard and Water Safety Instructor Certificates. Red Cross Certification preferred, (YMCA Lifeguard and Ellis & Associates certifications may be considered.) Must attach current certifications to application.

$6.75 per hour

Job #22226 LIFEGUARD: 2 positions

Performs lifeguard duties; ability to learn and administer first aid and CPR; enforces safety rules; cashiers; maintains pool area. Must be at least 16 years of age and possess a Lifeguard Certificate. Red Cross Certification preferred, (YMCA Lifeguard and Ellis & Associates certifications may be considered.) Must attach current certification to application.

Summer Fun Program: June 7 – August 5, 2004 (Orientation: June 1 - June 4, 2004) All summer program staff must obtain certification of completion of the Red Cross First Aid/CPR Course prior to the first day of the program. Classes will be available for applicants interested in obtaining this certification. The work schedule for all summer positions is Mon.-Th., 7:30-4:30; 8:30-5:30, for nine weeks. May be required to work overtime. More information is available through the Parks and Recreation Department, 393-8400. * Employees returning to the same position will be given an additional 3% pay increase per year up to 3 years.

Job #22217 SUMMER PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$11.19 per hour

Management and administration of summer youth program. Plans, develops, and administers program recreational activities for approximately 700 school aged children at three sites; training, orientation, and supervision of approximately 25 summer employees. A bachelor’s degree plus two years related experience and a valid Texas Driver’s License with acceptable driving record required.

Job #22218 ASSISTANT SUMMER PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$8.80 perhour

Assists with the management and administration of summer youth program including supervision and training of approximately 25 summer employees. Assists in preparing and scheduling on and off campus site activities. A high school diploma or equivalent plus two years related experience, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

Job #22219 CHALLENGE PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$10.56 per hour

Administration of summer youth challenge program involving planning and implementation of programming recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities including swimming and field trips. Supervises, trains, and schedules employees. A bachelor’s degree in special populations or a related field plus two years related experience. Two years of directly related experience may substitute for 30 hours of college with a maximum substitution of 60 hours and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

Job #22220 ASSISTANT CHALLENGE PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$6.61 per hour

Assists with the administration of the summer youth challenge program including supervising and scheduling of summer employees. Organizes recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus one-year related experience, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

Job #22221 CHALLENGE PROGRAM AIDE: 2 positions

$6.24 per hour

Child supervision on campus sites and during transportation and field trips. Administration of recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities including swimming and field trips; maintenance of campus site area; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus experience working with physically and/or mentally challenged children required.

Job #22222 PLAYGROUND SITE SUPERVISOR: 3 positions

$7.42 per hour

Performs supervisory duties for Playground Leader positions. Supervises children, develops, and administers program recreational activities on playground campus sites for over 300 children. Maintains campus records; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus two years related experience and a valid Texas Driver’s License with acceptable driving record required. Extensive experience working with children preferred.

Job #22223 ASSISTANT PLAYGROUND SITE SUPERVISOR: 3 positions

$6.61per hour

Assists with the supervision of the playground leaders. Supervises children and administers program recreational activities on playground campus sites. Maintains campus sites; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required. Experience working with young children preferred.

Job #22224 PLAYGROUND LEADER: 12 positions

$6.24 per hour

Child supervision on campus sites and during transportation and field trips. Administration of program recreational activities; maintenance of campus site area; ability to learn and administer first aid. Must be at least 16 years of age. Experience working with young children preferred.

All positions close March 29, 2004. An application must be completed for each position and the job number stated. APPLY TO: Human Resources Department, City Hall Building, 630 E. Hopkins, San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: 512-393-8066 Fax: 512-396-4656 Job Line: 512-393-8290 Web site: www.ci.san-marcos.tx.us Email: humanresources@ci.san-marcos.tx.us *EOE/AA/Drug Free Workplace*

HOOKED: Vehicle restraint device can decrease car chases

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

g Cont. from page 1

more efficient. The weight transfer allows a Crown Victoria police cruiser to restrain a much larger vehicle. The device takes about two hours to attach to the front of the police cruiser. It is a modular system that does not require assembly, drilling or welding. Weatherford built his prototype from a piece of plate metal he found on I-35; Weatherford and his father purchased additional materials. He said his interest in design and technology developed when he was 9 years old after his father gave him a welding torch. He received a bachelor of science degree in technology from then SWT in 1990. Weatherford’s idea came to him on his own, but he credits Bob Habingreither, Texas State technology chair and San Marcos mayor, for teaching him how to make his dream a reality. “Dr. Habingreither’s power technology class made it all possible,” Weatherford said. “If I had not taken it, there is no way I would have been able to design this.” Interceptor Technology, Weatherford’s company, was specifically created to focus on developing and marketing his design. The company has

successfully tested the capabilities of Talon 30 times, he said. Weatherford recalled a specific instance when he tested the Talon on a Dodge Ram pick-up truck with a hemi engine. The police cruiser used to test the device approached the rear end of the truck and hooked its claws into the bumper. Almost instantly, the truck stopped moving, with no damage left behind by the Talon’s hooks, he said. Currently, Weatherford is in the process of marketing his device to other police agencies. The San Marcos Police Department has not expressed an interest in purchasing the device. A representative from SMPD said there are about two car chases a month. According to a San Marcos Daily Record article, SMPD is aware that Weatherford is driving a police cruiser that has two large metal hooks attached to the front of it. “We made the San Marcos Police Department aware of the vehicle before we started driving it on the streets,” Weatherford said in the article. “We invited them to pull it over anytime just to verify that it is me in the car. We discussed the legality of driving a car that looks like a police car. Its purpose is to save lives and they understand that.”

CRIME: UPD tightens security on campus

g Cont. from page 1

Security Access division has increased the number of times officers walk through the building, checking for unlocked doors and suspicious activity. “We are always trying to prevent things like this; it’s an ongoing thing,” Thomas said. “We didn’t change a whole lot of the way we do business because of this because we always try to be proactive about the way we do business.” One such measure is called the Gotcha card program. If an officer finds an office or classroom door unlocked when it is supposed to be locked, he is to place a card on the door that says “Gotcha” and lock the door. The necessary security measures were in place even when the equipment was stolen, but

locks behind you,” Thomas said. “Be another pair of eyes and ears for us.” Chapa said a simple way to prevent crimes is by paying attention to what is going on. “Just know your surroundings,” said Chapa. “When you walk into a place, know who’s seated around you, know where the exits are located. Some basic crime prevention on behalf of the students, faculty and staff is ideal. It will help in our mission to create a safer campus environment.” — Paul Chapa If any susUniversity Police Department captain picious activity is spotted, people that help patrol the cam- contact the UPD at 245-2805 or pus in addition to the officers, by dialing 911. To report information, conincluding the Bobcat Bobbies. He said he encourages everyone tact investigators at 245-2883 or to report suspicious activity or Crime Stoppers at (512) 353call the UPD if a door is left STOP. For crime prevention tips, call the community awareunlocked. “If you’re working late in a ness and resource team at 245building, make sure the door 8341. Chapa said he suspects the perpetrator was watching the building, waiting for the officer to leave. “The word routine in our business is taboo,” Chapa said. “They may be casing the buildings, watching for a time when the officers come by. We have to be conscious of that but it’s concerning.” Thomas said they have many

“Periodically, you’ll have one or two laptops that are taken from the library or the cafeteria or the (LBJ Student Center). But over the last couple of weeks we’ve definitely seen a rise in computer theft.”

