Issuu on Google+

UNIVERSITY OF WOLVERHAMPTON • SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN


Eva Salvi (Graphic Communication)

Contents Introduction

1

International students

2

Business links

4

Research

6

Masters programmes

8

Learning resources

10

Employability

12

Case studies

14-19

Support for practitioners

20

Events

22

Applying to study

24

UCAS course

25

Preparing for your interview

26

BA (Hons) Animation

28

BA (Hons) Computer Games Design

32

BA (Hons) Design, Craft and Applied Art

36

BA (Hons) Fashion Accessories

53

BA (Hons) Graphic Communication

56

BA (Hons) Illustration

62

BA (Hons) Interactive Media and the Web

68

BA (Hons) Interior Design

72

BA (Hons) Fine Art

76

BA (Hons) Photography

80

HND Photography

84

BA (Hons) Product Design

86

BA (Hons) Textile Design

90

BA (Hons) Video and Film Production

94

FdA Commercial Video Production

98

Index

102

Manchester Nottingham

Wolverhampton Birmingham London Bristol

Wolverhampton City Centre

School of Art & Design University of Wolverhampton Molineux Street, Wolverhampton WV1 1DT Course enquiries: +44 (0) 1902 322058 General enquiries: +44 (0) 1902 321900 E-mail: art-design@wlv.ac.uk

love what you do,

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Produced by the School of Art & Design Marketing


WELCOME

Your university years are all about change. They’re about exploring somewhere different, learning new skills and meeting new people. We can offer you a place in which to fire your imagination and receive a quality education and skills training.

Whatever You Want to Do We have over 20 undergraduate courses to choose from – Animation to Textiles, Web Design to Fine Art, Fashion to Product Design, Graphics to Photography. Whatever You Need to Succeed Our workshops, computer labs, studios and teaching spaces have been re-designed with you, the student in mind. The University Learning Centre is highly acclaimed in National Student Surveys. Whatever Support You Need Our staff came out top in an independent survey of over 200 students as to what was best about the School of Art & Design. They particularly appreciated that staff ‘went the extra mile’ for them.

do what you love www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

1


Nabeel Yaha

Joanna Manousis

Yianny Eleftheriades

We currently welcome over 200 EU and International students into the School of Art and Design.

International links and collaborations:

International destinations:

International students:

The School has long-term links and collaborative agreements with institutions in China, Malaysia, India, Norway, Germany, Cyprus, Ireland as well as developing links with the newer EU nations of Eastern Europe.

Dawn Moncrieffe featured in a special exhibit at the Deaf Culture Centre in Toronto, Canada.

International students not only contribute to the creative and multi-cultural life of the School while here, but also win UK accolades themselves.

We have expanded our Erasmus exchange programmes in Poland and Romania. Such is the strength of the Norwegian connection to Wolverhampton that Norway’s national day on May 17th is celebrated by the students with a party, just as Chinese New Year is also marked by the University.

Joanna Manousis, from Shrewsbury, graduated with a First Class honours degree in Glass in 2007; she has since worked with glass sculptor Karen WillenbrinkJohnsen in Seattle, USA. Rachel Workman, from Redditch, while studying for BA (Hons) Graphic Communication, had her work exhibited at the Nobel museum, Stockholm.

Contact: International Office, University of Wolverhampton, Wulfruna Street, Wolverhampton WV1 1SB. Tel: +44 (0) 1902 322735 Fax: +44 (0) 1902 322488 Email: international@wlv.ac.uk

2

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

Portuguese Graphic Communication graduate Joao Filipe Cunha won top place in Smashing Magazine’s international competition to create Beautiful Blog Headers that designers can download free. Sculptures by Yianny Eleftheriades from Cyprus were exhibited at the ‘New Horizons’ show at the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists Gallery in Birmingham in 2008.


INTERNATIONAL

In a global world ideas and innovation are borderless

‘World’s divided’ by Jackie Hough

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

3


A Creative Approach to Business

We provide specialist knowledge and advice from our staff of internationally recognised creative and technical professionals. By working with us, you can access state of the art facilities, which include the latest technologies in art and design experimentation and production.

Our services include: • Research and consultancy • Student projects and placements • Knowledge Transfer Partnerships • Knowledge Catalysts • Conferences and seminars • Industry-related courses.

You can engage with a range of art and design disciplines: Digital Media: • Video and film production • Web design • Animation • Interactive media • Digital arts • Computer games design Visual Communications: • Packaging and text design • Illustration • Editorial design • Graphic communication

4

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

Design and Applied Arts: • Glass and ceramics • Textile design • 3D design in wood, metal and plastics • Interior design • Fashion • Product design Fine Art and Photography: • Commercial and architectural photography • Public art • Fine art • Social realm/practice


BUSINESS

“ Turnover growth is more likely for businesses that increase their investment in design.” Design Council

Working with companies including Wedgwood, John Lewis, Marks and Spencer, Watsons Glass, Brintons Carpets and Mini Cooper, our staff and students have a track record in engaging with commercial projects. Student Projects and Placements An undergraduate can bring fresh insights and creative ideas to the table to help you meet business objectives. Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) This is a government-funded initiative to encourage collaboration between universities and business in order to transfer knowledge from one to the other, improving competitiveness. Clear objectives are set, in keeping with your company’s overall business strategy.

Ktponline.org.uk cites dramatic improvements in sales and profitability as a result, often by more than 40%. Projects vary and can be up to 3 years, supported by an academic and the University’s own facilities. Recent KTP’s have been conducted with Fairfield Display and Lighting, Fabritect, Goodwill Trophy Company, and Tough Furniture. Knowledge Catalysts This scheme aims to exploit the research base in the arts for commercial gain and is appropriate for smaller companies which might not be eligible for Knowledge Transfer Partnerships. The scheme will support a partnership between the School of Art & Design and a business or organisation which seeks to address a significant challenge faced by the business partner. Projects can run from 3-15 months.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Conferences and Seminars We have a range of suitable spaces from workshops to lecture theatres, meeting rooms to exhibition facilities. Recent events include an exhibition for Furniture West Midlands, a seminar for the Crafts Council and an international symposium on creative pathways in glass. Industry-related Courses Our courses are vocationally relevant and have strong links to industry. There is the opportunity to tailor a course to suit your particular organisational needs. Contact: Scott Knight on 01902 321908 or email: Scott.Knight@wlv.ac.uk for more details.

Telephone: 01902 322058

5


Research opportunities in Art and Design The University’s Centre for Art, Design, Research and Experimentation (CADRE) works to actively promote the development and application of creative knowledge. Our researchers pursue creative inquiry and critical analysis that address issues of practice and theory, as well as the impact and application of art and design upon society. We have three clusters of excellence:

Studio Theories and Practices This group brings together researchers rooted in studio-based, creative and professional practices to explore and advance different interdisciplinary approaches to material form and conceptual processes in fine art, applied arts and design. The research group has a dual focus. One key area has a depth of knowledge and expertise in printmaking, sculpture and painting as expanded practices. The other key area focuses on investigating and developing conceptual processes integral to architectural ceramics, art glass, tableware design in silver and ceramics and textile design. Critical Theory and Social Practice This group is noted for its wideranging and internationally renowned analysis and engagement with models of sociability and performativity in contemporary art. These approaches encompass critical environmental and public art practices, photography and representation, philosophical aesthetics, popular culture and the ‘everyday’. The overall focus of the group is to explore and support the encounter between theories of art and cultural and

6

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

social theory as a basis for the analysis of art’s contribution to social change. Digital Theory, Practice, Technology This research group has a depth of knowledge and expertise in digital creativity and audio visual technology. With explorations into both narrative and non-narrative forms in conceptual, immersive and performative spaces, practitioners and theorists engage in both traditional and digital media ranging from virtual and ludic environments through to animation, sonic art and gallerybased video. It focuses research on the position (both temporal and spatial) of the spectator/participant in relation to moving image and digital technologies.

To find out more: Dr Dew Harrison Associate Dean, Postgraduate Studies, Research and Enterprise. School of Art & Design University of Wolverhampton Molineux Street Wolverhampton WV1 1DT T: 01902 322717 E: Dew.harrison@wlv.ac.uk W: www.wlv.ad.uk/cadre

For further details about PhD study within the School of Art & Design, please contact Admissions Telephone: 01902 322058 or email: art.design@wlv.ac.uk

Telephone: 01902 322058


RESEARCH

Cornford and Cross How buildings learn, 2001

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

7


MA Programmes

What are my choices? Why study for a Master’s degree? In a competitive job market, especially in the creative industries, a Master’s gives you the edge. It demonstrates you possess a depth of knowledge in your chosen area as well as the transferable expertise that employers are looking for – communication and inter-personal skills, team-working, IT, presentation and negotiation skills.

Why study for a Wolverhampton MA? With our Master’s programmes’ you can: • Be flexible - with lots of choice in four clear pathways, which can be studied as one year full time or two years part-time • Develop your passion – focus your study to suit your interests, but also extend your artistic vocabulary into new areas • Learn alongside and benefit from highly experienced practitioners who exhibit regularly nationally and internationally. • Develop your research skills supported an internationally recognised team of researchers.

In what ways will I benefit personally? • You will have access to new facilities, comparable with the best • You will have the opportunity to fully explore your creativity • You will be able to display your artwork in a public exhibition • You will increase your employment prospects

8

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

MA Fine Art This programme enables you to develop your fine art practice in photography/performance/film and video/sculpture/installations/ public art and print-making. There is an art history and theory strand to this programme, as well as a research component. MA Art and Design This well-established programme focuses on the creative questions important to you. You will be supported in creating work using the most appropriate media and techniques. One-third of your study will be research methods, art history and theory to underpin your practical development in areas such as: • 3D and Applied Art (Ceramics, Glass, Textiles, and Interior Design) • Visual Communication (Graphic Design, Illustration) • Digital Media (Animation, Interactive Media, Computer Games Design and Video and Film Production).


