Issuu on Google+

International Foundation Year (IFY) as an integrated Undergraduate Degree course

Course Guide

Awarded by The University of Wolverhampton (UoW) in collaboration with the City of Wolverhampton College (CoWC)

2012-13


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

  

Contents   

About this guide ............................................................................................................................. 3  Welcome to the International Centre (IC) working with City of Wolverhampton College (CoWC)  ........................................................................................................................................................ 4  Welcome to the City of Wolverhampton College (CoWC) ............................................................. 4  About the International Foundation Year (IFY) .............................................................................. 5  The educational aims of this course: .......................................................................................... 5  Distinctive features of the course .............................................................................................. 5  The Wolverhampton Graduate and Employability ........................................................................ 6  What is ‘Employability’? ......................................................................................................... 6  How Will You Develop Your Employment Skills? ................................................................... 7  The course learning outcomes: ...................................................................................................... 7  The Learning outcomes will be achieved through the following learning activities: ................ 7  Teaching methods include: .................................................................................................... 8  Wolverhampton’s Online Learning Framework – WOLF ........................................................... 8  Blended learning ......................................................................................................................... 9  Assessment methods ................................................................................................................ 10  Support for learning ................................................................................................................. 10  Attendance requirements for the course ................................................................................ 12  Academic Regulations .............................................................................................................. 12  Course Structure (Business) ......................................................................................................... 13  Course Structure (Engineering) .................................................................................................... 14  Course Structure (SCIENCE) .......................................................................................................... 15  Module Descriptions .................................................................................................................... 16  Generic modules ....................................................................................................................... 16  Business modules ..................................................................................................................... 17  Engineering modules ................................................................................................................ 18  Science modules ....................................................................................................................... 19  Induction to Your Course .............................................................................................................. 20  Enrolment: EVISION, WOLF & Email communication .............................................................. 20  Teaching Sessions ..................................................................................................................... 21  Course Contacts ........................................................................................................................ 21  Please note the name and contact details of your personal tutor at induction. ..................... 22  Assessment and feedback ............................................................................................................ 23  Assessment Grades .................................................................................................................. 23  What is Feedback ? ................................................................................................................... 24  Resit or Retake.......................................................................................................................... 25  Illness and Other Valid Reasons for Non‐submission of Coursework ...................................... 26  Extenuating Circumstances and Obtaining Extensions for Assignments ................................. 26  What Should You Avoid? What Should You Seek to Achieve? ................................................. 27  Academic Misconduct .................................................................................................................. 28  Defining Academic Misconduct: ............................................................................................... 28  1


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Cheating ................................................................................................................................ 28  Collusion ............................................................................................................................... 28  Plagiarism ............................................................................................................................. 29  Support for Students ................................................................................................................ 29  Ethics ........................................................................................................................................ 30  Diversity and Equal Opportunities ............................................................................................... 30  How You Can Comment on Learning, teaching and assessment ................................................. 31  Student Representative ............................................................................................................ 31  What is a Student Rep? ........................................................................................................ 31  The Role and Function of a Student Rep .............................................................................. 31  To Apply….. ........................................................................................................................... 32  Health and Safety issues ............................................................................................................... 32  International Foundation Year Course (September start) ........................................................... 33  Calendar 2012/13 ......................................................................................................................... 33  International Foundation Year Course (November start) ............................................................ 34  Calendar 2012/13 ......................................................................................................................... 34  CITY Campus Maps ....................................................................................................................... 37     

 

2


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

ABOUT THIS GUIDE     This  Course  Guide  will  help  you  plan  your  University  of  Wolverhampton  undergraduate  International  Foundation Year (IFY) with City of Wolverhampton College. The guide tells you which modules you must  study  and  pass.  The  guide  also  offers  you  brief  descriptions  of  each  module,  including  general  information about assessment tasks, and an overview of how you can progress to the next level of your  study.     You  should  read  this  Course  Guide  in  conjunction  with  the  Undergraduate  Student  Handbook;  the  University’s  Academic  Regulations  located  on  the  University  of  Wolverhampton  website  http://www.wlv.ac.uk/default.aspx?page=9555  .  Together,  these  documents  should  provide  you  with  all the basic information that we think you will need for your period of study in the UK.     You should read this guide now so that you understand the various aspects of your studies. Some of the  sections  may  not  be  immediately  helpful  to  you  but  you  will  use  all  of  the  information  as  you  go  through your studies. Keep it somewhere safe and accessible, so that you can refer to it when you need  to.     In this course guide we may have not covered every query and problem that you might have so if you  find  that  there  is  something  you  need  to  know,  please  do  not  hesitate  to  ask  your  course  leader  (Dr  Megan  Lawton  M.J.Lawton@wlv.ac.uk),  or  module  tutor(s)  or  personal  tutor.  You  can  also  go  to  the  University’s  International  Centre,  and  Student  Support  and  Guidance  Services  located  on  the  City  campus in the Student Gateway. We value your views and welcome suggestions for ways of improving  the operation of the course.    Please  note  that  in  order  to  develop  and  improve  the  course,  it  may  be  necessary  on  occasions  to  amend or revise the details given in this Course Guide.       Throughout this guide we have tried to give you hints, tips and things to remember, indicated by this  symbol   

 

 

3


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

WELCOME  TO  THE  INTERNATIONAL  CENTRE  (IC)  WORKING  WITH  CITY  OF  WOLVERHAMPTON COLLEGE (COWC)     Welcome to IC working in collaboration with CoWC and congratulations on reaching this stage of your  education. The purpose of this guide is to provide you with some of the information that is needed to  ensure a successful and enjoyable time on your course.     Obtaining  an  honours  degree  is  a  considerable  achievement  and  should  be  a  target  for  you  all.  This  course if you are prepared to work hard, complete all the tasks set for you and pass your assessments  will allow you to progress into a degree programme. However, it is not all hard work and so your time  on the course should also be seen as providing an opportunity to develop new and lasting friendships.    We know that studying in a new country also brings with it some anxiety. Don’t worry, the International  Centre  is  here  to  help  you  get  the  best  from  your  studies  and  can  provide  a  one‐stop  shop  to  our  international students. They can deal with any questions you have whether this relates to visas, living  and  working  in  Wolverhampton  to  questions  relating  to  your  course  and  specific  support  that  is  available to you. You are encouraged to visit the IC Student Support Office and get to know the team.    Your  tutors  and  staff  within  IC  and  CoWC  take  your  education  very  seriously  and  want  you  to  succeed. We hope that you will.       Rishma Dattani  Deputy Director, International Centre  University of Wolverhampton       

WELCOME TO THE CITY OF WOLVERHAMPTON COLLEGE (COWC)    The  City  of  Wolverhampton  team  have  expertise  on  delivering  foundation  programmes  and  will be teaching you on your modules through the first year. In studying a  University course  and being supported by the CoWC you have the best of both worlds. You will be able to use  the facilities and support that is offered not just by the University but also by the College.      Enjoy your course!    Sue Spragg  City of Wolverhampton College (CoWC)  

4


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION YEAR (IFY)    This  Guide  outlines  the  modules  which  are  available,  teaching  and  learning  activities  and  assessment  tasks.    If  there  is  anything  you  need  to  discuss  further,  please  contact  Dr  Megan  Lawton  m.j.Lawton@wlv.ac.uk .   

