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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT


WE’RE ALL CONNECTED

At the University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, we’re not just solving for x. We’re part of a bigger equation— and our community reflects that. Our students view each other as collaborators, not competitors. Our professors partner with students to help them achieve their goals. And everything we teach has meaningful applications throughout our community and around the globe. Sometimes, we’re solving for better medical devices to improve patient outcomes. Or the average happiness of the world, as determined by three years’ worth of tweets. But no matter the problem, and no matter the answer, we’re always solving for humankind.


SOLVING FOR OUR PLANET’S FUTURE We’re asking real-world questions in Vermont that point toward better ways for the entire planet. From our local groundwater to our national electric grid, we’re all connected. For our college’s faculty, that’s more than a simple truth. It’s a call to action, driving research in the lab and in the field to find cleaner, greener, safer ways.

HERE’S WHAT THAT LOOKS LIKE.

>| Building a smart electric grid with new algorithms to smooth out the supply of renewable electricity.

>| Applying advanced mathematics to find elusive, toxic methane leaks in underground wells.

>| Monitoring stream bank erosion to better understand and control phosphorous pollution, critical to the health of Lake Champlain.

Where sustainable meets smart.

>| Building sophisticated sensor systems— including ground-penetrating radar— to help cities remotely monitor and map water pipes and gas lines, to prevent failures and waste.


Assistant Professor Appala Raju Badireddy is an expert in environmental nanotechnology, exploring high-tech sustainable solutions in the treatment and reuse of water.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES


SOLVING FOR HUMAN HEALTH Malaria and Chagas disease. They make millions of people sick. Our researchers and students apply new modeling techniques to attack these ancient killers. Working side-by-side with global partners, they’re making fundamental breakthroughs— using advanced mathematics and our on-campus supercomputers—in understanding how these diseases spread and the best spots to stop them. This work is one example of the many ways our college crosses disciplines with medicine and the health and life sciences to find innovative approaches to vexing problems.

Professor Donna Rizzo is a disease modeling expert, with research applications from medical imaging to groundwater contamination. She often instructs with practical lessons from her “past life” working as an engineer in the field. A 2014 recipient of UVM’s top teaching award, she says, “I’m always trying to foster a place where people feel comfortable asking questions.”


At UVM, we leverage a rare proximity of our Larner College of Medicine, medical center, engineering building, and new STEM Center, all within a couple of minutes’ walk. Location creates opportunity. Our burgeoning biomedical engineering programs prepare students for one of the fastest growing corners of the field. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 23 percent increase in the number of biomedical engineering jobs between 2014 and 2024. UVM students and faculty are working together to create new biomaterials capable of healing punctured lungs and treating cancer, and applying sensor technology to study body mechanics with the goal of better rehabilitation and outcomes for joint replacement patients.

Senior Claudia Benito Alston ’17 gained experience in the college’s FabLab, and has put her 3D-printing skills to work with faculty from engineering and medicine. She’s been part of a team of researchers creating a new method, using bioprinting, for treating mastectomy patients.


SOLVING FOR A COMPLEX WORLD In this emerging world driven by Big Data, UVM faculty are using the power of mathematics to find new answers. And because we’re committed to teaching, as well as research, our students get to learn from and collaborate with top minds that are:

Charting human happiness in real time. With a headline-grabbing tool they call the Hedonometer, Chris Danforth and Peter Dodds are measuring global happiness using billions of Tweets.


Guarding the power grid against failure. Paul Hines with colleagues Mads Almassalkhi and Jeff Frolik are unpacking the mechanisms which allow small problems in the power grid to become continent-crossing blackouts.

Leading the world’s understanding of evolutionary robotics. Josh Bongard is building machines that learn, digging deep into the nature of cognition.

Understanding crime networks to better fight them. Math can help take down a kingpin. Puck Rombach’s work with network theory suggests better law enforcement strategies in the fight against organized crime.


GOING BEYOND Our STEM-focused clubs and honor societies will take you around the race track or around the world. Build and drive alternative energy cars with AERO, or improve water systems in Nicaragua with Engineers without Borders. No matter your passion, you’ll find a club that helps you connect with friends and gain years of real work experience before you graduate.

find the value around you

SOME OF OUR STUDENT CLUBS >

>| Society of Women in Computer Science

>| American Society of Civil Engineers

>| Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers

>| Alternative Energy

Racing Organization (AERO)

>| Engineers Without Borders

>| Tau Beta Pi >| Society of Women Engineers

>| Baja >| Computer Science Crew >| Math Club >| American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics

>| Biomedical Engineering Society


TARIYE PETERS, PEREKEBINA YOROKI AND BENJAMIN DEMING AT ENGINEERING DESIGN NIGHT (2017)

Mentored by faculty, working collaboratively with peers, our students put skill and innovation to the test and on display at annual events such as Engineering Design Night, a computer science fair, and a campus-wide research fair. Projects run the gamut from mining for ice on the moon with NASA to designing a better golf club. It’s another chance for students to build their resumes and networks before graduation.