MA PROGRAMMES MA Design for Advertising This course provides you with the creative skills required by today’s advertising industry.

The MA will give you the technical, personal and presentational skills needed to get a head start in the fast-paced industry of advertising and design.

The course is suitable for people with a background in the visual arts, marketing or advertising and who would like to transfer their creative skills to the commercial world of advertising and design. The course provides a unique opportunity to study advertising design whilst working alongside MA students in other creative disciplines. This shared environment helps create a supportive atmosphere in which to develop a personal portfolio of work. The programme includes modules in Marketing which are taught by staff from the University of Wolverhampton Business School – giving a business edge to your design skills. How to Apply: For an application from or to order an MA brochure call: 01902 322058 or email: art-design@wlv.ac.uk

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

9


Support for your research The Harrison Learning Centre on the City Campus contains the most comprehensive collection of contemporary art & design resources in the region. Here you will find books, journals and electronic resources to help you learn about all aspects of Art & Design. With specialist subject support on hand, advice is always available to support your research needs. Academic Resources & Support • Books • Art & design journals • DVDs • Specialist art & design databases • Information help desks • Study skills support • Information skills workshops • IT help desks Facilities • Extensive IT resources • Bookable group study rooms • Wireless Internet connections • Self-issue machines • Colour photocopying and printing Specialist Support • Dedicated art & design librarian

CONTACT Tom Hicks Telephone: 01902 322377 Email: t.j.hicks@wlv.ac.uk Academic Resource Librarian (Art & Design)

10

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


LEARNING RESOURCES www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

11


Promoting & Enhancing Your Employability The learnt experience alone won’t always guarantee a job, which is why we’ve set up The Creative Employability. Experience of the world of work

Understanding the creative industries

It is vital for you to know how and where your skills fit into a commercial setting and to prove to potential employers that you have tasted life outside of university.

Some of the skills that you will need as artists and designers are unique to the creative industries. The ability to compete for commissions and also understand how to exhibit work is essential, so the Studio will promote external competitions and exhibitions as well as initiating our own.

Our Professional Placement is an opportunity for students to spend one year in paid employment within the Creative Industries as part of their degree course. There is also a Placement Module which can be taken in years 2 or 3. The Creative Employability Studio will support students to find and secure both professional and module based-placements and promote other forms of work experience including: • live commissions where you can work on real art and design projects within your modules • initiatives that sponsor students to explore their business potential • part-time job opportunities within the creative industries • voluntary work.

12

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Commercial awareness is the key to employability and we bring in practitioners to talk about specific skills such as networking and self-promotion, and help you promote your individual work for commercial sale. Learning through practice Although already a practising artist, the chances are you have yet to venture across the studentcommercial interface. The Creative Studio will be working for you, building on our relationships with practitioners and graduates. We want to know who is doing what, where and invite them back to tell you how they did it!

Telephone: 01902 322058


EMPLOYABILITY

185,500 people work in design Through the promotion of our placements and employment opportunities the Studio maintains communication with industry, promoting our graduates and their work. We also pursue industry sponsorship for student prizes, exhibitions and other developmental work. Our display boards contain up to date information on placement opportunities, part-time and voluntary work, business development projects, information on commercial work space, exhibitions and competitions. Why not come and take a look?

12,450 design consultancies employing 60,900 designers and 348,300 non-designers 47,400 self-employed, freelance and non-employing designers 77,100 in-house designers in 5,900 businesses with 100 or more employees

Contact: Hilary Price, Creative Employability Studio Co-ordinator. Email: H.Price@wlv.ac.uk Tel: 01902 322433

The Design Council

Picture: Architectural model making for interior design

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

13


©

Phil Brookes, PhD Photography student

Dive-bombing Arctic skuas, dressing up as a ‘bear’ for Alaskan cruise tourists, icy brittle film snapping, camera condensation at temperatures ranging from plus 20 to minus 40 – just some of the challenges facing PhD Photography student Phil Brooks during his 13 year labour of love to document the appeal of cold, inhospitable climates featured in his show and book, 60 Degrees North.

14

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


CASE STUDIES Phil, whose work has already featured in The Guardian newspaper, the German Foto magazine and The British Journal of Photography, is researching ‘The Art of Assessing Lens-based Creativity’ for his PhD. In the summer of 2008, his photographic explorations of the landscapes and communities that can be found 60° north of the equator were exhibited at The New Art Gallery Walsall. The accompanying book features 33 of Phil’s beautiful images.

Shortest Hop in the World In the 13 years since his pilgrimage began, Phil has visited Canada, Greenland and Norway, as well as the Shetland and Orkney Islands. In the latter, he enjoyed the shortest scheduled flight in the world – a ninety second ‘hop’ between the islands of Papa Westray and Westray! When not travelling or studying, Phil teaches at Sandwell College and spends time with his wife Dianne (whom he met while studying at Wolverhampton) and his four year-old son Archie.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

15


Š

Cathryn Jiggens, CASE STUDY BA (Hons) in Sculpture

I graduated with a BA Honours in Sculpture and Printmaking in 2000. I chose Wolverhampton to study because the modular system allowed me to study both sculpture and printmaking together, which emerged as my strongest subjects from my Foundation studies.

Since 2002 I have undertaken a range of freelance commissions, residencies, exhibitions, arts education and development work. The professional development modules at Wolverhampton were really helpful in preparing me for life after university. After completing a 6 month residency in Berlin in 2007, I relocated to London and now work part-time for a prestigious arts magazine called Artist’s Newsletter as I continue to develop my art practice in this new context. You can see more of my recent work and career path at www.cathrynjiggens.com

16

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


Justyna Ptak, First Year BA (Hons) Photography

CASE STUDIES

©

“Connecting what I love with what I wish to do everyday”

A first year brings new success

What are the best things about the School?

Hi, I’m Justyna Ptak. I’ve just completed my first year of the Photography course, and I will be finishing my BA degree in 2010.

I think the School of Art & Design is a great place to study and improve because of the equipment powerbase. You have easy access to books, cameras, computers, and everything you need. Very helpful staff are always there to answer your questions. And the atmosphere is great. I’m learning from people who have a vast store of knowledge.

Why did you choose Wolverhampton? I visited before I started, and the University, city and people impressed me.

What is special about the course?

What are the benefits of entering (and winning!) competitions? The greatest benefit is self-satisfaction, that what I’m doing is good, and someone appreciated it. It makes me feel as well I’m in the right place, doing the right thing. What do you want to do in the future? After finishing university I wish to study, live and work in the United Kingdom in a profession directly relevant to photography. Studying photography and working within that field and connecting what I love with what I wish to do everyday is my dream.

A very important thing is the great atmosphere between students, and between students and tutors, who are more than happy to help you and show you many ways you could improve yourself. Knowledge is very accessible, because of the great library, and equipment students can use (studios, darkroom, IT suites, printing services, art shop, photographic store etc.). Well educated tutors are always there to talk to you about your work, suggest interesting books, albums, exhibitions worth visiting.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

17


©

Jono Bacon, BA (Hons) Interactive Multimedia Communication

“I am the Ubuntu Community Manager and my job is to manage this world-wide community of contributors and users who are involved in Ubuntu.”

Ubuntu is the fastest growing Operating System in the world, a version of Linux that has gone on to incredible success in the last few years, gathering millions of users all over the world. With Ubuntu being an Open Source system, a significant chunk of the system is contributed to by volunteers. I enjoyed the course because it covered the more interesting side of computing, and I particularly enjoyed the diverse elements in the course - I enjoyed learning about language theory, doing a short research project, learning about different multimedia technologies, learning more traditional programming, sound/graphics applications and more. My tutors were excellent - very supportive and very encouraging at an important time of my life. The course was very diverse - I enjoyed the negotiated study, multimedia, psychology and development modules. I had heard the course was well respected across Europe, which attracted me, but when I visited the University and saw the facilities, that encouraged me to come too. I had a meeting with one of my tutors and that sealed the deal! University brought something else to me which was very valuable - a diverse social and life experience. I met a range of different types of people, from all over the world, and this helped me mature, and grow as a human being.

18

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

I plan on building up the Ubuntu community as best I can for the foreseeable future, but I am also heavily involved in music and at some point would like to take some time away from Open Source to go on tour and focus on my music full time. I am also interested in projects that help spread technology to people and could imagine spending some time working on getting technology to kids in remote regions of the world. I had a great university experience and highly recommend coming to Wolverhampton. Oh, and use Ubuntu - www.ubuntu.com. Hey, one plug is ok, right? More about Ubuntu Ubuntu is an African word meaning ‘Humanity to others’, or ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’. The Ubuntu distribution brings the spirit of Ubuntu to the software world. Ubuntu is a community developed operating system that is perfect for laptops, desktops and servers. Whether you use it at home, at school or at work Ubuntu contains all the applications you'll ever need, from word processing and email applications, to web server software and programming tools. Ubuntu is and always will be free of charge. You do not pay any licensing fees. You can download, use and share Ubuntu with your friends, family, school or business for absolutely nothing.

Telephone: 01902 322058


Calvin Pope, BA (Hons) Design and Applied Arts (Textile Design)

After years running his own tie-dye and screen-printing businesses, a chance drive past the School of Art & Design led to a change of course for Calvin.