The educational aims of this course:    The  International  Foundation  Year  is  part  of  an  integrated  four‐year  degree  route.  This  first  year  is  designed for you, as an international student, to develop your capabilities to study in a specific subject  that will enable you to progress onto a degree at the University of Wolverhampton. You will develop an  understanding of the expectations and the academic skills to successfully study for a degree in the UK.  The course will help you use and further develop your English in an academic context and help you to  be able to learn a digital environment.     In this course, you will study a mixture of subject‐specific modules and more general modules that will  expand  your  English  language  and  learning  skills  appropriate  for  higher  education.  You  will  make  the  general modules relevant to your specific subject and learning experience by the topics and examples  that  you  pick  and  use.  In  addition,  you  will  have  a  unique  opportunity  to  study  a  module  from  your  chosen follow‐on degree course. The course therefore allows you to gain an early experience of your  chosen  subject  discipline  at  degree  level.  Depending  on  your  choice  of  degree  course,  you  will  be  routed  to  one  of  three  pathways  –  Business,  Engineering  or  Science  ‐  these  support  the  number  of  follow‐on  degree  courses  available  for  progression  on  successful  completion  of  the  International  Foundation Year.   

Distinctive features of the course    This  course  will  enable  you  to  understand  the  expectations  of  studying  for  a  degree  in  your  chosen  subject at the University of Wolverhampton.    It  will  help  you  enhance  your  capabilities  in  English  within  academic  and  digital  environments.  The  University of Wolverhampton is a mature user of technology in learning and teaching. This course will  enable you to develop your skills to be able to work in a digital environment.    All  the  general  modules  will  allow  you  to  base  your  activities  on  the  subject  specific  content  of  your  course.    You will recognise, plan and develop your own learning capabilities to enable you to progress to your  next level of study.    The  course  includes  a  module  from  the  follow‐on  degree  course,  which  means  that  you  will  gain  20  credits prior to progression to the follow‐on course on successful completion of the module. 

5


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

THE WOLVERHAMPTON GRADUATE AND EMPLOYABILITY    By the end of your undergraduate degree course, the University expects you to be a Wolverhampton  Graduate who is knowledgeable and enterprising, digitally literate and a global citizen, but what does  this mean?.    Digitally Literate: Our graduates will be confident users of advanced technologies; they will lead  others,  challenging  convention  by  exploiting  the  rich  sources  of  connectivity  digital  working  allows.    Knowledgeable  and  Enterprising:  Our  graduates  will  know  how  to  critique  analyse  and  then  apply knowledge they acquire in an enterprising way.    Global  citizens:  Our  graduates  will  bring  informed  understandings  of  their  place  and  ethical  responsibilities in the world.    Depending on the courses you take each of these broad definitions with be contextualised by the work  you have done in your chosen subject area and the evidence you have gathered by your formative and  summative assessment tasks.    Learning activities in this course are wide and varied and will start you on your journey to develop your  graduate attributes. The graduate attributes are developed by:‐     Knowledge  &  Enterprise  will  be  developed  by  actively  taking  part  in  all  the  activities  on  your  course including attending lectures to gain subject specific knowledge, participation in seminars  and workshops to further develop and apply your knowledge     Global citizenship will be developed by you sharing your experiential learning of global cultures  and concepts and undertaking a variety of activities including lectures, discussions (both online  and in class).  Using subject knowledge and theory in various scenarios, within regional, national  and international contexts, and increasing complexity will contribute to on‐going development  of this attribute as you progress through your course.       Digital  literacy  will  be  developed  by  a  range  of  Independent  study  activities  and  formative  assessments which require you to use digital technologies thus extend your technological skills.   Other  opportunities  will  include  participation  in  online  discussions,  producing  course‐relevant  videos and/or other digital work, alongside reflective learning through the online blogs.      What is ‘Employability’?    ‘Employability’  is  concerned  with  the  development  of  skills  aimed  at  enhancing  your  employment  prospects  throughout  your  time  here  at  the  University  of  Wolverhampton.    Developing  specialist  subject and academic knowledge is important for employers but they also want to employ individuals  who are able to:  6


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Communicate effectively,  

Work in a team and have good interpersonal skills.  

Solve problems 

Work on their own using their own initiative and are able to adapt to changing situations 

Be self‐confident 

How Will You Develop Your Employment Skills?    We  aim  to  provide  you  with  the  opportunity  to  develop  these  through  the  modules  you  will  be  studying.  The assessments you do for your modules are designed to help you develop Subject specific  skills through the research you undertake for the assignments.  In addition, they are also designed to  help you develop other  key skills such as your written  communication skills.   Where you  have formal  presentations, this will build your self‐confidence in addition to helping you develop your skills of verbal  communication. Working as part of a team will develop vital group‐work skills.  Attending your classes  regularly will further ensure that you have the opportunity to develop other skills.    

  THE COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES:    At the end of this course you, the student, will be able to:    1. Identify key concepts and theories appropriate to your chosen subject context.   2. Select and utilise appropriate information for given situations and scenarios   3. Demonstrate the origins of your ideas by correctly and appropriately referencing  sources used in your work.    4. Express and present findings using appropriate conventions for academic audiences.   5. Demonstrate an appropriate level of capabilities to work within a digital environment.   6. Identify different learning styles and reflect on your own learning and personal  development.   

The Learning outcomes will be achieved through the following learning activities:         

Exploration   Orientation  Reflection  Planning  Developing practical skills for learning  Developing practical digital literacy skills  7


International Foundation Year (IFY)  

/

Developing practical information literacy skills  Scenario based work 

  Teaching methods include:          

Lectures  Seminars  Tutor‐led/group‐led group discussions   One to one and group tutorials   Presentations to peers by individuals or groups   Workshops 

 

Wolverhampton’s Online Learning Framework – WOLF    To access all the materials that you need for study you will have to use WOLF which is the University’s  virtual learning environment (VLE). WOLF can be used both on and off campus – all university  computers have an icon of a wolf’s head, such as this one, on our machines. To enter the software you  just double click on the icon (if this means nothing to you – don’t worry we will show you what to do in  your Welcome week!)   

