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A UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS P U B L I C AT I O N F O R A LU M N I A N D F R I E N DS VOL.63, NO. 4 | Winter 2013

LEADERS IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY

KEEPING PEOPLE CONNECTED [ page

24 ]

Steering UNT Forward [ page 1 6] Peter Weller [ page 30] Reviving Communities [ page 34] n o r t h texa n . un t . edu

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CAN ART COMMUNICATE BIG DATA AT A GLANCE?

Image courtes

D

emonstrating the interconnections hidden in large-scale research data is no easy feat. The xREZ Lab is creating innovative ways to visually and audibly represent big data across multiple ďŹ elds and provides a collaborative space to fuse art, technology and science. At UNT, we are on a mission to connect interdisciplinary knowledge and artistically show the world how to see big data with new eyes.

— Ruth West

Associate professor, colleges of information, engineering, visual arts and design, arts and sciences, director of xREZ Lab

sy of: atlasinsilico.net Image courtesy of: atlasinsilico.net

F RO M OU R

President The UNT way A COMMUNITY OF PEOPLE DEDICATED TO THE HIGHEST GOALS

The No r t h Texan U N I V E R SI TY R E L AT I O N S ,

D ESI G N E R S

CO M M U N I C AT I O N S A N D

ST E V E N A LT U N A

M A R K E T I N G L E A D E R SH I P

K I T YO U N G

(’ 0 6)

V I C E P R ESI D E N T D E B O R A H L E L I A E RT

( ’ 9 6 M . E D.)

P H OTO G R A P H E R S M I CH A E L CL E M E N TS

A SS O C I AT E V I CE P R ESI D E N T

G A R Y PAY N E

M A RTY N E W M A N

J O N AT H A N R E Y N O L DS

( ’ 02 M . J .)

(’ 99)

A SS I STA N T V I CE P R ESI D E N T

V I D EO G R A P H E R

K E L L E Y R E ESE

B R A D H O LT

(’95)

(’ 0 9)

D I R EC TO R S

WRITERS

K E N N M O F F I TT

E R N EST I N E B O U S Q U E T

DENA MOORE

J ESSI C A D E L EÓ N

R O L A N D O N . R I VA S

N A N C Y KO L ST I A D R I E N N E N E TT L ES

M AG A Z I N E STA F F

B U D DY P R I CE

M A N AG I N G E D I T O R J U L I E E L L I OT T PAY N E

E L L E N R OSSE TT I ( ’ 97)

(’ 0 0 , ’ 0 8 M . J . )

CL AU D I A TAY LO R M A R G A R I TA V E N EG A S

E D I TO R S R A N D E N A H U L ST R A N D JILL KING

(’ 96)

J U L I E W EST ( ’ 88, ’ 07 M . J . )

L ESL I E W I M M E R

(’ 07 )

( ’ 9 3 M . S ., ’ 00 M . A .)

O N L I N E CO M M U N I C AT I O N S O N L I N E E D I TO R

G R EG A LT U N A

MICHELLE HALE

J ESSE G A R R I S O N

Jonathan Reynolds

(’ 02 )

E R I C VA N D E R G R I F F A RT D I R EC TO R SEAN ZEIGLER

( ’ 00)

ST U D E N T CO N T R I B U TO R S N ATA L I E C A B A L L E R O

P H OTO E D I T O R

L AU R E N F R O CK

ANGILEE WILKERSON

CR YSTA L H O L L I S J E N N I F E R K R AU SE

I N T EG R AT E D B R A N D I N G

Z ACH A R Y L A N G L E Y

J I L L I A N J O R DA N

JUN MA

W E S M A RT I N

( ’ 05 )

E R I C A M A RT I N E Z

( ’ 01 )

P R O J EC T M A N A G E M E N T E R I C A B LO U N T C L AU D I A CO O P E R

( ’ 06 )

