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UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN

FALL 2016 1


CLIMATE ACTION PLAN | FALL 2016 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Special thank you to Claire Flynn (‘17), designer of the University of San Diego Climate Action Plan. Her work is a living example of the values of this document in action. Thank you to the Sustainability Task Force and all who contributed directly and indirectly to this document. Please see Appendix C for a complete list of contributors. A special thank you to USD’s Energy Policy Initiatives Center for their technical expertise on this project. 2


TABLE OF CONTENTS 4

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

6

SUSTAINABILITY AT USD

12

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS ENERGY

COMMUTING

AIR TRAVEL

ZERO WASTE

FLEET

WATER

14

18

22

26

30

34

38

CLIMATE RESILIENCY

40

CROSS-CUTTING INITIATIVES

43

IMPLEMENTATION, FUNDING, TRACKING, AND MONITORING

44

HOW THE CAP WAS DEVELOPED

45

APPENDIX

47

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

3


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT One of the roles of academia is to help advance democratic and global citizenship. As a Catholic university committed to Catholic moral and intellectual traditions, the University of San Diego prepares students to be enlightened, engaged and ecological citizens. Enlightened citizens focus on developing a global perspective and moral character, preparing compassionate, scientifically literate, and culturally sensitive individuals, who, through their collective acts, advance humanity. Engaged citizenship starts on our campus in how we work and care for each other, and also relates to Pope Francis’ call that we pay greater attention to the needs of the poor, the weak and the vulnerable around us. The final form of citizenship we cultivate is what Pope Francis has described as “ecological citizenship.” In his encyclical entitled Laudato si’, or “On Care of Our Common Home,” Pope Francis emphasizes the need to protect nature with a “courageous and responsible effort to redirect our steps and to avert the most serious effects of environmental deterioration caused by human activity.” Regarding this, he is “confident that America’s outstanding academic and research institutions can make a vital contribution in the years ahead.” Climate change represents one of humanity’s most urgent challenges; leading by example, the University of San Diego has developed a bold and comprehensive Climate Action Plan that turns the Pope’s call into an operational plan. This will become a lens for decision-making that takes into account the impacts of our actions and operations. This important initiative is consistent with our national reputation for sustainability excellence and is a reflection of our commitment to preparing students to be enlightened, engaged and ecological citizens. Implementation of this Climate Action Plan will improve business processes, enhance and enrich academic experiences, and create meaningful engagements directed at improving the community and embodying our mission and values in the world. The goal is a comprehensive sustainability program that aims to minimize USD’s environmental footprint, support new and existing initiatives for sustainable development and entrepreneurship, support and promote program integration and collaboration with USD’s academic, research, and educational programs, and realize operational cost savings through efficiency projects. Our Climate Action Plan is a natural extension of the principles and pathways outlined in our new Envisioning 2024 strategic plan. I am confident that this plan will help us to prepare for and realize a very bright and exciting future as we set the standard for an engaged, contemporary Catholic university where innovative Changemakers confront humanity’s urgent challenges.

4

James T. Harris III, DEd President, University of San Diego


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The call for dialogue by Pope Francis in Laudato sí’ is a moral and spiritual challenge for all of humanity to join in solidarity in the Care for Our Common Home. In this integral ecology, the world’s complex problems derive from interconnected human and environmental dimensions. At the same time, respect for human dignity is inextricable from care for the natural world and reminds us that we have a responsibility to the poor and marginalized, who are most vulnerable. Laudato sí’ brings urgency and contemporary relevance to the broader mission of Catholic higher education in the 21st century, and the University of San Diego is uniquely equipped to respond to this challenge. We are not only taking the words of Pope Francis to heart, but we are using them as a foundation for our collective commitment to environmental stewardship. Through liberal arts teachings, scholarship, an engaged campus culture and community partnerships—all principles and pathways outlined in our Envisioning 2024 strategic plan—we are bringing together in a Climate Action Plan (CAP) our strengths, resources and uniqueness to fulfill the world’s need for Changemakers as we unlock creative and innovative ways to care for all creation. The Climate Action Plan is one of the first steps in the strategic pathway to Care for Our Common Home. As an important first step in this process, our Climate Action Plan takes inventory of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) at USD for the years 2010 through 2015; considers projected emissions based on our environmental footprint and student enrollment through the year 2035 (as reflected in our new Campus Master Plan); and outlines how the university will reduce greenhouse gas emissions in six major categories:

• Energy (electricity, natural gas, and renewables and clean energy) • Commuting (student and employee) • Air Travel (education and business) • Zero Waste (diversion) • Fleet (fuel) • Water

Using 2010 as a baseline, the minimum goal is to reduce the university’s emissions and environmental footprint by 15 percent by 2020; 40 percent by 2030; and 50 percent by 2035. Our targets to reduce emissions levels are informed by and consistent with the City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan.

“Since everything is closely interrelated, and today’s problems call for a vision capable of taking into account every aspect of the global crisis, I suggest that we now consider some elements of an integral ecology, one which clearly respects its human and social dimensions.” - Pope Francis

USD’s Climate Action Plan calls for us to prepare for the impact that climate change will have on our campus and the broader San Diego region. It outlines initiatives that will help to effectively implement the CAP, including data collection and management, education and culture, research and academic integration, financing, and authority and responsibility. It also underscores the need to regularly assess and report on our progress that will ultimately help USD reach its goals. Moving forward, successfully minimizing USD’s environmental impact will also achieve significant cost savings for the institution via efficiency projects and life-cycle cost analyses. The Climate Action Plan serves as a guide to help the university enhance the livability of its campus through the efficient and responsible use of resources. It is a living document that will change over time as new opportunities to improve sustainability unfold.