      WOLF can also be accessed via the internet at www.wlv.ac.uk/wolf    To log‐in to WOLF you will need your log‐in details and password. You will be shown how to do this in  your Welcome week. If you have any problems please ask for help. When you go into WOLF for the first  time you will see your own personal page which you can personalise including adding a picture of  yourself. You should find a list of all the modules that you will be studying. Each module is a unit of  study created by your tutor(s). In them you will find all your module guides, learning materials,  assessment tasks and group forums. You can also use WOLF to help you get to other useful electronic  places and resources in the University.      It is really important that you know how to use WOLF so if you  are not sure ASK

     8


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Blended learning    In  2008,  the  University  adopted  a  Blended  Learning  Strategy  which  promotes  the  integration  of  technology supported learning across all our modules. We believe this will improve the  employability  and, digital literacy, of our students and the effectiveness and efficiency of our learning and teaching  practice.      The  learning  activities  in  this  course  address  all  elements  of  the  blended  learning  strategy  which  will  contribute to  your development of the graduate attribute of digital literacy:      Students are entitled to : 

 

1. have access where possible to an  electronic copy of all lecturer‐ produced course documents e.g.  module guides, assessment briefs,  presentations, hand‐outs, and  reading lists     2. formative assessment   opportunities on line with  appropriate meaningful electronic  assessment feedback;    3. have opportunities to collaborate  on line with others in their learning  cohort;  4. have the opportunity to participate  in electronic Personal Development  Planning (ePDP);    5. submit all appropriate assessments  online;  6. opportunities to engage in  interactive learning during all face  to face sessions. 

All module guides, assessment briefs,  presentations, hand‐outs, and learning materials  are in WOLF.   

  You will be encouraged and in some cases required  to post work online that will receive formative  feedback from tutors and members of the module  group.    You will collaborate with other students on line  through module blogs or by using WOLF or email.        This is a core element within the course as is one  of the course learning outcomes    Where appropriate you will submit assessments  online.    You will continuously engage in interactive face‐to‐ face learning as this is required to enhance English  language capabilities in an academic environment.   

 

 

 

9


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Assessment methods    You  are  assessed  by  completing  a  wide  range  of  learning  activities  that  will  be  appropriate  to  the  learning outcomes of the individual modules that you study. The assessments are designed to give you  experience of and to develop skills that you will need for further study in higher education in the UK    There are two types of assessment used on this course:    Formative assessment will help to guide, encourage and support you to understand the expectations of  your chosen academic study and general expectations of studying at a HE level. Advice will be given that  is relevant to the learning outcomes and assessment criteria and will identify areas for improvement or  enhancement.     Summative  assessment  is  marked  against  learning  outcomes  and  assessment  criteria.  It  will  give  you  your grade that will contribute to your course award.   

Support for learning    A  core  strand  through  this  course  is  the  development  of  learning  skills  appropriate  to  both  general  study at HE level and specific study in a chosen specialist subject. In some modules the development of  these skills are explicit in others they are embedded within the curriculum.    For example:     The  University  Counselling  Service  offers  short  courses  on  topics  such  as  "Self  Confidence",  "Stress  Management  and  Relaxation"  and  "Life  Skills".  They  also  provide  study  skills  and  academic support, providing short courses such as provide help in areas such as "Writing and  Assignment Skills", "Exam Techniques", "Enhancing Professional Skills", "Personal Development  Planning" and "Making Choices for the Future. COWC has specialist counselling services as well  and  can  offer  support  that  is  geared  to  support  learners,  for  example  study  skills  advice  or  support for assessments, or maths workshops.     University  Learning  Centres  provide  general  academic  skills  support  to  all  students  at  www.wlv.ac.uk/skills.  They  can  offer  advice  on  areas  such  as,  academic  writing,  assignment  planning, exam preparation, and time management. In addition, there is a regular timetable of  drop‐in  and  bookable  workshops  covering  information  and  digital  literacy  skills,  including  academic  referencing.  CoWC  also  has  learner  focussed  teams  who  provide  both  subject  specialist  and  general  help.  CoWC  also  provide  a  range  of  inclusive  technology  to  support  individual needs      The International Centre will be able to provide more generic international advice and guidance  for example visas. In addition, the Centre will be able to provide regulatory guidance and direct  you  to  relevant  staff  for  academic  support.  They  will  be  able  to  deal  with  any  questions  that 

10


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

relate  to  living  and  working  in  the  UK  and  issues  you  face  whilst  studying  at  the  University.  CoWC also has specialist support on hand for international students     You will receive support and guidance in the area of Personal Development Planning (PDP), so that you:  can understand better your learning process, have the skills and understanding to act on the feedback,  so as to become more effective and successful, collect evidence on your achievement to enhance your  employability.     Feedback  ‐  tutors  provide  personalised  written  feedback  following  all  summative  assessments.  The  mechanism for feedback from formative tasks varies between assessments, but will always be provided  in  some  form.  On  occasions  tutors  may  provide  generalised  verbal  feedback  to  the  whole  group  on  points  relating  to  an  assessment.  You  may  also  be  asked  to  give  feedback  to  your  peers  and  to  your  tutors.    When you join the University you will be given a personal tutor. Your personal tutor is someone who  can offer you guidance and advice; this could be about your course, and any other aspects that affect  your study.   In order for personal tutoring to be a beneficial and meaningful relationship for you,  you need to communicate with your personal tutor. We encourage you to have a look at these  guidelines to help you do this:        1. You should keep in regular communication with your personal  tutor  2. Try to prepare for and engage in meetings with your personal  tutor  3. Your personal tutor is the person you need to contact if there  are any issues that are affecting your academic performance  or if you are worried about your progression and  achievement.  4. We also encourage you to act on recommendations and  advice that your personal tutor offers. 

                    You can find out more about personal tutoring by going to www.wlv.ac.uk/personaltutoring       

11


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Attendance requirements for the course    Attendance is a key requirement of the course and will be monitored and recorded. The  University is  required to report non‐attendance to the UK Border Agency (UKBA). You must be enrolled at the start of  the course and then attend your classes regularly. Any non‐attendance will be followed up and you will  be required to meet with staff to explain why you did not attend. You may also be required to produce  documentary  evidence  to  support  any  non‐attendance.  It  is  therefore  vital  that  you  inform  the  International Centre if you know that you will not be able to attend a class.    UKBA requires the University to also report on student failure and withdrawal from the University. It is  therefore your responsibility to ensure that you attend all classes therefore improving your chances of  success.     To  successfully  move  into  your  degree  you  will  need  to  take  and  pass  (including  resits)  ALL  level  3  modules. This will give you 100 credits to move into the next part of your course. If you do not achieve  this number of credits at level 3 then you will not be able to progress and will have to return home 28  days after the final award board. We have to report your results to the UKBA.    Non‐attendance at practical classes, particularly in Science, may mean that you fail your assessment.    

