Page 1

A fair variety

Road win

Bobcats make their way to SLC tournament with Nicholls victory/Sports/Page 10

Multicultural females Images of Women conference brings arts to the forefront/Trends/Page 6

Clear Channel fails to balance out its syndicated content/Opinions/Page 5

TUESDAY

VOLUME 93, ISSUE 58 www.universitystar.com

MARCH 2, 2004

Proposal could add Tram routes

T E X A S

By Amelia Jackson News Reporter Students may soon be able to ride the Tram without the worries of overcrowding or the possibility of being left behind. The Associated Student Government heard from Brad McAllister, Texas State Tram System representative, during its Monday meeting. McAllister detailed a proposal to the Senate that would add additional bus routes and manhours to the system after a $10 increase in student fees per semester. Bus fees are now $42 during

The American Sign Language Club will host Deaf Awareness Week as part of Diversity Month at Texas State to highlight solutions and services available to those suffering from the inability to hear. The events, which take place across campus today through Friday, will also highlight the importance of bringing ASL classes back to the university, which were discontinued in Summer 2001.

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U N I V E R S I T Y - S A N

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the fall and spring semesters and $21 during the summer sessions. The new plan would raise long-semester fees to $52 and short-semester fees to $26. The new routes would be implemented along North LBJ Drive and additional buses would go to Aquarena Springs. “I was surprised because I stood up in most of my classes this week and people were for (the new proposal) because of the additional routes on Aquarena Springs,” said Jeremy Boucher, biochemistry senior. This proposal would serve as a temporary solution to the g See ASG, page 3

ASL Club hosts Deaf Awareness Week on campus By Kassia Micek Assistant News Editor

S T A T E

“Our goal is to increase deaf awareness on the campus community,” said Lisa Bothwell, ASL Club president and premass communication junior. Bothwell said these programs have a large impact because onethird of the United States population will have some sort of hearing loss by the age of 60. Krystal Minter, Deaf World Committee co-chair and political science sophomore, agrees with Bothwell. “It would be very beneficial g See DEAF, page 3

Andy Ellis/Star Photo. Emmitt McCoy receives a standing ovation from a full house Friday after it was announced the he and wife Miriam had donated a record $20 million to Texas State University. The money will be used for a new College of Business Administration building and other increases in the program.

McCoys donate $20 million to College of Business Administration By Nikki Dawson News Reporter and David Doerr News Editor University administrators, students and faculty rejoiced Friday as the announcement was made that Emmett and Miriam McCoy pledged $20 million toward the Texas State College of Business Administration. In return for the gift, the Texas State University System Board of Regents agreed to name the College of Business Administration in honor of the McCoys during its Thursday meeting in

Beaumont. The gift will be used to establish endowed chairs and professorships, undergraduate and graduate scholarships and program development for students and faculty. President Denise Trauth said the gift is “transformational” for the university and that it will benefit the university for generations to come. “To have the McCoy name on our College of Business Administration is a mark of distinction for Texas State,” Trauth said. “The McCoy name has come to mean the highest standard of ethics for business practice, and we are proud to be associated with that name.”

C-SPAN bus educates students in The Quad Representatives aim to engage young people with civil affairs

By Jennifer Wisnoski News Reporter Typical school buses don’t have plasma screen monitors, onboard TV cameras or production equipment, but the yellow C-SPAN vehicle parked in The Quad Monday was not an average bus. Since November 1993, the Cable Satellite Public Affairs Network has driven its two educational buses across the country to raise awareness of

its operations and to encourage young people to become engaged in civil affairs. According to the C-SPAN Web site, the buses traveled to all 50 states and their capitals, all nine presidential libraries and logged 30,000 miles in 2002. Michael DiSerio, C-SPAN account representative, gave tours of the bus to students Monday in The Quad. DiSerio showed students the mobile classroom and the working television production studio housed on the bus. “There are TVs in front and a stage in back,” he said. “We also have two robotic arms that

Tony Ramos/ Star Photo Students in The Quad wait in line to get a tour from an account representative for C-SPAN of the C-SPAN School Bus.

we can put cameras on.” SPAN but do not dictate what In addition, the bus has should be broadcast. The main soundboards and editing sys- goal is to keep a balance, espetems housed in the front half of cially politically. The network the bus. The will go so far bus is as to change equipped the order of with two political hotHDTV plaslines as well ma screen as their nummonitors, two bers to remain DVD players, fair and unbitwo computased. DiSerio ers and two said the netD V C P r o cameras with — Michael DiSerio work is differplaying and C-SPAN account representative ent than other news chanrecording nels because decks. it “shows an C-SPAN has been on the air event as if you’re in the audisince 1979 and reaches about ence.” 89 million homes, DiSerio To illustrate his point, said. DiSerio showed a DVD of four “We are out there to be the stations covering one event. eyes and ears for people to see Fox News, CNN, C-SPAN what’s going on,” DiSerio said. and MSNBC all covered Major DiSerio said many people Gen. Ray Oderino’s press conthink C-SPAN is funded by the government, but it is actually ference when Saddam Hussein was captured. Only C-SPAN funded by the cable industry. C-SPAN charges 5 cents a showed a full screen of month per subscriber, which Oderino while the other three directly funds the network. stations had picture-in-picMost cable networks charge tures, as well as scrolling news on the bottom of the screen, about $2 a month. Representatives from net- which can distract a viewer.

“The bus is a good tool to show our concern with the public and for the public to learn about what we do.”

works like Comcast and Time Warner sit on the board of C-

g See C-SPAN, page 4

Emmett is the retired chairman and chief executive officer of McCoy’s Building Supply Centers. The university also recognized him Friday on his 81st birthday. The new building that will house the Emmett and Miriam McCoy College of Business Administration, which has been renamed McCoy Hall, is scheduled to open January 2006. The new building will feature high-tech classrooms, student and team areas, an academic advising center, a trading laboratory and state-ofthe-art computer labs. g See MCCOY, page 4

Congressman visits to discuss his re-election By Erin McGowan News Reporter Rep. Ciro Rodriguez, DSan Antonio, met with a group of local supporters at the San Marcos River Pub and Grill Friday to discuss his re-election for the 28th District of Texas. Melissa Seckel, Rodriguez’s field director for Hays County, arranged the event with the help of the congressman’s friend Laura Flores. Seckel said Flores was instrumental in making sure the event ran smoothly. “I wanted to do something special for the congressman so that he could meet a lot of people from Hays County,” Flores said. “I personally know congressman Rodriguez from

Today’s Weather

working with him in the U.S. Congress in Washington, D.C., and I think he’s a great man and an effective leader. I’m supporting him 100 percent, and so I thought I would come to San Marcos and try to help him get the vote out.” Seckel recently graduated from Texas State and immediately began working for Rodriguez in his campaign in the recently augmented district, which stretches from Hays County to Zapata County. Rodriguez was only able to stay at the event for a short time because of his busy schedule, but he made time to give a short speech and meet with potential voters. g See VISIT, page 3

I N S I D E

High: 71 Lo w : 61

Classifieds........................8

Wind: From E at 11 mph Precipitation: 20% Max. Humidity: 74% UV Index: 3 Low

News.............................2-4

AM Clouds/PM Rain

Wednesday’s Forecast Isolated T-Storms 75/64

Comics/Crossword........7 Opinions...........................5

Sports...........................9,10 Trends...............................6


NEWS

2 - The University Star at the San Marcos Library. Walt D isne y World ’s Co lle ge Program presentation is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the LBJSC Teaching Theater.

Calendar of

EVENTS Tuesday

Pu blic Rela tion s Stu de nt So ciety of America meets at 5 p.m. in the LBJSC, Room 3-10.1.

Wednesday

Ch ristian s at T ex as Stat e meets at noon in the LBJSC, Room 3-10.1. Sex ua l Assau lt & Ab use Se rvices meets at 4:30 p.m. at the Texas State Counseling Center.

Im age s o f Wo men is at 6 p.m. in the LBJSC Teaching Theater. Ame rica n Sign Lan gu ag e Clu b meets at 7 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-10.1.

America n Market ing Asso ciatio n meets at 5:30 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-14.1.

Ch rist ian s a t Te xa s St ate meets at noon in the LBJ Student Center, Room 3-10.1.

Stu de nt V olu n tee r C on ne ction meets at 5:30 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-5.1.

T he Ro ck meets at 7:30 p.m. at the CSC chapel.

Break in g F ree Fro m Die tin g support group meets at 3 p.m. at the Texas State Counseling Center. For more information, call 245-2208.

High er G rou nd meets at 5:30 p.m. at St. Mark’s Church.

C hi Alph a F ellowship meets at 8 p.m. in Old Main, Room 320.

Bo bca t Sup pe r is at 5:30 p.m. at the Christian Community Center.

D eck Sup p ort: Un de rgrou nd hosts a techno show at 8:30 p.m. at The Basement, in LBJSC.

Na tion al Associa tion of En viron men ta l Pro fession als meets at 5 p.m. in the Evans Liberal Arts Building, Room 311. Colleg iate En tre pren eu r’s Orga nizat ion meets at 5 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-5.1.

SEARCHING FOR RESCUERS

V ictory Ove r V iolen ce meets at 5:30 p.m. at LBJSC, Room 3-13.1.

Cat ho lic St ud en t C ent er provides a free lunch at 11 a.m. at the center.

Tex as Sta te C ou nselin g Ce nt er hosts a seminar on relationship conflicts from 3:15-4:45 p.m. at the center.

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

T exa s St at e Cru meets at 7:30 p.m. at the Academic Services Building-South, Room 315.

Co lle ge Rep u blican s meets at 7 p.m. in LBJSC, Room 3-13.1.

C hristia ns on Ca mpu s meets at 9:30 p.m. at the McCarty Student Center.

Cro sst alk meets at 8 p.m. in the Alkek Teaching Theater.

Calen da r Su bmission Policy Bib le St ud y meets at 8 p.m. at the Catholic Student Center.

Thursday

Bike fo r t h e Right meets at 5 p.m.

Calendar submisions are free. Send submissions to Calendar of Events Manager Paul Lopez at TexasStateCalendar@yahoo.com or call 245-3487 for more information. Notices for weekly meetings need to be submitted once. The University Star reserves the right to refuse entries or edit for libel, style and space purposes. D eadline: Three working days prior to publication.

Hours of Operation

Albert B. Alkek Library Monday -Wednesday 7:30 a.m. - 1 a.m. Thursday 7:30 a.m. - midnight Friday 7:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m. - 1 a.m.

Student Recreation Center Monday - Thursday 6 a.m. - midnight Friday 6 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday noon - midnight

Golf Course Open daily 7 a.m. - dusk

APPLICATIONS SOUGHT Editor-in-Chief The University Star Application Packets Available: 10 a.m.; Monday, March 22 ; Old Main 102 Deadline: Noon; Friday, April 2; Old Main 102 Meet with Advisory Committee: Week of April 5 The Student Publications Board of the Texas State Department of Mass Communication is conducting an all-campus open petitioning process to select students to serve as Editor of The University Star beginning the Fall Semester. Each applicant is asked to complete a written petition which is subsequently screened by the board. Qualified candidates for the position are then interviewed by the board.