Good Morning Commuters free coffee and doughnuts Sponsored by: Career Services

Reminder:

National Multicultural Job EXPO Wednesday, March 31 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. @ Strahan Coliseum

Wednesday, March 24 Thursday, March 25 8 a.m.-10 a.m. @ LBJ Student Center


OPINIONS CONTACT Scooter Hendon staropinion@txstate.edu (512) 245-3487

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

OPINIONS

THE UNIVERSITY STAR Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Focus should shift to fix expiring Medicare

D

Page 5

THE MAIN POINT

espite what faux “news” reports may have said last week, the $500 billion price tag put on Medicare is not a good thing. Why? Because on Tuesday, government trustees reported that Medicare will go broke by 2019, which is seven years sooner than earlier projected. The new Medicare prescription drug law, which went into effect in December, is partly to

blame for the deteriorating funds, although White House spokesman Trent Duffy told the Associated Press that it was the rising cost of health care. And although the Republican-endorsed law gave private insurers a bigger role in the program — Republicans want Medicare to have minimal government involvement — the government’s own projections show that these same private insurers will cost tax-

payers more than Medicare in the future. So while all this is swelling in people’s heads and nothing is being done to change it, President Bush and Sen. John Kerry are acting like two children in a playground playing the blame game. Bush blames Kerry for voting against the prescription drug benefit and Kerry blames Bush for coming into a strong economy as president and not doing a thing to

fix Medicare. But it’s an election year, and they are politicians; what’s to be expected? Well, as voters, the country should expect its leader and his contender to come up with a way to fix this so that the elderly of the future can rely on some form of government assistance, especially since Social Security is expected to go insolvent in 2046. Or they can keep arguing. That could also work, but not so much.

THE GUILT OF MEL GIBSON

Thhe Main Point is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the department of mass communication or Texas State University-San Marcos. Letters policy: E-mail letters to starletters@txstate.edu. Letters must be no longer than 350 words. No anonymous letters will be printed. We reserve the right to edit for grammar, spelling, space and libel. We reserve the right to refuse obscene, irrelevant and malicious letters. All e-mails must include the name and phone number of the letter writer. Students should also include their classifications and majors.

Filmmaker not faithful to The Bible

“The ugly baboon backside of Christendom is racism,” said Thomas Keneally in a recent interview. (Keneally, the Australian-Irish author of Schindler’s List, left the seminary just weeks short of ordination as a Catholic priest.) But he Jeffrey Gordon needn’t have singled out Guest Columnist Christianity. It is no accident that savage wars have been fought in the name of every world religion (with the sole sublime exception of Buddhism). Membership in an organized religion has always been, at the basest level, a way of distinguishing oneself from the heretical Other in the eyes of God. Throughout world history until very recently (precisely 1965, when the Vatican officially renounced its condemnation of the Jews as Christ-killers), hatred of that Other has been a mark of the strength of one’s own religious commitment. The history of religiously inspired hatred can cast some light on the outrage and lust for vengeance that have sometimes followed viewings of Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. After our March 9 Interdisciplinary Symposium on the film, a student came to me to discuss her boyfriend’s reaction to it. They had hardly left the theater when he unleashed a stream of venom against the Jews. Gibson was well aware that his film might provoke this reaction. “This is the film the Jews don’t want you to see,” he told an interviewer. At the same time, he held up his hands in innocence: His intention was only to make a film as wholly faithful to the four gospels as he possibly could. And in this, indeed, he has succeeded magnificently. I have never seen a more provocative, dramatically compelling and biblically accurate depiction of the final agony (the “passion”) of Jesus. I don’t think Gibson set out to do harm to Jews. He is most likely not anti-Semitic. What this film forces us to confront, like nothing in previous artistic depictions, is the virulent antiSemitism in the gospels themselves. Matthew (the second of the gospels, written probably about 80 A.D.) is the most Jewish of the gospels. Jesus, for Matthew, is the Messiah (Greek: Christ), the anointed one, the fulfillment of the Old Testament prophecy of a redeemer to be sent by God. Rabbi Jesus does not represent a break with the ancient Hebraic tradition, but rather its realization. And so Matthew becomes the scriptural authority for the second-century Ebionist insistence that in order to be a true Christian, one had to first convert from paganism to Judaism and to follow the Jewish laws. The author of the book of Matthew was an emphatically Jewish-Christian (as indeed was Paul, the first significant Christian writer). Yet it is in Matthew that we find the root source of all later anti-Semitism: the curse that the Jews, realizing their profound error in condemning the Messiah to crucifixion, proclaim against themselves. “Let his blood be upon us and our children,” the curse repeated in full Aramaic accuracy in Gibson’s film, though not translated. In John, probably written decades later (perhaps 100 A.D.), we find more extensive antiJewish vitriol, though nothing quite so dramatic and devastating as this eternal self-curse. John marks a decisive break with the parent religion: For the author of John, to become a Christian

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Chris Sipes/Star illustration demands of the convert, whether Greek or Roman pagan or Semitic Jew, a final renunciation of any previous religious commitment. For almost all of us, our earliest instruction in religion is as doctrine, a body of beliefs and their accompanying rituals. Among the beliefs we are to learn and adopt is the story of our religion’s beginning, the lives, teachings and deaths of its heroes and divinities. All of this is presented to us as received and final knowledge. To be faithful servants of our God is to accept these as ultimate truths, settled for all eternity. It is only much later, in our adulthood, that some of us take an interest in our religion as an institution which, whatever its inspiration, has been shaped by human beings contending with social and political realities of their time. And even then, in pursuing this interest in the historical development of our religion, we know we risk the suspicion of our co-religionists and our own self-censure for having betrayed the posture of obedient faith urged upon us as children. Having been severely shaken 10 years ago by the haunting internal condemnation of his life as meaningless, Mel Gibson returned to the faith of his childhood in all its pure and unambiguous obedience. The film he made in tribute to this return reflects exactly this. He tells the gospel story that he learned as a child. He selects from the four, often divergent, gospel accounts of the final sufferings of Jesus the details with the greatest dramatic and cinematic potential. How can he be faulted for this? We have no non-Christian sources for the life and death of Jesus. He is not mentioned once in the writings of any historian of his day. The relatively undisputed facts about his life can be stated with shocking brevity: A Jew born in 3 B.C., he became a rabbi who, like many other apocalyptic Jews of his time, preached the imminent end of this world. In about 30 A.D., he was crucified under the rule of Roman procurator Pontius Pilate. Every key detail of the four

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gospel accounts, every key article of what has come to be Christian faith, was the focus of intense dispute among first and second century Christians, whether the relation of Christianity to Judaism, the occurrence and nature of the resurrection, or the status (divine, human, or both) of Yeshua, the Messiah. Each sect of early Christianity had its own gospels, but the four gospels and apostolic letters that comprise the New Testament reflect the views on these and other crucial matters that won out, that became part of the official doctrine, thereafter to be enshrined as the eternal truths of the church. The other gospels were destroyed (or buried to prevent destruction, as in the case of the Gnostic gospels discovered in Egypt in 1945), never copied. And a principal feature of the official doctrine was the demonization of the Jews. From one point of view, this feature seems simply preposterous. Many true innocents leaving the theater wonder, “How could anyone say this movie is anti-Semitic? After all, Jesus, Mary, all the disciples were Jews themselves, and they are shown very sympathetically.” But what this blessedly naïve view ignores is the intentional and millennia-long de-Judification of the New Testament by its original writers, editors, copyists and translators. The leading cast of characters is not Jesus, Mary, Joseph, John, James, Paul, Peter, etc., but (as Gibson to his credit makes clear) Yeshua, Miryam, Yosef, Yohanon, etc. Yeshua’s title is not teacher or master or lord, but rabbi. These changes alone in recent translations restore for us the real context of the Christian (Greek for ‘messianic’) story — the fact that it is a Jewish story about deeply committed Jews who go to their deaths as Jews. The task for the gospel writers, none of whom was an eye-witness to the events he describes, was to invoke the authority of the ancient Hebraic scriptures (the Old Testament); to placate the Roman rulers, whose persecution they rightly feared after the recent crushing of

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the Jewish revolt against Rome; and to distance themselves from the parent religion in order to establish a decisively Christian identity — and to do all this within the context of an eminently Jewish story. A paradoxical charge if ever there was one! The solution? The presentation of an increasingly Christianized non-Jewish Jesus, culminating in Rabbi Jesus’ own denunciation of the Jews (in John 8:44) as children of the devil; the invention of the traitorous Judas (meaning ‘the Jew’), a tale lifted intact from the Hebrew Midrash; the absolution of the Romans from guilt for Jesus’ execution; the insertion into the unlikely Matthew of the wholly improbable eternal curse, “Let his blood be upon us and upon our children,” a curse no one could sanely pronounce and no one could rationally accept as just. Gibson’s fault was not in making a biblically unfaithful film. His fault was in re-telling to a world, at last taking its first tentative steps toward religious tolerance, an ancient story with aspects of which have unleashed an enormity of harm. He is guilty of reading the gospels outside their historical and political contexts, unaware of the political exigencies to which their writers were answering, wholly uninformed by the revelatory historical scholarship of the last 100 years. He is guilty of identifying the gospels, human documents by human authors driven by human imperatives, with apodictic truth. Zen visionary Thich Nhat Hanh teaches us that we — you and I — are responsible for the meaning and the very existence of Jesus in our own hour. It is well past time, as Pope John XXIII understood in the ’60s, to allow that meaning to rise from the mountain of ashes that previous incarnations have left in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Gordon is a philosophy professor and National Endowment for the Humanities distinguished professor.