Academic Regulations    This  course  adheres  to  the  University’s  academic  regulations  for  students  undertaking  an  undergraduate  degree.    A  full  version  of  these  regulations  can  be  found  on  the  University  web  page.   These  regulations  govern  your  course  and  will  be  binding  on  you.  It  is,  therefore,  important  that  you  read and become familiar with them.    You can access the regulations and much more information by going to the University’s home page –  www.wlv.ac.uk on the right hand side you will see a large button titled ‘Current students’, click on this  to take you into information for all students. At the bottom of the list you will find the Undergraduate  Regulations     For information relating to your experience as an international student go to:  www.wlv.ac.uk/international     

12


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

 

COURSE STRUCTURE (BUSINESS)    Core (C) or  Option (O)* 

Module  Code 

Module Title 

Credits 

Delivered in  block/term 

  C 

  3LI001 

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3LI002 

  Getting ahead as an international  student      Successful study   

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3MG001 

  Introduction to Management 

  20 

  Semester 1 

    C 

    3IM001        3LI003        Various 

    Business Decision‐Making        Learning in a digital environment         Subject module level 4    To be advised based on follow – on  degree course 

    20 

    Semester 2 

  20 

  Semester 2 

  20 

  Semester 2 

  C 

  O 

 

  Please note     A core module is one that you must take and an option module is one that you have a choice to take this  one or replace it with another module that your tutor will advise you to do.    For this course you will take a maximum of 6 modules     

13


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

 

COURSE STRUCTURE (ENGINEERING)    Core (C) or  Option (O)* 

Module  Code 

Module Title 

Credits 

Delivered in  block/term 

  C 

  3LI001 

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3LI002 

  Getting ahead as an international  student      Successful study   

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3ET005          3ET006   

  Mechanical Technology  

  20 

  Semester 1 

    Electrical Technology 

    20 

    Semester 2 

  C 

  3ET004 

  Materials   

  20 

  Semester 2 

  O 

  Various 

  Subject module level 4    To be advised based on follow – on  degree course 

  20 

  Semester 2 

    C 

  Please note     A core module is one that you must take and an option module is one that you have a choice to take this  one or replace it with another module that your tutor will advise you to do.    For this course you will take a maximum of 6 modules                  14


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

COURSE STRUCTURE (SCIENCE)   

  Core (C) or  Option (O)* 

Module  Code 

Module Title 

Credits 

Delivered in  block/term 

  C 

  3LI001 

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3LI002 

  Getting ahead as an international  student      Successful study   

  20 

  Semester 1 

  C 

  3BA001 

  Introduction to Bioscience 

  20 

  Semester 1 

    C 

    3BC001        3LI003        Various 

    Introduction to Chemistry        Learning in a digital environment         Subject module level 4    To be advised based on follow – on  degree course 

    20 

    Semester 2 

  20 

  Semester 2 

  20 

  Semester 2 

  C 

  O 

   

15


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

MODULE DESCRIPTIONS     The following gives a brief overview of the modules. All modules are 20 credits unless stated otherwise. 

Generic modules  3LI001 Getting ahead as an international student. ‐ Semester 1    This  module  will  help  you  understand  the  UK  higher  education  system  and  how  you  can  study  effectively  within  it.  It  will  also  help  you  understand  the  academic  expectations  and  conventions  for  study in your subject context.    Assessment: Case study 100%      3LI002 Successful Study ‐ Semester 1    This module will focus on developing your capabilities to study effectively in higher education in the UK.  It  will  help  you  to  understand  the  processes  you  will  need  to  go  through  to  produce  work  for  assessment this includes recognising what you are being asked to do, selecting and using appropriate  sources of information and exploring academic conventions for a range of assessment tasks. Finally the  module will also investigate giving receiving and using feedback to improve your own learning.    Assessment: Portfolio 100%      3LI003 Learning in a digital environment ‐ Semester 2    This  module  will  help  you  develop  your  digital  literacy  skills  to  be  able  to  study  in  a  digital  learning  environment.  This module will concentrate on four main digital capabilities:    Learning skills and life planning  ICT/computer literacy  Information literacy  Communication and collaboration    These will be developed through a range of computer‐based activities     Assessment: Portfolio 100%     

 

 

16


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Business modules    3MG001 Introduction to Management ‐ Semester 1    The  module  is  designed  to  give  students  an  introductory  level  understanding  of  management.  On  completion  of  the  module,  students  will  have  acquired  knowledge  of  the  development  of  the  Management discipline, the structure of business organisations, the environment in which they operate  and the different management functions that exist within organisations.    Assessment: 1 in‐class test 40% and 2 Portfolio 60%          3IM001 Business decision making ‐ Semester 2    This module is designed to show learners that the collection and management of business information,  and the successful communication of that information throughout a business, is critical for the future  prosperity of the organisation. It will explore the importance of providing accurate business information  as an aid to effective decision making in an organisation, and develop the skills and knowledge needed  to manipulate data management software to produce information in a suitable format.    Assessment: Portfolio 100%        Semester 2    PLUS a Level 4 module in your chosen subject – your tutors will advise you on which one to take       

 

 

17


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Engineering modules    3ET005 Mechanical Technology‐ Semester 1    The  aim  of  this  module  is  to  develop  an  understanding  of  the  basic  scientific  principles  underpinning  mechanical technology    Assessment: 1 in‐class test 50% and 2 in‐class test 50%          3ET006 Electrical Technology ‐ Semester 2    The principal aim of this module is to introduce the fundamental concepts needed to understand the  operation of electrical and electronic circuits and systems    Assessment: 1 practical report 50% and 2 in‐class test 50%        3ET004 Materials‐ Semester 2    The principal aim of this module is to enable students to understand why different materials are used in  different applications. In achieving this aim, the students will be made aware of issues relating to the  environmental, recycling and disposal.    Assessment: 1 group presentation and individual report 60% and 2 in‐class test 40%          Semester 2    PLUS a Level 4 module in your chosen subject – your tutors will advise you on which one to take       

 

18


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Science modules      3AB001 Introduction to Bioscience‐ Semester 1    This  module  will  provide  you  with  an  introduction  to  pure  and  applied  aspects  of  biology.  The  topics  covered will include an overview of the origin and evolution of life on Earth and an introduction to the  features and diversity of the major groups of animal, plant and microbial life forms. An understanding  of the fundamentals of biological systems is a pre‐requisite for further study.    Assessment: Examination 100%            3BC001 Introduction to Chemistry ‐ Semester 2      This module introduces the fundamental concepts of chemistry and develops these concepts to allow  an  understanding  of  chemical  principles  required  in  on‐going  and  related  studies  in  biological,  biomedical, pharmaceutical and forensic sciences    Assessment: Examination 100%          Semester 2    PLUS a Level 4 module in your chosen subject – your tutors will advise you on which one to take       

 

 

19


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

INDUCTION TO YOUR COURSE    You will start your programme with a Welcome Week this is to help you settle into the university, your  course and to meet your tutors. You will also do a variety of things that will help you get to know your  fellow students and other people at the University. You will receive a full induction to the course; we  will show you how to access the wide range of learning resources and support systems including course  management,  personal  tutoring  and  international  student  support.    Staff  will  introduce  you  to  the  learning methods, course and module expectations required.        REMEMBER:  If  you  are  not  clear  about  anything  ask!  We  really  don’t  mind.        