5


SUSTAINABILITY AT USD UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO MISSION The University of San Diego is a Roman Catholic institution committed to advancing academic excellence, expanding liberal and professional knowledge, creating a diverse and inclusive community and preparing leaders who are dedicated to ethical conduct and compassionate service.

SUSTAINABILITY AND THE USD MISSION In its dedication to an ethical and compassionate community, the University of San Diego strives to take responsible actions affecting and preserving the environment. Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical “Care for the Common Home” spoke of responsibility to protect Creation. As a Catholic institution, the responsibility to take ethical actions regarding the environment is essential to the mission of the University of San Diego.

66


CLIMATE INITIATIVES AT USD Since 2010, USD has collaborated with San Diego leaders to create programs, policies, and strategies to address climate change. Through the Energy and Policy Initiatives Center, Climate Education Partners: San Diego Region, and the San Diego Climate Collaborative, USD works to study energy policy issues, conduct a range of educational activities, and share resources to facilitate climateaction planning. Energy Policy Initiatives Center (EPIC):

EPIC is a non-profit research and academic center of the University of San Diego School of Law that studies energy policy issues affecting California and the San Diego region. EPIC’s mission is to increase awareness and understanding of energy and climate related policy issues by conducting research and analysis to inform decision makers and educating law students.

Climate Education Partners (CEP):

CEP is one of six grants in the nation from the National Science Foundation to educate leaders in the community on the impacts of climate change. Designed as a dynamic collaborative of local expert scientists, educators, and a wide range of community leaders, Climate Education Partners conducts a wide range of educational activities to engage the community. These include listening to what San Diegans care about and what they want to know, developing practical resources on local impacts, conducting climate impact tours, hosting roundtable discussions and supporting regional leaders and their communities with their planning needs for informed decision-making.

The San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative: The Climate Collaborative is a San Diego regional forum for public agencies to share expertise and leverage resources to facilitate climate action planning. By partnering with academia, non-profit organizations, and business and community leaders, the Collaborative works to inspire regional leadership and ensure a vibrant economy and healthy environment. The main goals of the Climate Collaborative are to: Address and prevent the harmful effects of climate change Promote a high quality of life for the San Diego region Foster a green and growing economy 7


SUSTAINABILITY TASK FORCE In response to demand from students, faculty, and staff, sustainability was launched as a new initiative as part of the President’s Strategic Directions in Fall 2007. As part of this initiative, the Sustainability Task Force was created to evaluate the status of sustainability at USD and its peer institutions. This committee created the “Outline of Sustainability Initiatives,” which encompassed academics, outreach and community relations, auxiliaries operations, facilities operations, campus life, and executive council decisions. Noting that the implementation of an extensive action plan would require the guidance of a full-time director with the authority and resources to carry out the proposed objectives, the Director of Sustainability position was created and the Office of Sustainability was formed in January 2010. Since this time, the Office of Sustainability has designed and implemented a number of initiatives to build a culture of sustainability on campus and across the greater San Diego community. For a complete list of Task Force members please see Appendix C.

8


APR 2010 OFFICE OF SUSTAINABILITY

1989 RECYCLING APR 2008

NOV 2010 SOLAR KICK-OFF

SUSTAINABILITY/CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAM TASK FORCE REPORT Areas of Emphasis: Academics Ops. (facilities) Outreach Campus Life Ops. (aux) Executive Council

DEC 2010 CLIMATE COLLABORATIVE FORMS

2016

JAN 2015 ‘15 SDG&E PARTNERSHIP

2015

2014

JAN 2013 ‘13-’14 SDG&E PARTNERSHIP

2013

2012

2011

MID 2010 $8.5M INVESTMENT IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY

2010

2009

JAN 2010 ‘10-’12 SDG&E PARTNERSHIP

2008

1989

2007

NOV 2007 TASK FORCE MEETS FOR THE FIRST TIME

MAR 2014 STARS GOLD RATING

APR 2010 ELECTRONICS RECYCLING CENTER OPENS

HISTORY OF SUSTAINABILITY

9


WHAT WE’VE ALREADY ACHIEVED ENERGY Energy efficiency is at the heart of sustainability efforts at the University of San

Diego. Since 2010, USD has partnered with our local utility provider, San Diego Gas & Electric™. This partnership provides funding for the Office of Sustainability and access to regional energy programs that highlight opportunities for energy efficiency as well as access to program incentives to make projects financially viable. This has led to USD making significant investments in energy conservation, leading to verified reductions in energy consumption of more than 10 million kilowatt hours (kWh) annually and resulting in a 20% reduction of the university’s total energy consumption. Additionally, USD has more than 5,000 solar panels across 11 buildings on campus that provide more than 7% of the university’s energy needs.