CASE STUDIES

©

Seeing an advert for one of the Open Days, Calvin bit the bullet and hasn’t looked back since. “The Design for Interior Textiles course was just what I was looking for to extend my skills and abilities. As a mature student and the only male among twentyodd females, it was challenging at first, but in the second year I won a live commission for Brinton’s Carpets. The prize was a two-week placement at the leading carpet company.” Graduating in 2007, Calvin landed a role with high-end carpet makers Ulster Carpets of Portadown, and as a Residential Carpet Designer and Contracts Carpet Designer, Calvin has found his niche, designing for hotel chains, casinos and residential clients based all over the world.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

19


AA2A practicioner Mo White in the print room

20

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


SUPPORT FOR PRACTITIONERS

Support for practitioners

Dave Gilroy

AA2A Artists Access to Art Colleges (AA2A) is a project run by CHEAD (Council for Higher Education in Art and Design), and funded by the Arts Council England through the National Lottery Grants for the Arts programme. The School of Art & Design is one of 32 colleges and universities across England that run an Artists Access to Art Colleges Scheme (AA2A). We offer places to four artists or makers, providing specialist facilities plus library lending facilities, access to lecture programmes, life rooms, etc. AA2A enables promising artists to improve their skills by benefiting from the University’s resources and expertise. Each artist/maker has at least 100 hours access, which they can use over a period between October and April. A grant of £220 is available for materials or travel. For more details about the scheme please visit the AA2A website, www.aa2a.org.

For an AA2A pack for the School of Art & Design, please contact Sheila Hind on 01902 323 399 or email: s.hind@wlv.ac.uk.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

21


Events

Big Painting Exhibition, Frank Bowling

Here are just a few of the artists/ designers who have given public lectures at our school: Wayne Hemingway

Frank Bowling

Acclaimed designer, Wayne Hemingway recruited some of the best art and design students from the University of Wolverhampton to work on one of his latest projects.

Frank Bowling held an exhibition of his ‘Big Paintings’ for 3 weeks at the University’s impressive Millennium Building Gallery in March 2008.

The Red or Dead label co-founder and partner in Hemingway Design was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University in 2005. He recruited up to 30 students to help him set up an online searchable database of popular culture called ‘The Land of Lost Content’/ www.edu.lolc.co.uk Wayne and the LOLC team have produced an electronic ‘museum’ of around two million post-war popular culture artefacts to inspire future generations of designers. This includes everything from ‘Ena Sharples’ hairnets to packaging for soap powder, and advertisements for fashion to punk memorabilia.

A pioneering artist, who divides his time between London and New York, Frank Bowling was born in Guyana, which means ‘place of water’, and his artwork is often themed around water and the hinterlands, coastal and delta areas. He trained in Britain, winning a scholarship to the Royal College of Art. In 2005 he became the first black artist elected to the Royal Academy in its 200 year history. His work is represented in over 30 collections, including the Royal College of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Tate Gallery and the Victoria and Albert Museum. He was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Arts in recognition of his outstanding contribution to painting and the arts by University of Wolverhampton in 2007.

22

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


EVENTS

We regularly arrange exhibitions and events for you and members of the public to attend ranging from collaborations with industry to informative public lectures by high-profile artists/designers.

Ally Capellino Top fashion designer Ally Capellino, whose client list includes Kate Moss, Orlando Bloom and Jamie and Jules Oliver, gave us all a real insight into the highs and lows of the fashion trade at a talk for the School of Art & Design in October 2007. Not a stereotypical ‘fashionista’, Ally is a down-toearth Yorkshire lass from Tadcaster, but she packed 25 years of experience as a London-based designer into addressing a full-house of school, college and University students and staff. Ally Capellino (‘Capellino’ is Italian for ‘little hat’), aka Alison Lloyd, took up her professional name when she set up her eponymous fashion label in 1980 with her then creative partner and husband Jono Platt. Her company was restructured as an accessories company in 1999 and produces two seasonal men’s and women’s collections annually.

Undergraduate Degree Shows Each year in June Postgraduate MA Shows Each year in September Visit our ‘News & Events’ page on our website for more events. Open Days Please visit our website for dates or contact 01902 322058. Out and About UCAS Design your future, Business Design Centre, London UCAS Design your future, Manchester Central Convention Complex: www.ucas.com D&AD New Blood Exhibition: www.dandad.org New Designers: www.newdesigners.com Clothes Show Live, NEC Birmingham Focus on Imaging, NEC Birmingham Design & Technology, NEC Birmingham and many more

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

23


Applying to study

Undergraduate Entry Requirements

A level

• 240 tariff points including a minimum of 160 from A level subjects or equivalent • Successful completion of a Foundation Course in Art and Design • Entry based on academic qualifications, experience, portfolio, referee comment. • Offers are subject to interview

BTEC National Diploma

Foundation Studies in Art & Design

Points A = 120 B = 100 C = 80 D = 60 E = 40

Points DDD = 360 DDM = 320 DMM = 280 MMM = 240 MMP = 200 MPP = 160

Points D = 285 M = 225 P = 165

PPP = 120

Tariff Conversion The UCAS tariff is a points system used to report grades for entry into higher education in a numerical format. Use the chart below, as a guide to convert your grades into points. Joint Courses The School offers specialist joint degrees in: • Graphic Communication and Illustration. • Interior Design and Textile Design. For information regarding financing your study contact: Higher Education Shop, Telephone: 01902 321032, Email: heshop@wlv.ac.uk.

24

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

How to apply Applications for full-time undergraduate BA (Hons) and HND programmes listed in this prospectus are usually made through UCAS – the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. To apply you will need the UCAS Handbook and an application form. Copies can be obtained from schools and colleges, the University of Wolverhampton Higher Education Shop and any British Council Office. You can also contact UCAS direct at: UCAS, PO Box 28, Cheltenham, Gloucester GL52 3ZA Tel: +44 (0) 1242 223707 www.ucas.com

Telephone: 01902 322058


APPLYING TO STUDY

UCAS Courses Undergraduate Courses BA (Hons) Animation *BA (Hons) Design, Craft and Applied Art BA (Hons) Computer Games Design BA (Hons) Fashion Accessories BA (Hons) Fine Art BA (Hons) Graphic Communication BA (Hons) Illustration BA (Hons) Interactive Media and the Web BA (Hons) Interior Design BA (Hons) Photography BA (Hons) Product Design BA (Hons) Textile Design BA (Hons) Video and Film Production FdA Commercial Video Production HND Photography All courses now available with professional placement (sandwich) year Specialist Joints: BA (Hons) Graphic Communication and Illustration BA (Hons) Fasion Accessories and Textile Design NEW! Level 0 – BA (Hons) Art & Design* This one year full time programme enables candidates who lack normal university entry qualifications to begin a degree with a preparation level. Introductory modules build towards a portfolio of creative work that prepares candidates for the challenge of degree study.

* Please contact the School at time of application.

Applications for part-time programmes should be made directly to the School using a University of Wolverhampton application form obtainable by contacting the School. Tel: +44 (0) 1902 322058 Email: art-design@wlv.ac.uk

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

25


International Students International students can apply either through UCAS or the International Office. For further enquiries or for an application form please contact: Email: international@wlv.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0) 1902 322735

Postgraduate Courses For postgraduate courses please apply to: Colin Davies MA Programme Manager colin.davies@wlv.ac.uk or contact: +44 (0) 1902 322058 email: art-design@wlv.ac.uk Postgraduate Entry Requirements You should have an appropriate Honours degree in an art and design related subject or a combination of relevant professional experience and formal qualifications. Subject to portfolio interview.

26

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


Preparing for your interview

Sketch Books

If you are invited to an interview, you will be asked to bring along a portfolio that contains samples of your work. Your portfolio should contain a collection of work, which shows your skills and knowledge across a number of project studies. It is a visual representation of your interests, explorations, work in progress and final pieces. When preparing for this, you might find the guidelines below useful.

Sketch books or work books should show what has influenced you: research, preparatory work, analysis of your work, ie, working through an idea and testing various approaches. Remember, work in progress is just as important as finished work.

Presentation Your portfolio should be clearly laid out and easy to look through. It can be any size that works for the content. The portfolio should aim to demonstrate your strongest work, indicating your creative and technical abilities rather than quantity of work.

Digital Work If you have developed your work with the use of computers, you could include video clips and animations, please bring along a CD/USB flash drive or laptop.

PREPARING FOR YOUR INTERVIEW

Preparing for your interview

For further information about the interview process please contact: Tel: 01902 322058 or Email: art-design@wlv.ac.uk

Drawing For many courses, drawing is a key element to your portfolio. Include examples of different types of drawing, such as, life drawing, still life, illustrations and show different uses of media where possible. Projects Include examples of different projects you have undertaken and be prepared to talk through the project and the development of your work.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

27


BA (Hons) Animation

28

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


The creative opportunities in animation are huge, open as this subject is to so many forms and methods. It combines visual aesthetics with sound, structured time and emotion.

Reena Kalsi, BA (Hons) Animation

BA (HONS) ANIMATION

©

‘‘

Animation can be entertainment, or a powerful voice for social and political statement. Equally, it can be incorporated within fine art practice or the language of advertising.

The BA (Hons) Animation course equipped me with the skills required for the creative industries. With encouragement and support from the tutors, I continued onto further success by directing my own films and projects, including one for the Channel 4 Animator in Residence Scheme in 2003. I have recently been a teaching assistant producing short films, and continue to collaborate with members of the department with a project commissioned by Collide ’07.

’’

Ed Tonks Matt Sampson Darre Iddon

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

29


Jo B utch

er

Jo Butcher

Why choose this course? • This course seeks to develop your technical knowledge and cultivate your understanding of movement, mostly through drawing. • You’ll learn the following software applications up to an industry standard: Maya, Toon Boom, After Effects, Flash, Photoshop, Painter and Premiere Pro.