Enrolment: EVISION, WOLF & Email communication    You will be required to enrol onto your course before starting to study. To enrol you will use a computer  system called eVision. You can access eVison through the UoW homepage www.wlv.ac.uk , click on the  button marked ‘Current students’ on the left‐hand side. You will see a link to eVision and you will then  be taken through a series of steps to enrol online. Make sure you have checked your joining instructions  and have the relevant information with you.    It is very user friendly, but if you require help, staff will guide you through the process during induction.  You will receive a student number at this stage which you will need to access other the UoW systems  such as WOLF. This is your student number and is important that you remember this as you will need to  note this on any correspondence and assessed work that is submitted.    You  are  required  to  register  for  a  UoW  IT  account  as  soon  as  possible  to  allow  you  to  access  the  full  learning  facilities.  At  this  stage  you  will  be  allocated  an  email  address,  which  will  enable  you  to  communicate with colleagues and members of staff. Please note that staff will use this email account to  communicate  with  you  rather  than  any  other  personal  account  you  may  have.  You  will  be  offered  options  for  the  name  of  your  account  such  as  A.Student@wlv.ac.uk,  student.A@wlv.ac.uk  whatever  address you pick make sure it is the one that you use to contact tutors and will also be the one used by  the University to send you information.      REMEMBER:  Keep  a  record  of  your  student  number  and  your  email  address but do not keep any passwords with them!!    Check your email ever day as you might have been sent an important  message from your tutors.    20


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Teaching Sessions      At  the  start  of  each  module  you  will  receive  a  module  guide  for  each  unit  of  study.  Module  guides  provide information on content, learning outcomes, compulsory and suggested learning resources (e.g.  books,  journals,  web  sites)  assessments:  including  the  assessment  task,  dates  for  formative  and  summative submission and grading criteria for that module. Please make sure you refer to this whilst  completing your studies and before handing your work in.     You will be expected to arrive on time and be ready to learn.  Mobile phones should be on silent and  unless it is an emergency you should not take or make any calls or texts  during the class.    Teaching  sessions  will  provide  you  with  key  concepts  and  theories  related  to  the  subject  you  are  learning.  In  sessions  you  will  be  required  to  contribute  perhaps  within  discussions  or  in  the  form  of  activities.  Group  and  individual  tasks  will  help  you  to  engage  with  and  consolidate  your  learning.  It  is  also  important  that  you  undertake  the  necessary  guided  reading  prior  to  the  start  of  each  session  so  that you are able to participate fully and check that you understand the key concepts and theories.     You  will  be  briefed  on  assessment  tasks  and  set  work  to  complete  and  submit  prior  to  your  final  (summative) assessment submission. Completing formative tasks will give you the opportunity to check  your  understanding  and  you  are  encouraged  to  discuss  any  concepts  that  you  have  difficulty  understanding with your module tutor. 

Course Contacts    There are a number of staff who will be able to help if you have any queries. In the first instance you  should speak to your personal tutor to help you succeed with your studies. The following provides an  outline of who you should contact based on the type of query you have.    Your  Course  Leader  at  the  University  of  Wolverhampton  is  Dr  Megan  Lawton  however  Sila  Patel  at  CoWC will be acting in a Deputy role as well. They will be able to address any general course related  questions you have. In addition, you will be allocated a personal tutor at your induction session. Your  personal tutor will be available to help you with any questions you have at any time during your time on  the  IFY  course.  Your  personal  tutor  is  a  key  member  of  staff  who  will  be  able  to  advise  you  on  study  skills  and  support  available  to  you,  your  progress  on  modules  and  also  answer  any  general  questions  you may have relating to academic regulations or processes.    However module tutors are your first point of reference if you have any questions about modules you  are studying. They will be able to answer any queries relating to the topics that you are studying and  any questions relating to the assessment.     Finally  there  are  administrators  at  UoW  who  are  more  than  willing  to  help  you  find  answers  to  your  queries,  contact  staff  on  your  behalf,  or  generally  guide  you  on  where  to  find  the  answer  to  any  problems.         21


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

 

Please note the name and contact details of your personal tutor  at induction.         My personal tutor is:     Their telephone number is:    Their email is:    Their office hours are:              Role  Name  Institution  Course Leaders  Dr Megan Lawton  UoW  Silla Patel  CoWC  Administrative assistance  Gill Fletcher  UoW  Core module tutor teams (CoWC)  Silla Patel  CoWC  Blossom Vassel  CoWC     

 

Module 

Telephone 

Email 

01902 322593  01902 821280 

m.j.lawton@wlv.ac.uk   goddardpatels@wolvcoll.ac.uk 

01902 322474 

gillfletcher@wlv.ac.uk  

3LI001 & 3LI003  3LI002 

goddardpatels@wolvcoll.ac.uk  vasselb@wolvcoll.ac.uk  

 

22


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK  Assessment Grades  All summative assessment will get a grade but formative assessment will normally only have feedback  that will indicate what you might have achieved and how you can improve your work.    For both level 3 and 4 modules the following grades results are used and recorded    Grade   Performance   Result Level 3/4   A   B   C   D  

Outstanding / Excellent   Very good   Good   Satisfactory  

Pass   Pass   Pass   Pass  

Pass by compensation  

Pass  

E  

Compensatable fail  

F  

Uncompensatable fail  

Defer (first attempt)   Fail (following second  attempt)   Defer (first attempt)   Fail (following second  attempt)    

NS  

Assessment not submitted  

GA   AM   M  

Assessment grade awaited   Academic Misconduct under investigation  

#E   1 

  Defer (first attempt)   Fail (following second  attempt)   Held   Held   Defer  

   

       

  REMEMBER: The language used here has certain meanings for  the purposes of assessment, if you are not sure what anything  means ask you tutor.   