WATER

The University of San Diego has reduced its annual water consumption by more

than 38 million gallons since 2006. In 2016, the campus had its lowest water usage in more than 25 years. Facilities continues to replace ornamental grass with drought-friendly material to reduce our water consumption. USD’s use of a weather-based irrigation system utilizes wireless technology to allow sprinklers to automatically adjust to weather, reducing over-watering and allowing us to be responsive to dynamic weather conditions. Retrofits such as low-flow aerators on faucets, water efficient toilets, and low-flow shower-heads have been implemented throughout campus buildings to help realize these savings.

10


WASTE DIVERSION The University of San Diego promotes a Zero Waste goal for the campus by focusing on various campus initiatives. USD has incorporated single-stream recycling across campus to make recycling easier. To help divert waste from paper cups, Dining Services promotes their Sustain-A-Bottle, a reusable water bottle for refills. Dining areas contain preconsumer composting sections, while community composting takes place at USD’s Crossroads Garden and SOLES. Throughout the school-year, USD promotes and hosts various Zero Waste programming that educates the community on mindful consumption.

ELECTRONICS RECYCLING CENTER The University of San Diego pursued a creative solution to the electronic waste

problem by opening its own Electronics Recycling Center (ERC) to serve both the campus and the San Diego community in 2011. It was the first electronic waste collection center on a college campus and the first full-time collection center in San Diego. Working directly with certified third-party recyclers, the ERC responsibly resells or recycles all of its collected e-waste. Serving as an innovative model of social entrepreneurship, the ERC is self-funded and provides an environmental benefit to the community while keeping hazardous materials out of the landfill. On-campus, the ERC serves to educate students about the importance of proper recycling, integrates academic involvement with hands-on experiences, and creates employment opportunities for students. Off-campus, the ERC serves as a community resource for electronic recycling through free donations and pick-ups, provides education to regional schools, hosts local e-waste collection drives, and partners with local businesses to recycle old electronics. Since opening, the ERC has collected and diverted more than 2.7 million pounds of electronics from the San Diego region.

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH

Education and outreach is essential to sustainability at the University of San Diego. In keeping with the USD mission, campus engagement in environmental awareness is a main objective for the Office of Sustainability. As such, the Office of Sustainability has created a robust student internship program that provides outreach opportunities to engage the campus and local San Diego community in embracing a sustainable lifestyle and environmental stewardship. Through programming, events, and academic involvement, the Office of Sustainability allows students to learn important sustainability concepts, behaviors, and habits. Thoughout the 2015 school year, the Office of Sustainability participated in more than 45 events reaching approximately 4,000 students. 11


2010 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS TOTAL 2010 EMISSIONS

30,301 MT CO2e

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

REDUCTION STRATEGIES: MR. ODO The basic framework utilized throughout the plan, known as MR. ODO, is derived from the five main approaches to reducing emissions: Measure, Reduce & Optimize, Decarbonize, and Offset, prioritized in that order. • • • •

12 12

Measure: Consistent and accurate measurement of each category of emissions is central to success in a CAP. In some cases, additional processes and procedures may be necessary to get more accurate data. Reduce & Optimize: Efficiency and reducing demand is at the heart of this approach. After successfully understanding what we consume, we can then minimize consumption as much as possible. Decarbonize: This approach asks constituencies to examine if there is a way to conduct a specific activity in a cleaner way (e.g. purchasing renewable energy vs. energy from unspecified sources). Offset: This final approach is utilized after all other measures have been thoroughly considered and acted upon. In some cases, MR. ODO is not entirely applicable. While accurate measurement is essential, reduction and optimization or capacity to decarbonize may not be attainable or necessary.


GHG EMISSIONS AND REDUCTION TARGETS GOALS The University of San Diego Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory was performed by USD’s Environmental Policy Initiatives Center (EPIC). The university’s emissions are inventoried from 2010 through 2015 and projected through 2035. The inventory follows the recommended boundary of the U.S. Public Sector Protocol. The emissions categories are Energy (purchased electricity and natural gas), Commuting (student and employee), Air Travel (education and business), Fleet (gasoline and diesel consumption), Zero Waste (solid waste), and Water (water and wastewater). USD has chosen the baseline year of 2010 and targets that are consistent with the City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan. Those targets, relative to the 2010 baseline year, emphasize a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of 15% by 2020, 40% by 2030 and 50% by 2035. The 2020, 2030 and 2035 emissions are projected from the baseline by estimating the emissions per full-time student with projections of growth consistent with the 2017 Master Plan Update. Details for calculations and reduction targets can be found in the USD Technical CAP Document available at the CAP Website.

13 13


ENERGY

ELECTRICITY, NATURAL GAS, AND RENEWABLES AND CLEAN ENERGY

Energy is a primary focus of the University of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan. The consumption of electricity and natural gas comprises 55% of USD’s 2010 carbon footprint. As the largest source of emissions, it is a primary target for reductions moving forward. Through a systematic approach to generate savings through efficiency and increased reliance on renewable energy, USD will be able to lower emissions and reduce costs moving forward. Increased visibility through measurement will lead to an understanding of where and when energy is used to most effectively target reduction and optimization efforts. After the completion of energy optimization, the university will purchase cleaner and renewable energy directly. USD will then purchase renewable energy credits or offsets for the remaining energy consumed.

14 14


ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLES Increase electricity and natural gas efficiency in USD operations. Increase the use of cleaner and renewable energy in USD operations.