• You will develop a critical awareness of the subject and establish your own creative individuality. • You will explore a range of styles – we cover any approach to the art of animation, depending on your talents and skills.

• You will familiarise yourself with computer-based and traditional animation techniques.

• The course is delivered via a variety of teaching methods, including studio and workshop teaching, seminars and presentations.

• You will combine visual and sound skills with structured time and motion.

• You will have the option to study Interactive Media and Video alongside Animation.

Year One You will cover the basics of animating, develop pre-production skills (story boarding – synopsis and treatment), writing techniques and an understanding of film language. Principles of animation and animating the human form: Technical hands-on modules will develop the craft of animating through 2D digital, traditional and CGI methods. You will not only be able to use a variety of software (Maya, Flash, Photoshop, Premiere Pro) by the end of Year One, but will also be able to animate complex human movement and speech. Drawing and observation: You will be introduced to the importance of drawing in the animation process. Drawing is used to study and analyse movement as well as being a powerful medium for self-expression and is an invaluable tool for conceptual development. Important related skills such as pre-production planning, video editing and digital sound are also taught at Year One.

30

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

Vinohd Sundararaj

Typical areas of study

Steve Chong

• You will hone your editing, creative use of sound, compositing and idea generating expertise.


BA (HONS) ANIMATION Jason Watkins

Year Two You will be encouraged to find your own aesthetic expression and conceptual approach through experimentation. You will also have the opportunity to choose various technical paths i.e. digital 2D, CGI, stop motion, oil painting under the camera, pixilation and compositing. You will complement your practical studies with theory-based modules that investigate current contextual and historical aspects of the subject. Narrative forms: A study of film language, narrative and non-narrative conceptual approaches, genre’ and related contextual issues. Experimental study: The aim is to develop technical, aesthetic and conceptual individuality through rigorous testing of ideas and methods. You may opt to study two of the following: advanced 2D, Maya modelling and rigging or 3D stop motion.

Year Three The third year focuses on preparation for employment and personal career strategies. You are free to produce any style of work you wish through negotiated study modules. You may opt to produce one large film or to undertake experimental work, ranging from fine art approaches to commercial sequences. Entry requirements – please see page 24

Career opportunities Typical career opportunities open to graduates include work in animation, TV and games design, illustration and the creative and communications industries. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art

You will build professional skills in creative compositing, character and environment.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

31


BA (Hons) Computer Games Design

32

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) COMPUTER GAMES DESIGN

Computer games is one of the most dynamic and entrepreneurial sectors of the creative industries. This course is your introduction to a fast-evolving, cutting-edge career.

Why choose this course? • You will join one of the most dynamic and entrepreneurial areas of the UK creative industries’ economy. • This course is designed to give you a comprehensive understanding of the computer games environment, building on time, space and movement in relation to interactive narrative structures, games design and conventions, and character development. • It will examine game strategy, game concept and development, animation, video and sound in an interactive context. • You will learn appropriate planning methodologies. • This course seeks to develop your technical skills, explore techniques in scriptwriting and visual narratives, and develop teamwork skills. • Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practical workshops, tutorials, group work and live projects.

Philip Railnca

• You will acquire the skills required to produce a finished game. • The course will develop the necessary skills and knowledge to enable you to formulate original concepts presented as storyboards and working artwork, supported by realisation techniques relevant to game content and production.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

33


Typical areas of study Year One • Interactive Authoring: your skills will be developed using industry-standard, time-based multimedia authoring packages to produce simple, interactive artefacts. • 3D Modelling: you will be able to produce basic designs that establish a practice, technique and context for 3D software usage in computer games. This will involve study of games character and scene, and their parameters. • Casual and Browser Games. • Games Engines: you will study and practice in an industry-standard game engine and editor and make a virtual world. • Digital Sound: This covers sound theory, audio recording techniques, digital audio processing, editing and sound compositing.

Year Two • Simulation and Immersive Engagement • 3D Modelling and Rigging • Research and Writing Narratives • Game Engine Evaluation Year Three • Negotiated Practical Projects and Research • Portfolio Development

Career opportunities This course prepares you for a career as an art director, visualiser and designer in the computer games industry. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA Programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24 34

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) COMPUTER GAMES DESIGN Adam Mills

Richard Harrison

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

35


BA (Hons) Design, Craft and Applied Art

Joanne Cox

Dilyana Evtimova

36

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

Dilyana Evtimova


Come and join our vibrant community on this innovative and visionary new course led by some of the most renowned practicing makers, designers and public artists in their field. The course aims to broaden your approach to design and applied arts by encouraging interdisciplinary practices in the field of design for creative industries, studio practice, small batch production, site-specific commissions, community arts, architectural application and installation. Our design philosophy challenges preconceived ideas about materials and concepts, crossing well established boundaries to set new trends within contemporary art and design practice. It provides a framework for you to explore the potential of a variety of materials and processes in relation to your chosen practice - experimentation and creative risk-taking are encouraged. Design-related software will provide you with the opportunity to explore the potential of professional presentation techniques (printed and virtual) and new technologies for advanced prototyping and computer-aided production processes. The teaching and learning emphasis on individuality, technical skill development and dynamic design practices will equip you with the knowledge and understanding you will need to realise your creative potential and personal career ambitions. The School of Art & Design is recognised for its approach to employability and Professional Practice/Work Placement modules will prepare you for a range of career opportunities in art and design

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

Ros Ingram

Many opportunities for collaboration and partnerships with renowned companies (Wedgwood, Ibstock Brick, Watsons Glass, Pearsons Glass, Thorn Lighting, DuPont International, etc.) have been developed for you to gain valuable experience of working in competitive environments. During the past two years students have worked with award-winning RIBA architects Solanjer da Cruz and Wolverhampton City Council on innovative new projects within the city, taking advantage of its multimillion-pound regeneration scheme. You will also be able to develop work for national competitions, live commissions, and group exhibitions. Each year a number of students take advantage of our international exchange programmes to experience life as a design student in a university in Europe or the USA. Our approach to Design, Craft and Applied Art education will enable you to compete with current designers in your chosen field and develop new and challenging products for a variety of markets within a sustainable world environment.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

37


Design, Craft and Applied Art Typical areas of study Visual (expression and presentation) • Observational drawing, media exploration, design methodology, sketch modelling, technical drawing, scale drawing, presentational artwork, raster image manipulation and presentation, vector drawing and design, modelling, rendering and animation. Contextual (research) • Historical, contemporary, critical, reflective, technical, industrial. • Local, regional, national, international. • Traditional, non-traditional, sustainable, professional. Practical (skills) • Mouldmaking, casting, fabricating, constructing, turning, blowing, carving, stamping, prototyping, milling and hand building.

• Learn to use kilns, furnaces, torches, welders, hearths, potters wheels, lathes, saws, drills, presses, formers and cutters. • Produce work as one-off designs, as small batch production and for industry. • Take part in competitions, exhibitions and live briefs. • Work as an individual or as part of a team. • Materials, wood, metal, plastics, ceramics, glass. Personal (development) Develop key skills from dependent learning at level one, through interdependency to independent learning. Involve yourself in creative thinking, problem solving, self-expression, debate, negotiation and communication. Record, evaluate, reflect upon and actualise ideas and outcomes.

Career opportunities Possible career paths include establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker; setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others; engaging in freelance work; designing for industry or working in the industry; working on private and public commissions, art projects, community projects, installations and architectural projects. Other opportunities include arts administration, curation, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial. You may continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

38

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART Ceramics students, firing weekend in Wales

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

39


40

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

3D Design (Wood/Metal/Plastics)

Today’s design industry demands visual, aesthetic, practical and theory skills, as well as advanced abilities in IT. Explore these in a variety of media related to: design and the applied arts/jewellery/silversmithing/wood, metals and plastics.

Why choose this area of study?

Emma Langley

• because 3-D Design is one of the most exciting, imaginative and wide-ranging programmes of study available in Art & Design; • because you will learn how to explore your creative potential and realise design ideas using a broad range of methods, media and materials; • because you will be able to develop accurate making skills in our purpose-built workshops for wood, metal, plastics, jewellery and silversmithing, which are professionally staffed, equipped and maintained; • because your learning and teaching has been developed to provide a lively and engaging programme of study that includes: studio and workshop activities, seminars and lectures, contextual field trips, individual and group based project work, and self-directed research; • because your creative design practices are complemented by industry standard computeraided design for 3-D modelling, image manipulation and presentation graphics.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

41


TThomasina Warren

Typical areas of study Year One • Creative drawing • Introduction to workshop practices • Exploring design processes • Computer-aided design • Project development Year Two • Visual research • Design method and practice • Advanced workshop practice(s) • Function and form • Computer modelling • Site-specific design Year Three • Negotiated project(s) • Professional practice • Portfolio development • Creative industries and opportunities

42

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

43

Philip Crawley

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

Julian Martin


44

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Jo Lee

Kerry Williamson

Amy Cooper

Su Wong

Telephone: 01902 322058


Emma Rogers

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

Ceramics

Ceramics at Wolverhampton is acknowledged by many to be one of the most exciting and innovative clay programmes in the country. The course continues to build on the philosophy that with such a versatile material, students should be encouraged to explore all possible areas of expression. Why choose this area of study? • Engage with and develop an intrinsic knowledge of clay, a material which has a history spanning thousands of years. You will be given the opportunity to expand and challenge the potential of this material taking it into the forefront of 21st century creativity, innovation, experimentation and design. • There is an emphasis on the creative industries, and bespoke modules enable you to apply for Enterprise and Innovation grants such as the SPEED grant for starting up your own business. You are also actively involved in external projects that develop an awareness and experience of the real world through design competitions, public art commissions, collaborative projects with architects and the ceramic industry.