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the Fall and Spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. with a daily circulation of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Copyright March 24, 2004. All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


SXSW

TRENDS

The University Star

FESTIVAL

SHOWCASES PLETHORA OF FILMS

Wednesday, March 24, 2004 Page 6

FILM WINNERS

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR COMPETITION SHORT 9:30 Dir.: Mun Chee Yong

JURY AWARD FOR NARRATIVE FEATURE Luck Dir.: Peter Wellington; with Luke Kirby, Sarah Polley, Jed Rees

JURY AWARD FOR BEST ANIMATED SHORT Pan With Us Dir.: David Russo

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR NARRATIVE FEATURE Mind the Gap Dir.: Eric Schaeffer; with Alan King, Elizabeth Reaser, John Heard, Eric Schaeffer, Charles Parnell, Jill Sobule

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR ANIMATED SHORT Subsidized Fate Dir.: Lance Myers

JURY AWARD FOR BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE A Hard Straight Dir.: Goro Toshima

JURY AWARD FOR BEST EXPERIMENTAL SHORT Dissolve Dir.: Aaron Valdez

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR DOCUMENTARY FEATURE Witches in Exile Dir.: Allison Berg

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR EXPERIMENTAL SHORT Roothold Dir.: Eric Patrick

JURY AWARD FOR COMPETITION SHORTS Gretchen and the Night Danger Dir.: Steve Collins

JURY AWARD FOR BEST MUSIC VIDEO 54 Seconds, “Better?” Dir.: Tracie Laymon

WANT

MORE

SXSW

READ THE UNIVERSITY STAR THURSDAY

SPECIAL JURY AWARD FOR MUSIC VIDEO Dizzee Rascal, “Fix Up, Look Sharp” Dir.: Ruben Fleischer

Audience Awards LONE STAR STATES Mojados: Through the Night Dir.: Tommy Davis Runner-up: A Few Good Dykes, Dir.: Mocha Jean Herrup EMERGING VISIONS The Naked Feminist Dir.: Louisa Achille DOCUMENTARY FEATURE A League of Ordinary Gentlemen Dir.: Christopher Browne

NARRATIVE FEATURE Blackballed: The Bobby Dukes Story Dir.: Brant Sersen; with Rob Corddry, Paul Scheer

COVERAGE?

FOR MUSIC AND MORE FILM COVERAGE.

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CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT — The following are promotional shots for their respective films. They are Super Size Me, Code 46, Antone’s: Home of the Blues, Knots, Gozu, Dear Pillow, Mojados: Through the Night, Cosmopolitan and Last Man Standing.

Jury Awards

SXSW

BY CHRIS ROBINSON SENIOR REPORTER

AUSTIN — There is nothing like Austin caught in the fever pitch of South By Southwest. The city is alive with strange, imported people during all hours of the day. Whether you have a badge or not, there are guys who will wait on street corners to hand you free CDs, books and pamphlets. And it’s not entirely uncommon to catch a glimpse of a star just before he disappears into the midst of an entourage. The price of admission to SXSW will continue to sting even months after the festival ends, but I’m not sure a price can be put on meeting a favorite actor or director. That kind of business is pure magic. Especially useful was having the director or a production member on hand to answer questions about the film, which was often the case. In regard to the films themselves, there was an abundance of good Texas-themed documentaries. There were few films that stunk, but there wasn’t one that towered above the rest, either. As a whole, the entire lineup was shades of excellence, both in narrative and documentary. Here’s looking forward to next year.

Antone’s: Home of the Blues Documentary Feature Dir: Dan Karlok 4 Stars If there is any truth to Austin’s claim as “the live music capital of the world,” then its credo at least owes partial credit to a little blues joint called Antone’s. Since its inception in 1973, when Sixth Street was still a far cry from the aorta of Austin’s music scene, Antone’s brought blues legends such as B.B. King, Muddy Waters, Pinetop Perkins and it even saw the beginnings of Stevie Ray Vaughn’s rise to fame. The documentary explains that these accomplished bluesmen were lured to Austin not through the promise of fortune — “We never, ever considered making money,” admits founder Clifford Antone — but rather because they saw in Antone a complete dedication to an unrelenting love for the blues. Antone’s: Home of the Blues traces the jagged line from the foundation of Antone’s passion for the blues in his earthy Louisiana roots to the ups and downs of his club’s multiple relocations. From the warm anecdotes told at a barbecue roundtable to bits of interviews with Robert Rodriguez and Willie Nelson, Antone’s neatly explains the tremendous impact one relatively inconspicuous blues joint has had on the Southwest music scene.

Code 46 Narrative Feature Dir: Michael Winterbottom Starring: Samantha Morton, Tim Robbins 3 Stars The future told in Code 46 contrasts brilliantly lush midnight cityscapes with the barren wastes of deserts that fringe these metropolises. Because of increased solar radiation and other untold environmental hazards, people are confined to these sprawling metropolises, and travel between them is meticulously screened so that indigenous strains of diseases aren’t spread. “Papelles,” trumped up passports, are the highly sought-after means for travel. Maria (Morton) works in a lab preparing papelles, selling a few on the side. William (an uninspired Robbins) is an investigator armed with an “empathy virus” that enhances his ability to read hidden meanings behind people’s actions. He can see right through Maria’s scheme, and though he is a successful family man, William chooses to overlook Maria’s transgressions in favor of gaining her affection. The story of their love is an awkward affair with not enough emphasis placed on why exactly William decides to fall for her. Moreover, the issue of the actual Code 46 — in which a person cannot impregnate someone who shares 25 percent or more of similar DNA — is rife with logical weaknesses. Is the use of condoms outlawed in the future? Regardless of plot holes, the cinematography of Code

46 is a glimpse at the vibrant beauty of the city on the same intoxicating scale found in Lost in Translation.

Gozu Narrative Feature Dir: Takashi Miike Starring: Sho Aikawa, Hideki Sone 4 Stars Those unfamiliar with Miike’s directing style may compare his expert manipulation of the bizarre with the lunatic genius of David Lynch (Lost Highway). Gozu, like many of Lynch’s films, is slicked with pitch-black humor and delights in waltzing toward the delirious. Gozu opens with Ozaki (Aikawa), a dangerously psychotic hitman, brutally slamming an unassuming Chihuahua against a restaurant’s front window because he suspects it was a “Yakuza attack dog.” Minami (Sone), Ozaki’s younger brother, is reluctantly on his way to completing a hit on the unstable assassin when suddenly Ozaki’s body disappears. The search for his brother is a labyrinth of the strange that drags Minami, the epitome of a stylishly clueless Yakuza lackey complete with requisite Fendi scarf, through the company of transvestite ghosts, anal ladle fetishes and a frothy, cowheaded milk god (the film’s title translates into “cow head”). Not all viewers are suited to watch, much less appreciate, circumstances as unusual as these, but those who can are in for a treat.

Dear Pillow Narrative Feature Dir: Brian Poyser Starring: Gary Chason, Rusty Kelley, Vivian Vives 3 Stars There is a lot to be said for working in the porn industry. Ideally, that kind of employment combines two of the most important things for a person (especially for a teenager): sex and money. But this perspective tends to overlook the crucial element of personal involvement and the anxiety it tends to include. Like 2002’s XX/XY, Dear Pillow examines the deep emotional consequences that can follow uncertain indulgences. When Wes (Kelley) is fired for masturbating in g See SXSW, page 7


Wednesday, March 24, 2004

AMUSEMENTS

SXSW: Whets filmlovers’ appetites

g Cont. from page 6

the bathroom at work, he sees a new job opportunity in shadowing the employment of his neighbor, Dusty (Chason), who submits phony erotic letters to the porn magazine Dear Pillow. Dusty shows Wes the ropes through a series of unabashedly raunchy diatribes about male sexuality, most of which is spent reminding Wes about the organ for which he’s writing. Meanwhile, Wes refines his skills by eavesdropping on the erotic phone conversations of his sultry apartment manager, Lorna (Vives). Though initially resounding with the pangs of undeclared homosexual desire, the relationship between Dusty and Wes gradually morphs into an awkward paternal bond. Their time spent together, especially once the volatile Lorna gets into the mix, offers an intimate look at clumsily sincere displays of affection.