WHAT COMES AFTER

hack your career

The thing about “what comes after” is this—“after” starts now. Your courses, many of them with a service-learning focus, connect you with real-world applications. Your professors, who welcome you to their research teams, are your first professional mentors. Your friends, working on group projects or joining forces in student clubs and competitions, are your first colleagues. Your new home in Burlington, a hub for technology and innovation, is ripe with internship opportunities. It all adds up to creating postcollege life a part of everyday college life. Our Career Readiness Program will help you graduate with a broad array of experiences, a keen sense of your interests and strengths, and a path for where you want to go with your degree.

BURLINGTON, A HOTBED FOR START-UPS AND ESTABLISHED COMPANIES LIKE BURTON SNOWBOARDS, PROVIDES STUDENTS AMPLE INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES.


ALUMNI SUCCESS Milo Werner ’02 is vice president for engineering at Off.Grid:Electric, a Silicon Valley firm advancing clean and affordable energy worldwide. The civil and environmental engineering grad has also held leadership roles at Fitbit and Tesla Motors.

A statistics major at UVM, Zack Scott ’99 has built a career on the leading edge of sports analytics as the Boston Red Sox’ vice president for baseball research and development.

% 94

of our graduates are employed or continuing their educations six months after graduation

After earning her bachelor’s degree in environmental engineering from UVM in 2015, Flora Su has gone on to pursue her PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she focuses on atmospheric chemistry and climate change.


BURLINGTON, VERMONT

AN INNOVATION ECOSYSTEM

Long a home to the entrepreneurial spirit, Burlington is becoming known as a center for emerging technologies,

“Top 10 Tech Hub”

—Forbes

promising start-ups,and a thriving maker culture at the intersection of science, technology and art. Local companies like NRG Systems, Microstrain and Dealer.com are leaders in their respective fields of wind energy, robotics, and automotive e-commerce.

TO MARKET. The idea for inTACT — a set of tactile graphics drawing tools that brings learning, creativity and fun to the blind

“10 Most Inventive States”

—CNN Money

and visually impaired — grew out of a senior engineering design project by mechanical engineering major Joshua Coffee ‘11. Today, Coffee is president of the company that he cofounded with his former professors, and in 2015, they won a $1 million tech transfer grant from the National Institutes of Health.


“Silicon Valley in Vermont”

—The Atlantic

On campus, we’re turning up the dial on opportunities to innovate. Students:

>| Live in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship learning community.

>| Submit an idea to the Catamount Innovation Fund, which supports student entrepreneurs with resources to build their business venture.

>| Intern at the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies, UVM’s co-working space.

Cullen Jemison ’19, a double major in mechanical engineering and computer science, won the LaunchVT Collegiate competition for the product Thermouse, a customized mouse that can be molded to fit a user’s hand. Jemison used his engineering skills and the college’s rapid prototyping tools in the FabLab to bring to life his business partner’s concept.


HIGH-TECH HOME BASE You’re joining UVM at an incredibly exciting time for STEM students. We’ve transformed our facilities with a renovation of our home in Votey Hall and the addition of a brand new, stateof-the-art STEM complex, the largest construction project in our 226-year history.


Here, you’ll learn in next generation classrooms, designed for active learning. You’ll do research in newly renovated teaching labs, with opportunities to work on cutting-edge projects in nanotechnology, wearable sensors, and app development. And you’ll seamlessly bridge the disciplines, sharing space with faculty across the STEM fields to tackle the world’s problems collaboratively.


COLLEGE OF

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING

INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGINEERING PRO GR AMS

ABET – Accredited Programs B.S. Civil Engineering B.S. Electrical Engineering B.S. Environmental Engineering B.S. Mechanicial Engineering

Engineering

MATHEMATICAL B.A. Engineering B.S. Engineering

B.S. Engineering Management

ABET – Accreditation Expected B.S. Biomedical Engineering

SCIENCES D E PA RT M E N T O F CO M P U T E R S C I E N C E

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS

B.S. Computer Science

B.S. Mathematical Sciences, Major in Mathematics

B.S. Computer Science and Information Systems

B.S. Mathematical Sciences, Major in Statistics

D E PA RT M E N T O F CO M P U T E R S C I E N C E A N D D E PA RT M E N T O F M AT H E M AT I C S A N D STAT I ST I C S

ACCELER ATED MA STER’S

B.S. Major in Data Science

CEMS’ Accelerated Master’s Programs (AMP) allow talented undergraduates to complete a Master of Science degree in one additional year in the following areas: Civil and Environmental Engineering Complex Systems and Data Science Computer Science

Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Statistics Biomedical Engineering (expected Spring 2018)

Electrical Engineering

READY TO APPLY?

www.uvm.edu/apply

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

www.uvm.edu/cems

HAVE QUESTIONS?

(802) 656-3392

info@cems.uvm.edu


WHY UVM?

We believe that the best engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians will not only have deep experience in their fields of study, but also broad exposure across disciplines. At UVM, you’ll have access to top scholars and courses in these fields, and you’ll live and study alongside friends with diverse passions and majors— music to nursing to wildlife biology—whose ideas and interests will expand your world. With this deep and broad education, you’ll launch prepared not only to land a great job, but with the ability to see the world through multiple lenses, an essential 21st-century life skill.

go.uvm.edu/cemssocial


CEMS at The University of Vermont  

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences booklet

CEMS at The University of Vermont  

College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences booklet