23


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

What is Feedback ?    Feedback is an essential part of your programmes. It helps you to maximise your potential at different  stages of your learning, raise awareness of your strengths and areas for improvement, and identify  actions that you need to take to improve your performance. Feedback can be seen as informal (for  example in day‐to‐day encounters between teachers and students or between peers) or formal (for  example written as part of formative or summative assessment). Feedback is also part of the interaction  between teacher and learner, not a one‐way communication.   What can you expect from your tutors whilst you are preparing your work?    Normally  tutors  will  advise  you,  as  a  group,  on  the  assessment  at  or  near  the  start  of  the  module.  Thereafter, you may consult your tutors by setting up an appointment to meet with them or emailing  them.  It  is  not  the  role  of  a  tutor  to  read  drafts  of  your  work  and  correct  them  with  a  view  to  your  obtaining a ‘good mark’. An assignment should reflect your effort and input, and the role of the tutor is  to  guide  and  advise  you.  It  is  then  your  responsibility  to  assess  this  advice  and  guidance  and  use  it  accordingly. Tutors provide this in good faith, but its use ‐ or lack of it ‐ by you is not an automatic route  to a good or a poor grade. Other factors, particularly those pertaining to your skills and efforts, will play  a vital role in your achievement.    After completion of the assignment    Feedback on your summative assessment will usually be available for collection from your tutor during  a  scheduled  class  session  three  weeks  after  the  submission  date.  Students  are  strongly  advised  to  collect  feedback  as  it  is  an  indicator  of  your  progress  and  how  you  can  improve  your  performance.  Feedback  from  one  module  can  help  you  improve  your  performance  in  other  modules.  The  main  feedback is through a copy (to you) of the assessment feedback sheet handed out in class or by email  from  tutors/administrative  support  staff.  Please  note  feedback  is  not  normally  available  for  examinations,  however  if  you  wish  to  discuss  your  examination  please  contact  your  Module  Tutor  directly.    Formative mid‐term tests    Where formative assessment is linked to summative assessment tasks feedback may be given earlier in  order  to  link  with  your  study  programme.  You  will  get  no  grade  on  your  formative  assessment  but  tutors will give you an indication of how well you are doing.     Feedback on failed assignments    Work  that  has  failed  will  be  annotated  with  sufficient  written  feedback  that,  combined  with  the  feedback sheet, will guide you to prepare for the appropriate resit, however resit work is different from  the first sit so further tutorials and guidance will be given.       24


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Resit or Retake    Resitting  means  taking  one  or  more  pieces  of  assessment  (dependant  on  the  module  requirements) again at the next opportunity.     Retaking  means  studying  the  whole  module  again  when  it  is  next  offered  on  the  timetable.  Retakes are subject to a fee penalty.  Please note for IFY, if you need to retake a level 3 module  you will need to return home and reapply for a new visa to retake the module when it is next  offered.     Your need to resit assessments (or to retake modules) will be outlined on e:Vision in your ‘Provisional  and Agreed Results’ section. It is your responsibility to access e:Vision and ascertain whether you need  to  complete  any  resits  or  retakes.  Details  of  your  results  will  appear  on  e:Vision  shortly  after  the  examination boards.    

  REMEMBER:  Always  speak  to  your  tutor  about  what  you will have to do as soon as possible.         Where  resits  are  required  you  must  resit  the  failed/missing  items  of  assessment  at  the  next  opportunity.  The  submission  date,  and  the  instructions  for  the  resit  work,  should  be  checked  by  accessing resit instructions on WOLF. In most cases, resit assessments will be different to the original  assessment. You must complete the resit work, not the original assessment found in the module guide.    Your module tutors will be informed of all resit students and the requirements of the module however  it  is  your  responsibility  to  complete  the  retrieval  work.  If  a  module  is  not  resat  at  the  next  available  opportunity a fail grade is awarded. Then you will have to retake the module in its entirety for which  fees will be charged.    If  you  resit  an  assessment,  the  maximum  grade  you  can  be  granted  for  the  assessed  work  is  D.  This  grade  will  be  aggregated  with  grades  awarded  for  any  passed  components  to  produce  your  overall  grade. If you fail a resit you will be required to retake the module in order to redeem failure.     If you retake a module there will also be a restriction on the grades you will be awarded for assessed  work to D. Retaking a module includes all requirements as if the module was a first sit (in other words,  you must attend appropriate lectures and seminars and must complete all the assessment tasks for the  module). You must retake a module when it is offered; this could mean waiting for a period of up to a  year for some modules to be repeated. Please note for IFY, if you need to retake a level 3 module you  will need to return home and reapply for a new visa to retake the module when it is next offered.   If  changes  to  the  programme  have  taken  place  during  that  period  an  alternative  module  will  be  recommended for you to complete your study. Fees are chargeable for all retake opportunities. When 

25


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

you resit or retake a module the credit value of the module will be added to the total number of credits  you have studied.   

Illness and Other Valid Reasons for Non‐submission of Coursework    If  you  are  ill  during  the  course  of  the  module,  or  have  other  valid  reasons  for  non‐submission  of  coursework you may be eligible for an  extension (of up  to 7  days). Please  talk to your personal tutor  before  your  deadline  if  you  feel  you  might  need  to  explore  these  options.  You  must  apply  for  7‐day  extensions one week in advance of the submission date and this can only be granted by the University  of Wolverhampton Student Office.  Valid evidence of your circumstances, e.g. a letter from a doctor, in  the case of sickness, must be provided.      

 

REMEMBER:  Always  talk  to  your  personal  tutor  if  you  think  your  work  could  be  affected  by  issues  or  events  outside  to  the University or College 

 

Extenuating Circumstances and Obtaining Extensions for Assignments    Some  students  experience  illness  or  other  serious  personal  difficulties  that  are  of  a  long  term  nature  that affect their ability to undertake or complete assessed work. You must inform your personal tutor  and copy this to the International Centre Course Administrator whenever the period of difficulty starts.  They  will  advise  you  upon  the  type  of  evidence  to  collate  to  help  you  submit  an  application  to  the  University of Wolverhampton for a formal extension called ‘extenuating circumstances’. The application  for  such  extensions  is  a  formal  process  and  you  will  need  to  fill  in  a  form  which  is  available  from  e:Vision. When filling in the form please provide a full personal statement and evidence to support your  claim. This can be faxed to the International Centre, if you need to please mark the form and evidence  ‘confidential’.  This  will  be  submitted  to  Registry  and  a  response  given  direct  to  you  by  email  within  seven working days.     Full guidance on what evidence to provide and when, is included in the ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ on  e:Vision. To support your claim you might provide:     Written  evidence  from  a  member  of  the  medical  profession,  a  counsellor,  Officer  of  the  Students’ Union or outside agency, e.g. Police, Social Worker, Citizens Advice Bureau, Church,  Temple, etc.   or   a detailed written statement from yourself, your parent(s), partner or other significant person  in your life explaining the nature of your difficulty.    Please note that only in very exceptional circumstances will a request for extension be granted after a  submission deadline. If you do not submit coursework on time (including attending for an individual or  26


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

group presentation) and you have not applied correctly for an extension you will receive an F grade. If  you do not submit assessment by a revised deadline you will receive an F grade.        REMEMBER:  Speak to your tutors as soon as possible, let people  know what is happening before it is too late to help you     