M inimu m Qu alifications: To qualify, applicants must be a full-time student at Texas State

and must carry at least 12 hours during the term of office. Students must have worked in a professional editorial environment, or have served as a section editor at a university student newspaper. Students of all majors and classifications, including graduate students, may petition for the position. Applicants must be in good academic standing with the university with a minimum grade point average of 2.25.

The Univ ersi ty Star Missi on: It is the official student laboratory newspaper of Texas State University. Its mission is to inform, educate and entertain readers, while serving as a forum for the free exchange of ideas and as a marketplace for the sale of goods and services in an instructional environment characterized by dedication to freedom of expression, to cultural diversity and to the highest professional standards in both editorial and business practices.

Andrew Nenque/Star photo Firefighter J.R. Manrique of the South Hays Fire Department discusses requirements for volunteer recruitment to Tony Farmer, finance senior. With two new stations opening as early as April, South Hays will be in The Quad through Thursday looking for men and women to join their team.

Chilean writer celebrated through readings of works Kerouac’s poetry is also part of the event By Katherine Eissler News Reporter The 100th birthday of deceased Chilean writer Pablo Neruda will be celebrated with bilingual readings of his works at 1 p.m. today in the Wittliff Gallery, located on the 7th floor of Alkek Library. Miriam Balboa Echeverría, Spanish professor in the modern languages department, has organized readings of Neruda’s works as well as those of prominent “beat” writer Jack Kerouac. Echeverría said she has made the unanticipated combination of Neruda and Kerouac not only because they are 20th century writers, but also because Neruda met Kerouac once and liked him and his poetry. “I think we need to do (the readings) for the students and also for the students who don’t know of Neruda,” Echeverría said. Born Neftalí Ricardo Reyes Basoalto in 1904, Neruda adopt-

ed his pen name in memory of Jan Neruda, a Czechoslovakian poet from the 19th century. Neruda made his literary mark in 1933 by publishing his first collection of surrealistic poems, Residencia en la Tierra , and became one of the most popular Latin American poets of the 20th century, winning the World Peace Prize in 1950 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1971. Kerouac was born JeanLouis Lebris de Kerouac in 1922. He achieved fame with his book On the Road, published in 1957, which is an account of his cross-country trip with fellow beat writer Neal Cassady. Kerouac, known for his spontaneous prose, coined the phrase “beat generation,” describing his generation’s attitude of “weariness” with the world. Emphasis will be on Neruda’s work, which will be read in Spanish by Echeverría and Nestor Lugones, Spanish assistant professor. Jeff Gordon, philosophy professor, will read both Neruda and Kerouac’s works in English. Gordon was invited to participate in the readings after teaming with Echeverría on other

poetry projects presented for his philosophy classes. Echeverría hopes to make the poetry readings a regular event. “I want to do readings once a semester in the Wittliff Gallery if possible and do student readings in the modern languages department also,” Echeverría said. “(Poetry) is different when you hear the voices of the readers.” The goal of the Wittliff Gallery, which contains the largest collection in the state of contemporary Mexican photos and is host to the Southwestern Writers Collection, is to present works that are relevant to what the students are doing in classes, said Michele Miller, Wittliff Gallery spokeswoman. At 2 p.m Wedesday,Tom Miller, editor of Writing on the Edge: A Borderlands Reader, will lecture in the gallery. Leonard Folgarait, Vanderbilt University art history professor, will lecture on Tina Modotti and Manuel Álvarez Bravo: Defining Mexico Through Photography at 12:30 p.m. March 9 on the 11th floor of the J.C. Kellam Administration Building. These events are free and open to the public.

Ed itor's Jo b Descr iption : The Editor is the primary student editorial administrator for the

Star and has authority over news, feature and opinion content. The editor also recommends guidelines for daily operation, provides a role model for professional behavior, delegates operational authority and fulfills policies and procedures as determined by the Advisory Committee and faculty adviser. All copy and artwork for each publication is evaluated by the Editor, who also oversees staff meetings and handles personnel problems. Each editor carefully recruits and properly trains new staff members and effectively supervises them. The editor also promotes relations between the publication and campus organizations.

Term of Offi ce and Sal ary : The editor’s term of service is for the Fall 2004-Summer 2005 semesters. A salary is paid to the editor.

P eti tioning P rocess: A written petition is to be filed by each applicant. This petition consists

of questions to determine the applicant's qualifications in journalism, academics and management, and also seeks information designed to elicit the applicant's interest in the position and personal characteristics. Those applicants determined to be qualified will be interviewed by the Advisory Committee which will make the final selection.

P eti tion Dead lines: Petitions for the position will be due by Noon, Friday, April 2 to the

Director of Student Publications, Old Main 102. Persons interested in petitioning should sign a candidacy list in Old Main 102 and pick up a petition packet. Qualified applicants will be notified by Monday, April 5 and scheduled for an interview with the Student Publications Board during that week. Following interviews, selection and notification will be made as soon as possible thereafter. The formal assumption of duties is Monday, August 2.

Application packets will be available at 10 a.m., Monday, March 22, 2004 in Old Main 102.

“Know Your Dreams, Know Your Limits, Know the Consequences.”

The Quad Monday, March 8 and Tuesday, March 9 Don’t Drink and Drive Public Service Announcement courtesy of The University Star.


NEWS

ASG: Editor talks about Pedagog

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

g Cont. from page 1

Andy Ellis/Star photo San Marcos resident Larry Ballard is greeted by U.S. Congressman Ciro Rodriguez, D-San Antonio. Rodriguez visited with his supporters Friday at the River Pub Bar and Grill as a part of his re-election campaign.

VISIT: Re-election discussed g Cont. from page 1

In his speech, Rodriguez said he would fight for better education standards, better healthcare coverage and a more stable economy if he were reelected. “One of the key issues that has always been important to me is the issue of education, and one of the realities is that we are not emphasizing education the way we should,” Rodriguez said. After he left to speak to firefighters in Geronimo, his wife Carolina stayed with the crowd. Rodriguez has represented the 28th District in Congress for the past seven years, and he said that he faces a challenge in this re-election campaign because of the recent redistricting pushed by the Republican-dominated Texas Legislature. John Puder, Rodriguez’s political director, said he is confident that, despite redistricting, Rodriguez will be re-elected for this term. “Redistricting was really a disappointment,” Puder said. “It was a Republican effort to change the lines to create more districts for Republican congressmen. We’re now in the fallout of what happened. What we’ve created

(are) these districts that really aren’t connected to each other or make a whole lot of sense. This core district runs from Zapata (County), south of Laredo, all the way to the edge of Austin. But the congressman has represented most of this district in the past. Just a few areas are new to him. Hays County is new to him, and just a portion of Bexar County is new to him. Outside of that, he’s represented the other counties.” Since redistricting was passed, Rodriguez has been trying to get to know the new counties that were added to the 28th District. He is running against Henry Cuellar for the Democratic nomination. Voting for the Democratic primaries in Texas takes place March 9. Rodriguez urged everyone who attended the event, especially the younger people, to vote. He said the young people of the United States need to get involved in the government in order to protect their interests. “One of the things that is important is that we’re asking our young people not only to defend this country; we’re asking them to pay for it. Not only are we handing you the debt, we’re handing you an infrastructure that is decaying,” Rodriguez said.

overcrowding issue on buses. When the contract expires in 2007, the university will look to extending the routes to include public transportation for non-students as well as students, McAllister said. This would open the Tram system to federal funding. If the Senate approves the plan at its next meeting, the fee increase will be presented to students in a referendum during ASG elections March 30 and 31. The Senate also heard from the editors of the Pedagog, Texas State’s yearbook, which will be revived this year after being discontinued for the second time in 1999. Rebecca Quillin, yearbook editor and biochemistry freshman, said the time is right for bringing back the yearbook because the first Pedagog was printed in 1904, making this year the 100th anniversary. The yearbook was discontinued in 1975 and brought back in 1978 for a single edition to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the school. The book resumed publication in 1984 and operated until 1999. This year’s Pedagog will not be in the traditional style of yearbooks, which include photographs of every student. Instead, it will be a 100-page “catch-all” of important events, clubs and happenings at Texas State for the past four years, Quillin said. Kyle Morris, economics sophomore, strongly supported reinstating the yearbook and drafted legislation calling for its support. “(Pedagog) is something that helps to facilitate the school in the long run,” Morris said. Quillin also said some major focal points of the book would be the name change, new university departments and the deaths of former President Jerome Supple and coach Jim Wacker. There will also be a then-and-now section for students to compare and contrast university life today to the early 1900s. The books will cost between $25 and $30 and pre-orders will be taken in April. The yearbook is slated to be distributed in August. ASG will hold grievance sessions from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Wednesday in The Quad and the LBJ Student Center. “I encourage students to stop by our grievance tables,” said ASG President Ernie Dominguez. “It’s a great opportunity for students to give ideas and voice concerns so we can better serve the students this semester.” In other business, the Senate approved the nomination of three new senators. Lee Hunt, criminal justice junior; Anna Westhoff, undeclared sophomore; and Trey Rogers, finance sophomore, will be the last students admitted into this year’s Senate. All senators are required to file and run for office to remain in ASG for the 2004-2005 school year.

DEAF: Events aim to raise awareness about deaf issues for anyone to learn about deaf culture and how we interact with each other,” Minter said. “Deaf people are very creative, social and direct.” Events during the week will provide students with information on living with deafness. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. today in the LBJ Student Center Amphitheater students will sign songs, read “ABC” stories, read ASL poetry and have ASL storytelling. Bothwell explained ABC storytelling is like “acting out or miming” the story. Also at 11 a.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132, a discussion on cochlear implants will take place. Rebecca Raphael, psychology assistant professor, and Tracy Gentry, pre-theatre freshman, will talk about their experiences with cochlear implants, along with implant technology and history. Raphael had the implants installed as an adult and Gentry received the implants when she was 5 years old. Currently, there is a debate on whether the Federal Trade Commission should allow the implant surgery to be performed on children or wait until a person can decide on the procedure

If YOU have a news tip, let us know! Email our News Editor at:

starnews@txstate.edu

See Thursday’s ad for more details!

municating in long distance, underwater and in the air.” Also on Thursday, David Coco, Texas School for the Deaf outreach specialist, will moderate a panel discussion titled “LateDeafened Adults: Identity and Coping Skills” as part of the Philosophy Dialogue series at 11 a.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132. At noon in the LBJSC Amphitheater, members of the ASL Club will lead a group in singing R. Kelly’s “The World’s Greatest” as the Diversity Month event opener. Then, at 1 p.m. in the Psychology Building, Room 132, Tim Knetl, N.Y.O.S. Charter School ASL teacher and former ASL Club president, will participate in a panel discussion titled “Deaf Culture From a Hard-of-Hearing Person’s Perspective”. “It’s a very necessary thing for the students to learn about,” Bothwell said about sign language. Deaf Awareness Week began as an annual event three years ago to spread the word about what is available to those who suffer from hearing loss. “I think it’s very important for people to come to this event, to show the university there is a need for ASL classes to start again,” Bothwell said.

for himself. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday the ASL Club will gather at The Fighting Stallions for a social where students can learn about ASL and the club. At 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Psychology Building, Room 132, Joe Ploeger, Austin Deaf Events Newsletter editor, will discuss deaf culture from the perspective of a deaf person as part of the Philosophy Dialogue series. The LBJSC Ballroom will be transformed from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday into a “Deaf World” in which those who attend will have to discover a means to communicate without speaking. Booths will contain a mock bank, a café with free food and drinks and a television with captions. ASL Club representatives will also staff booths to distribute information on how a person can lose hearing, different sign language around the world and the history of American Deaf Culture and ASL. Attendees will only be permitted to communicate through signs, gestures or writing. “I want to encourage people to learn gestures and learn to be open-minded,” Minter said. “They will learn that the deaf can do anything but hear. We are capable of com-

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News Briefs

The University Star - 3

Aristide says departure was coerced by U.S.