Super Size Me Documentary Feature Dir: Morgan Spurlock 4 Stars “I’m getting to fulfill every 8-year-old’s dream!” director and martyr Morgan Spurlock happily declares while unwrapping the first meal of his month-long McDonald’s binge. The gloriously unhealthy experiment conducted in Super Size Me is Spurlock’s retort to the case filed against McDonald’s a few months ago, which the court struck down under the pretense that it must first be proven that daily consumption of McDonald’s products is grossly unhealthy before the plaintiffs will be awarded a settlement. After hiring the professional assistance of a cardiologist, a gastroenterologist, a doctor of internal medicine and a dietician, Spurlock took the McChallenge and quickly got himself McSick. The rules of engagement are that he must eat off the McDonald’s menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner, he must walk a minimal amount of steps equivalent to those who spend a lot of time in offices, and he will only Supersize his meal if asked. Even though the fatty results are predictable, there is nothing like hearing that fast food, like alcohol poisoning, is capable of pickling your liver. Super Size Me is more than a dayto-day journal of Spurlock’s health; he travels to public schools to investigate the majority of junk on the menu and then it’s off to a stomach stapling procedure that is witnessed from the oily inside. Spurlock conducts his experiment with a mellow charm that lifts Super Size Me beyond a flat defamation of fast food and into an entertaining analysis of the United States’ addiction to the stuff. And, of course, no documentary about the golden arches would be complete without Wesley Willis’ “Rock and Roll McDonald’s.”

The University Star - 7

Mojados: Through the Night Documentary Feature Dir: Tommy Davis 3 Stars

From its modest outset, Mojados: Through the Night earnestly conveys the message that the motivation for its four border-jumpers is the opportunity to provide a better life for their respective families. Carrying nothing but an 85-pound backpack loaded with film supplies, a handheld camera and some seriously big balls, director Tommy Davis follows Guapo, Tigre, Oso and Viejo in their perilous journey across a 120-mile stretch of Texas badlands. He eats the same preserved tortillas, even when they accumulate mold, drinks the same muddy water from used milk jugs, and shares the same cold spot next to a meager campfire for many anxious nights. Davis’ inspiration for Mojados (literally meaning “wetbacks”) stems from growing up in McAllen, a Texas border town, and witnessing first hand the struggles of migrant workers. Unfortunately, Davis’ desire to express their story is overshadowed by a gruff narration that beleaguers the film. Outside of this and a conclusion that fails to adequately tie off loose ends, Mojados succeeds in providing a voice to those who embark on the dangerous journey north.

Knots Narrative Feature Dir: Greg Lombardo Starring: Scott Cohen, Annabeth Gish, Paulina Porizkova, John Stamos 4 Stars Knots tells with gleeful moral abandon the story of three men and the emotional havoc wrought when Lily (Porizkova), an “omnisexual” man-eater, inserts herself into their social web. Dave (Cohen), a neurotic 30-something suffering from “nice guys finish last” syndrome, is having intimacy difficulties with his wife Greta (Gish). His friend Cal (Stamos), an oversexed fashion photographer, suggests a little infidelity would recharge Dave’s desire for his wife. Cal insists with roguish charm that there is no better way to test a man’s love for his wife than directly measuring her performance in bed with another woman. A run-in with Lily, whose screen presence exudes an abundance of sexual confidence, gives Dave the incentive to take this advice seriously. After a marginally successful double date with Lily, Greta and his sorely undersexed friend Jake (Michael Leydon Campbell), Dave comes home to find that his wife has already beat him to the punch. The jab comes not from Greta in the arms of another man, but from Lily whose quaint smile is as sly as it is knowing. Her manipulation of their lives, as well as many other minor characters that pass through, is only as heartless as the decisions the men had already resolved to make. Ultimately Knots never takes itself too seriously with its mes-

sage on unfaithfulness and retribution to spoil what is, at its core, a pleasantly masochistic romantic comedy.

Last Man Standing Documentary Feature Dir: Paul Stekler 3.5 Stars It wasn’t always an impossible task for Democrats to get elected in Texas. Stekler, director of Last Man Standing and a University of Texas professor, meticulously explains the gradual progression of politics that has led the South toward a stance comparable to “South Carolina on steroids.” But politics, like gambling, is never a sure bet. In 2002 when the Republican Party held a powerful sway on the Texas Legislature, Patrick Rose, a Dripping Springs native and a recent Princeton graduate, shouldered the mounting odds and ran for state representative as a Democrat. Undaunted, incumbent Rick Green took up his own campaign and would eventually be forced to acknowledge Rose as a serious contender. Standing is a poignant, fearless look at the good ol’ boy attitudes that underlie Texas politics. It precariously balances attention for both candidates, though it is difficult to not favor the underdog, especially when one of Green’s supporters is shown saying, “I’m a Christian and I don’t see how a Christian can be a Democrat.” During a post-screening question-and-answer session, Stekler said that both Rose and Green had seen the film and approved of it, which should say something for the lack of intentional bias in Standing.

Cosmopolitan Narrative Feature Dir: Nisha Ganatra Starring: Carol Kane, Roshan Seth 4 Stars Gopal (Seth) has a foul impression of his middle-aged and divorced neighbor, Mrs. Shaw (Kane). Only an immoral hussy would invite so many male suitors over to visit on such unusual occasions. Gopal’s judgment stops short, though, once his own family abandons him — his daughter to explore Mongolia with a German boy and his wife to return to the family’s homeland of India — which leaves the retired bachelor alone to flounder in a culture that only days before he imagined to have burrowed a place within. The only resources available to Gopal in his eventual quest for Shaw’s affection are his wistful memories of televised Indian musicals and his daughter’s collection of Cosmopolitan magazines, whose outrageous relationship quizzes instantly addict the painfully naïve Gopal. Cosmopolitan is a delicious slice of romantic Bollywood cinema that takes as much care to lampoon its extravagant conventions as to nurture the qualities that make them endearing. Cosmopolitan will premiere June 1 on PBS.


the university star classifieds

Classified ads are accepted by phone or email only if payment is made by credit card or if the client has established billing status. The deadline for all classified ads is noon two business days prior to publication. No physical addresses or names will be printed in ads placed under the heading of “Personals.” All classified ads must be paid in advance unless credit has been established. There are no refunds on classified ads. There is no charge for “Lost call call 245-3487 245-3487 or or email email starclassifieds@txstate.edu starclassifieds@txstate.edu and Found” ads. Check your classified ad for accuracy. Any changes must be made by the second day of publication. To change or cancel your ad, please call 512-245-3487 or email starclassifieds@txstate.edu The University Use the following formula when determining the cost Star reserves the right to refuse, edit, discontinue or classify ads under appropriate headings. Please remember it HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: for your ad: 1. Provide your name, address, and phone number to us by is always in your best interest to research or investigate any company from which you plan to purchase a good or fax, e-mail, mail or phone. Number of words x appropriate rate per word service. University/Non-Profit Classified Rates apply to campus departments, official student organizations of Texas 2.. Provide the written text of your ad. Certain conditions + 5¢ per bolded words State University-San Marcos and recognized non-profit organizations. This rate includes classified ads placed by apply. Please read all policies and terms. + 5¢ per italicized words students, faculty and staff under the headers of “Personals,” “For Rent” and “Roommates.” Ads placed by stu+ $10 typing fee for ads over 50 words University/Non-Profit Classified Rate is 15¢ per word. dents, faculty and staff for personal profit will be charged the Local Classified Rate.The Local Classified Rate + $10 for ads not run consecutive days Local Classified Rate is 25¢ per word. Take number form above and x by the number of applies to all advertising that does not fall under the area of University/Non-Profit Rate or is for straight profit. days you would like your ad to run to determine the “For Rent” and “Help Wanted” ads placed by businesses will be charged the Local Classified Rate. Extra services that are offered: TOTAL COST. 5¢ per bolded or italicized word. Please indicate.