  What Should You Avoid? What Should You Seek to Achieve?     Remember that you are writing for another reader or readers. Do not assume that the reader will fill  the gaps in your work.     Use the introduction to establish what you are doing in your assignment.     Use examples to support your analysis.     Be objective and aim for reasoned argument. Phrases such as ‘in my opinion’ or ‘in my view’ are of  little value because they are subjective. Do not use them. You should aim to support your points with  evidence and reasoned analysis.     Always acknowledge  the use of someone else’s work, using  the  appropriate system of referencing.  Also,  it  is  a  very  serious  offence  to  use  someone  else’s  work,  especially  word‐for‐word  or  paraphrased contents of other’s work. This is called “plagiarism” and will be covered throughout the  course to ensure that you are aware of how to avoid it.     Always  keep  copies  of  the  sources  or  keep  a  note  of  each  source  as  you  use  it,  so  that  you  can  reference it in your bibliography at the end of your assignment.     Plan your work in advance so as to meet the hand‐in (submission) date. Writing up your research is  often more time‐consuming than you expect.     Get help from tutors and mentors if you are unsure.     Above all, do not ‘suffer in silence’; your personal tutor, the module team and the course team will  be able to provide guidance so please use them.        REMEMBER: Read and make sure you understand the section on  ‘Academic misconduct’ in this guide.     27 There are penalties for academic misconduct!! 


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

       

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT    The  University  considers  seriously  all  acts  of  academic  misconduct,  which  by  definition  are  dishonest  and  in  direct  opposition  to  the  values  of  a  learning  community.    Academic  misconduct,  if  not  challenged, will ultimately devalue academic standards and honest effort on the part of students.   

Defining Academic Misconduct:    Cheating 

 

 

 

 

 

  Cheating is defined as any attempt to gain unfair advantage in an assessment by dishonest means, and  includes, for example, all breaches of examination room rules, impersonating another student, falsifying  data, and obtaining an examination paper in advance of its authorised release.��   This is not an exhaustive list and other common examples of cheating would include –    Being in possession of “crib notes” during an examination   Copying from the work of another student   Prohibited communication during an examination   Acts of plagiarism or collusion as defined below     Collusion    Collusion  is  when  two  or  more  people  combine  to  produce  a  piece  of  work  for  assessment  that  is  passed  off  as  the  work  of  one  student  alone.    The  work  may  be  so  alike  in  content,  wording  and  structure that the similarity goes beyond what might have been coincidence.  For example – where one  student  has  copied  the  work  of  another,  or  where  a  joint  effort  has  taken  place  in  producing  what  should have been an individual effort.       Collusion should not be confused with the normal situation in which students learn from one another,  sharing ideas and group work to complete assignments (where this is specifically authorised).   

28


International Foundation Year (IFY) Plagiarism 

 

 

 

 

/

 

  Plagiarism  is  the  act  of  taking  someone  else’s  work  and  passing  it  off  as  your  own.    This  includes  incorporating  either  unattributed  direct  quotation(s)  or  substantial  paraphrasing  from  the  work  of  another/others. It is important to cite all sources whose work has been drawn on and reference them  fully in accordance with the referencing standard used in each academic school.    The most common forms of plagiarism are:     Cut or copied and pasted materials from websites     Copying the work of another student (past or present) including essays available through “essay  bank” websites – or other data.     Copying material from a text book or journal       

Academic misconduct is wrong and will not be  tolerated so don’t do it!         To find out more go to : www.wlv.ac.uk/turnitin4students  

Support for Students    The  University,  will  be  both  sympathetic  and  supportive  in  preventing  plagiarism  and  other  forms  of  academic misconduct, particularly in the first year of undergraduate study.      A variety of support mechanisms are in place to help students succeed and avoid academic misconduct.      Visit  our  study  skills  support  website  at  www.wlv.ac.uk/skills.  See  the  section  on  tackling  academic misconduct.     Download the Students' Union guide to Avoiding Academic Misconduct ("Read, Write, Pass") ‐  available from the same webpages.      Book an appointment to see a study skills advisor      Speak to your personal tutor or module leader.    

29


International Foundation Year (IFY) 

/

There  is  help  available  if  you  need  it.   The  University  caught  and  prosecuted  500  cases  of  Academic Misconduct last year ‐ it is better to do the work than think you can get away with  cheating ‐ the penalties are severe... 

  

Penalties    Where an offence is admitted, or a panel decides that cheating, plagiarism or collusion has occurred, a  penalty will be imposed.  The severity of the penalty will vary according to the nature of the offence and  the  level  of  study.    Penalties  will  range  from  failure  of  the  assignment  under  investigation  to  a  restriction of the award a student may ultimately achieve or a requirement to leave the University.      Full details about the University's policy on Academic Misconduct and regulations and procedures for  the investigation of academic misconduct are available at our website:   www.wlv.ac.uk   

Ethics    Research is an essential and vital part of teaching and learning. Much is literature‐based, using books,  journals,  periodicals  and  web‐based  material.  However,  some  research  may  involve  interaction  with  organisations and people. You should ensure that you do NOT conduct research that could be intrusive  or sensitive or could cause psychological harm or suffering to others. Always check with your tutors.    For  most  modules  formal  approval  is  not  normally  required  for  research  that  brings  you  into  contact  with organisations and people. However, where such contact does occur, it is imperative that you are  fully  aware  of  and  rigorously  and  consistently  apply  the  Ethical  Guidelines  as  contained  in  the  appropriate module guides. Where individuals or organisations have agreed to provide information to  you, you may be required to produce evidence that permission has been given for access or contact.   

     

  You must not take any images of or interview people for your course  or modules without the persons’ written permission. Where you will  be required to do this in your study you will be  told what to do  by  your tutors and given the relevant documentation to use.   

   

  DIVERSITY AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES    Both  the  University,  and  CoWC  seek  to  promote  equality  of  opportunity  for  all,  and  to  eliminate  discrimination,  particularly  on  grounds  of  colour,  gender,  sexual  orientation,  ethnic  origin,  age,  disability,  religion  and  socio‐economic  background.  The  University  and  CoWC  requires  staff,  students  and  visitors  to  behave  in  a  non‐discriminatory  manner  and  to  support,  implement  and  develop  30


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

institutional  practices  and  procedures  that  promote  and  reinforce  equality  of  opportunities  and  treatment for all. This course team continues to follow these principles by ensuring that the curriculum  design and its process of delivery take into consideration the needs of our diverse student body.     All  module  materials  provided  in  class  are  also  made  available  on  WOLF,  to  ensure  that  all  students  have equal access to these materials in a variety of formats. A range of different assessment methods is  used in order to prevent  assessment being biased  towards any one learning  preference and different  teaching methodologies are adopted to accommodate different learning styles.     City of Wolverhampton College is committed to safeguarding and protecting the welfare of learners and  expects all who work with or on behalf of the College to share this commitment. If you need any further  information  please contact the Designated Safeguarding Person – Lesley Cross on 01902 315757.   