WASHINGTON — A day after a U.S.-chartered plane spirited him from his strife-torn country to Africa, exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide charged Monday that the United States had forced him to leave in what he described as a “coup d’etat” and “kidnapping.” Bush administration officials fervently denied the charges, but the accusations from Aristide and his allies in Congress and elsewhere threw the White House on the defensive and loomed as a potentially troublesome complication in the effort to steer the impoverished country into a new order after nearly a month of unrest. At the United Nations, some diplomats expressed uneasiness, fearing their quick approval Sunday night of a Security Council resolution supporting an international peacekeeping effort was beginning to look more like an internationally sanctioned coup. “Aristide was a democratically elected president who responded positively to a political solution that the opposition rejected,” Algerian Ambassador Abdallah Baali said, referring to a powersharing deal Aristide had agreed to but Haitian opposition leaders had rejected. “But the pressure was not put on the opposition. It was put on him. Today we wonder if we had reliable information, and enough time to make the right decision.” Aristide, speaking from a government compound in the Central African Republic, said that, contrary to what U.S. officials have said publicly, he agreed to go into exile only after U.S. officials told him they would not protect him from the rebel forces that were preparing to overrun the capital.

Search for tanker’s crew called off PORTSMOUTH, Va. — The Coast Guard on Monday called off its search for 18 crew members missing from the chemical tanker that exploded and sank off the Virginia coast on Saturday night, and the seamen were presumed dead. Officials said it would be nearly impossible to survive even a few hours in the cold Atlantic Ocean. The Coast Guard searched in good weather for more than 36 hours after the 570-foot Bow Mariner burst into flames and went down, finding six survivors

and recovering three dead crewmen. The Bow Mariner — carrying more than 3.5 million gallons of ethanol and almost 200,000 gallons of fuel oil for its engines as it headed from New York to Houson — sent a distress call shortly after 6 p.m. Saturday. The survivors were found floating in an oil-covered life raft and were plucked from the ocean by a Coast Guard helicopter, about 55 miles east of the Eastern Shore community of Chincoteague. Ethanol leaked into the water and ultimately created a narrow slick that covered almost nine square miles. The fuel oil covered a much smaller area, creating a thin black sheen atop the waves. Rear Adm. Sally Brice-O’Hara, commander of the Coast Guard’s 5th District, announced Monday that the Coast Guard was halting its search at 1 p.m. after rescuers completed 30 missions and covered 70 square miles in unseasonably warm weather with clear skies.

National Guard biggest since World War II

FORT POLK, La. — Deep in “The Box,” big blue buses morph into rolling, apocalyptic explosive devices. Danger crouches in the high brush and glares down from the pines. Smoke and flame interrupt breakfast, obliterate lunch, upend dinner. Sleep is for the weak or the foolish. A tireless teenager’s constitution is all that keeps Bret Roberts, a 19-year-old National Guardsman from Depoe Bay, Ore., alert. Under the weary gaze of his squad leader, Roberts peers down a lonely Louisiana road as he leans hard into a belt-fed M249 machine gun capable of delivering 1,000 rounds per minute. “Looking for the big blue bus of love,” he says with the devil-maycare aplomb of a grizzled veteran. The bus Roberts is looking for is a prop, just as the explosions and the menace in the woods are artful fictions, all part of an elaborate training exercise concocted to prepare thousands of National Guard troops engaged in the biggest deployment of citizen soldiers in half a century. Sometime this spring, not long after Roberts and his pals leave the 200,000acre training pod known as “The Box,” National Guard and reserve troops will come to represent nearly 40 percent of the 105,000 U.S. military men and women in Iraq. Briefs are from wire reports.

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C-SPAN: Bus stops on campus to promote voting 4 - The University Star

g Cont. from page 1

DiSerio answered questions from students ranging from political to educational. One student asked if C-SPAN covered alternative political parties. “We do also cover alternatives like the Libertarian Convention, the Reform Party, the Green Party and National Law,” DiSerio said. John Watts, a student at Austin Community College, asked DiSerio about a new French network that is similar to Al Jazeera TV in the Middle East. DiSerio said that network is funded completely by the French who want to “try to be the balance to

power and show others’ views.” C-SPAN also carries broadcasts from other countries such as England, China, Germany and France. DiSerio found his job at CSPAN by applying on its Web site. He recommends that anyone who is interested in the network apply online. “There are internships in every department running fall, spring and summer in Washington, D.C.,” he said. About 200 students came for a tour of the bus throughout the day. Tours ran between 15 to 20 minutes, with about 12 students in each session. Local broadcast news stations also came to visit the

NEWS

bus. DiSerio said the bus was scheduled to come to Texas months ago to cover the March 9 primary. The bus visited the University of Texas campus Friday and will continue to tour Texas this week. The bus will tour Louisiana next week. DiSerio said the bus tour’s main goal is to educate and work with cable affiliates and generate good public relations. “There is no law that says cable stations have to carry us,” DiSerio said. “The bus is a good tool to show our concern with the public and for the public to learn about what we do.”

FILING FOR ASG

ELECTIONS HAS BEGUN!

MCCOY: Donation breaks record

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

g Cont. from page 1

McCoy Hall’s teaching theater, which can seat as many as 150 people, will be named in honor of the McCoy’s son Dennis and his wife Cindy. Dennis was killed in a company airplane crash in 1985 near Brownwood. Despite the sudden inflow of money, Denise Smart, College of Business Administration dean, said the college has capped its enrollment. She said last year the college had about 4,400 undergraduate majors. By next year, she expects the number to decrease to 3,500 as part of an effort to better serve students. It also serves 1,500 undergraduate minors and 450 graduate students. Smart said the size of the faculty would not directly increase in response to the gift. “Indirectly it will (increase),” Smart said. “These (endowments) aren’t creating new positions per se, but they will be enhancements to positions. This will allow us to attract scholars of national prominence. The details of that are yet to be determined but we will certainly be hiring some new faculty members.” TSUS Regent Don Flores was on hand at the press conference Friday to thank the McCoys for their gift. “I think it’s great,” Flores said. “I think it is a wonderful time for the university. It’s from the generosity of a wonderful couple that believes in San Marcos and the university.”

Emmett said he and his wife are happy to make the gift. “It should provide support for a good school to make it one of the best colleges of business administration in Texas and better than most of the rest,” he said. “With this help, Texas State should be able to attract more great professors and students to the university and San Marcos.” The gift creates an opportunity to obtain other gifts to the university through the process of finding donors willing to match funds provided by the McCoys. “Six chairs have been established with endowments at $1 million each,” said Greg Hill, University Advancement vice president. “It gives us the opportunity to seek further donations to that endowment, and if a chair at $1 million is matched by another donor then the donor that contributes the second million will be the namer of that chair.” While the legalities of the gift have yet to be sorted out, administrators do not forsee any problems. The Board of Regents approved an outline for the establishment of a foundation to administer the gift, but still needs to approve its contract, bylaws and articles of incorporation. “The motion that regents approved thanks the McCoys for the gift, names the college, the building and the teaching theater for the McCoys,” said Bill Nance, Finance and Support Services vice president.

“Then they authorized the chairman of the board of our local committee to sign the contract and approve the bylaws after they have been reviewed and approved by the vice chancellor and general counsel. It will probably take a couple of months for all of the legal work to be done.” Nance said the outline for the foundation specifies $6 million will go to endowed chairs, $3 million to endowed professorships, $3 million to faculty development, $3 million to undergraduate scholarships and $1.5 million to graduate scholarships, $2.5 million to student development and $1 million to general program development. Students, faculty and administrators who attended the announcement said they were excited about the impact the gift will have on the college. “I think it will really raise the consciousness for the students coming out of this school right now, and with that McCoy brand, we’re going to have to make everyone proud,” said Jeff Lubanski, graduate accounting student and College of Business Administration advisory board member. McCoy Building Supply Centers, a retail building supply company, was founded in 1923 in Houston by Emmett’s father Frank McCoy. Emmett moved the company’s headquarters to San Marcos in 1972. It has 87 stores and employs more than 2,000 people in Arkansas, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.

If representing the student body as the

PRESIDENT,

City of San Marcos PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT Posted - March 1, 200 The City of San Marcos needs qualified individuals to fill the following vacancies:

VICE PRESIDENT, OR AS A SENATOR

Summer Aquatics Program: May 17-August 14, 2004 Employees MUST be able to work a flexible schedule, including evenings and weekends. More information is available through the Parks and Recreation Department, Activity Center, 393-8280.

for your college is something you would like to do, go to the ASG Office (LBJSC 4-5.1) and file today!

Performs lifeguard duties; instructs swimming lessons; ability to learn and administer first aid and CPR; enforces safety rules; cashiers; and maintains pool area. Must be at least 16 years of age and possess both Lifeguard and Water Safety Instructor Certificates. Red Cross Certification preferred, (YMCA Lifeguard and Ellis & Associates certifications may be considered.) Must attach current certifications to application.

Filing ends March 12 at 5:00 p.m. Elections will be March 30 and March 31. Please consult the ASG Constitution and Election Code for candidate qualifications and the election process. Call the ASG Office at 245-2196 for more information.

ASG FILING FORM Name: Texas State ID: Classification: GPA*: Local Phone No: Permanent Phone No.: Email: Local Address: Permanent Address:

* Employees returning to the same position will be given an additional 3% pay increase per year up to 3 years.

Job #22225 LIFEGUARD/SWIMMING INSTRUCTOR: 5 positions

Job #22226 LIFEGUARD: 2 positions

$7.40 per hour

$6.75 per hour

Performs lifeguard duties; ability to learn and administer first aid and CPR; enforces safety rules; cashiers; maintains pool area. Must be at least 16 years of age and possess a Lifeguard Certificate. Red Cross Certification preferred, (YMCA Lifeguard and Ellis & Associates certifications may be considered.) Must attach current certification to application.

Summer Fun Program: June 7 – August 5, 2004 (Orientation: June 1 - June 4, 2004) All summer program staff must obtain certification of completion of the Red Cross First Aid/CPR Course prior to the first day of the program. Classes will be available for applicants interested in obtaining this certification. The work schedule for all summer positions is Mon.-Th., 7:30-4:30; 8:30-5:30, for nine weeks. May be required to work overtime. More information is available through the Parks and Recreation Department, 393-8400. * Employees returning to the same position will be given an additional 3% pay increase per year up to 3 years.