The North Texan (ISSN 0468-6659) is published four times a year (in March, June, September and December) by the University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #311070, Denton, Texas 76203-5017, for distribution to alumni and friends of the university. Periodicals postage paid at Denton, Texas, and at additional mailing offices. The diverse views on matters of public interest that are presented in The North Texan do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the university. Publications staff can be reached at northtexan@unt.edu or 940-565-2108. Postmaster: Please send requests for changes of address, accompanied if possible by old address labels, to the University of North Texas, University Relations, Communications and Marketing, 1155 Union Circle #311070, Denton, Texas 76203-5017. The UNT System and the University of North Texas are the owners of all of their trademarks, service marks, trade names, slogans, graphic images and photography and they may not be used without permission. The University of North Texas does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, disability, marital status, ancestry, genetic information, citizenship, or veteran status in its application and admission process, educational programs and activities, employment policies and use of university facilities. Direct questions or concerns to the equal opportunity office, 940-565-2759, or the dean of students, 940-565-2648. TTY access is available at 940-369-8652. AA/EOE/ADA

Sincerely,

Created by the Division of University Relations, Communications and Marketing

V. Lane Rawlins President president@unt.edu

©2013 UNT URCM 12/13 (14-050)

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When I became interim president in 2010, I didn’t plan to stay longer than a year. But I fell in love with the work and people of UNT. Fortunately for me, I was given the opportunity to stay longer. Now, after nearly four years, I am retiring, although I will remain involved as President Emeritus. I believe that top-quality public education is a critical need in our state and nation. Not only does it change the lives of individuals who are able and willing to pursue it, it is essential to our society’s economic, social and political health. A few universities lead the way in this, and I see in UNT the opportunity, drive and commitment to be among those leaders. That has — in one way or another — been our destiny since we were founded in 1890. Our founding president, J.C. Chilton, described our promise and goal, “to become leaders in the education of the young men and women of Texas.” So, when we now declare our bold vision of providing the best undergraduate education and establishing UNT as one of the leading research and scholarly universities in America, we are elaborating on Chilton’s dream. UNT is devoted to excellence. We attract students who are talented and will build our society’s future. Our commitment to excel goes beyond teaching and research to providing a personal touch to students, effectively budgeting our resources, being on the frontier of technology, improving our campus and building a stronger athletics program. These must continue to be our priorities. UNT is a community of people dedicated to these highest goals — a commitment that I refer to as the “UNT way.” And, UNT has an environment where ideas can be freely expressed and people nurture each other. That is why I chose to stay, why I fell in love and why I will always be proud of my association with UNT. Thank you for your support.

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Inside

W I N T E R

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FEATURES

16 Steering UNT Forward

President V. Lane Rawlins led UNT to be the University for North Texas. By Ernestine Bousquet

30 Peter Weller Renée Vernon

UNT celebrates the notable actor, director and alumnus. By Margarita Venegas

32 Homecoming 2013 “Mean Green on the Big Screen”

34 Reviving Communities Alumni breathe new life into old neighborhoods. By Ellen Rossetti

38 Founder’s Circle DEPARTMENTS

Michael Clements

24

F R O M O U R P R E S I D E N T • 2

The UNT way D E A R N O R T H T E X A N • 5

JKF memories ... Airmen of Note UNT TODAY • 8

Leaders in High Technology

Celebrating excellence ... Distinguished Lecture Series ... Mean Green ... Ask an Expert

U S I N G S K I L L S L E A R N E D AT U N T, A LU M N I D R I V E

U N T M U S E • 1 9

I N N OVAT I O N AT T H E NAT I O N’ S TO P CO M PA N I E S . A S F O RWA R D T H I N K E R S , T H EY A R E M A K I N G ST R I D E S I N S O F T WA R E D EV E LO P M E N T, R A I L LO G I ST I C S , CO P P E R AND FIBER OP T I CS, C YB ERSECURI T Y A N D L E A R N I N G T E C H N O LO G I E S TO B R I N G P E O P L E TO G E T H E R . By Adrienne Nettles and Leslie Wimmer

Abby’s wish … Woodworking talent ... Young and Restless ... Vespers of 1610 EAGLES’ NEST • 40

Commitment to serve ... Connecting With Friends ... Neighborhood designs ... Friends We’ll Miss L A S T W O R D • 4 8

The Golden Eagles remember campus life 50 years ago.