8 - Wednesday, March 24, 2004

automotive

Honda, Chevy, Jeep, Toyota, etc. From $500. Police Impound. For listing: (800)719-3001, ext. 7462. (3/2)

for rent

SPRING BREAK AFTERMATH. Efficiencies $480. Water and electric paid. 4 bdrms/2.5 baths $1250. Water paid and w/d included. Call April @ 512-754-6701. (4/29) ____________________________ PRELESE NOW for the best apartment selection for Summer and Fall. We offer one-stop shopping for free floorplans & maps...plus info on specials, availablility and amenities. Call or come by APARTMENTS TO GO by “The Square”. 112 W. Hopskins at Guadalupe/ 353-FREE/Licensed Real Estate Broker. (4/29) ____________________________ Country setting 2/1 ceiling fans, close to town & TSU ce/ch, no smoking $500 + deposit. 557-4054. (4/1) ____________________________ Subleae 1 bd/ 1 bth in a 4/4 at the University Club ASAP through August. 512-757-1906. (3/25) ____________________________ Let others pay your rent! Own your own mobile home already on lot. 3/2, 99’ model in great shape. A steal at $22,900 (512)567-7709. (3/25) ____________________________ 3/2.5 Huge Duplex! $1100, on Tx State shuttle, Move in 8/20/04. 1600 sq ft. Large closests. W/D, 2 garage, no pets, www.sagewoodtrailduplexes.com or Mike 665-2772. (4/29) ____________________________ Two people needed to sublease 2 bed/ 2 bath apartment. Available immeidately through August. (512)805-4163. (3/31) ____________________________ Pre-lease Today. 8/20/04 3 blocks from TxState. $735/mo. 2br/2.5ba TH. $300/dep., Full size w/d, FREE ROADRUNNER & HBO. No dogs 396-4181 or windmilltownhomes.com (4/29) ____________________________ Duplex-Preleasing for 8/20. 3 blocks from Tx State. 2 br/2 ba, $785. Full-size w/d, FREE ROADRUNNER & HBO, 396-4181 or windmilltownhomes.com (4/24) ____________________________ FREE cable for 2 months, with 2 bdrm/ 2 bath at 1400 Clarewood. Apt. Lease available on April 1st for $725/month, no deposit, newly remodeled. Call Harris at 396-0549. (3/24)

for rent

Sublease room at THE Zone for low price of $345 a month, June only. Free internet, cable and phone, w/d. Low monthly utility bill. Female roommate wnated. Call Melody 210-394-9150. e-mail mp1102@txstate.edu (4/1) ____________________________ $380 per mo., all bills paid, fully furnished, on bus route. 512-878-0777. (4/6) ____________________________ Trailer for rent. $600/month or $300.month w/ roommate + utilities. Sharon 754-9039 or 353-8985. (4/1) ____________________________ 1 br/ 1ba HOUSE. 8/21/04 MOVE IN, Huge yard. $695 + $300 dep. 900sf, 2 blocks from SWT. 396-4181. (4/24) ____________________________ $735 Preleasing for 5/20/04. 3 blocks from Tx State. 2 br/ 2.5 ba townhouse 1050 sf. Full-size w/d, FREE ROADRUNNER & HBO, 396-4181 or windmilltownhomes.com (4/24) ____________________________ Sublease my large on e bedroom 1 1/2 bathroom apartment in April. Cheap rent: Call Crystal for details. 557-3406. (4/1) ____________________________ 2/1 house. Historic Distric. Hardwood floors. Fenced yard. Pet’s OK. $700/month. 557-0961. (3/31) ____________________________ 2/2 Condo, Washer/Dryer, Walking distance to TX State. $675 (512) 784-6598. (3/31) ____________________________ Available now. 2 brand new homes for lease or purchase in Kyle. 3/2/2 w/ all appliances including washer and dryer. 1 month free w/ one year lease. Call Norman (512)268-6325 or (512)699-1587. (4/1) ____________________________ Roommate wanted, $200/month + utilities, call Nathan (512)878-1846. (3/31) ____________________________ Live rent free! Buy my big, near new 3/2 mobile home. Sell when graduate. I’ll finance/ good credit. Payments $165/mo. ($18,500) After 5 p.m. 512-868-3900/ 738-0652. (4/29) ____________________________ 1b, 2b, 3b & rooms, next to Tx State. Good prices. Why shuttle or commute? Large pool, upgraded apartments, wooden or tile floors, preleasing May & August. Call 392-2700, or 757-1943. (3/31) ____________________________ Part of the drama. Female roommate ISO to male roommates. $250 per person. 210-387-8831. ____________________________ Awesome Deal 1/1, $395, gas, water, trash incld. Now pre-leasing Apt. Experts 805-0123. (4/29) 350 N. Guadalupe St. Ste. 140 San Marcos, TX

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Townhome Community 1/1.5, $436, 2/1.5, $545 w/ dryer incl. $0 app. & 1/2 off dep. Now preleasing. Apt. Experts 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Great views of Tx State. 1/1 $435 +, 2/1 $550+, Now pre-leasing for Fall ‘04. Pet friendly. Apt. Experts. 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Brand New Community. Fully furn., most bills pd. Ethernet, local ph, w/d incl. $399 +, AE 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Texas Size Townhomes. 1 & 2 bdrms $495, most bills paid w/cable. Pets ok. Apartment Experts 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Industrial Modern Living. $375 +, cable, ethernet, phone & w/d incl. AE 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Downstairs 1 bedroom apartment. $400/monthly, $200 deposit. 754-0954. (3/26) ____________________________ Great Community. 1/1 $460 +, 2/1 $480+, on shuttle, pets ok. Now preleasing for May ‘04!!! Apartment Experts 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ $100 prelease + bonus offer, 3 bedroom 3 bathrooms w/d 396-1520. (2/3?) ____________________________ NO RENT TILL APRIL!! 1/1 $495+, 2/2 $685+, 3/2 $699+, w/dryer included (rest. apply) Apt. Experts 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Big Dogs Okay! Walk or shuttle to class. most bills pd. w/cable. 1/1 $450+, 2/2 $595 + Apt. Experts. 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ Small Community, 1/1 $450, 2/2 $650, with free wireless internet. Pet’s o.k Apt. Experts 805-0123. (4/29) ____________________________ ON A BUDGET? So am I. That’s why we have Langtry Apartments. 205 Craddock Ave., Waiting for you. 2 bedroom 2 bath apartment homes with washer/dryer ready for you to move-in today. Only $650 per month. Who said living in San Marcos had to be expensive? Langtry Apartments 396-2673. (4/29) ____________________________ TWO BEDROOM FOR THE PRICE OF A ONE! That's right! Rent a two bedroom for the price of a one bedroom. You pay only $575.00 a month. Move in today to West End Condominium # 3. 1221 West Hopkins. VJE Realty Group 353-3002. (4/29) ____________________________ Skinny Dippin! In the middle of Winter! Our Skinny prices are dippin even lower! One bedroom now only $575.00. Washer/Dryer, microwave, free high speed internet with no dial-up and resort style amenities. Call the Metropolitan 393-6000. (4/29)

for rent

Privacy, Privacy and More Privacy! A place of your own! Stadium view apartments has a few 1 bedroom 1 bath homes for you. Fireplaces, ceiling fans, PRIVATE outside storage and covered parking await you. On-Site laundry, pool, and spa are only one call away. VJE Realty 353-3002. (4/29) ____________________________ Ready & Waiting! Nice, 1 bedroom , 1 bath studio home. 1642 Post Road. lot’s of storage and yard area. VJE Realty 353-3002. (4/29) ____________________________ 1 bd APT. $395/mo. 353-5051. (4/29)