Job #22217 SUMMER PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$11.19 per hour

Management and administration of summer youth program. Plans, develops, and administers program recreational activities for approximately 700 school aged children at three sites; training, orientation, and supervision of approximately 25 summer employees. A bachelor’s degree plus two years related experience and a valid Texas Driver’s License with acceptable driving record required.

Job #22218 ASSISTANT SUMMER PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

$8.80 perhour

Assists with the management and administration of summer youth program including supervision and training of approximately 25 summer employees. Assists in preparing and scheduling on and off campus site activities. A high school diploma or equivalent plus two years related experience, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

*GPA requirements: President and Vice President nominees must have a 2.75 Texas State GPA at the time of candidacy. Senate nominees must have a 2.50 Texas State GPA at the time of candidacy. Please circle the position as to which you wish to run. Y o u ma y o nly se le ct one . Be sure to read the requirements for each position to know if you qualify. Consult the ASG Constitution and Election Code for rules concerning other eligibility requirements and the election process. Call the ASG Office for any concerns or questions. PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT SENATOR for College of: APPLIED ARTS EDUCATION LIBERAL ARTS SCIENCE BUSINESS FINE ARTS & COMM. HEALTH PROF. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE GRADUATE

Job #22219 CHALLENGE PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

Job #22220 ASSISTANT CHALLENGE PROGRAM COORDINATOR: 1 position

Signature:

Date:

Witness:

Date:

$6.61 per hour

Assists with the administration of the summer youth challenge program including supervising and scheduling of summer employees. Organizes recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus one-year related experience, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

Job #22221 CHALLENGE PROGRAM AIDE: 2 positions

$6.24 per hour

Child supervision on campus sites and during transportation and field trips. Administration of recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities including swimming and field trips; maintenance of campus site area; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus experience working with physically and/or mentally challenged children required.

Job #22222 PLAYGROUND SITE SUPERVISOR: 3 positions

Statement of Understanding By signing this form I agree that the preceding information provided by myself is true. I agree that I have read and understand the guidelines specified in the ASG Election Code. I agree to campaign within the guidelines specified therein. I understand that a copy of the ASG Election Code is located in the ASG Office in the LBJSC 4-5.1 and at www.asg.txstate.edu. I additionally understand that failure to abide by the ASG Election Code rules and falsification of this document will result in my disqualification from the Associated Student Government election.

$10.56 per hour

Administration of summer youth challenge program involving planning and implementation of programming recreational activities for school aged children with physical/mental disabilities including swimming and field trips. Supervises, trains, and schedules employees. A bachelor’s degree in special populations or a related field plus two years related experience. Two years of directly related experience may substitute for 30 hours of college with a maximum substitution of 60 hours and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required.

$7.42 per hour

Performs supervisory duties for Playground Leader positions. Supervises children, develops, and administers program recreational activities on playground campus sites for over 300 children. Maintains campus records; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent plus two years related experience and a valid Texas Driver’s License with acceptable driving record required. Extensive experience working with children preferred.

Job #22223 ASSISTANT PLAYGROUND SITE SUPERVISOR: 3 positions

$6.61per hour

Assists with the supervision of the playground leaders. Supervises children and administers program recreational activities on playground campus sites. Maintains campus sites; enforces safety rules; ability to learn and administer first aid. A high school diploma or equivalent, and a valid Texas Driver’s License with an acceptable driving record required. Experience working with young children preferred.

Job #22224 PLAYGROUND LEADER: 12 positions

$6.24 per hour

Child supervision on campus sites and during transportation and field trips. Administration of program recreational activities; maintenance of campus site area; ability to learn and administer first aid. Must be at least 16 years of age. Experience working with young children preferred.

All positions close March 29, 2004. An application must be completed for each position and the job number stated. APPLY TO: Human Resources Department, City Hall Building, 630 E. Hopkins, San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: 512-393-8066 Fax: 512-396-4656 Job Line: 512-393-8290 Web site: www.ci.san-marcos.tx.us Email: humanresources@ci.san-marcos.tx.us *EOE/AA/Drug Free Workplace* Successful completion of pre-employment drug testing required.


OPINIONS CONTACT Scooter Hendon staropinion@txstate.edu (512) 245-3487

OPINIONS

THE UNIVERSITY STAR Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Clear Channel fails to offer balanced content

Page 5

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

THE MAIN POINT

C

lear Channel, the multinational, San Antoniobased corporation that owns a vast majority of American radio stations, refuses to offer balanced viewpoints. Florida-based talk show host Randi Rhodes continues to push for syndication from Clear Channel for her radio show that carries a liberal viewpoint. Rhodes pulls high ratings that rival conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh in the Florida broadcasting area, and she has

charged her supporters with emailing the appropriate authorities about syndicating Rhodes’ show — something they have done in large numbers — but Clear Channel refuses to respond to any of the requests. It is believed the main reason Clear Channel refuses to syndicate Rhodes’ show is because Limbaugh has said he will pull his show from syndication if Rhodes accompanies him in the Clear Channel radio family. It is understandable Limbaugh would want

Even so, Clear Channel does have the right to choose what it syndicates, and in the end, it has the final say on whether a show will be a lucrative investment. Limbaugh does pull a lot of influence by his high popularity, and angering the cash cow usually isn’t a good idea. In the end, it’s still a shame listeners have little choice on what they hear on the radio, and their requests going unanswered show that Clear Channel will only go for the easy solution.

to avoid having viewpoints that oppose his own broadcast throughout the country. However, Clear Channel should be openminded enough to include a show that obviously grabs many listeners’ attention, even if it opposes its personal viewpoints. It makes sense that it would resist a liberal view since most liberals oppose large media conglomerates, but a corporation of that size has a responsibility to provide all viewpoints, despite the obvious conflict.

The Mai n Poi nt is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the department of mass communication or Texas State University-San Marcos. Let ter s poli c y: E-mail letters to starletters@txstate.edu. Letters must be no longer than 350 words. No anonymous letters will be printed. We reserve the right to edit for grammar, spelling, space and libel. We reserve the right to refuse obscene, irrelevant and malicious letters. All e-mails must include the name and phone number of the letter writer. Students should also include their classifications and majors.

New Hampshire holds promise of liberty

God is not confined to one religion

Let’s talk religion. I understand this part of Texas is well within the boundaries of the Bible Belt, that region of the South and Midwest where any conversation of theology is automaticalJeff Miller ly equated to JudeoStar Columnist Christian dogma. Here’s the part where some toes are going to get stomped on: Christianity is not the only religion. And a thousand God-fearing Texans in chorus scream: “You must be one of those damned atheists! You’re going to burn in the slow fires of hell, blasphemer!” If there is a hell, I’m fairly certain I have a hot spot reserved already, so the threat of brimstone and hellfire is somewhat lost on me. I am by no means stating that Christians are wrong in their belief system. I think the stories of Jesus, Noah and David and Goliath are wonderful. But that’s just what they are — stories with some really great morals not meant to be taken literally. I’ll try to put it another way. As a child growing up, I read a lot of Dr. Seuss and A.A. Milne, and those books had many good ideas about manners and friends and cooperation and the like. I was somewhat aware that there was no such thing as a plate of green eggs and ham, nor was there a walking, talking stuffed bear named Pooh. However, I learned much from these books, not from the fantastical characters, but from the virtues and lessons they taught along the way. I think that’s kind of what the Bible is supposed to be. It’s a collaborative effort of many people who put into

The University Star 601 University Dr. San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

You do not have the right to label someone as idolatrous or anti-whatever just because he worships in a different fashion or to a God of a different name.

words what the basic idea behind religion is. The idea itself is fairly simple, but ultimately complex in meaning — to have any form of religious belief is to realize that there is definitely a grand and driving force behind it all. It also posits recognition and appreciation to whomever you have named that divine entity, be it God, Allah, The Way, The Path, Buddha, Vishnu, etc. I certainly didn’t write this to offend Christians or make them a target, that’s just the predominant religion around these parts, and I was brought up primarily around the Holy Trinity belief system. I just want people to think about other possibilities before they write them off as blasphemy or a personal affront to their God. On a side note, it is not right for our political and social leaders to spout off their personal beliefs to the public or to use them as a defense for sociopolitical actions. The worst example is that of George W. stating that God is on our side in Iraq. “This is God’s work, and He is behind us. God is on our side.” I expect Bush, as a man who has put himself in a bad spot, to make an occasional reference to God. But I certainly do not condone the president of the United States consistently referring to his personal deity as a defense for his

Editor In Chief............................Genevieve Klein, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.....................Scooter Hendon, staropinion@txstate.edu News Editor.........................................David Doerr, starnews@txstate.edu Assistant News Editor.....................Kassia Micek, km1018@txstate.edu Sports Editor......................................Jason Orts, starsports@txstate.edu Entertainment Editor.........Terry Ornelas, starentertainment@txstate.edu

poor decision-making abilities. I’m surprised G.W. hasn’t been blasted with a lightning bolt yet. To get back to the main point, if you are of any religious ilk, you must remember there are others out there who are as devout as you are, perhaps even more so. Everyone is guaranteed the same basic rights in the Constitution, one of the key ones being the right to practice whatever religion you believe in, with no discrimination or interference. However, you do not have the right to label someone as idolatrous or anti-whatever just because he worships in a different fashion or to a God of a different name. On the contrary, you might be surprised as to how similar your faith is to a Muslim’s, a Hindu’s, a Jew’s, a Buddhist’s or a Wiccan’s. Keep in mind that it’s all relative, and whatever you believe in, others out there are praying as hard as you are to what they view to be holy. The bottom line: Every religion is based on faith in divinity, and each member of each religion is immediately related to all others in all religions on that basis of faith. Praise God, Allah or Whomever. Amen.