Cover: Photography by Michael Clements

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Online

E X C L U S I V E S

n o r t ht exan .u nt.edu /on li n e

ONLINE FEATURES POP CULTURE ICON Step into the world of artist and alum Ron English and hear his approach to his work and how it has evolved. PREPARING FOR SOCHI Former Mean Green star Johnny Quinn makes transition from football player to bobsledding Olympic hopeful.

MORE ONLINE FEATURES • VIDEO: GOLDEN EAGLES • SLIDESHOW: HOMECOMING • VIDEO: HAPPY HOLIDAYS • VIDEO: HARPBEATS • VIDEO: BEYOND THE GREEN

GET CONNECTED Connect with us at facebook.com/ northtexas. Alex Scott

Heart of Mexico

T H I S S U M M E R , J O U R NA L I S M ST U D E N TS T E A M E D U P W I T H

Follow us at twitter.com/ northtexan. Watch us on youtube.com/ universitynorthtexas . Follow us at instagram.com/unt.

ST U D E N TS AT A S I ST E R S C H O O L I N M E X I CO TO T E L L STO R I E S A B O U T T H E I R I M M E R S I O N I N T H E L I V E S O F LO CA L C I T I Z E N S . V I S I T T H E P RO J E C T’S W E B S I T E F O R I N S P I R E D TA L E S WOV E N I N NA R R AT I V E , P H OTO A N D V I D E O.

When you see this arrow, join our North Texan community online at northtexan.unt.edu.

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Visit The North Texan online to: • Keep up with what’s happening between issues of The North Texan • Tell us what you think about our stories • Learn more about your fellow alumni • Write memorials about friends we’ll miss • Enjoy an array of additional stories, photos, videos and recordings

DEAR

North Texan Let us know what you think about news and topics covered in The North Texan. Letters may be edited for length and publication style. Read more letters and share your comments at northtexan.unt.edu.

JFK memories

On Nov. 22, 1963, I had broadcast the president’s motorcade from the corner of Main and Akard in the city’s heart, where vast crowds of cheering well-wishers had given JFK and his beautiful wife a warm welcome to Dallas. I had set starry-eyed children atop my KRLD Radio mobile unit’s luggage rack so that they could get a good view of the first couple. I was still reporting while Lee Harvey Oswald was killing President Kennedy barely more than a thousand yards away. I could not hear the three shots that echoed through Dealey Plaza. A few minutes later I was behind the wheel, speeding with my colleague Warren

Fulks to Parkland Hospital, where I drove around the barricades just set up by the police and Secret Service. I jumped the station wagon over the curb and across medians all the way to some 150 feet of Parkland’s emergency entrance. There among the growing crowd that had begun sifting into the parking lot and standing in vigil together, I broadcast the saddest scene of my life. Bob Huffaker (’69 M.A., ’74 Ph.D.) Denton Editor’s note: Huffaker, then a reporter for CBS television and radio affiliate KRLD, also relayed the news of Jack Ruby’s shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald to the national television audience live from the scene (pictured above in a photo courtesy of KRLD-TV, KDFW-TV/The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza). The 2004 book he co-wrote

with Bill Mercer (’66 M.A.), George Phenix and Wes Wise — When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963 — was released in a new 50th anniversary edition this fall. Huffaker also was featured in press around the world this November, including live on MSNBC and in documentaries on CBS, CNN, Discovery and PBS. See page 45 for some of the other UNT-related media coverage surrounding the anniversary. I recall with vivid memory how students on campus learned the news of John F. Kennedy’s death. Having left my dorm room in Terrill Hall for an advanced French class, as I crossed Avenue B near the old Language Arts Building, I became instantly aware that something was wrong. Rather than the bustling activity of students rushing to be somewhere, there was a pall of silence at every place you looked.