for sale

Kroeler love-seat, $68, solid oak dresser w/ mirror, $75, heavy pine bunk bed complete, $158, backgammen set, $10, nice roll around office chair w/arms, $48, queen mattress set, $65. Partins’ Furniture. 2108 Ranch Road 12. 396-4684. Free Delivery. (3/25) ____________________________ Brand new wedding dress. $400 obo. Solid wood vanity, $75. Solid oak computer desk w/ hutch $100. 20” monitor, $50. 878-8175. (3/25) ____________________________ Like new 65” Connely Rocket Tournament water ski w/ dbl boots & case. $100. 738-1658. (3/25)

help wanted

PROGRAM ASSISTANT MENTORS UTSA PREP is seeking college students majoring in Mathematics, Engineering, Science or Technology to provide 6th-11th grade students academic counseling, tutoring, group supervision & activities. Temporary full-time employment: June 2-July 29. Application deadline: March 26. To apply call (210) 458-2060 or visit www.texprep.org EEO/AA Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Going to be here this summer! Make big $$$ operatine a fireworks stand at Canyon Lake. 392-4007. (3/25) ____________________________ Going to be here this summer! Make big $$$ operatine a fireworks stand at Canyon Lake. 392-4007. (3/25) ____________________________ Law firm needs part-time help. Please fax resume to Monica. 800-920-3529. (4/1) ____________________________ Health Club hiring experienced sales people. 353-0789. (4/1) ____________________________ New Braunfels Smoke House now hiring waitstaff and cooks. Apply at restaurant. 146 Hwy 46 East. 830-625-2416. (4/1)

Across from Downtown Post Office

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help wanted

Nanny needed for 3 boys ages 7, 5, 3. This position is for much more then a “babysitter”. you will be responsible for planning activities, thorughtout the day, preparing meals and some light housekeeping. Must be English speaking and have own transpotation. Hours full-time in summer and part-time in Fall. Excellent references required. Please call 754-8659 for more information ____________________________ Needed: waiters/waitresses/cooks at Papa Docks Restaurant in Canyon Lake. Possible $300-700 weekly. Apply in person. Tues-Fri between 2-5. FM 306 at Canypn Lake Marina. (4/8) ____________________________ !Bartending! $300 a day potential, no exp. necessary, training provided 800-965-6520 x157. (4/29) ____________________________ Make money taking Online surveys. Earn $10-$125 for surveys. Earn $25-$250 for focus groups. Visit www.cash4students.com/swtxsu (3/25) ____________________________ Personal Care Assistant needed for quadrplegic man. Applicants must be able to lift 150 lbs. They must also have a good driving record. Full-time and part-time positions available. Experience is not necessary. Please call 512-280-5402 or 512-589-7327, if there is no answer leave voicemail and your call will be returned. (?) ____________________________ Bartender trainees needed. $250 a day potential. Local positions. 1-800-293-3985 ext 316. (4/26) ____________________________ Soccer coaches wanted for youth soccer league. Great experience, resume builder! Contact Tony tlashley@aegistg.com (3/25) ____________________________ Webmaster wanted for local youth soccer organization. Volunteer only. Great resume builder. Contact Tony at tlashley@aegistg.com (3/25) ____________________________ The City of New Braunfels is accepting applications for seasonal positions in the park and Recreation Department: park rangers, lifeguards, cashiers, attendants, asst. managers, river spotters, laborers, counselors and swim instructors. Positions open until filled. Must be at least 16 YOA. 15 - 40hrs/wk, including weekends, holidays, and evenings. Starting pay range is $6.91 $10.00 depending upon position. For more info. call 830-608-2160 or on the city website: www.ci.new-braunfels.tx.us (4/1) ____________________________ Athletic, outgoing students for calendar greeting cards, etc. $50 - 150/hr no exp needed. 512-684-8296. (4/29) ____________________________ SUMMER CAMP JOBS IN COLORADO --- Make a difference in the life of a girl at Girl Scout overnight camps in the mountains SW of Denver. General Counselors, Program Specialists (Western horseback riding, backpacking, crafts, nature, sports/archery, challenge course, farm, dance & drama) and Administrative Positions. Late May – early August. Competitive salary, housing, meals, health insurance, travel and end-of-season bonuses. For an application, e-mail campjobs@gsmhc.org or call 303-607-4819. (4/29) ____________________________ Get paid for your opinions! Earn $15-$125 and more per survey! www.paidonlinesurveys.com ____________________________ Arabian Horses: several open positions:Ranch in SM, close to campus, flex hrs. 1.hoof trimmer hrly $ or trade. 2.temp ranch hand $6hr. 3.serious/exp trainers--negot pay. 4.good riders who love to ride$open! 5.attractive models who ride well-trade photos. 6.secretary--coordinate, manage, research--open$

STERLING UNIVERSITY

SPRINGS APARTMENTS

Ethernet Included Washer/Dryer Private Bed & Bath On Bus Route

353-2234 EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

help wanted

*Riding lessons available. Project: Got 14 horses and more foaling. And a website (texasarabianhorses.com).. working on photos/text to showcase, market, and sell 11 horses in 6 months. Experience and time are negotiable commodities. Pay you in cash when possible or trade when agreeable ..! Email resume , aspirations, services to: Nabil@Haysco.net. However, if imperative my cell 210-367-7842 and 353-3477 ranch. (4/29) ____________________________ Are you a dynamic, compassionate, motivated individual looking for the EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME? If so then Horizon Camps is the place for you. Horizon Camps is made up of three OUTSTANDING co-ed summer camps, seeking AMAZING staff to work with INCREDIBLE kids ranging in age from 7 to 15. Located in NY, PA, and WV, positions are available in the areas of group leading, athletics, theatre-arts, water sports, outdoor education, and so much more. For more information and to complete an application please contact us... www.horizoncamps.com 1-800-544-5448. (4/29)

miscellaneous

STUDY ABROAD: Study Abroad with Nicholls State: For 6 credit hours of credit ($1740 - Costa Rica), ($1707 - Mexico), ($1672 Ecuador), ($1918 - Spain), ($3263 - Paris), ($3144 - Nice), ($2097 Austria), ($1916 - Italy for 3 credits). Longer programs for more credit are available. No Deadlines. For all levels. 985-448-4440/toll-free = 1-877-Nicholls, www.nicholls.edu

roommates

Need roommate. Move in May 1st. 2 bed/2 bath nice condo. Washer/dryer. 1 block from campus. $335/month + half bills. Call Steven at (512)353-3381. (4/1) ____________________________ Sublease in a 4 bd/4ba, all bills paid except electricity. $355/month. 361-564-8476. (4/1) ____________________________ 2 F Clean roommates needed. Furnished, nice house $375/mo. + 1/3 utilities. 805-0299. (4/1) ____________________________ Green-minded female. Bedrooms. $325+ 1/3 bills, $200/deposit. No pets, no tobacco. Available April 1st. Big house on campus. Call (512)754-8434. (3/25) Is money your obstacle?

services

We have your loans today! We’re close to campus and here for you. Stereo’s, DVD’s, Jewelry and more. San Marcos Pawn. 164 S. Guadalupe, 396-7296. (4/24) ____________________________ Typing etc! Audio transcription, resumes, notary public, applications, binding, editing, bumper stickers, tables, etc. 392-9880. ____________________________ Professional Photographer Specializes in weddings, portraits & modeling. Visit my website @ www.ashleyhorton.com For Additional info. Please contact me via e-mail @ ah1005@txstate.edu (3/25) ____________________________ aplusapts.tv why waste time when you can shop online! Or stop in at 325 E. Hopkins. (4/29) ____________________________ myGOLDresume.com 866.290.3030. (4/22)

wanted

Wanted: Used cars, trucks, and motorcycles. Any condition, running or not. If you have something to sell, please call Willis Mitchell at 353-4511. (4/29)

is now accepting applications. Visit our stores or apply online at bobcatbooks.com


S POR TS

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Star Staff Picks continued Championship Pick:

B ob Bajackson S ta r D i r e c t o r Won first Big 12 title. Eddie Sutton knows how to win tourney games.

Oklahoma state beats Uconn

Kansas (4) Nevada

St. Louis Nevada (10)

OK St.

St. Joseph’s (1)

E. Rutherford

OK St.

Duke

Xavier (7)

UConn Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Kevin Washburn Sp or ts R e po r te r The combination of outside shooting and Shelden Williams inside.