GOALS 1

2

Reduce projected electricity use by 25% by 2020 and 35% by 2035.

Reduce projected natural gas consumption by 25% by 2020 and 35% by 2035.

3 Increase use of cleaner and renewable sources of energy by 7.5% by 2020 and 40% by 2035.

55% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM ENERGY CONSUMPTION Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Emissions from Energy Consumption Emissions from & Energy(Electricity Consumption Natural Gas) (Electricity & Natural Gas) 55%

15


HISTORICAL DATA TRENDS (FY 2010-2015) ENERGY CONSUMPTION:

FY

ELECTRICITY (MWh)

NATURAL GAS (Therms)

2010

32,571

1,101,836

2011

26,153

933,605

2012

26,174

921,422

2013

26,890

843,221

2014

26,532

752,738

2015

26,960

653,735

FUN FACT 7%

of USD’s energy is generated by solar panels.

16

USD has reduced natural gas consumption by

41% since 2010.


MR. ODO MEASURE

Measure energy use at building level

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Engage in active energy management to reduce consumption Conduct technical audits to determine additional efficiency projects Implement projects and programs that achieve savings Create a sustainable funding mechanism for projects

DECARBONIZE

Adopt policies and procedures for renewable energy procurement Increase procurement of renewable electricity Investigate investment in off-site renewable energy generation

OFFSET

Offset electricity consumption Purchase renewable energy credits

STRATEGIES

2020

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

4,929 MT CO2e

7,555 MT CO2e

Reduction from Energy Strategy

5,314 MT CO2e

10,944 MT CO2e

2020 Reduction from Energy Strategy 39%

2035 Reduction from Statewide Policy 25% Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 36%

Reduction from Energy Strategy

Reduction from Statewide Policy

37%

38%

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 25% 17


COMMUTING STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE

Student and employee commuting comprises 27% of USD’s total carbon footprint. USD will enhance mobility and access throughout the campus as well as expand mobility options on campus. USD is envisioned to become a multimodal campus with access to regional transportation at the Morena/Linda Vista Trolley Station, a safe and enjoyable pedestrian environment, and bicycle facilities and parking.

18 18


COMMUTING SUMMARY Increase cleaner and alternative modes of transportation.

GOAL Reduce projected miles driven for commuting by 2% by 2020 and 12% by 2035.

27% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM STUDENT & EMPLOYEE COMMUTING Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Emissions from Student & Employee Commuting

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

27%

19


HISTORICAL DATA TRENDS (FY 2010-2015) COMMUTING:

FY

STUDENT COMMUTING (miles)

EMPLOYEE COMMUTING (miles)

2010

11,864,623

8,275,924

2011

11,206,172

9,256,874

2012

10,881,808

9,126,053

2013

10,456,732

8,611,152

2014

10,251,835

9,791,151

2015

10,274,755

10,212,901

FUN FACT The average employee commutes

26.4 MILES per trip. 20

1/3 of off-campus

students use alternative modes of transportation (i.e. walk, bike, carpool, trolley, tram) (2015).


MR. ODO MEASURE

Annual assessment Collect relevant data during registration

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Develop a Transportation Demand Management plan Develop standard for alternative modes of transportation including walking, biking, mass transit, car/vanpool, ridesharing and other preferred methods Increase linkages to public transit Develop other programs (bike sharing, etc.)

DECARBONIZE

Expand electric vehicle charging stations on campus

OFFSET

Offset the remaining footprint

STRATEGIES

2020

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

9,998 MT CO2e

17,206 MT CO2e

Reduction from Commuting Strategy

245 MT CO2e

1,293 MT CO2e

2020

2035

Reduction from Commuting Strategy 4%

Reduction from Commuting Strategy 2%

Reduction from Statewide Policy Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 73%

25%

Reduction from Energy Efficiency Strategy

Reduction from Statewide Policy 38%

58%

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AIR TRAVEL EDUCATION AND BUSINESS

International study opportunities are a major component of the USD learning experience and align with the institution’s mission, vision and core values. These opportunities provide on-the-ground cultural and practical experiences to compliment classroom study, helping to create a truly global mindset and level of competence. While air travel is essential in almost all cases, it is also a significant contributor (13%) of USD’s emissions. Unlike the other initiatives, aside from measuring air travel, the only relevant part of MR. ODO is Offset.

22 22


AIR TRAVEL SUMMARY Reduce air travel and offset associated emissions.

GOAL Offset 100% of USD-related business and educational travel by 2020 and continue to offset air travel through 2035.

13% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM AIR TRAVEL Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Emissions from Air Travel 13% Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

23


HISTORICAL DATA TRENDS (FY 2010-2015) AIR TRAVEL:

FY

STUDY ABROAD AIR TRAVEL (miles)

OTHER AIR TRAVEL (miles)

2010

10,618,878

7,400,935

2011

13,393,460

8,568,387

2012

13,268,577

9,517,547

2013

15,486,453

10,177,752

2014

15,486,453

8,365,288

2015

13,942,064

7,371,471

FUN FACT 59%

of total air miles traveled by USD students, staff and faculty in FY2010 were from study abroad. 24

77.8% of undergraduate

students study abroad (2015).


MR. ODO MEASURE

Refine data collection for institutional travel

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Explore possibility of virtual travel including video conferences, etc.