Increasing deficits. UnconNew Hampshire residents. These stitutional and illegal wars. An reforms can be more effective incompetent “leader” who acts when done at the local level instead more and more like a king. This of some faceless bureaucrat in government continues to spiral out Washington, D.C., making policy of control, and, as it for states thousands of does, its claim of legitimiles away. Sorens Aaron Ball macy is further weakalso feels the project ened. will lead to the As Americans we restoration of the conmust come to the constitutional federalism clusion that our governof our founders, espement requires drastic cially with respect to action to prevent it from the 10th Amendment. becoming a permanent There are just warfare state. Our some areas where the Star Columnist options at this point in federal government time are limited. Voting offers needs to butt out and allow the nothing in the way of real change, state and local governments to take and it is obvious that mass protest over. He hopes that other states will will not deter this government see the successes of the Free State from its anti-liberty agenda. What Project in New Hampshire and will then can true patriots do? I believe emulate it from fear of “losing their the best opportunity for us is to tax base.” join the Free State Project, a moveWhy New Hampshire? New ment that envisions “liberty in our Hampshire was chosen because, “it lifetime.” has the lowest state and local taxes In a recent article in the in the country, has friendly gun laws … (and) a large legislature Atlasphere newsletter, Free State Project founder Jason Sorens with a strong system of town govexplained what the project is about. ernment so that you can influence a The Free State Project is a movegreat many important policies by ment of freedom-loving individuals participating in town meetings.” who advocate moving 20,000 other Not to mention it has one of the like-minded citizens to New coolest state mottos: Live Free or Hampshire to “begin reining in fed- Die. Even the state’s Republican eral power by using the state to Gov. Craig Benson has endorsed challenge the federal government’s the project, publicly inviting memauthority in many areas.” bers to the state. New Hampshire is One of the most exciting tools a also one of the most beautiful states state could do in challenging the in the United States with its fall feds would be, according to Sorens, foliage and picturesque landscapes. the “outright nullification (of federThis is one of the most exciting al law) or some kind of unilateral ideas I have come across in a long time. This isn’t some utopian declaration of sovereignty.” These vision; it is an idea based very free-staters would then build, from much in reality and has the incredithe town up to the state government, a classical liberal state where, ble potential to effect change in as Sorens says, “the maximum role this country. I encourage everyone and anyone interested in maintainof civil government would be to ing and preserving the great ideals protect individuals’ life, liberty and of men such as John Locke, property.” Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith Government would be, in size to go to freestateproject.org and and scope, reduced by two-thirds. join the movement that will see Many areas, such as education and public utilities, would be deregulat- “liberty in our lifetime.” ed, allowing the free-market to take Ball is a history senior. over, ensuring more freedom for

Miller is an English freshman.

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The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the Fall and Spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. with a daily circulation of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Co pyrig ht Ma r ch 2, 2004 . All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


T h e U ni v e rs i t y S t a r

TRENDS Cult Classics

Page 6 — Tuesday, March 2, 2004

By Ian Ragsdale

Film

Trendy Thoughts “Fat Tuesday in Austin. I had fun, but it wasn’t as good as last year because of the weather.” — Rob ert G ill b io logy sop ho more

“When was Mardi Gras? I obviously did nothing special.” — An th on y G arza art e du cat ion se nio r

“I hung out with old friends.” — Melissa Ta ussig b iolo gy ju nio r

Event presents images of women

How did you celebrate Mardi Gras?

Jazz flutist puts music, poetry into lecture

Title: Tron Director: Steven Lisberger Yr. Released: 1982 Starring: Jeff Bridges, Bruce Boxleitner, David Warner, Cindy Morgan

Tron may have been the first motion picture to deal with questions about the power of computers in our lives, but everyone remembers it for being the first feature dominated by computer graphics. The rudimentary images may inspire little awe in contemporary audiences, but they are titillating to many a nerd nostalgic for the MS-DOS prompt and QBasic programming. Unfortunately, the deep subject matter was given a shallow emotional treatment by the family-friendly spinsters at Disney, but there’s still a lot the sympathetic viewer can find to love in Tron. Bridges energetically plays Flynn, a man-child hacker extraordinaire who is transported into the world inside a computer when a jealous program catches him hacking his former employer’s databanks. Inside, Flynn must play deadly video games against rogue programs while he searches for hidden data that will resolve a dispute in the real world. It’s no more improbable than most science fiction plots, but Tron is more beautiful than most. Everything from the Common Gateway Interface sets to the CGI costumes take their cues from circuitry to make a world crisscrossed with glowing lines and translucent panels. Even if this is not exactly what a computer looks like inside, it’s what everyone wishes it did. Tron was not a box office success. It was a breakthrough movie in 1982, just as The Matrix was in 1999, and no matter how many imitators will come around or how much better special effects will get, the originators deserve to receive their dues. Most Memorable Scene: The Light Cycle battle — think of the video game Worms on motorcycles. Quote: “End of line.”

By Jenny Lindsey

Album Title: Bad Brains Artist: Bad Brains Yr. Released: 1982 Label: Roir

Bad Brains was the master of fusion. Its pioneering mixture of punk and reggae is exemplified in the band’s self-titled 1982 release. Originally issued only on cassette, the album was re-released on CD with the title Attitude and on vinyl as Bad Brains. Although the band was never mainstream, it’s often cited as being inspirational to many, including Henry Rollins, Beastie Boys, Billy Corgan, No Doubt and Sublime. They were a mainstay in New York City and in the punk scene there. Its legendary performances had fans hungry for more and they were finally fed with the 1982 release. In a landscape of cries for total anarchy and “argh, everything sucks,” the socially conscious lyrics were a breath of fresh air. In addition to the lyrics, the individual musical talents of the members were allowed to shine by means of the album’s many solos, their fast and furious pace is broken by melodic reggae riffs. Somehow it all works, so well in fact, that it’s often hard to determine where one song ends and another begins. This is Bad Brains at its best. The four jazz musicians who came together to form Bad Brains left an indelible mark on the punk scene. The band’s influence is as undeniable as its genius. Superlative songs: “Banned in D.C.,” “Fearless Vampire Killers,” “Don’t Need It”

BY BRANDON COBB ARTS REPORTER

Courtesy photo Comedian Shayla Rivera headlines the comedy act for the 9th annual Images of Women conference, taking place Thursday at Texas State.

Comedian explores cultural comedy BY SHANNON MCGARVEY SENIOR REPORTER In a day and age where comedians are a dime a dozen, Shayla Rivera is breaking the mold as one of North America’s premiere Hispanic comedians. A jack of many trades and a woman of varied tasks, Rivera has explored the unusual life of a rocket scientist, mother, motivational speaker, wife and comedian. Rivera has appeared on programs on such networks as Showtime, CBS, NBC, Galavisión, Telemundo and in various commercials and short films. To add to this list, she will be performing at the 9th annual Images of Women gala Thursday in the LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater co-hosted by Kappa Delta Chi Sorority, Inc. and Black Women United. The event “promotes and celebrates diversity, cultural awareness and the advances amongst women of color,” according to a press release. Though Rivera is the headlining comedy act for Images of Women, she didn’t always want to be a comedian; in fact, she wanted to be an astronaut. Clearly, a huge leap from comedy, aerospace engineering always intrigued Rivera and even compelled her to pursue a degree in it at Texas A&M University. Soon, though, like many college graduates, she had to confront the realities of her chosen profession and found that aerospace engineering “was more like Kmart with lots of pocket protectors” than something she genuinely enjoyed doing. So where does a native Puerto Rican woman turn after trying her hand at being a rocket scientist? Many people would just retire fulfilled, but Rivera took to her true calling and became a comedian, along with, of course, the lesser-rec-

ognized but equally admirable task of being a dedicated wife and mother. She took to the road, performing with famed musician and speaker Galen Abdur-Razzaq, making pit stops just long enough to perform at such events as the inaugural Reyes of Comedy Night to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. Rivera combines the feminist strength of her one-woman comedy show “Mujer con Pantalones” (“Woman With Pants”) with the invigorating musical prowess of Abdur-Razzaq in a unique two-hour show. A talented jazz musician and major figure touring nationwide on the university circuit, Abdur-Razzaq “has performed for over 30 years and has shared the stage with world renowned artists such as Billy Taylor, Melba Moore, Sun Ra (and) John Patton.” Along with being an exceptional musician, AbdurRazzaq is a cultured and captivating speaker on the relevance of jazz music in our society and its historical significance to the world. On Thursday, before Rivera’s set, AbdurRazzaq will “interpret a piece of music with an emphasis (on) four women of the Jazz Age” before launching into a short, catered intermission. Although all publicity for the event has emphasized the strict tentativeness of timing, Images of Women should start with a short introduction followed by the two-hour show at 6 p.m. Admission to the event is free, as funding for Images of Women has been provided by the Texas State Multicultural Programming Committee and the Under Represented Student Advisory Council. Food will also be provided.

Shayla Rivera didn’t always want to be a comedian; in fact, she wanted to be an astronaut.

Ask someone to think of jazz and they’re likely to describe the creamy vibrato of the saxophone or to imitate tinkling eighth-note piano runs. The flute is not likely to be mentioned in conjunction with jazz. In the hands of a capable Abdur-Razzaq musician, however, a flute can provide a soothing contrast to the brashness of a saxophone or trumpet solo. Jazz flutist Galen AbdurRazzaq will demonstrate this Thursday during his lecture titled “Women in Jazz,” a look at the contributions of jazz music’s celebrated matriarchs and its forgotten muses. Abdur-Razzaq incorporates musical demonstrations and poetry in his lectures to illustrate the vibrant essence of jazz. “This (lecture and performance) showcases me, exposes my very inner soul,” AbdurRazzaq commented to Truman State’s Index after an inspiring performance. A graduate of Berklee College of Music in Boston and Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., Abdur-Razzaq has an impressive list of recording credits to his name, performing with Billy Taylor, Sonny Phillips, Jimmy Heath, Clifford Adams and Saturn’s most distinguished jazz legend, Sun Ra. He is a masterful performer and an engaging speaker, and is sure to edify attendees with information on women’s contributions to jazz as well as redefine people’s attitudes about the flute’s place in jazz. The performance is part of the Multicultural Student Affairs, Kappa Delta Chi Sorority, Inc., and Black Women United’s presentation of the 9th Annual Images of Women Conference, “Empowering Multicultural Women” from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday in the LBJ Student Center Teaching Theater.

North Chicago Dance Company highlights history BY BONNIE STEPP ARTS REPORTER

SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING! Download your pass Thursday, Mar.complimentary 4 in San Marcos : : at for a screening near you at Download your complimentary pass www.campuscircle.net/girlnextdoor campuscircle.net/girlnextdoor

emile hirsch

elisha cuthbert

On Thursday, the River North Chicago Dance Company visited Evans Auditorium to give a oneof-a-kind history lesson to spectators. Fourteen performers touring the country made a quick stop in San Marcos this week to present “Street Beat,” the evolution of jazz dancing in America, through a series of fun and buoyant dance numbers. It was a two-

Spring Break

part program consisting of a short behind-the-scenes look at a professional dancer’s life followed by a series of dances, each demonstrating the fashion, music and moves of a particular decade from 1920 to the present. During the first part of the show, the audience was introduced to the performers as each showed off their graceful balance and wicked flexibility. The dancers appeared without elaborate costumes to depict what

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goes into the creation of a show such as this one. The second half of the show, a timeline of American history through jazz dance, used period costumes and soundtracks, accompanied by specific dance styles such as swing, disco and break-dancing. The performers were precise in their execution of the dances, and their portrayal of history invoked some strange energy in the audience. Spectators from 7 to 70 years old were clapping their hands and laughing and cheering at the sight. A member of the dance company, who gave extra insight into the occurrences in America

during certain decades, narrated the entire show with information about main events of the period including fashion and significant figures. The Chicago-based dance company includes dancers from all around the United States and as far away as Switzerland and Mexico. They travel the country doing educational dance shows such as this. The company will also host dance workshops in Chicago this summer for those ages 12 and older. But if one is not interested in learning how to dance, it is still worth viewing a show if for no other reason than to learn a little American history.

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Tuesday, March 2, 2004

College Guy by Christy Gray I’m sure a lot of you watched the Oscars, and I would just like to say...