Duke

beats Pittsburgh Kansas (4)

St. Louis

Ga. Tech

Georgia Tech (3)

Pittsburgh

Wake Forest (4)

E. Rutherford

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh (3)

Duke

Duke (1) Duke

Atlanta Xavier (7)

Duke Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Ji m Bob Br eazeale Spor ts Re por ter Only team I have left from my original Final Four.

Oklahoma State beats Uconn

Kansas (4)

St. Louis

Kansas

Georgia Tech (3)

OK St.

Wake Forest (4)

E. Ruthe rf ord

OK St.

Oklahoma State (2)

OK St.

Duke (1) Duke

Atlanta Texas (3)

UConn Alabama (8)

Phoenix

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Rick Breland Sp o rts Re p or te r With two great guards and a dominating center, they look unbeatable.

duke

beats oklahoma st. UAB (9)

St. L ouis

Ga. Tech

Georgia Tech (3)

OK St.

St. Joseph’s (1)

E. Rutherford

OK St.

Oklahoma State (2)

Duke

Duke (1) Duke

Atlanta Xavier (7)

Duke

Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Bruce Kalmick Sp orts Repor ter Deep bench; good athletes and somone always steps up.

oklahoma state beats duke

UAB (9)

St. Louis

UAB

Georgia Tech (3)

E. Rutherford

OK St. OK St.

Duke (1)

Atlanta

Duke

Texas (3) Duke Syracuse (5)

Ph oe ni x

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Chr is Galligher Sp orts Repor ter They are physical and the only team that can match up with Duke.

Oklahoma state beats duke

Kansas (4)

St. Louis

Kansas

Georgia Tech (3)

OK St.

Wake Forest (4)

E. Rutherford

OK St.

Oklahoma State (2)

OK St.

Duke (1)

Atlanta

Duke

Xavier (7)

Duke Syracuse (5)

BIO191-867_5.75x5Logo.qxd UConn Ph oe ni x UConn (2)

East Rutherford Region

No. 1 St. Joseph’s University vs. No. 4 Wake Forest University St. Joe’s survived a scare in its last game, a 70-65 win against Texas Tech University, but now it must face Wake Forest, another difficult challenge. Wake is not a big, physical team that dominates on the boards, which means guard play on both sides will be key, and few teams can match the Hawks’ tandem of Jameer Nelson and Delonte West at that position. Those two are the primary reason the Hawks have lost just once this season.

Phoenix Region

No. 5 Syracuse University vs. No. 8 University of Alabama The defending national champion Syracuse Orangemen are proving they are no one-hit wonders and that Carmelo Anthony isn’t the only reason they took it all last year. Guard Gerry McNamara and forward Hakim Warrick have been outstanding all year for the Orangemen, including McNamara’s career-high 43 points in an 80-75 opening round win against Brigham Young University. Alabama sent the first No. 1 seed of the tournament packing, as it knocked off Stanford University on the strength of a game-high 22 points from Kennedy Winston and now has the confidence it can beat anyone.

No. 2 Oklahoma State University vs. No. 3 University of Pittsburgh This one promises to be a war. Both OSU and Pitt are very physical, meaning neither one will back down if it becomes a slugfest. Pitt allows opponents to score just 56 points per game, while the Cowboys aren’t far behind, allowing 62 ppg. Offensively, Pitt is balanced, with four players averaging double figures. But the Panthers score just 68 ppg. The Cowboys also have four averaging in double figures, but are more explosive overall, scoring 78 ppg. Point guard John Lucas, is the catalyst for that offense.

No. 2 University of Connecticut vs. No. 6 Vanderbilt University UConn has been one of the most impressive teams in the tournament, thanks in large part to the play of guard Ben Gordon, winning by 18 and 17 points in its first and second round games, respectively. But the Huskies will go only as far as center Emeka Okafor and his injured back will take them. Vanderbilt took advantage of one of the greatest collapses in tournament history, as the Commodores used two fouls on 3-point attempts and a controversial intentional foul call to overcome an 11-point deficit with 3:45 to play against North Carolina State University.

Atlanta Region

OK St.

St. Joseph’s (1)

Oklahoma State (2)

win against Cincinnati and was led by guard Deron Williams’ 31 points. Point guard Dee Brown will be key because Duke likes to use a pressure defense. No. 3 University of Texas vs. No. 7 Xavier University On paper, this looks like a mismatch. UT is the nation’s deepest team, as 11 players average 10 or more minutes per game. Xavier, though, is coming off an upset of Mississippi State University and is the only team to beat St. Joe’s this season, so the Musketeers will not be intimidated. The Longhorns are bigger and more athletic but have no true point guard and may be prone to turnovers if Xavier can put pressure on the basketball. UT must also find a way to stop Xavier guard Lionel Chalmers, who torched Mississippi State for 31 points.

second-seeded Gonzaga University in the second round, 91-72, and is led by guard Kirk Snyder, who scored 18 points that win.

Duke (1)

Atlanta

By Jason Orts Sports Editor

g Cont. from page 10

OK St.

Oklahoma State (2)

Texas State ends homestand Tournament: Pressure mounts as with win, Sawicki returns Sweet 16 narrows

The University Star - 9

No. 1 Duke University vs. No. 4 University of Illinois Duke and Illinois have both been very impressive so far, as the Blue Devils have won their two games by a combined 63 points and the Illini coming off a 92-68 win against the University of Cincinnati in round two. Duke has been getting contributions from everybody, including guard J.J. Redick, who broke out of a slump against Seton Hall University in the second round, scoring 21 points. 9:00 AM Page 1 1/22/04 Illinois shot 63 percent in its

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Texas State faced off with the University of the Incarnate Word Tuesday at Bobcat Field, winning 8-2 to finish a fourgame homestand with a 2-2 record. This game marked the return of Bobcat pitcher Bobby Sawicki, a 2003 preseason Second Team All-American, who had been out of action since March of last season with a torn rotator cuff in his right shoulder. Sawicki pitched a scoreless ninth inning. “His stuff tonight actually wasn’t as good as it has been in practice,” said Texas State coach Ty Harrington of Sawicki. “But it’s important for him to get out there. He thrives on the competition and if he can pitch like he’s capable, it makes us a better ball club.” The Bobcats even their record at 12-12, while the Division II UIW falls to 17-6 despite outhitting Texas State, 9-6. The five Crusader pitchers combined to give up 11 walks while the defense committed two errors. “We’re struggling offensively,” Harrington said. “They helped us with the first couple of runs we got tonight even. Honestly, when we win it’s because we are pitching well and are playing good defense. I’m frustrated, they’re frustrated and we’re not going to be a .300 hitting team this year. That’s just the way it is.” The Crusaders wasted no time jumping on Bobcat starter Paul Schappert, putting runners on second and third with one out in the top of the first. But Schappert got Crusader first baseman John Elia to pop out to second base for the second out. After shortstop Justin

Ashley A. Horton/Star photo Dominic Ramos, junior shortstop, safely slides into second base against the University of the Incarnate Word Tuesday night at Bobcat Field. The Bobcats defeated the Crusaders, 8-2. Krawietz walked to load the bases, left fielder Adrian Lozano lined a single to right field that scored two, but Krawietz was gunned down at the plate, ending the inning. The Bobcats threatened in the third, putting runners on the corners with two outs. Left fielder Matt Miller sent a line drive to deep center, but Jeff Lehmann ran it down, preserving the 2-0 UIW lead. But Schappert settled down, holding the Crusaders scoreless over the next four innings, picking up his second win of the season (2-4). Bryan Hurley and Sawicki gave the Bobcats four innings of scoreless relief. Texas State finally cut the deficit in half in the fourth on a bases loaded walk from second baseman Patrick Crumpton, scoring designated hitter Stephen Quintana. But the Bobcats left the bases loaded when shortstop Dominic Ramos and center fielder Evan Tierce struck out, leaving the score 2-1. The Bobcats took the lead in

the fifth, as first baseman Mark Cooper, Miller, and right fielder Richard Martinez loaded the bases on three consecutive walks to open the inning. Quintana popped up to second base, invoking the infield fly rule. UIW second baseman Matt Taylor couldn’t make the catch, allowing Cooper to score, tying the game. Third baseman Kyle Anson walked to reload the bases before catcher C.J. Quayle recorded the only hit of the inning, a 2 RBI single to center field, giving the Bobcats a 4-2 advantage. Texas State tacked on one in the sixth on back-to-back doubles from Tierce and Cooper and three in the seventh as Tierce singled in Crumpton and Ramos and was plated by a Cooper single, completing the scoring. The Bobcats will be back in Southland Conference action this weekend, as they travel to Lake Charles, La., to face the McNeese State University Cowboys Friday through Sunday.