DECARBONIZE

N/A

OFFSET

Investigate offset programs for offseting air travel miles Determine criteria for selecting offset program

2020

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

6,006 MT CO2e

13,108 MT CO2e

Reduction from Air Travel Strategy

4,238 MT CO2e

5,318 MT CO2e

STRATEGIES

2020

2035

Reduction from Air Travel

Reduction from Statewide Policy

Reduction from Air Travel

18%

25%

31%

Reduction from Statewide Policy

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

44%

44%

38%

25


ZERO WASTE DIVERSION

Although waste is a small part of USD’s overall footprint (2%), it is the highest profile and most tangible measure for students, faculty, staff and guests of the university. There is no better way to communicate our commitment to sustainability than with a robust Zero Waste program that shows intentionality in our consumption. USD aims to be a Zero Waste campus by diverting 90% of its waste from the landfill. With the San Diego Miramar Landfill close to reaching capacity, limiting waste generation from USD is essential to decreasing environmental impact.

26 26


ZERO WASTE SUMMARY Achieve Zero Waste in USD operations.

GOAL Increase projected solid waste diversion to 60% by 2020 and 75% by 2035.

2% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM WASTE GENERATION Solid Waste Generation 2%

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

27


28


MR. ODO MEASURE

Conduct waste characterization audit to refine targets

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Utilize the waste hierarchy to address issues of waste Develop procedures to reduce waste Implement consistent bins and procedures across campus Encourage educational programs that increase diversion

DECARBONIZE

N/A

OFFSET

Offset remaining waste footprint

STRATEGIES

2020

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

9,856 MT CO2e

17,816 MT CO2e

387 MT CO2e

682 MT CO2e

Reduction from Zero Waste Strategy

2020

2035

Reduction from Zero Waste Strategy 3%

Reduction from Zero Waste Strategy 2%

Reduction from Statewide Policy 25% Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 72%

Reduction from Energy Efficiency Strategy 60%

Reduction from Statewide Policy 38%

FUN FACT 33% of USD’s solid waste is diverted from landfills (2015).

29 29


FLEET FUEL

Fuel consumption for the university fleet comprises 2% of USD’s total carbon footprint. USD will reduce fuel-related emissions by prioritizing the purchase of hybrid and electric vehicles as well as prioritizing fuel efficiency and more timely turnover of the campus fleet.

30


FLEET SUMMARY

Increase use of cleaner and alternative modes of transportation.

GOALS 2

1

Reduce projected fossil fuel consumption of USD fleet 5% by 2020 and 20% by 2035 by increasing clean-fuel vehicle use.

Reduce projected fossil fuel consumption of USD fleet 5% by 2020 and 15% by 2035 through optimized use

2% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM FLEET FUEL CONSUMPTION Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion 2%

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

31


HISTORICAL DATA TRENDS (FY 2010 - 2015) FLEET FUEL CONSUMPTION (GASOLINE): 80,000

60,000

40,000

20,000

2010

2011

FY

2012

2013

2014

2015

FLEET GAS CONSUMPTION (Gal.)

2010

56,190

2011

56,564

2012

58,258

2013

58,174

2014

60,772

2015

58,652

FUN FACT USD Trams account for

33%

of fuel use (2015). 32


MR. ODO MEASURE

Update data collection process for fleet vehicles

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Reduce miles driven by USD fleet by utilizing bikes, encouraging walking, and optimizing tram schedules Create efficiency guidelines for vehicle purchases Centralize fleet purchasing

DECARBONIZE

Develop hierarchy for vehicles Develop priorities to switch to electric vehicles

OFFSET

Offset remaining fleet fuel consumption

STRATEGIES

2020

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

10,184 MT CO2e

18,237 MT CO2e

60 MT CO2e

262 MT CO2e

Reduction from Fleet Strategy

2020

2035

Reduction from Fleet Strategy 1% Reduction from Statewide Policy

Reduction from Statewide Policy 25%

Reduction from Fleet Strategy 1%

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 74%

38%

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 61%

33


WATER Water conservation has been a priority for USD due to San Diego’s semi-arid climate and the drought conditions facing California for the last several years. Stewardship of our most precious resource while also maintaining the well-known beauty and integrity of the campus is essential for the university. Weather-based irrigation controllers and strategic landscaping projects have contributed to significant reductions in campus water consumption.

34


WATER SUMMARY Increase water efficiency in USD operations.

GOAL Reduce projected water use by 20% by 2020 and 30% by 2035.

1% OF 2010 BASELINE EMISSIONS CAME FROM WATER CONSUMPTION Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

16,525 MT CO2e

Student & Employee Commuting

8,100 MT CO2e

Air Travel

4,018 MT CO2e

Solid Waste Generation

696 MT CO2e

Campus Fleet Fuel Combustion

532 MT CO2e

Water Consumption

360 MT CO2e

Wastewater Generation

70 MT CO2e

Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation 1%

Emissions from Energy Consumption (Electricity & Natural Gas)

35


HISTORICAL DATA TRENDS (FY 2010-2015) WATER:

DOMESTIC WATER CONSUMPTION (Gal.)

FY

TOTAL WATER CONSUMPTION (Gal.)