• An important part of our philosophy is that you have the opportunity to experience projects outside the School enabling you to take advantage of field study trips to artist studios, firing projects involving wood firing, soda and raku, museum visits, exhibitions and conferences. • You can choose from a wide range of options within the ceramic arts/design practice. Areas of study include objects and vessels for domestic interiors/galleries, architectural and environmental ceramics, site specific and public artworks, design for industry and small-scale batch production. You will gain an understanding of your own practice in relation to studying ceramics in its cultural, historical and contemporary context.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

45


Typical areas of study

Serge Sanghera

Year 1 The focus of the first year is on materials and processes within ceramics. Workshops and demonstrations introduce you to handbuilding, throwing, large-scale processes, mouldmaking techniques, ceramic printing/surface application and glazing. You will learn about alternative firing solutions such as raku, sawdust and soda firing. Creative drawing forms a fundamental part of the process of developing ideas. You will be encouraged to research and develop your own personal response to tutor set briefs. First year exhibitions take place at the end of semester 1 in Wolverhampton galleries giving you the experience of showing finished objects in the public arena.

Vicky Shaw, Subject Leader Ceramics

Year 2 After gaining a range of experiences at Level 1 you will be able to choose your own area of specialism and individual processes as you progress through the course. You will be encouraged to research, interpret and develop ideas in-depth choosing appropriate materials and process. You will develop an awareness of your own practice, in relation to ceramics in an historical and contemporary context. You will have opportunities to become involved in live projects and competitions as well as developing your own self-negotiated project.

David Jones, Senior Lecturer Ceramics

Year 3 The final year focuses on independent study and a self-negotiated proposal in consultation with staff. There is an emphasis on clarifying and refining making skills and developing an understanding of the context in which you work. You will be equipped with the skills to coherently communicate your ideas through presentations and the preparation of a professional portfolio of work. The year culminates in an exhibition in which you present your final body of work at the Degree show, New Designers in London and Hatfield House.

46

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

47

Martin Geyer

Gwen Heeney, Senior Lecturer Ceramics

Joy Westmacott

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART


48

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

Jo Ballard

Sheldon Cooney

Beccy Feather

Iestyn Davies

Joanna Manolsis

Peng Liu


©

Joanna Manousis, BA (Hons) Glass

Glass is a powerful material capable of amazing diversity. It performs a wide range of functions including everything from the design of everyday objects, to large-scale architectural and sculptural installations. This exciting degree encourages you to explore your creative potential within some of the finest facilities in the UK and Europe.

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

Glass

‘‘ Why choose this area of study? • You will study at one of the best equipped glass departments in Europe. • You will explore all aspects of glass making including glass blowing, kiln forming, machine manufacturing, large-scale hot glass casting, architectural and sheet glass processes and finishing. • This degree has an established international reputation and provides an opportunity to explore your creative potential working with glass. • Apply your ideas in commercial product design, architectural interior design, sculptural applications, jewellery and accessories, which encompass hand made and industrial processes. • There will be opportunities to develop your work for competitions, live commissions, exhibition and manufacturers, in both the UK and internationally. • Critical, contextual and professional studio topics will introduce you to the application of glass from a cultural and historical perspective.

After graduating with a First Class Honours BA in Glass from Wolverhampton in 2007, I went to the west coast of the United States for a scholarship master class at Pilchuck Glass School.

I arrived back in the UK to find I had been selected for the ‘Best Newcomer Award’ through Pearson’s Glass of Liverpool. Last year, I travelled back to the Seattle area to work with glass sculptor Karen Wllenbrink Johnsen. I have now secured a Master’s placement in Glass at Alfred University, New York. There are only two graduate students taken per year. As I start, my recent sculptural pieces will be on exhibition at The International Glass Biennale Exhibition in Stourbridge.

’’

www.joannamanousis.com

• You will benefit from visits and work placements in studios, galleries and industry, both locally and internationally.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

49


Typical areas of study Year One We shall question how we do things. You will develop a range of skills and practice in glass.

You will enhance your levels of practice and professional skills and have the opportunity to experience ‘live’ competitive projects.

You will be encouraged to research, analyse and develop inquisitive, experimental and creative approaches to the way you handle ideas. You will be encouraged and guided how to contextualise your thinking through technical, historical and contemporary research in glass.

Year Three We shall question what we do with your skills, to use them professionally, and what you would like to do within your independent practice and your future career. You will be refining your skills by applying them to professionally executed objects and artefacts. You will conclude with a final exhibition, including live commissions, and in so doing, develop a professional portfolio of work.

You will integrate drawing development and digital visualisations.

Gillies Jones

Year Two We shall question why we do things and how you work as an individual maker, craftsperson, designer and artist, and reflect upon your independent practice in a professional context.

50

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

51

BA (HONS) DESIGN, CRAFT AND APPLIED ART

Stoneman & Patel


Model wears students designs at the Clothes Show Live, NEC Birmingham

BA (Hons) Fashion Accessories

52

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) FASHION ACCESSORIES

Design for Fashion Accessories is a growing market both in the UK and internationally. This exciting programme of study offers you the opportunity to fuse fashion and textile expertise whilst exploring creative making skills and innovation in materials. Through live project work and links with the Creative Industries you will develop contemporary trend awareness and gain a thorough understanding of the fashion accessories market. On completion of the three year degree programme you will be equipped with the skills and knowledge to embark on a chosen career in the fast-moving, dynamic fashion industry.

Why choose this course? • Students will study a range of textile and 3D options, including wood, metals and plastics, glass and ceramics. Your investigations will give you the opportunity to design for a variety of fashion accessories that might include footwear, bags and luggage, scarves, belts, jewellery and other items of adornment. • It will provide you with the opportunity to study topics that promote individual creativity focusing on design for fashion accessories. • There is a strong emphasis on visual research, aesthetic and design translation, underpinned by the skill and knowledge required to meet the demands of the contemporary fashion and textiles industries. • You will develop the skills and creative disciplines required to design for fashion accessories using innovative and interdisciplinary techniques.

• You will have the opportunity to use the latest CAD/CAM technology to realise your ideas. • Live projects allow you to integrate your personal creative expression with the needs of industry across a variety of markets, ranging from global fashion labels to sole traders. • Exposure to creative industries and industrial opportunities gives you the chance to explore career aspirations and forge links with your related industry. • Employability skills help you to prepare professional portfolios, E-portfolios and gain an in-depth knowledge of your industry. • Personal study in your final year allows you to explore your creative practice in depth.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

53


Typical areas of study

Career opportunities

Year One • Introduction to skills and workshops in textiles and 3D design • Creative drawing and visual communication skills • Research and study skills focused on fashion accessories • Design methodologies for fashion accessories • CAD for fashion accessories. Year Two • Market forces across the fashion and textiles industries • Trend forecasting • Design methods and product prototyping • Advanced skills. Year Three • Creative industries and opportunities • Professional preparation for future careers • Professional understanding of materials and processes • Research and development • Personally negotiated final projects.

The employment opportunities that exist for graduates studying Design for Fashion Accessories are varied and extensive. Career pathways include: textile design, accessory design, printed fabric design, scarf design, shoe and bag design, jewellery design and the design of luxury small goods. Other career pathways include employment or consultancy in trend prediction, colour and lifestyle, fashion and textile illustration, working as a fashion stylist, or working in the marketing and merchandising aspects of the fashion and textiles industry. Fashion accessory graduates have the opportunity to engage in freelance work, sell design work through agents and design studios, and work to commission. Graduates can work as designer/makers, running their own businesses and selling through retail and within arts and crafts outlets. Recent graduates are working with: John Lewis (Visual Merchandising & Design) Channel 4 (TV Graphics) Zara (Design) George at Asda (Design) Monsoon (Management) Armani (Management)

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Joint Honours Degree with Textile Design available

54

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) FASHION ACCESSORIES www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

55


BA (Hons) Graphic Communication

56

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


This popular career-orientated course encourages you to engage with design at a professional level across both print and screen. Taught modules are set within the context of a diverse, evolving design and communication industry, as well as the wider world of contemporary society. The course includes advertising, graphic design, multimedia, web and editorial design.

Hayley Payne BA (Hons) Graphic Communication

BA (HONS) GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

©

‘‘

The effect of the course at Wolverhampton has been significant. Due to the variety of the course I am considerably more employable than many other designers I have met and I have yet to actually work alongside another designer who has the same spread of experience and expertise in both print and multimedia that I have built up. I currently live and work in Switzerland where I co-ordinate and brand manage the development and maintenance of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Cup. A major aspect of my role is based at the football matches. I have been tasked to coordinate and work on location around Europe, so I get to be in the thick of the real application of the work I am doing.

Sean Bird

Whoever said going into design was highly competitive, a tough industry to crack and low paid, was wrong. It just takes planning!

’’

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

57


Why choose this course?

58

• Our lecturers are central to your experience; they are passionate about teaching and motivating you. At Wolverhampton, the graphics team are all practitioners, so they know what is happening in graphic design.

• You will work with and alongside a diverse range of local, national and international students within the School. This creates an interesting mix of original thinking with diverse cultural influences, which enriches your learning experience whilst you study.

• The course encourages you to maintain a sharp focus on the design industry, but also to take a step back to appreciate its place in society at large. In this way, you will become a thinking practitioner, able to colour your work with many related theories and influences, such as art and design history, aesthetics, semiotics, representation, deconstruction, as well as ecological, ethical and social issues.