Bill Murray was ROBBED! He should have won for best actor! It just isn’t fair! He has been in so many great movies! Ghostbusters, Caddyshack, Rushmore!

AMUSEMENTS

The University Star - 7

As for Sean Penn, would it KILL you to make a happy movie?

The 4th Dimension

By Nick Tracy...

T oday’s slang sq uiffy British in origin, this adjective means you’re just a little drunk; not sloshed, but getting there. Example: He’s just a bit squiffy; he hasn’t even finished his fifth Guinness.

m anky

“Look Bob, I know he’s your new pet and all, but let’s face it, the last we need right now is another mouth to feed.”

Also British in origin, this adjective is used to describe someone that is scruffy, dirty or disgusting. Or all of the above. Example: He’s a good bloke, if you can get past him being manky and all.


OPINIONS CONTACT Scooter Hendon staropinion@txstate.edu (512) 245-3487

OPINIONS

THE UNIVERSITY STAR Defending the First Amendment since 1911

Clear Channel fails to offer balanced content

Page 5

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

THE MAIN POINT

C

lear Channel, the multinational, San Antoniobased corporation that owns a vast majority of American radio stations, refuses to offer balanced viewpoints. Florida-based talk show host Randi Rhodes continues to push for syndication from Clear Channel for her radio show that carries a liberal viewpoint. Rhodes pulls high ratings that rival conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh in the Florida broadcasting area, and she has

charged her supporters with emailing the appropriate authorities about syndicating Rhodes’ show — something they have done in large numbers — but Clear Channel refuses to respond to any of the requests. It is believed the main reason Clear Channel refuses to syndicate Rhodes’ show is because Limbaugh has said he will pull his show from syndication if Rhodes accompanies him in the Clear Channel radio family. It is understandable Limbaugh would want

Even so, Clear Channel does have the right to choose what it syndicates, and in the end, it has the final say on whether a show will be a lucrative investment. Limbaugh does pull a lot of influence by his high popularity, and angering the cash cow usually isn’t a good idea. In the end, it’s still a shame listeners have little choice on what they hear on the radio, and their requests going unanswered show that Clear Channel will only go for the easy solution.

to avoid having viewpoints that oppose his own broadcast throughout the country. However, Clear Channel should be openminded enough to include a show that obviously grabs many listeners’ attention, even if it opposes its personal viewpoints. It makes sense that it would resist a liberal view since most liberals oppose large media conglomerates, but a corporation of that size has a responsibility to provide all viewpoints, despite the obvious conflict.

The Mai n Poi nt is the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board. Columns are the opinions of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the full staff, Texas State UniversitySan Marcos Student Media, the department of mass communication or Texas State University-San Marcos. Let ter s poli c y: E-mail letters to starletters@txstate.edu. Letters must be no longer than 350 words. No anonymous letters will be printed. We reserve the right to edit for grammar, spelling, space and libel. We reserve the right to refuse obscene, irrelevant and malicious letters. All e-mails must include the name and phone number of the letter writer. Students should also include their classifications and majors.

New Hampshire holds promise of liberty

God is not confined to one religion

Let’s talk religion. I understand this part of Texas is well within the boundaries of the Bible Belt, that region of the South and Midwest where any conversation of theology is automaticalJeff Miller ly equated to JudeoStar Columnist Christian dogma. Here’s the part where some toes are going to get stomped on: Christianity is not the only religion. And a thousand God-fearing Texans in chorus scream: “You must be one of those damned atheists! You’re going to burn in the slow fires of hell, blasphemer!” If there is a hell, I’m fairly certain I have a hot spot reserved already, so the threat of brimstone and hellfire is somewhat lost on me. I am by no means stating that Christians are wrong in their belief system. I think the stories of Jesus, Noah and David and Goliath are wonderful. But that’s just what they are — stories with some really great morals not meant to be taken literally. I’ll try to put it another way. As a child growing up, I read a lot of Dr. Seuss and A.A. Milne, and those books had many good ideas about manners and friends and cooperation and the like. I was somewhat aware that there was no such thing as a plate of green eggs and ham, nor was there a walking, talking stuffed bear named Pooh. However, I learned much from these books, not from the fantastical characters, but from the virtues and lessons they taught along the way. I think that’s kind of what the Bible is supposed to be. It’s a collaborative effort of many people who put into

The University Star 601 University Dr. San Marcos, TX 78666 Phone: (512) 245-3487 Fax: (512) 245-3708

You do not have the right to label someone as idolatrous or anti-whatever just because he worships in a different fashion or to a God of a different name.

words what the basic idea behind religion is. The idea itself is fairly simple, but ultimately complex in meaning — to have any form of religious belief is to realize that there is definitely a grand and driving force behind it all. It also posits recognition and appreciation to whomever you have named that divine entity, be it God, Allah, The Way, The Path, Buddha, Vishnu, etc. I certainly didn’t write this to offend Christians or make them a target, that’s just the predominant religion around these parts, and I was brought up primarily around the Holy Trinity belief system. I just want people to think about other possibilities before they write them off as blasphemy or a personal affront to their God. On a side note, it is not right for our political and social leaders to spout off their personal beliefs to the public or to use them as a defense for sociopolitical actions. The worst example is that of George W. stating that God is on our side in Iraq. “This is God’s work, and He is behind us. God is on our side.” I expect Bush, as a man who has put himself in a bad spot, to make an occasional reference to God. But I certainly do not condone the president of the United States consistently referring to his personal deity as a defense for his

Editor In Chief............................Genevieve Klein, stareditor@txstate.edu Managing Editor.....................Scooter Hendon, staropinion@txstate.edu News Editor.........................................David Doerr, starnews@txstate.edu Assistant News Editor.....................Kassia Micek, km1018@txstate.edu Sports Editor......................................Jason Orts, starsports@txstate.edu Entertainment Editor.........Terry Ornelas, starentertainment@txstate.edu

poor decision-making abilities. I’m surprised G.W. hasn’t been blasted with a lightning bolt yet. To get back to the main point, if you are of any religious ilk, you must remember there are others out there who are as devout as you are, perhaps even more so. Everyone is guaranteed the same basic rights in the Constitution, one of the key ones being the right to practice whatever religion you believe in, with no discrimination or interference. However, you do not have the right to label someone as idolatrous or anti-whatever just because he worships in a different fashion or to a God of a different name. On the contrary, you might be surprised as to how similar your faith is to a Muslim’s, a Hindu’s, a Jew’s, a Buddhist’s or a Wiccan’s. Keep in mind that it’s all relative, and whatever you believe in, others out there are praying as hard as you are to what they view to be holy. The bottom line: Every religion is based on faith in divinity, and each member of each religion is immediately related to all others in all religions on that basis of faith. Praise God, Allah or Whomever. Amen.

Increasing deficits. UnconNew Hampshire residents. These stitutional and illegal wars. An reforms can be more effective incompetent “leader” who acts when done at the local level instead more and more like a king. This of some faceless bureaucrat in government continues to spiral out Washington, D.C., making policy of control, and, as it for states thousands of does, its claim of legitimiles away. Sorens Aaron Ball macy is further weakalso feels the project ened. will lead to the As Americans we restoration of the conmust come to the constitutional federalism clusion that our governof our founders, espement requires drastic cially with respect to action to prevent it from the 10th Amendment. becoming a permanent There are just warfare state. Our some areas where the Star Columnist options at this point in federal government time are limited. Voting offers needs to butt out and allow the nothing in the way of real change, state and local governments to take and it is obvious that mass protest over. He hopes that other states will will not deter this government see the successes of the Free State from its anti-liberty agenda. What Project in New Hampshire and will then can true patriots do? I believe emulate it from fear of “losing their the best opportunity for us is to tax base.” join the Free State Project, a moveWhy New Hampshire? New ment that envisions “liberty in our Hampshire was chosen because, “it lifetime.” has the lowest state and local taxes In a recent article in the in the country, has friendly gun laws … (and) a large legislature Atlasphere newsletter, Free State Project founder Jason Sorens with a strong system of town govexplained what the project is about. ernment so that you can influence a The Free State Project is a movegreat many important policies by ment of freedom-loving individuals participating in town meetings.” who advocate moving 20,000 other Not to mention it has one of the like-minded citizens to New coolest state mottos: Live Free or Hampshire to “begin reining in fed- Die. Even the state’s Republican eral power by using the state to Gov. Craig Benson has endorsed challenge the federal government’s the project, publicly inviting memauthority in many areas.” bers to the state. New Hampshire is One of the most exciting tools a also one of the most beautiful states state could do in challenging the in the United States with its fall feds would be, according to Sorens, foliage and picturesque landscapes. the “outright nullification (of federThis is one of the most exciting al law) or some kind of unilateral ideas I have come across in a long time. This isn’t some utopian declaration of sovereignty.” These vision; it is an idea based very free-staters would then build, from much in reality and has the incredithe town up to the state government, a classical liberal state where, ble potential to effect change in as Sorens says, “the maximum role this country. I encourage everyone and anyone interested in maintainof civil government would be to ing and preserving the great ideals protect individuals’ life, liberty and of men such as John Locke, property.” Thomas Jefferson and Adam Smith Government would be, in size to go to freestateproject.org and and scope, reduced by two-thirds. join the movement that will see Many areas, such as education and public utilities, would be deregulat- “liberty in our lifetime.” ed, allowing the free-market to take Ball is a history senior. over, ensuring more freedom for

Miller is an English freshman.

Photo Editor..................................Brad Sherman, starphoto@txstate.edu Design Editor.......................................Matt Rael, stardesign@txstate.edu Systems Administrator.........Ben Stendahl, starsysadmin@txstate.edu Art Director...........................................Christy Gray, cg1056@txstate.edu Calendar of Events...........Paul Lopez, TexasStateCalendar@yahoo.com Advertising Coordinator......................Jodie Claes, starad1@txstate.edu

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Visit The Star online at www.UniversityStar.com

The University Star is the student newspaper of Texas State University-San Marcos published Tuesday through Thursday during the Fall and Spring semesters. It is distributed on campus and throughout San Marcos at 8 a.m. with a daily circulation of 8,000. Printing and distribution is by the New Braunfels Herald-Zeitung. Co pyrig ht Ma r ch 2, 2004 . All copy, photographs and graphics appearing in The University Star are the exclusive property of The University Star and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the editor in chief.


SPORTS

Tuesday, March 2, 2004

Baseball: Men suffer 3 straight losses n Cont. from page 10

Ashley A. Horton/ Star photo Kristen Zaleski, junior center fielder, hits a home run in the last inning of the game to win against Nicholls State. The Bobcats defeated the Colonels, 4-2.