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Everywhere on the streets and lawns, people were frozen in their tracks. It was as though someone had pushed a “stop” button and all the robots ceased movement. Some students were quietly talking to one another in hushed tones; others were completely silent — meditating on the news they had just learned. Other students were in small groups, huddled around automobile radios where blow-by-blow reporting of news continued. It was from one of those radio broadcasts that I learned of the death of President Kennedy. No one knew yet what it all meant. As students of the early ’60s, we were accustomed to protesting world events we really didn’t understand. But this immediate event, only a few miles away, held an impact we could not comprehend. Donna Beth Lee Shaw (’65) Houston On Nov. 22, 1963, I was working for the State Department of Public Welfare on the second floor of the Old Red Courthouse. I watched the motorcade from my boss’s office in the round corner room at the corner of Main and Houston. The president and Jackie passed by right under the

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DEAR

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Airmen of Note Andre J. “Frenchy” Rheault, longtime UNT, Mean Green and Denton supporter and retired U.S. Air Force master sergeant, escorts World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., each year. On his latest trip, he met up with UNT alumni who are members of the U.S. Air Force Airmen of Note, the premier jazz ensemble of the U.S. Air Force, and sent us this photo. Pictured from left are Master Sgt. Doug Morgan (’96), baritone saxophone; Technical Sgt. Ben Polk (’08), bass trombone; Master Sgt. Ben Patterson (’96), lead trombone; Rheault; Master Sgt. Jeff Martin, trombone; Master Sgt. Andy Axelrad, alto sax; Master Sergeant (select) Tyler Kuebler (’95, ’97 M.M.), alto sax and music director; and Master Sgt. Blake Arrington (’02, ’04 M.M.), clarinet with concert band and Honor Flight Liaison for the group’s visit with the U.S. Air Force band. window. They turned onto Houston, then onto Elm, just as planned. About the time that the bus carrying the White House Press Corps passed, I heard three shots, but I thought surely they were firecrackers. When the radio began broadcasting reports that the president had been shot, I thought it was speculation based on the firecrackers. Of course, I was wrong. From my vantage point I could have also seen the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository, had I been looking. I just missed being an eye­ witness to the assassination. Dorothy Buice (’91 M.S.) Grand Prairie My father, my uncle and my two cousins and I made our trek to downtown Dallas

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to view the motorcade. The president and first lady had just passed by the old Dallas courthouse where we were standing when the shots rang out. We were all stunned! I can remember my Uncle Buck saying to my father, “Jones, I believe somebody just shot the president.” Soon Daddy ushered us into the Buick and we made our way back over the Houston Street viaduct into Oak Cliff. Not a word was spoken as we listened intently for details on the radio. Daddy took me back to school at T.W. Browne Junior High School where I was in the seventh grade. Soon after my arrival, the official announcement was made that the president was dead. Just a little while later, the announcement came over the loud speaker that Officer J.D.

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Tippit had been killed in the line of duty while trying to apprehend the suspect. Tippit’s son was an eighth-grader at my school. Silence, followed by tears and then sobs, filled our school. For me and many others who experienced that event, that one day will live in our memories forever. Jane Ann Shipp (’72, ’77 M.Ed.) Waxahachie

More history

After being inducted into the U.S. Secret Service and working during the John F.