• Our students’ work has been published in design books and magazines and has been recognised by the presentation of a Best in Show award at the D&AD New Blood Exhibition over two years.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

• You will have access to professional industry standard software applications running on Apple Macintosh workstations.

Telephone: 01902 322058


Eva Wong BA (Hons) Graphic Communication

‘‘

From an early age I’ve always been fascinated by Art and Design and I knew then that I eventually wanted to be part of the Design industry. Now I’ve landed a dream job working as a Designer at AKQA (www.akqa.com) in their London offices, possibly the best point of my life so far.

At the University of Wolverhampton, I studied Graphic Communication, which covered all sorts of areas from theory to design practice. I chose to specialise in Multimedia Design, as I knew this was a key skill to have in this ever expanding and growing industry. The best work I created while at university was my personal website and the videos I created for the Channel 4: e-Stings. I also enjoyed modules such as Editorial Design, Packaging and Branding – all skills that I now use at work.

BA (HONS) GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

©

Graphic Communication at the University of Wolverhampton has offered me many opportunities that I am extremely grateful for, especially when I took part in the D&AD New Blood exhibition in London. Being part of the Graphic Communication presence at that exhibition gave me one of the highlights of my life and also secured me a ticket to AKQA, that I can only describe as a ‘company for the digital age’. At AKQA I have the opportunity to indulge my love of video games when I work on websites like Xbox.com and work on campaigns for clients such as Codemasters. It’s pretty awesome when you see your design and ideas go live on the internet or when you work as part of a team on a national/international campaign. Without the friendship of the Graphic Communication staff and students, I probably wouldn’t have the confidence, determination and understanding that I now have which continues to spur me on.

’’

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

59


Typical areas of study The Graphic Communication course comprises a wide range of modules that reflect this exciting, creative professional area. These modules can be further extended to include business and marketing. Emphasis is given to developing your thinking abilities to enable you to create new and interesting ideas and solutions to a range of communication issues and problems that reflect the high expectations of both the creative advertising industry and increasingly modern and sophisticated audiences.

Year Three This year is all about developing and consolidating your learning to create a portfolio of your achievements and work – preparing you for your future – be it within the design professions, postgraduate study and/or related areas such as teaching. Some students choose to specialise within one area whilst others prefer a broader range of modules. All students have the option of negotiating their own projects, so they can demonstrate the skills appropriate to launch them into their chosen futures.

Year One You are introduced to professional design skills and ways of thinking. Modules encourage you to explore digital imaging, typography, designing for screen and print and much more. Year Two You are offered a choice of options that engage with potential future employment opportunities such as editorial design, graphic design and branding packaging, designing for multimedia environments, as well as conceptual thinking which incorporates and introduces relatively new fields such as sound.

Career opportunities This course has a long history of preparing students for employment in the creative industries with many graduates taking up positions within the industry at national and international levels.

media content suppliers, exhibition designers, packaging consultants, publishing companies (books, magazines, newspapers), in-house design studios and information design companies.

Pick up a magazine at the newsagent, watch TV, browse the web for the latest sites and the chances are you might see the work of one of our graduates. We have an established record in effectively preparing students for employment, and every year the majority of our graduates enter careers within the creative industries.

We are also proactive in assisting start-up companies, and a number of our graduates have gone on to establish successful design consultancies both in the UK and abroad.

Typical employment opportunities include: design consultancies, advertising agencies, brand planners, TV and multimedia companies,

Entry requirements – please see page 24

60

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Joint Honours Degree with Illustration available

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

61


Monica Cichocka

Krista Davies

Katy-Jane Clapp

BA (Hons) Illustration

62

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) ILLUSTRATION How Koon

In books, magazines, advertising and new media, illustration skills help stimulate, highlight and focus attention on the message or themes being expressed. Through exploration of figure, editorial and advertising illustration, as well as illustrating for younger audiences, this programme will help you evolve your own illustrative personality and specialisms.

Why choose this course? • You are taught specific illustration skills and will develop an understanding of illustration in professional practice.

• You are encouraged to develop research and critical skills – vital to the development of your illustrative personality.

• You will have opportunities to be creative and experimental and explore a wide range of art and design skills and media, enabling you to adapt to the changing nature and demands of industry.

• This course helps you develop the individual skills necessary to communicate with other creative professionals in the illustration and visual communication industries.

• The teaching places strong emphasis on the development of a questioning attitude to a variety of projects, which include working in studios, on location, and software, drawing and printmaking workshops.

• Current illustration students’ feedback is positive about the opportunities they have to experiment with media and ideas, to work independently on personally developed projects and on the quality of tutor support.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

63


Typical areas of study Year One A number of broad-based modules provide an introduction to illustration, supported by the development of practical skills including drawing and experimenting with a wide range of media. Additionally you will develop study and research skills and further practical skills across a range of software. Modules include: • Drawing for Childrens’ Books, Narrative and Editorial • Concepts and Delivery – Image and Text, Sequential and Promotional Contexts • Visual Communications Skills.

Year Two You will study a range of specialisms including: • Editorial Illustration • Illustration for Younger Audiences • Image and Text • Narrative Illustration. There is also the opportunity to develop personal projects and work independently on live projects and competitions. Year Three You will consolidate your practice by undertaking research and producing personal project work. You will also explore potential employment and further study opportunities.

Career opportunities This course could open up a career as a freelance illustrator working on publishing, editorial, design and advertising commissions. You will also be equipped to gain employment in a wide range of related areas in the design, animation and visual communications industries. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Panjarat Jittpukdee

Joint Honours Degree with Graphic Communication available

64

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

65

Anna Alfut

Joel Millerchip

Alex Keane

BA (HONS) ILLUSTRATION


Š

Ian Dodds BA (Hons) Illustration

I graduated from Wolverhampton University in 2002, and after six months panic about finding a job, I started working as a freelance illustrator in 2003. I have worked in different areas of illustration such as Design, Packaging and my specialism Editorial. My clients include The Guardian, Radio Times, Financial Times, Independent on Sunday, Big Issue, Ancestry.co.uk plus many others from around the world. The illustration course helped me develop a strong portfolio, which together with the professional practice module allowed me to leave with confidence in understanding what lies ahead to find work in this competitive market. Even after university I was still able to get back in touch to ask for advice or seek another opinion, which I have used on a number of occasions.

66

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) ILLUSTRATION www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

67


BA (Hons) Interactive Media and the Web

68

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND THE WEB

The fast-changing world of interactive multimedia and the Web is one of the most exciting areas in the digital media domain. The opportunities are almost limitless for those who wish to combine design and technical skills.

Why choose this course? • The course prepares you for a professional career in the exciting and rapidly changing area of interactive media. • It gives you the opportunity to develop a wide range of practical abilities and knowledge in areas such as web design and development, streaming media, rich-media, interaction design, digital sound and video, image composition, project management and critical and creative thinking. • You will design, develop, and manage your own sophisticated media-rich, dynamic website. • You will work with industry-standard software packages, processes and techniques in wellequipped computer labs and workshops. • You will have the opportunity to work on your own large-scale and client-based projects. • You will work alongside award winning practitioners and researchers in the field of Interactive Media.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

69


Typical areas of study Year One In this year you are introduced to the fundamentals of interactive media and develop your ability to explore and express interactive concepts individually and in groups. You design and develop web sites, record and manipulate digital sound, create and compose digital images and produce interactive artefacts. Some of the topics you study in this year are: • Interaction Design • Interactive Web Design • Interactive Authoring • Digital Sound • Digital Image Creation

• Interactive Media project • Instructional Design • Interactive Practice • Creative Industries and Opportunities

Year Two This year builds on what you learn in Year One and enables you to produce more sophisticated and richer interactive artefacts such as dynamic websites. You learn how to shoot and edit digital video for use in streaming and interactive artefacts. You learn how to use scripts, behaviours and code to create and control interactivity in your artefacts and you are also introduced to how an interactive project is created and managed by working as a member of a production team. Some of the topics you study in this year are: • Interaction Development • Dynamic Web Design • Digital Video • Streaming Media • Project Management

Year Three This year prepares you for entry into the world of employment. You develop your understanding of instructional and user-experience design. Most of your time is spent on working on projects. Some of these projects are live client-based and some are negotiated between you and your tutors. All the work you produce in this year will form part of your portfolio to show to the potential employers. Some of the topics you study in this year are:

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Career opportunities Opportunities to work in interactive media are very broad and could include: interactive and dynamic web design and development, e-learning, project management, design and development of interactive CDs and DVDs, usability, testing, prototyping and conceptualisation, online marketing & advertising, e-commerce, online publishing, online broadcasting & pod-casting, and digital entertainment. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

70

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND THE WEB www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

71


BA (Hons) Interior Design

72

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) INTERIOR DESIGN

The widespread practice of themed environments, be they in leisure, theatre, heritage, exhibition or retail sector spaces, has meant that Interior Design as a business activity has grown to the extent that it now makes a significant contribution to the economy. As a consequence, many career opportunities exist for talented graduates, either as freelancers or within architectural or design practices. Why choose this course? • Interior design at Wolverhampton is strongly vocation in its orientation with project work that is both current and relevant. Typically, you will be expected to work on designs that transform living and working spaces to meet client briefs. In so doing, you have the opportunity to develop your understanding of spatial arrangements and spatial relationships and to demonstrate and exploit your creative thinking in a business context. • The taught element of the course covers key design elements, including surface, form, structures, colour, light, movement and time. In design work, you explore how design elements can be combined to create environments which are purposeful and stimulating, with cultural and social sensitivity. • Reflecting the world of work, a feature of this course is project work that culminates in critiques. This encourages you to critically reflect on your own work and the work of others. In so doing, students not only grow in terms of confidence, but also develop your own identity as an Interior Designer.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