HOW YOU CAN COMMENT ON LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT    We greatly value your feedback; students’ views are collectively influential in how we deliver teaching  and  learning  programmes  and  are  gathered  through  staff‐student  meetings  and  via  questionnaires,  particularly the Module Evaluation Proformas (MEPs) that you are asked to complete towards the end  of  a  module.  Such  feedback  is  analysed  for  annual  monitoring  of  modules,  subjects  and  courses.  We  also  conduct  a  mid‐module  evaluation  which  can  take  many  different  forms  but  would  normally  asks  you to consider questions such as;    1. What are the key things you have learnt so far?   2. Is there anything that remains difficult to understand?   3. What changes to the teaching activities might improve your learning?   

Student Representative  What is a Student Rep?  Student Reps represent students in their school at school level by:     

Attending School Quality Committees (SQC)   Meeting with the relevant Student Liaison Officer  Course Committee meetings 

They represent students in their school at Students' Union level by:    

Attending the Student Representative Council.   Attending the Advice and Support Committee.  

The Role and Function of a Student Rep  Student Reps are the voice of students in their school course.  They represent the needs and concerns  of students to the university and the Students’ Union (SU).  Their responsibilities include:    31


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

Identifying students’ issues and opinions 

Voicing these concerns at school/subject committees or the equivalent 

Report back to students with news and developments in the representative’s defined area 

Keeping informed about current issues in the school and university 

Liaising with other school, subject, site, level (etc) reps and the Academic Affairs Officer of the  Students’ Union 

You  are  not  expected  to  deal  with  individual  student  academic  problems.    Academic  Affairs  in  the  Student Union can provide specialist advice and support, and the Student Gateway in MB Building on  City Campus is also there to provide support.  To Apply…..    Please contact the Academic Affairs Officer at the Student Union.  Alternatively, further information is  available  online  via  Student  Union  homepage,  then  select  the  Student  Voice  link  (http://www.wolvesunio.org/ ) 

    HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES    The University of Wolverhampton Safety Policy Statement sets out the University’s policy on Health and  Safety so far as it affects employees, students and visitors. All students are expected to conform to this  Policy and any disregard of instructions on Health and Safety may lead to disciplinary action. A full copy  of  the  Health  and  Safety  Policy  document  may  be  viewed  on  the  University  website  or  at  School  and  Campus Offices. https://www.wlv.ac.uk/staff/services/hsd.aspx     In addition to the general Health and safety policy you will be required to comply with specific health  and  safety  issues  relating  to  working  in  your  chosen  subject.  These  will  be  dealt  with  in  individual  modules.       

If you have any question about anything in this course guide then either speak  to or email to your course leader or any other member of staff supporting this  course from either the University or CoWC.         

 

32


International Foundation Year (IFY) INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION YEAR COURSE (SEPTEMBER START)  CALENDAR 2012/13    Week commencing  Univ week 

International Foundation Year dates 

17 September 2012 

Induction/Welcome week/start of classes 

24 September 2012 

 

1 October 2012 

 

8 October 2012 

 

15 October 2012 

 

22 October 2012 

 

29 October 2012 

Independent study/project 

5 November 2012 

10 

 

12 November 2012 

11 

 

19 November 2012 

12 

 

26 November 2012 

13 

 

3 December 2012 

14 

 

10 December 2012 

15 

 

17 December 2012 

16 

Assessment 

24 December 2012 

17 

Christmas Holiday, University closed 

31 December 2012 

18 

Christmas Holiday, University closed 

7 January 2013 

19 

Christmas Holiday, University closed 

14 January 2013 

20 

Assessment/Exams 

21 January 2013 

21 

Feedback week 

28 January 2013 

22 

Start semester two 

4 February 2013  

23 

 

11 February 2013 

24 

 

18 February 2013 

25 

Independent study/project 

25 February 2013 

26 

 

4 March 2013 

27 

 

11 March 2013 

28 

 

18 March 2013 

29 

 

25 March 2013 

30 

Friday only closed for Easter 

1 April 2013 

31 

Easter Holiday University Closed  

8 April 2013 

32 

Level 4 module only, no level 3 modules 

33

/


International Foundation Year (IFY) Week commencing  Univ week 

International Foundation Year dates 

15 April 2013 

33 

 

22 April 2013 

34 

 

29 April 2013 

35 

 

6 May 2013 

36 

May Bank Holiday (6 May ‐ CLOSED)  

13 May 2013 

37 

Assessment (Friday end of course) 

20 May 2013  

38 

 

27 May 2013 

39 

 

3 June 2013 

40 

Assessment Boards 

10 June 2013 

41 

Assessment Boards 

17 June 2013 

42 

Publication of results 

24 June 2013 

43 

 

1 July 2013 

44 

 

8 July 2013 

45 

Resit week 

15 July 2013 

46 

 

22 July 2013 

47 

Resit Award Boards 

29 July 2013   

48 

Publication of results 

 

INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION YEAR COURSE (NOVEMBER START)  CALENDAR 2012/13   

Week  commencing 

Univ week 

International Foundation Year dates 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 November  2012 

11 

Induction/start of classes  

19 November  2012 

12 

 

34

/


International Foundation Year (IFY) Week  commencing 

Univ week 

International Foundation Year dates 

26 November  2012 

13 

 

3 December 2012 

14 

 

10 December  2012 

15 

 

17 December  2012 

16 

Assessment 

24 December  2012 

17 

Christmas Holiday, University closed 

31 December  2012 

18 

Christmas Holiday, University closed 

7 January 2013 

19 

 

14 January 2013 

20 

Assessment/Exams 

21 January 2013 

21 

Feedback week 

28 January 2013 

22 

Start semester two 

4 February 2013  

23 

 

11 February 2013 

24 

 

18 February 2013 

25 

Independent study/project 

25 February 2013 

26 

 

4 March 2013 

27 

 

11 March 2013 

28 

 

18 March 2013 

29 

 

25 March 2013 

30 

Friday only closed for Easter 

1 April 2013 

31 

Easter Holiday University Closed  

8 April 2013 

32 

Level 4 module only, no level 3 modules 

15 April 2013 

33 

 

22 April 2013 

34 

 

29 April 2013 

35 

 

6 May 2013 

36 

May Bank Holiday (6 May ‐ CLOSED)  

13 May 2013 

37 

Assessment (Friday end of course) 

20 May 2013  

38 

 

27 May 2013 

39 

 

3 June 2013 

40 

Assessment Boards 

10 June 2013 

41 

Assessment Boards 

35

/


International Foundation Year (IFY) Week  commencing 

Univ week 

International Foundation Year dates 

17 June 2013 

42 

Publication of results 

24 June 2013 

43 

 

1 July 2013 

44 

 

8 July 2013 

45 

Resit week 

15 July 2013 

46 

 

22 July 2013 

47 

Resit Award Boards 

29 July 2013   

48 

Publication of results 

 

 

 

36

/


International Foundation Year (IFY)

/

CITY CAMPUS MAPS 

 

37


Course Guide 2013