Softball: Women win 3-game sweep n Cont. from page 10

Brooks is now No. 10 in Texas State history with 132 steals, just three away from ninth place. The Cowgirls, meanwhile, had three in double figures, led by guard Clarissa Clark’s 12. McNeese had better scoring balance, as seven Cowgirls had seven points or more. Texas State opened the game on an 8-0 run, highlighted by a jumper and lay up from Johnson to start the scoring. But McNeese bounced back, going on a 12-2 run of its own to take the lead, 1210, with 9:41 to go in the first half. Neither team established momentum for the rest of the first half and the game was tied at 23 at halftime. After guard Alphalisha Johnson gave the Bobcats a 2-point lead with a lay up to start the second half, the Cowgirls took over for good. By the first media timeout with 15:35 to go, McNeese led by eight, 38-30, and was never challenged again. Texas State will return home for its season finale at 5:30 p.m. Friday against Stephen F. Austin State University.

one of their own in the eighth to give the score its final look, 10-1. There was only one close game in the series and that was Saturday afternoon’s matchup that finished with a 2-1 LSU win. Sophomore catcher Matt Liuzza sent a Hurley pitch down the left field line for a double then managed to score when Texas State failed to record a double play two batters later and had to settle for a fielder’s choice. That run would be the deciding factor as Texas State lost its second game and the series on Saturday. With the series already decided, all the Bobcats had to play for on Sunday was pride and statistics, and neither one of those was improved with the 13-2 loss suffered at the paws of the Tigers. After a leadoff double, the Tigers followed up with four singles and a sacrifice fly to center field to bring in the game-deciding runs. The Tigers would add insurance runs in the sixth and seventh innings, but the nine runs the team put up in those two frames were trivial with Texas State’s offensive output. The Bobcats will enjoy their second consecutive Tuesday off after last week’s rainout with Baylor and will see their next action when they take on defending national champion Rice University (82) in Houston for a three-game set this weekend.

Women: Win breaks string of losses n Cont. from page 10

second with one out. Catcher Rachael Bonetti then drew a walk and both runners advanced on a passed ball before Snow signaled home Zaleski and scored on an error as Texas State led 2-0 after one inning. Texas State added another pair of runs in the second as Sharp reached on an error with one out and moved to second on Krueger’s single. Zaleski grounded into a fielder’s choice, forcing Sharp at third, but right fielder Jennelle Wolters doubled home Krueger and Zaleski to give the Bobcats a 4-0 lead. Once again, Zaleski ignited a scoring rally for the Bobcats, leading off with a double in the fifth inning and scoring on Bonetti’s single to push the advantage to five runs. Trahan was solid in the circle for Texas State through five innings but ran into trouble in the sixth when she allowed three runs before giving way to Neuerburg

with one out. Neuerburg promptly struck out the first two hitters she faced to get out of the inning and retired Nicholls 1-2-3 in the seventh inning to earn the save. In the final game of the series, the Bobcats were forced to rally from an early deficit and won on Zaleski’s walk-off, two-run home run in the seventh inning. The Colonels roughed up Neuerburg in the first inning, getting three hits and a pair of runs off Texas State’s ace. But she settled down after that, retiring 19 of the final 20 hitters she faced. The Bobcats chipped away at the lead, manufacturing a run in the second and third innings. Wilson was hit by a pitch to lead off the second inning and then stole second. With one out, third baseman Danielle Vice drew a walk and both runners moved up a base on a delayed steal before Sharp laid down a sacrifice bunt to score Wilson. In the third, Zaleski started

things off with a walk, followed by Wolters’ single that moved Zaleski to third. One out later, Snow drove Zaleski home with a sacrifice fly to left field to knot the score up at two apiece. In the bottom of the sixth, Snow led off with a walk, and, with one away, Trahan doubled off the left field wall. However, Colonel left fielder Jodi Robin played the ball off the wall perfectly and fired a strike to third base to beat a sliding Snow for the second out and ended the rally. But Zaleski made up for it in the seventh inning. With one out, Krueger drew a walk and Zaleski took the first pitch she saw over the left-center field wall for the game-winning homerun. Texas State resumes action today by traveling to College Station to face Texas A&M University and will pick up SLC play with a doubleheader against Northwestern State University on Saturday.

State battled back. The Bobcats grabbed the lead several times, but could never push their advantage above two points. Texas State had a one-point advantage with 2:03 left in the first half but allowed McNeese to score the final four points to take a 36-33 lead into halftime. The Bobcats would not be able to regain the lead for the rest of the game. After letting the Cowboys build a double-digit lead early in the first half, Texas State rallied to cut the deficit to three, at 6158. But the Bobcats could never get that one defensive stop they needed to get them over the hump. “It starts at the defensive end,” Nutt said. “It’s all about defense if you want to win. If we can’t sustain it, we have to make changes.” The Bobcats could only muster one point in the final two

minutes and McNeese hit its free throws, which pushed the lead to the game-ending 12 points. Several games during the losing streak saw the Bobcats suffer a similar meltdown at the end of games. “(The losing streak) takes a toll on you mentally and physically,” Nutt said. “We’re not where we need to be defensively and I thought we were pressing offensively.” Texas State’s last game of the season will also be its home finale. The game is Friday, March 5, against Stephen F. Austin State University in a game that could decide home court advantage for the first round of the tournament. Tip off is set for 7:30 p.m. at Strahan Coliseum and can be heard on the radio at KTSW 89.9 FM or on the Internet at Boostercast.com.

The University Star - 9 WOMen’s BBall at nicholls 3/1/04

Texas state

1st Half

Sc o r eb oa r d baseball at No. 1 LSU 2/29/04

TEXAS STATE (8-6) Players ss Ramos ph Rodriguez cf Tierce 1b Cooper lf Miller rf Martinez 3b Anson dh Williams ph Quintana c Pearce ph Bednarek ph Carter 2b Crumpton

AB 4 1 3 4 4 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 3

H 0 0 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

No. 1 LSU (9-1) RBI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Players Lf Patterson Holt cf ph Buteau c Liuzza dh Stavinoha ph Weaver 3b Harris ph DiLiberto rf Zeringue ph Bass 2b Gill 1b Harris 3b Naccarata ss Hebert

TOTALS

TOTALS 34 2 7 2

R H RBI 2 4 5 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 2 1 13 16 12

AB 5 4 1 2 4 1 2 1 3 1 5 3 1 3 36

5.2 0.1 0.0 1.0 1.0

12 2 1 1 0

6 3 3 1 0

5 3 3 1 0

2 1 0 0 0

2 1 2 0 0

25 3 1 4 3

Bumstead G. Smith C. Smith

H 4 3 0

R ER BB SO AB BF 2 2 1 3 22 24 0 0 0 1 9 9 0 0 1 2 3 4

March

5 at Rice...............................7 p.m. 6 at Rice.............................. 2 p.m. SLC woMen’s Standings

Northwestern St. Louisiana-Monroe Texas-Arlington Texas-San Antonio Stephen F. Austin TEXAS STATE McNeese State Sam Houston Southeastern La. Lamar Nicholls State

W 13 12 10 8 8 8 7 6 5 1 1

L 1 3 5 6 6 7 7 8 9 13 14

M-A 4-6 0-3 3-9 2-10 2-7 0-0 1-3 4-8 3-5 1-7 0-0 20-58

W 20 16 16 12 8 8 9 6 12 4 2

L 5 10 11 13 17 17 16 19 13 20 24

A 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

TO 3 1 2 5 2 0 0 1 3 2 0 19

B S 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 4 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 12

Score by inning

R H

Nicholls State............2..0..0...0 ..0...0...0 Texas...................... .....0...1...1...0..0...0...2

2 3 0 4 5 1

CF Eads RF Sasser 2B Hahn P Wagner 3B Blanchard SS Clouatre 1B Henry DH Vardell LF Robin

3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2

1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

PCT .800 .615 .593 .480 .320 .320 .360 .240 .480 .167 .080

TOTALS 25 2 3 2

CF rf c 1b 2b dh 3b ph ss lf

Players

Pt 10 1 14 13 4 0 6 17 11 4 2 82

Gleeson Wilkins Brown King Depron Blaszczynski Cox Geason James Totals

Zaleski Wolters Bonetti Snow Wilson Trahan Vice Ackley Sharp Krueger TOTALS

3 3 3 1 2 3 1 1 1 2 20

2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

FG M-A 3-6 0-5 2-6 3-8 1-11 0-6 0-1 3-9 0-1 12-53

3Pt FT Rbnd M-A M-A Of-T 0-0 1-2 1-4 0-5 2-2 1-1 1-2 4-6 2-6 1-3 0-0 1-4 0-5 0-0 1-5 0-5 0-0 1-4 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-2 4-6 4-8 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-23 11-16 13-36

Teams

SLC

Southeastern La. Texas-Arlington Texas-San Antonio Stephen F. Austin Louisiana-Monroe TEXAS STATE Sam Houston Northwestern St. Lamar McNeese State Nicholls State

W 11 10 9 8 8 8 7 7 5 5 1

L 3 5 5 6 7 7 7 7 9 9 14

PCT .786 .667 .643 .571 .533 .533 .500 .500 .357 .357 .067

TEXAS STATE Pitching H R ER BB SO AB BF 2 2 1 12 25 26

7.0 3

Win - Nicole Neuerburg (8-2), Loss - Nichole Wagner (0-5) Save - None Time - 2:00, Attendance - 205.

Teams

SLC

TEXAS STATE Texas-San Antonio Sam Houston Texas-Arlington Northwestern St. McNeese State Southeastern La. Stephen. F. Austin Nicholls State Louisiana-Monroe

W 3 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

A 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 5

S 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 4

W 19 15 14 17 12 13 12 10 11 9 6

L 6 11 13 8 17 13 13 15 16 16 20

PCT .760 .577 .519 .680 .414 .500 .480 .400 .407 .306 .231

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

PCT W L T PCT 1.000 15 5 0 .750 1.000 11 6 0 .647 1.000 9 10 0 .474 1.000 6 9 1 .406 .000 8 5 0 .615 .000 8 13 0 .381 .000 6 10 0 .375 .000 5 10 0 .333 .000 2 8 0 .200 .000 2 13 0 .133

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A

Ho

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sS

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Pt 7 2 9 7 2 0 0 10 0 37

Overall L 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 3 3

I-3

was held to only two points, nearly 14 points below his season average. On the offensive end, guard Terry Conerway led the charge scoring 19 points. “I felt great,” said Conerway. “It was my time to show that I’m the leader of this team.” The Bobcat lead reached 35 points midway through the second half when junior forward Nick Ponder hit a 3-pointer to make the score 58-23. The win moved Texas State into a fifth-place tie with the University of LouisianaMonroe. The Bobcats now sit at 13-13 overall and 8-7 in the Southland Conference. Before the win at Nicholls, Texas State’s troubles on the road continued at McNeese. The Bobcats hung tough in the first half. After falling behind by seven early on, Texas

B 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

Pt 8 6 2 5 19 0 9 2 0 7 2 1 61

Overall

Men: Defense proves important asset n Cont. from page 10

TO 1 2 4 1 3 1 0 1 0 13

S 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 7

SLC SOFTBALL Standings

H R ER BB SO AB BF 6.1 5 4 4 5 2 20 28

IP

B 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

SLC Men’s BBall Standings

IP

Neuerburg

TO 0 1 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 13

Technical Fouls: Texas State — None Nicholls State — None Attendance: 849

Nicholls State Pitching

Wagner

3Pt FT Rbnd M-A M-A Of-T A 0-1 2-3 2-7 0 0-0 0-0 1-6 0 0-2 0-0 0-5 4 1-7 0-0 1-2 4 5-6 0-0 1-3 1 0-1 0-1 1-3 2 2-7 1-1 0-0 0 0-1 0-0 1-4 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0-0 1-2 0-4 1 0-0 0-0 2-2 0 0-0 1-2 2-4 1 8-25 5-9 13-44 14