73


Typical areas of study During any one semester you are expected to choose three modules from the Interior Design subject group and a fourth module selected either from another School of Art & Design subject discipline (e.g. Interior Textiles, Ceramics) or from the Interior Design subject group. Year One Modules are designed to familiarise you with the principles and practices of interior design, including drawing techniques and computer visualisation. Additional modules explore the historical and cultural origins of design, and introduce research skills and mixed-media modelling as well as enabling you to familiarise yourself with model-making workshops. • Computer 2D and 3D visualisation • Contextual studies • Workshop modelling • Drawing and rendering techniques

Year Two This year is designed to provide you with the opportunity to apply the principles learnt in the first year. This begins with feasibility studies and finishes with detailing specifications in terms of design, costs and materials. You will be involved in a variety of live projects, contextual modules and advanced modelling techniques. • Residential design and spatial awareness • Commercial refurbishment • Live projects and exhibition spaces • Materials and specification Level Three A key feature of the final year is a self-directed project and dissertation. You explore different aspects of the design process, presenting work in physical and digital formats. Expectations are high in terms of required standard of work, reflected by the quality of work often displayed at the Design Show at the end of the year; some pieces of work are entered into national competitions. • Self-negotiated study • Researched thesis • Understanding of professional practice • Analogue and digital portfolio

Career opportunities

Joint Honours Degree with Textile Design available

The aim of the course is to produce graduates who are flexible and adaptable, and have the capability to research, think and communicate in a logical and objective way. By so doing, it is expected that graduates will be able to develop their careers in the face of change. This is encouraged throughout the course, for example in the development of interpersonal and transferable skills that complement the fundamental design skills that form the core of the curriculum. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

74

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) INTERIOR DESIGN www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

75


Degree Show 2008

BA (Hons) Fine Art

76

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) FINE ART

Fine Art is a diverse and vibrant course in the School of Art and Design. It embraces a wide range of specialist media and creative practices, including: painting, sculpture, printmaking, conceptual and social practice, film, video and photography, performance and installation. Why choose this course? If you study Fine Art at the University of Wolverhampton, you will: • Study in purpose-built studios and workshops in the School of Art and Design.

Rowshona Begum

• Drive your creative ideas through one or more of the Fine Art media specialisms. • Develop an in-depth knowledge of the history, concepts and ideas aligned to your studio practice. • Show your work in public exhibitions, commissions and site specific projects. • Engage with a wide range of practitioners through the visiting lecturer programme and Fine Art study tours to major UK and European cities and galleries. Additionally, there is the option of taking a specialist joint programme between Fine Art and Photography, which is specifically designed to develop both your technical and conceptual skills within this defined field of study.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

77


Typical areas of study Most of the Fine Art teaching takes place in your studio. At Level 1 you will have freedom to explore your own ideas in a supportive environment, working across all media specialisms. You will be encouraged to develop your making and thinking through technical workshops and the study of theoretical issues. At Level 2 you will develop a more independent approach to Fine Art practice and the course structure will allow you to deepen your understanding of your chosen media and establish the critical framework for your practice in history and contemporary culture. You will also have the opportunity to engage in placements and exhibitions reflecting your interests and career aspirations. Intensive studio practice is core to Level 3, but you will also have the opportunity to explore in depth the specific relationship between medium, technique and theory in your work. This is developed through your own studio work, tutorials, extended writing projects and presentations to your peers. The course culminates in the Degree Show exhibition. This is open to the public, and is your launch pad for the future.

Career opportunities Graduates from BA (Hons) Fine Art work as practising artists, setting up studios, exhibitions and artist-led projects in the community. Students also progress to teaching careers and work in galleries as curators, educators and interpreters. Others use their independent and creative thinking skills to develop successful and rewarding careers and enterprises within and outside of the cultural industries. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA Programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Chara-Tymviou

Joint Honours Degree with Photography available

78

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) FINE ART www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

79


BA (Hons) Photography

David Hall

80

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) PHOTOGRAPHY Sarah Millington

A blend of critical understanding with practical vocational skills, Photography at Wolverhampton explores all aspects of this medium, from darkroom to digital technologies, and from photography as a tool for promotion, to its role in medical discovery, and as social critique.

Why choose this course? • Engage with the ideas and concepts within contemporary photographic practice. • Explore photography as a medium of communication in a number of professional settings. • Practical work introduces you to cameras of all formats both in the studio and on location. • Gain access to computer-based design programmes and digital manipulation software. • Learn a variety of colour and black and white darkroom skills. • There are regular visits to exhibitions, as well as field trips and guest lectures from visiting professional photographers. Additionally, there is the option of taking a specialist joint programme between Fine Art and Photography, which is specifically designed to develop both your technical and conceptual skills within this defined field of study.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

81


82

Typical areas of study

Career opportunities

You will have the opportunity to study a full range of professional practices including: digital film and hybrid processes, lighting techniques, studio and location work, portraiture, landscape and different approaches to documentary work.

Our graduates have gone on to become successful professional photographers working in such fields as advertising, photo-journalism, fashion and editorial, documentary, studio portraiture and fine art.

Modules include: • Alternative and Experimental Photography • Documentary Photography • Photography, Visual Language and Creative Practice • Creative Digital Practice • Location, Studio and Darkroom Practice • Photography and Professional Practice • Photography and Art Practice • Photography for Persuasion • The Photographic Document • Interrogating Identity

You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) PHOTOGRAPHY www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

83


HND Photography

84

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


A diverse range of careers in photography and the media will be available to you. Successful completion of the HND could lead to progression onto the BA (Hons) Photography degree

HND PHOTOGRAPHY

Career opportunities

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Why choose this course?

Typical areas of study

• This course introduces you to the professional requirements of both digital imaging and conventional photography, as well as silver-based imaging.

Year One You can choose from a variety of study topics including: Professional Studies, Photographic Techniques, Computers in Photography, Visual Language in Photography; Studio Practice, Darkroom Practice, Materials, Techniques and Technology, and Press Photography and Photo-Journalism.

• Focusing on the practicalities of the subject rather than the theoretical, it explores practical aesthetics and image-making, combined with design and technique. • In your first year, you have the opportunity to acquire a wide range of photographic experience, while the second year provides an exciting opportunity to develop your own unique portfolio of images. • Specialised projects can, if desired, include extensive travel. The course aims to reflect current commercial trends in the industry. • Visit the Sandwell College website at www.sandwell.ac.uk for information on where you will be studying.

Year Two possible areas of study are: Business Practice; Advertising Photography; Digital Imaging; Creative Digital Images; Location Photography; Fashion Photography; and Specialist Practice Photography.

For further information on the HND please contact Sandwell College, High Street, West Bromwich B70 8DW. Tel: 0121 253 6660 Email: enquiries@sandwell.ac.uk

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

85


BA (Hons) Product Design

86

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) PRODUCT DESIGN

The Product Design course excels in encouraging you to develop your own ideas and innovative concepts. Professional design education teaches commercial awareness and understanding of aesthetics, human factors, sustainability and leading edge technologies. The faculty team are enthusiastic, experienced in design education and are also very active in the commercial design industry. This course offers you a highly creative environment in which to develop your ideas. It provides you with opportunities for future careers in creative industries within the UK and international markets. Why choose this course? • You will gain the ability to understand and deliver design projects from concept through to final production stage. You will learn how to evaluate design briefs, produce and detail designs, build prototypes and manage design projects. • Our unique location in the heart of the West Midlands, the home of innovation and manufacturing industries, gives you excellent opportunities to work closely with our industry partners on real design projects and commissions. You will also have the opportunity to participate in prestigious national and international design competitions.

• You will benefit from our excellent links with industry and have opportunities for work placements arranged via the University. • The department has new wellequipped workshops supported by dedicated technicians. There are extensive prototyping facilities for both large and small-scale work. You may choose to develop a wide variety of design projects, for example, from large-scale furniture to small-scale consumer electronics. • You will be encouraged and supported by a variety of learning styles, lectures, interactive workshop sessions, group and individual tutorials and design studio-based activities in a friendly learning environment.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Halstein Hjortland, BA (Hons) Product Design: Winner Chartered Society of Designers Product Design

Telephone: 01902 322058

87


Typical areas of study You will learn how to develop your creative ideas through problem-solving techniques, research, design methodologies, manufacturing technologies, and Computer Aided Design skills. You will learn how to visualise products, convey your ideas and generate innovative concepts. You will learn how to market yourself as a professional product designer and how to protect your ideas as an entrepreneur through understanding of intellectual property rights and design copyright. Year One In the first year, you’ll develop the fundamental principles of good design including drawing techniques, research skills and Computer Aided Design. You will study the history of art and design and the important role of the designer in society.

Year Two You’ll develop your understanding further with practical opportunities to apply the principles learned in your first year. You will be involved in a variety of live design projects. The contextual aspects of design applied to society will be explored and you will develop advanced Computer Aided Design skills. Year Three The final year includes opportunities to engage with industry clients. Lectures and seminars with professional designers allow you to explore your entrepreneurial aspirations. You will be encouraged to develop transferable skills that will equip you to be flexible and adaptable and to develop your career in a changing global economy. Self-directed projects allow you to explore the design process in depth. You will be supported to produce a professional portfolio which will include digital multimedia technology. The School of Art & Design graduates exhibit at the annual University Degree Show and at the prestigious annual New Designers Show in London.