2010

107,329,043

82,681,562

2011

90,495,899

67,937,744

2012

84,485,887

56,714,646

2013

95,279,492

65,132,690

2014

95,341,950

64,144,366

2015

83,301,020

59,338,092

FUN FACT Since 2010, USD reduced water consumption by

22% (2015). 36


MR. ODO MEASURE

Measure water use at building level

REDUCE & OPTIMIZE

Identify leaks through interval data Conduct audits to identify water saving projects Replace water-intensive plants with drought tolerant and native landscaping

DECARBONIZE

N/A

OFFSET

Offset remaining water usage

2020

STRATEGIES

2035

Reduction from Statewide Policy

3,479 MT CO2e

11,301 MT CO2e

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

10,156 MT CO2e

18,372 MT CO2e

87 MT CO2e

127 MT CO2e

Reduction from Water Strategy

2020

2035

Reduction from Water Strategy

Reduction from Water Strategy

1%

1% Reduction from Statewide Policy

25% Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies 74%

Reduction from other USD CAP Strategies

Reduction from Statewide Policy 38%

61%

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CLIMATE RESILIENCY While USD makes changes to decrease our own carbon emissions, we realize that we must prepare for the impacts of climate change. The work of Climate Education Partners (CEP) is dedicated to educating San Diego decision-makers on the impacts of climate change to produce an understanding of the potential threats we face in San Diego County. Their research provides a suite of solutions to prepare for or adapt to the impacts of climate change, including community resilience. Resiliency is “the ability of a system or community to survive disruption and to anticipate, adapt, and flourish in the face of change” (Second Nature). Through this Climate Action Plan, we will be better prepared for the expected changes in San Diego and will create a more sustainable campus to face these changes. For more details on the impacts and potential solutions for San Diego County, you can download CEP’s full report at http://www. sandiego.edu/2050/index.html

The chart below illustrates impacts the region and campus could expect to see.

REGIONAL IMPACT Increased temperatures and extended heat waves

IMPACT ON CAMPUS OPERATIONS Need to air-condition spaces that were previously cooled passively Potential need to reschedule classes in unconditioned spaces due to heat Need to restrict outdoor working hours for staff

Fewer rainy days with more intense rainfall during rainstorms

Flooding preparation and drainage issues

More frequent droughts

Potential for increased water restrictions on irrigation that impact campus appearance

At least 11 inches of sea level rise with increased changes of coastal flooding

While this does not directly impact campus, it could threaten students and employees who live along the shoreline

With extreme heat and less frequent rainfall an increase in wildfire frequency and intensity is possible

Impacts on students and employees such as safety, commuting, and property loss Loss of school and work days Increased health issues

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These potential impacts also present opportunities for research and education. In addition to the CEP projects, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Grant, “Connecting the Dots and Building Coastal Resilience in the San Diego Region,” a $650k grant to study the impacts of sea level rise in San Diego by the San Diego Climate Collaborative, highlights the research success of USD. Furthermore, individual faculty research on climate change science and sustainability-related projects are already underway. However, it is crucial for USD to explore additional opportunities to study the potential impacts and provide expertise and partnerships to our region. USD has developed four strategies for a resilient campus. These include: • educate the community on expected changes, • conduct a vulnerability assessment for the campus, • understand and communicate current practices, and • develop creative solutions With the predicted changes in mind, USD needs to educate campus leaders and the Board of Trustees to ensure we set the standard for other academic institutions. We must also conduct a vulnerability assessment for the campus. This will pinpoint the areas of impact and help us identify measures to prepare for these changes. Once we understand our vulnerable areas, we can educate the community and develop a plan for resiliency. It is important for us to communicate our current practices for the areas in which developed plans currently exist. With the increase in temperatures, there are procedures set in place through OSHA standards for worker health and safety. We are also installing HVAC in more buildings across campus to cool the spaces, however that creates an impact with an increased load and demand for overall energy consumption. Subsequently, energy standards and guidelines are currently being developed to minimize our impact and create a strategy to address this increase in energy load. Another practice currently in place is dealing with flooding in the different areas on campus from El Niño rains. This has helped USD create a process and plan to prevent leaks in known areas and address leaks quickly. Clear communication of our existing implemented solutions and policies is critical in order to promote our resiliency and to promote behavioral changes.

39 39


CROSS-CUTTING INITIATIVES USD has developed a Climate Action Plan in part because of who we are as an institution, which supports many aspects of the university’s strategic initiatives and reflects our Catholic identity. We need to ensure that steps are taken to implement the CAP; it must become what we do. To facilitate success, USD will consider ways to institutionalize climate action planning and implementation of the CAP into the way we conduct our campus operations. Because the CAP evaluates GHG emissions across all aspects of our operations, it is no surprise that we asked questions of our administration, faculty, and staff during the CAP development process that have never been asked before. When viewing our operations through the lens of GHG emissions, several areas emerged that cut across and influence the implementation of all strategies. USD will develop procedures around each of these cross-cutting issues to create the processes and structure required to implement the CAP. These cross-cutting initiatives include: · Data Collection and Management · Education and Culture · Research and Academic Integration · Financing · Authority and Responsibility