Nicholls State (12-12, SLC 7-6)

Rbnd

M-A M-A Of-T 0-0 2-2 1-4 0-1 1-2 1-3 0-4 8-12 1-2 1-1 8-9 5-8 0-0 0-0 0-4 0-0 0-0 0-0 1-1 3-6 0-1 0-0 9-12 4-7 1-1 4-4 1-3 0-2 2-3 2-2 0-0 2-2 0-1 3-10 39-52 18-43

Overall PCT .929 .800 .667 .571 .571 .533 .500 .429 .357 .071 .067

FT

Nicholls (2-8, SLC 0-3) TEXAS ST (12-5, SLC 3-0) Players AB R H RBI Players AB R

Tx State softball Schedule

SLC

FG M-A Allison 3-6 Dill 3-5 Brown 1-4 Naylor 2-8 Conerway 7-10 Blanchard 0-3 Ponder 3-9 Burroughs 1-2 Pfeiffer 0-1 N. Goellner 3-6 J. Goellner 1-2 Patterson 0-1 Totals 24-57

Players

SOFTBALL vs nicholls 2/29/04

Win - Nate Bumstead (1-0), Loss - Tom Robbins (2-2) Save - None Umpires - Ray Gregson Jr., Paul Guillie, Ray Miller Time - 2:32, Attendance - 8,103

Teams

FT Rbnd M-A Of-T A TO B S Pt 1-2 1-3 0 2 0 0 7 14-17 0-9 0 3 0 2 24 2-4 0-2 1 1 0 0 2 3-4 0-0 2 1 0 1 3 5-6 2-6 3 2 0 1 23 1-2 1-3 4 1 2 0 6 6-6 0-1 3 3 0 1 6 0-0 1-1 0 1 0 0 0 0-0 0-0 0 2 0 0 3 2-2 0-1 0 2 1 0 4 2-2 2-5 0 1 0 0 8 36-45 8-36 13 19 3 5 86

Technical Fouls: Texas State — None Nicholls State — None Attendance: 121

Louisiana State Pitching IP 6.0 2.0 1.0

3Pt M-A 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-2 4-9 1-1 0-2 0-0 1-2 0-0 0-0 6-16

FG 3Pt

Nwachukwu Fulton Durdette Bryant Lawrence Chopito Octave Mingo Benya Gipson Holmes Totals

29 4 3 5 3

Total

TEXAS STATE (13-13, SLC 8-5)

FG M-A 3-5 5-9 0-2 0-2 7-16 2-4 0-3 0-0 1-2 1-1 3-4 22-48

Players

IP H R ER BB SO AB BF

2nd Half

TEXAS STATE (8-17, 8-7 SLC )

Nicholls State (2-24, SLC 1-14)

TEXAS STATE Pitching

Robbins Jean Abschneider Gultz Colgan

1st Half

TEXAS STATE.......................23................38.......................61 Nicholls State.....................14.................23.......................37

Ale. Johnson Talbert Perkins Alp. Johnson Brooks Burrow Kelly Riley West Hinton Putnam TOTALS

TEXAS STATE....... ............0..2..0...0...0..0...0..0...0 2 7 2 Louisiana State... .....0..0..4...0...0..3...6..0..X 13 16 0

Men’s BBall at Nicholls 3/1/04

Total

TEXAS STATE........................40.................46.......................86 Nicholls State......................36.................46.......................82

Players

R H E

Score by inning

2nd Half

Highway 80

OPEN 10 a.m. — 11 p.m.

928 Highway 80 • San Marcos, TX 78666

(512) 754–7600


SOFTBALL: BOBCATS VISIT TEXAS A&M AT 6:30 P.M. TODAY

Spo r t s

Texas State clawed by LSU in 3-game sweep Tuesday, March 2, 2004

The University Star — Page 10

HARDCORE DEFENSE Bobcats secure spot in conference tournament

Evan Tierce, senior center fielder, catches a fly ball for the last out in the inning against University of LouisianaLafayette. The Bobcats defeated the Ragin’ Cajuns, 2-0. The Bobcats took on LSU during the weekend.

By Kevin Washburn Sports Reporter

THIBODAUX, La. — Texas State only needed one more win to clinch a berth in the conference tournament, and they got that win on a two-game road trip to Louisiana. The Bobcats earned a split on the two-game trip, pounding Nicholls State University 61-37, just two days after dropping a 79-67 decision to McNeese State University. Texas State was in the midst of losing seven of their last nine games, including the last six on the road. After each loss, coach Dennis Nutt preached to his team about giving more effort on the defensive end of the floor. Against Nicholls, the Bobcats answered coach Dennis Nutt’s pleas with a record setting defensive effort. Texas State held the Colonels to 22.6 percent shooting from the field, a school record for the lowest field goal percentage by a Texas State opponent. “The guys had the effort (tonight),” Nutt said. “Their heart was in it and they played the right way. Tonight we stepped it up and it started with defense. The defensive effort was led by senior guard Roosevelt Brown, who guarded Nicholls’ Ashley A. Horton/ Star photo leading scorer Willie Duprone for most of the game. Duprone Zack Allison, junior forward, goes up for two points against University of Texas-San Antonio Wednesday

Women’s basketball ends losing streak n See MEN, page 9

By Jason Orts Sports Editor

THIBODAUX, La. — It wasn’t pretty, but the Bobcats were able to break a three-game losing streak with an 86-82 win against last place Nicholls State University Monday night, clinching a Southland Conference tournament bid in the process. The Bobcats are 8-17 this season, 8-7 in SLC action and in sixth place, a half-game ahead of McNeese State University, which beat the Bobcats Saturday and is 7-7 in SLC play.

in Strahan Coliseum. The Bobcats were defeated by the Roadrunners, 66-69.

Texas State and Nicholls faced off in a game that featured 59 fouls and both teams attempting at least 32 free throws in the second half alone. Bobcat center Tori Talbert paced the Bobcats with 24 points and nine rebounds, while guard Julie Brooks added 23 points. “We’ve been starting to find our consistency,” said Texas State coach Suzanne Fox. “Julie has played really hard lately and hasn’t been rewarded, and Tori hasn’t played as well as she did tonight. When we get a guard and a post playing well at the

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same time, we can win ball games.” Texas State got 14 points on 3-5 shooting from 3-point range from Brooks in the first half, while Talbert added 12. Forward Erica Putnam also contributed, with six points and five rebounds in the first 20 minutes. The game stayed close early, until Texas State broke out to a 36-25 lead. But Nicholls was able to cut the lead to 40-36 at halftime on two 3-point baskets and 5-6 shooting from the free throw line. Two days earlier, the Bobcats went into Lake Charles to take on McNeese, and after playing a dead-even first half, the Cowgirls dominated the second half and claimed the win. McNeese dropped 60 percent of its shots in the second half (15-25) and made 82 percent (14-17) from the line, sending

Texas State to its third straight loss and sweeping the season series between the two schools. The Bobcats struggled from the floor, making 37 percent of their shots, but hit just 30 percent in the second half, and were only 5-14 from the free throw line for the game. “When you’re in the other team’s home gym, you’ve got to find a way to get shots to go in, and we couldn’t tonight,” Fox said. Texas State got 14 points from Talbert, while forward Aleise Johnson chipped in with 13. But nobody else scored more than forward Ashley Perkins’ six, and nine Bobcats scored three points or less. Brooks managed only five points on 2 of 8 shooting, but had team-highs with seven rebounds and four steals. n See WOMEN, page 9

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By Travis Summers Sports Reporter

BATON ROUGE, La. — According to the publication Collegiate Baseball, the Louisiana State University baseball team is the best squad in the country. Texas State is not on this list, and the reasoning is easy to understand after the Bobcats traveled to Baton Rouge this weekend to get swept in a threegame series by the Tigers, with a combined score of 25-4. The three straight losses give Texas State a record of 8-6 and improve LSU’s mark to 9-1. The weekend’s first action saw senior Paul Schappert hold the Tigers scoreless for the first two frames. Sophomore first baseman Will Harris hit a solo home run to left field, putting LSU on the board in the third. That score would set a trend as the Tigers would manage to score in every following inning. Schappert was eventually pulled in the sixth after giving up three consecutive hits to start a two-out Tiger rally. Replacing Schappert was senior Michael Gultz, who had some success, giving up no earned runs in his one inning of work, but still giving up three unearned. Texas State managed to get on the board in the eighth, when senior right fielder Richard Martinez singled up the middle to score senior center fielder Evan Tierce. That run would be the Bobcats’ only of the game, as the Tigers would answer back with n See BASEBALL, page 9

Softball opens season with sweeping victory By Geoff Eneman Sports Reporter

Texas State opened the 2004 Southland Conference season with a three-game sweep of Nicholls State University this weekend behind the pitching of Nicole Neuerburg and the timely hitting of center fielder Kristen Zaleski. The Bobcats won the opener 3-1, the second game 5-3 and the finale 4-2 to improve their season mark to 15-5 overall. “This was a tough weekend,” said Texas State coach Ricci Woodard. “We aren’t playing our best ball … but we’ll take it.” Zaleski finished the series six for 10 at the plate with two walks. She also drove in three runs and scored five times from the leadoff spot, including the game-winning, walk-off home run in the third contest. Zaleski is now hitting .516 on the season. “(Nicholls pitcher Nichole Wagner) made a mistake,” Zaleski said of her home run. “It’s a great feeling.” Neuerburg was just as effective, picking up a pair of wins to push her season record to 10-2 and also added her first save of the season. She also struck out 29 hitters and allowed only three earned runs. “It’s a good feeling starting out 3-0,” Neuerburg said. “Wins are what matters (right now).”

In the opener, Neuerburg pitched a complete-game twohitter, as she struck out 14 Colonel hitters in the Bobcats’ 3-1 victory. Nicholls scored its lone run of the game in the top of the first inning on right fielder Stephanie Sasser’s solo home run. Texas State knotted the score at one apiece in the bottom of the second. Designated hitter Katie Ann Trahan led off the inning with a single, and, with one out, shortstop Leslie Sharp drew a walk to put runners on first and second. Left fielder Amy Krueger then singled to load the bases, and Zaleski followed with an RBI single to center field, scoring Trahan. Trahan put the Bobcats on top for good in the bottom of the fourth inning when she slammed a solo home run, her first of the season. In the sixth inning, Texas State added an insurance run as first baseman Hannah Snow led off with a walk and was pinch runner for Lauren Griffith. Second baseman Ashley Wilson doubled to left-center field, and, after two strikeouts by Colonel pitcher Dione Meier, Sharp drew a walk and Krueger was hit by a pitch, scoring Griffith. The second game saw the Bobcats score early and holding on late to record a 5-3 win. Zaleski led off in the first inning with a single and stole n See SOFTBALL, page 9

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