Career opportunities Career opportunities are extensive. The applied nature of the course and the opportunity to be involved in live commissions will give you practical skills and academic experience to consider work with national and international companies. You may choose to work as a freelance designer or as a product designer within a company or design consultancy. Other careers to be considered include independent designer-maker, modelmaker, graphic designer, multi-media designer or working in the design marketing and business industry. You will also be equipped for further advanced study or teacher training in Design and Technology. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

88

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) PRODUCT DESIGN www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

89


Suky Kaur Badyal

BA (Hons) Textile Design

90

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


This highly creative course will prepare you for a career within the diverse textile design and related industries. Innovation, flexibility and knowledge of specialist skills are key. You will work within professional workshops and studio environments establishing a range of design solutions, with CAD, surface pattern design, digital and screen printing, stitch, floor covering, carpet and rug design to become creative thinkers and designers of the future.

Calvin Pope

BA (HONS) TEXTILE DESIGN

©

Elizabeth Adamson, BA (Hons) Design and Applied Arts (Textile Design)

‘‘

Elizabeth Adamson

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

The unique rug-tufting facilities attracted me to the course, as well as the opportunity to take part in live textile design projects with industry, such as John Lewis and Marks and Spencer.” Elizabeth Adamson, with her tufted rugs at Clothes Show Live, NEC, Birmingham, 2007.

’’

Taya Shakouri

Telephone: 01902 322058

91


Why choose this course? • This exciting degree provides you with the opportunity to explore your creative potential and realise textile design for both the interior and fashion arenas. • You will investigate design across a wide range of products and processes, including surface pattern design, traditional and digital fabric printing, floor coverings, rug and carpet design, textile stitch and CAD for textile design. • It gives you the opportunity to study topics that promote individual creativity centred on textile design for interiors and fashion. • There is a strong emphasis on visual research, aesthetic and design translation, underpinned by the skill and knowledge required to develop textile design for fashion and interior products.

• Live projects allow you to integrate your personal creative expression with the needs of industry. • Negotiated study in your final year allows you to explore your creative practice in depth. • Work-based learning allows you the opportunity to explore career options and forge links with your related industries. • Teaching and learning consists of studio and workshop activities, seminars and lectures, field trips, individual and group project work and self-directed research. • Professional involvement in the fashion and textile industry is explored through placement opportunities and one year sandwich option either UK or internationally based.

Typical areas of study Year One • Research and Study Skills. • Introduction to Textile Design Skills – investigation across a breadth of materials and processes including stitch, felt and dye. • Surface Pattern and Print – screen printing, lino printing and digital printing for fabric. • Rug: Hand-tufting, Carpet and Flooring Design. • Creative Drawing – exploring drawing through a range of mediums and approaches incorporating observational studies with experimental mark-making. • CAD for Textile Design. Year Two • Working to chosen product specifications, you develop market awareness whilst refining textile and problem-solving skills. • Live Projects e.g. – Watermark card/paper products and Brintons Carpets. • Design Futures – colour and trend prediction. • Advanced Textile Design – workshop-based exploration of skills and techniques.

92

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Year Three • Creative Industries and Opportunities – exploring entrepreneurial skills through a series of seminars and guest speakers. • Negotiated projects enabling you to fully explore your design aspirations. • Professional Portfolio Preparation. • Live Projects.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Joint Honours Degree with Fashion Accessories available

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) TEXTILE DESIGN Dhavinder Kaur

Natalie Alalma

Lucy Ashby

Career opportunities Career pathways include: working within the textile industry, working in commercial design studios, setting up a new business as a designer/maker, design for textiles in interiors (carpet and rug, furnishing fabrics, bed linen, wall coverings), design for fashion print and fabrics, card design, paper products, illustration, home stylist, fashion interiors buyer, colour/trend prediction. Careers are also available in education, arts administration or retail. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

93


BA (Hons) Video and Film Production

94

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) VIDEO AND FILM PRODUCTION

Balancing a mix of practical work with a strong understanding of the artistic, technical and commercial contexts in which you might work, this programme embraces the latest communication technologies to help you realise your creative ambitions. Why choose this course? • This course gives you the technical skills and creative confidence to develop and produce video programmes and films to a professional standard. • You will gain essential skills in production planning, shooting, sound recording and editing, working on studio and location-based productions, all with the aim of building your individual abilities in a group environment. • You will learn how to coordinate a team through all stages of production. • You will explore different genres and styles, with the possibility of focusing on your chosen area in your final year. • You will benefit from our strong links with the media industries.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

95


Typical areas of study Year One You will learn all the fundamental skills needed for digital video and filmmaking: camera, editing, sound, producing and directing. You will develop skills in storytelling as you produce documentaries and dramas and write your own scripts. Year Two You will apply skills and knowledge to a broad range of genres, as you explore the issues involved in each one. You will look at character as you develop narrative ideas and investigate the traditions and methods of documentary film makers as you produce your own documentary. You will lend your talents and expertise to collaborators and real-world clients, as you continue our course’s long track record of making video and films to help the community, charities and local companies. Year Three Now that you have developed your creative abilities, technical skills and confidence in production, you will develop your professionalism in several negotiated productions. You will be networking with media industry professionals. You will also work on a research-based written project, a year-long digital film production and your own showreel or portfolio.

96

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Career opportunities Past graduates have progressed through entrylevel positions (such as production assistant, trainee researcher, assistant editor) to become directors, producers, editors and directors of photography. Others have remained all-rounders, particularly those who have found positions in small production companies, or as media specialists in non-media organisations. You may also continue your studies to postgraduate level on our MA programmes: MA Art and Design, MA Design for Advertising or MA Fine Art.

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Telephone: 01902 322058


BA (HONS) VIDEO AND FILM PRODUCTION www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

97


Foundation Degree (Arts) in Commercial Video Production

98

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


Work placements are available which include work with Mediacove Productions (for commercial video productions) and also the British Youth Film Academy for feature film production. Successful completion of this course also allows you to progress into the third year of a BA (Honours) degree course which means you could achieve not one, but two higher education qualifications in just three years.

FOUNDATION DEGREE (ARTS) IN COMMERCIAL VIDEO PRODUCTION

This course is taught by industry experts and is hands on and practical, with a quarter of the course being work-based learning.

Why choose this course? If you have an interest in commercial video production, then this is the right course for you. Through two years full-time study (or four years part-time study) you will gain a professional qualification. The course will prepare you for a career in the media or, if you already have professional experience, it will build your knowledge and experience and help your career advancement. • Learn from tutors with a wealth of industry experience • Take advantage of links with the industry • No exams to take – delivered through coursework and work-based learning • Full-time and part-time study available.

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

99


Typical areas of study A variety of modules relating to commercial video production will enable you to experience this exciting field of employment. Modules include: Year One • Learn basic and intermediate skills in camera, lighting, editing and sound. • Apply your skills and creative ideas to project work in advertising, video production and compositing. • Deliver your knowledge and application of research. Year Two • Develop full, professional-level videos and documentary films. • Undertake a work placement. Assessment Assessment is entirely through course work, with 25% of your work carried out through work-based learning.

100

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Career opportunities After completing the Foundation Degree, you have the option of “topping up” to a BA (Hons) in Video and Film Production through an additional year of study (or two years part-time).

Entry requirements – please see page 24

Telephone: 01902 322058


www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

101

FOUNDATION DEGREE (ARTS) IN COMMERCIAL VIDEO PRODUCTION


INDEX

3D Design

40

A AA2A

E Graphics

84

21

Employability

12

Academic Resources & Support

10

Entry Requirements

24

Accessories - Fashion

60

Erasmus

Ally Capellino

23

Events

Animation BA (Hons)

28

Exhibitions

12

Applying to study

24

Art - BA (Hons) Fine Art

32

F Facilities

10

Art and Design MA Artists Access to Art Colleges (AA2A) B Business C Centre for Art, Design, Research and Experimentation (CADRE) Case Studies Ceramics Commercial Video Production (FdA)

8 21 4

Film Production Finance

24

Fine Art BA (Hons)

32

Fine Art MA 6 14-19, 74 40 106

60 102

8

G Games Design

36

Glass

40

Graphic Communication BA (Hons)

64

Communication - Graphic

64

H Help with your learning

11

Computer Games Design BA (Hons)

36

How to apply

24

I Interviews

26

Illustration BA (Hons)

72

Conferences and Seminars Course Codes

5 25

D Degree Shows

23

Industry-related courses

Design - Graphic

64

Interactive Media and the Web BA (Hons)

76

Interior Design BA (Hons)

80

Design & Applied Arts: 3D Design, Ceramics & Glass

40

International students

Design, Craft and Applied Art

36

International Students - How to apply

Design for Advertising MA

102

Fashion Accessories

2 22-23

9

Disabled Students Allowance

11

Dyslexia

11

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

5

2 25


INDEX J Joint Courses

24

R Research

6

K Knowledge Catalysts

5

S Specialist Support

10

Knowledge Transfer Partnerships

5

Study Support

11

Support for practitioners

21

Support for your research

10

L Learning Centre

10

M MA Art and Design

8

T Tariff Conversion

24

MA Design for Advertising

9

Textile Design

98

MA Fine Art

8

The Creative Employability Studio

12

8

U UCAS Courses

25

MA programmes Media - Interactive

76

Metal

40

P PhD study

6

V Video and Film Production BA (Hons)

102

Video Production (FdA)

106

Photography BA (Hons)

88

Visually impaired

11

Photography HND

92

Placements

12

W Wood/Metal/Plastics (WMP)

40

Plastics

40

Web (Interactive Media)

68

Postgraduate Courses - How to apply

25

Preparing for your interview

26

Product Design BA (Hons)

94

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058

103


NOTES

104

www.wlv.ac.uk/artanddesign

Telephone: 01902 322058


Art & Design Course Prospectus