40 40


DATA COLLECTION AND MANAGEMENT Data is the heart of the CAP – it determines every aspect from our estimated level of emissions and targets from quantifying our reduction strategies to monitoring progress. USD will create a comprehensive data collection and management strategy to institutionalize the climate planning process. Doing so will also support the first step in our MR. ODO reduction framework – Measurement. The strategy will include the following actions: ESTABLISH A CAMPUS-WIDE DATA CUSTODIAN Data required to develop and monitor a CAP is collected and maintained by many units on campus. Currently there is no central repository for housing, verifying, and analyzing GHG emissions-related data. USD will establish a campus-wide data custodian (e.g. Institutional Research and Planning) to serve this role. A data custodian will not only improve the efficiencies of climate action planning on campus but can also help to facilitate other relevant reporting standards, including sustainability rating programs. Also, as data analysis becomes more important, establishing a data custodian can help to improve overall decision-making and operational effectiveness across a wide range of areas beyond the CAP. ESTABLISH DATA REPORTING AND COLLECTION PROTOCOLS To monitor progress of the CAP, it is necessary to collect data on a regular basis, typically every 1-2 years. To institutionalize and regularize this collection process and to support the collection of other related data, USD will establish data reporting and collection protocols. ENHANCE DATA COLLECTION During the CAP development process, we identified areas for which we do not collect adequate data. For example, collecting additional information during the parking permit application would greatly improve estimates for the emissions associated with commuting to and from campus. Similarly, adding a few categories to the USD chart of accounts could enhance the accuracy of our estimates of emissions associated with campusrelated travel. Accounting was able to add these categories during the development of this plan. USD will continue to identify areas across campus where minor changes to the way we collect data can significantly improve our GHG emissions analysis.

EDUCATION AND CULTURE Many of the actions to reduce GHG emissions in the CAP involve technology or equipment improvements, however, behavior change plays an increasingly important role. USD will develop a strategy to educate our campus community about the CAP, our commitments, and what role each of us can play to reduce emissions. The ultimate goal is to embrace our Culture of Care to include the important issue of global climate change. To educate students about the importance of the CAP and sustainability on campus, USD will develop programs to expose students to USD’s commitments during prospective student tours, Preceptorial Programs and in Living Learning Communities. Similarly, USD will promote these ideas to faculty and staff during recruitment and orientation. 41


RESEARCH AND ACADEMIC INTEGRATION The CAP provides an opportunity to turn the USD campus into a living laboratory and for students and faculty to conduct engaged research. USD will develop and maintain a list of research projects that could help implement and evaluate the CAP. Examples of such research include a study of actual use of parking spots on campus, advancing dynamic electric load management, integration of energy storage and onsite generation, electric vehicle charging patterns, and benchmark building energy and water use.

$

FINANCING

Cost is an important criterion to evaluate and prioritize the actions included in the CAP. USD will develop an innovative financing strategy that includes the following elements: INCREASE CAPACITY TO IDENTIFY AND SECURE EXTERNAL FUNDING Numerous external funding opportunities exist to secure funding for CAP implementation, including foundation grants, research grants, and PACE financing. USD will develop additional capacity and a regular process to identify, screen, and, when appropriate, apply for external funding opportunities to offset implementation costs. ESTABLISH SUSTAINABLE FINANCING MODELS Many projects to reduce greenhouse gases also reduce operating costs. Such savings can be used to fund additional projects. USD will explore and develop financing models to ensure long-term and sustainable funding for CAP implementation. Examples of such models include revolving green funds or revenue recycling policies to allocate a portion of the costs savings for additional CAP or sustainability-related measures. DEVELOP POLICIES ON PROJECT RATE OF RETURN USD will develop a policy related to the required rate of return for CAP-related projects, including consideration of life-cycle cost analysis.

AUTHORITY AND RESPONSIBILITY By its very nature, the CAP cuts across all operational units. As such, responsibility for implementing the CAP can be diffuse and at times unclear. To ensure effective implementation and clear lines of accountability, USD will determine the appropriate authority and responsibility for all aspects of the CAP. This includes responsibility for achieving overall CAP goals and for achieving goals related to specific units on campus. To help institutionalize CAP implementation, USD will consider incorporating CAP milestones into job performance criteria. 42


IMPLEMENTATION, FUNDING, TRACKING, AND MONITORING CAP IMPLEMENTATION PLAN USD will adopt a detailed implementation plan to assign responsibility for each CAP action to the appropriate department, identify specific actions necessary to complete the action, develop a timeline for completion, identify needed policy changes, identify existing resources (financial and other), and identify needed resources. The implementation plan will also prioritize the CAP actions and address funding implications.

MONITORING PROGRESS USD will regularly monitor progress of the CAP. As part of this effort, USD will conduct a GHG emissions inventory every 1-2 years, develop metrics to measure progress on a regular basis, develop and release a monitoring/ progress report every two years, and update the CAP strategies and goals as needed to reflect the latest available data and actual emissions.