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fãxxà 16

SOFTBALL: BOBCATS HOST MISSOURI 1 P.M. FRIDAY

Spo r t s

The University Star — Page 10

Star Staff Picks

(Sweet 16 victories assumed) Championship Pick: Jason Orts

duke

Spo rts Edito r Pressure defense and strongest inside-outside game in country.

beats Oklahoma st. UAB (9)

How

Ga. Tech

St. Louis Georgia Tech (3)

Ok. St.

Wake Forest (4)

E. Rutherford

Ok. St.

Oklahoma State (2)

Duke

Duke (1)

Atlanta

Duke Syracuse (5) UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Travis Summers Sports Reporter Okafor has tremendous upside potential and their uniforms are pretty.

UConn

beats Georgia tech UAB (9)

St. Louis

Ga. Tech

Georgia Tech (3)

Ga. Tech

Wake Forest (4)

E. Rutherford Pittsburgh Pittsburgh (3)

UConn

Duke (1)

Atlanta

Duke

Texas (3) UConn Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

UConn

UConn (2)

Championship Pick:

Scooter Hendon Managing Editor Jarrett Jack and Ismail Muhammed will stick it to everyone.

Georgia Tech beats Uconn

Kansas (4)

St. Louis

Ga. Tech

Georgia Tech (3)

it is

S

March Madness continues Thursday

Duke

Texas (3)

Phoenix

Wednesday, March 24, 2004

Ga. Tech

St. Joseph’s (1)

E. Rutherford OK St. Oklahoma State (2)

Ga. Tech

Some call it parity, while others prefer to call it mediocrity. But no matter how you slice it, this year’s NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament has once again proved that anybody can beat anybody and given us a full dose of March Madness, including a Sweet 16 that includes just two Jason Orts No. 1 seeds and two Sports with Orts No. 2 seeds. The first round was rather mundane, with the chalk (higher-seeded teams) advancing in 28 of 32 games, and the biggest upsets being two No. 12 seeds beating No. 5 seeds, neither of which were shockers. But the second round offered an epidemic of upsets, including the top two teams in the field, Stanford University and the University of Kentucky, biting the dust. No. 2 seeds Mississippi State University and Gonzaga University were also victims, and both of them were beaten convincingly. All told, just nine of the 16 winners in the second round were seeded higher than their opponents. The biggest winners of the first weekend of play are the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big 12, Big East and Atlantic 10. The ACC, Big 12 and Big East all have three teams in the Sweet 16, and the Atlantic 10 has two, including St. Joseph’s University. Many cringed when the Hawks were given a No. 1 seed, but after a 70-65 win against Texas Tech University in round two and the losses of the aforementioned No. 1 seeds, St. Joe’s has validated itself. The biggest loser so far has to be the Southeastern Conference. Yes, there are two SEC teams in the Sweet 16 in the University of Alabama and Vanderbilt University, but its top

two teams, Kentucky and Mississippi State, fell flat on their faces in the second round. Anyway, on to the Sweet 16 matchups.

St. Louis region

No. 4 University of Kansas vs. No. 9 University of AlabamaBirmingham Kansas relies on the inside beef of Wayne Simeon and Jeff Graves and the slashing ability of Keith Langford offensively, but it must find a way to stop UAB, something Kentucky couldn’t do. This Jayhawk team may not be as talented as the one that went to the national championship game a year ago, but it is experienced. UAB has played in two of the more exciting games in the tournament, including its secondround upset of top-seeded Kentucky and outlasting the University of Washington, 102-100, in the only game in the tournament in which both teams scored at least 100 points. No. 3 Georgia Tech University vs. No. 10 University of Nevada-Reno Georgia Tech University was a chic pick to make the Final Four before the tournament began but has yet to play its best basketball. The Yellow Jackets “survived and advanced” through the first two rounds and must play better against Nevada, arguably the tournament’s biggest surprise. Georgia Tech is among the most talented teams in the tournament, with four guards that do most of the damage in Jarrett Jack, B.J. Elder, Anthony McHenry and Marvin Lewis. Nevada was dominant in its upset of g See TOURNAMENT, page 9

Mark Cornelison/Lexington Herald-Leader The University of Kentucky’s Gerald Fitch tries to get a shot over the University of Alabama-Brimingham’s Ronell Taylor Sunday in the second round of the NCAA tournament in Columbus, Ohio. UAB upset Kentucky 76-75 and will face Kansas for a chance to advance to the Elite 8.

National Championships from the last 10 years

2003 Syracuse 81, Kansas 78 2002 Maryland 64, Indiana 52 2001 Duke 82, Arizona 72 2000 Michigan St. 89, Florida 76 1999 UConn 77, Duke 74 1998 Kentucky 78, Utah 69 1997 Arizona 84, Kentucky 79 (OT) 1996 Kentucky 76, Syracuse 67 1995 UCLA 89. Arkansas 78 1994 Arkansas 76, Duke 72

Duke (1) Kentucky (1)

Atlanta

Duke

UAB

Washington (8)

Texas (3)

UAB

UConn Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

Kentucky

Florida A&M (16)

Division I Men’s Bracket

Duke (1)

Duke Alabama State (16) Seton Hall (8)

Duke Seton Hall

U of Al.-Birmingham (9)

Arizona (9)

Providence (5)

Illinois (5)

Illinois

Pacific

Murray State (12)

Pacific (12)

UConn

Kansas

Illinois

Cincinnati (4)

Kansas (4)

Cincinnati

Kansas

UConn (2) Ill.-Chicago (13)

Championship Pick:

Matt Isam Sport s Repo rt er Oklahoma State has the best defensive scheme in the country.

Oklahoma state beats Texas

Kansas (4)

East Tennessee State (13)

St. Louis

Boston College (6)

A t lan ta

Boston College

Air Force (11)

Utah (11)

Texas

Georgia Tech Georgia Tech (3)

Texas (3)

Georgia Tech

Texas

Nevada

Xavier

Princeton (14)

Northern Iowa (14)

Xavier (7)

Michigan St. (7)

Louisville (10)

Nevada (10)

Nevada Gonzaga (2)

Gonzaga

San Antonio

Xavier

Mississippi State (2)

Miss. St.

April 5

Valparaiso (15)

St. Louis

North Carolina (6)

North Carolina

Monmouth (15)

Kansas Stanford (1)

St. Joseph’s (1)

Stanford

St. Joe’s

Georgia Tech (3)

Liberty (16)

Ok. St.

St. Joe’s

Texas Tech (8)

St. Joseph’s (1)

National Champion

UT-San Antonio (16)

Alabama Alabama (8)

Alabama

Texas Tech

Southern Illinois (9)

Charlotte (9)

E. Rutherford OK St.

Florida (5)

Syracuse (5)

Syracuse

Manhattan

Brigham Young(12)

Manhattan (12)

Oklahoma State (2)

Ok. St.

Syracuse

Wake Forest

Wake Forest (4)

Duke (1)

Maryland (4)

Maryland

Wake Forest Virginia Commonwealth (13)

Atlanta

Texas

Ph oenix

Wisconsin

Vanderbilt (6)

Vandy Western Michigan (11)

Richmond (11)

Texas (3)

Vandy

Pitt

Pittsburgh (3)

Texas

North Carolina State (3)

NC State

Pitt

Syracuse (5)

Phoenix

UT-El Paso (13)

East Rutherford

Wisconsin (6)

Central Florida (14)

UL-Lafayette (14) DePaul (7)

Memphis (7)

UConn

DePaul

Memphis

Dayton (10)

South Carolina (10)

UConn (2)

Check out the rest of the Staff’s Picks on Page 9

U of Connecticut (2)

UConn

OK State Eastern Washington (15)

Coming Soon

We Proudly Brew

UConn

OK State

Oklahoma State (2)

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