43


HOW THE CAP WAS DEVELOPED

The Climate Action Plan was developed by the USD Sustainability Task Force, a representative group of campus constituencies including students, faculty, administrators, and staff selected by the Executive Council. Additional subcommittees were created for specific CAP topics: Energy and Water, Transportation, Resilience, Waste, Travel, and Fleet. The subcommittees consisted of members of the Task Force as well as affected and interested parties for each of the given topics. The Task Force held monthly meetings from January to May 2016 and reviewed the recommendations from the subcommittees. In total, these subcommittees included 50 participants, both internal and external, that reviewed emissions inventories and suggested potential reduction strategies. In addition to the Task Force and subcommittees, campus outreach regarding the Climate Action Plan included hosting open forums and pop-up events (35 attendees), as well as conducting an online feedback survey (46 CAP survey responses). A separate commuter survey was conducted to evaluate transportation to and from campus (1,510 Commuter Survey responses). In total, the Task Force received feedback from more than 1,600 participants. After obtaining feedback and recommendations, the Task Force took the CAP to the Executive Council for sign off and approval. The greenhouse gas inventory was calculated by USD’s Energy Policy and Initiatives Center (EPIC) from data gathered from various departments across campus including Facilities, Procurement, and Institutional Research and Planning. Details of that process are contained in a technical addendum located on the CAP website.

44 44


APPENDIX A: GOAL SUMMARY ENERGY

COMMUTING

1

2

3

Reduce projected electricity use by 25% by 2020 and 35% by 2035.

Reduce projected natural gas consumption by 25% by 2020 and 35% by 2035.

Increase use of cleaner and renewable sources of energy by 7.5% by 2020 and 40% by 2035.

ZERO WASTE Increase projected solid waste diversion to 60% by 2020 and 75% by 2035

Reduce projected miles driven for commuting by 2% by 2020 and 12% by 2035.

WATER

FLEET

Reduce projected water use by 20% by 2020 and 30% by 2035.

1

2

Reduce projected fossil fuel consumption of USD fleet 5% by 2020 and 15% by 2035 through optimized use.

Reduce projected fossil fuel consumption of USD fleet 5% by 2020 and 20% by 2035 by increasing clean-fuel vehicle use..

AIR TRAVEL Offset 100% of USD-related business and educational travel by 2020 and continue to offset air travel through 2035

APPENDIX A

45


APPENDIX B: EMISSION REDUCTION STRATEGIES ENERGY

COMMUTING

Increase energy and water efficiency in USD operations (electricity and natural gas).

Increase cleaner and alternative modes of transportation.

Increase use of clean and renewable energy sources.

ZERO WASTE

46

AIR TRAVEL

Achieve Zero Waste in USD operations.

Reduce air travel and offset associated emissions.

FLEET

WATER

Increase use of cleaner and alternative modes of transportation.

Increase water efficiency in USD operations.

APPENDIX B


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS SUSTAINABILITY TASK FORCE Scott Anders

David Horber

Melissa Plaskonos

Director, Procurement Services and Print Shop

Michael Lovette-Colyer

Emma Rojas-Liseski

Michel Boudrias

Andre Mallie

Ky Snyder

Peter Marlow

Mike Williams

Director, Energy Policy Initiatives Center

Dawn Anderson

Associate Professor, Environmental and Ocean Sciences

Michael Catanzaro

Education and Outreach Graduate Assistant, Office of Sustinability

Assistant Vice President for University Ministry

Assistant Vice President, Auxiliary Services

Director of Sustainability

Associate Vice President, University Communications

Janet Courtney-Smith

Allison McCall

Assistant Vice-President for Budget and Treasury

Laura Engeman

Climate Collaborative Coordinator

Thomas Herrinton

Vice Provost, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Class of 2019

Paula Morreale

Sustainability Coordinator

Chris Navye

Assistant Vice President, Facilities Management

Assistant Director, Parking Services

Vice President, University Operations

Director, Changemaker Hub and Associate Professor, Political Science and International Relations

Dan Yourg

Associate Director of Athletics for Business

Greg Zackowski

Senior Assistant Director, Recreation Facilities and Sport Clubs

Assistant Provost for Community Engagement

OTHER CONTRIBUTORS Robert Brauer

Director of Building & Grounds Operations, Facilities Management

Jeff Cirillo

Education Outreach Graduate Assistant, Office of Sustinability, 2015-2016

Amber Elliott

Administrative Assistant, Office of Sustinability

Kira EspĂ­ritu

Director of International Studies Abroad, International Center

John Godfrey

Associate Director of Facilities and Operations, Residential Life

Yichao Gu

Technical Policy Analyst, Energy Policy Initiatives Center

Jae Kim

Assistant Professor, Industrial and Systems Engineering

Chelsea Knott Class of 2009

Rani Kumar Class of 2016

Josh Lawrence

Associate Director of Athletics, Facilities and Operations

Kristin Mitchell Class of 2016

Melissa Montoya

Programming Graduate Assistant, Office of Sustinability, 2015-2016

Carol Norman

Director of Campus Restaurants, Dining

Michael Plakosh

Energy Manager, Office of Sustainability, 2010-2015

Barbara Schatzer

Director of Risk Management, Human Resources

Gabriel Silva

Building Services Manager, Facilities Management

Nilmini Silva-Send

Assistant Director, Energy Policy Initiatives Center

Charles Thomas

Grounds and Transportation Manager, Facilities Management

Jonathan Oberg

Andrew Tirrell

Karen Oropeza

Danidu Wijekoon

Tram Services and Fleet Safety Manager, Public Safety

Executive Assistant, Human Resources

Assistant Professor, Political Science and International Relations

Metrics and Reporting Graduate Assistant, Office of Sustainability, 2013-2014

APPENDIX C

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5998 Alcala Park San Diego, California 92110 www.sandiego.edu/climate-action-plan/

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Fall 2016 University of San DIego Climate Action Plan  
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