Kennedy assassination (“Living History,” fall 2013), I was later assigned to former President Lyndon B. Johnson. I was there when LBJ met with President Richard Nixon in regard to a Vietnam treaty in February 1970. We exited the Oval Office and walked out the North Portico. I’m the one in the middle. Mike Howard (’60) McKinney

Excellent faculty Pursuant to your request to hear about excellent faculty members (fall 2013), I am very happy to recognize Dr. David A. McEntire as the academic and prolific scholar, friend and most important exemplary person in my life who provided me with

outstanding, caring and persistent mentoring while I was engaged in my Ph.D. work at UNT. I am confident that after witnessing Dr. McEntire’s work ethic, competence and humble and caring attitude, I am a better educator, scholar and person myself. UNT and indeed the world are fortunate and better places because of clearly outstanding educators and scholars such as Dr. McEntire. He is the main reason for my success as a Ph.D. and in my tenure-track experience now as an educator and scholar at Western Illinois University in the Department of Health Sciences’ emergency management program.

Best wishes always to Dr. McEntire and to UNT in the years ahead. May truly great things come to both — deservedly so!

Medicine/Division of Infectious Diseases. UNT and Dr. Richardson got me off to a good start. Victoria L. Harris (’83 Ed.D.) Nashville, Tenn.

Heriberto Urby (’10 Ph.D.) Macomb, Ill. Rarely a day goes by that I don’t hear Dr. Peggy Richardson’s voice in my ear saying, “There is no good writing, there is only good re-writing.” She was the teacher of teachers. I give the credit for my success totally to her! I retired in October as director of education at the Tennessee AIDS Education & Training Center and associate in medicine at Vanderbilt University’s Department of

Uniform designs

My daughter Kristen Ashworth (’12) and I noticed the photo of the Dallas Cowboys Rhythm and Blue Dancers in the fall issue. Kristen, who earned her

UNT degree in fashion design, designed those uniforms. She also designed the warm-ups and practice wear for the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders. These designs can be seen on season 8 of the TV show Making the Team. She also designed other uniforms for the Rhythm and Blue Dancers as well as the uniforms of the Allen Ice Angels. Another great alum from UNT! Grace Ashworth Salado

Tell us about ... your high-tech student days If you would like to comment on a story, share your North Texas memories or photos, submit news or obituaries, or otherwise get in touch with us, we would love to hear from you. Email: northtexan@unt.edu Online: northtexan.unt.edu (follow the “Contact Us” link)

Reporting on some of our alumni who work in high-tech fields (see cover story, page 24)

Phone: 940-565-2108

made us think about what was considered high-tech when we were in college. Students

Fax: 940-369-8763

fresh out of high school have lived in a digital, wired world all their lives, but we

Mail: The North Texan;

remember when writing a term paper the night before it was due was made much easier

University of North Texas;

by the new-fangled self-correcting typewriter. Do you have any memories of the latest

Division of University Relations,

technology that helped you along your way at UNT? Share your stories with us at

Communications and Marketing;

northtexan@unt.edu or mail your letters to the address at the right.

1155 Union Circle #311070; Denton, Texas 76203-5017

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p / 10

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Global Connection

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Ask an Expert

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UNT Alumni Association

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Gary Payne

Today

IN THIS SECTION Brilliantly Green

CELEBRATING EXCELLENCE UNT honors faculty for their steadfast dedication to teaching and scholarship.

Read more about this year’s awards event at facultysuccess.unt.edu.

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MANY OF UNT’S 1,500 FACULTY MEMBERS are national and international experts in their fields, earning top honors, fellowships and awards. The university’s Salute to Faculty Excellence Week celebrates faculty for excelling as teachers and scholars. The celebration this fall paid tribute to the best of the best, culminating with a black-tie dinner at UNT’s Apogee Stadium. “Our faculty are committed to furthering our understanding of the world through research and scholarship and then sharing that knowledge and insight with students,” says President V. Lane Rawlins. “That’s what makes them such great teachers. They innovate and educate.”

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E M I N E N T F A C U LT Y A W A R D

Randolph B. “Mike” Campbell, Regents Professor of history, earned the UNT Foundation’s Eminent Faculty Award. The award recognizes a faculty member who has made outstanding and sustained contributions to scholarly-creative activity, teaching and service. Campbell, Lone Star Chair of Texas History and chief historian for the Texas State Historical Association, is a leading historian on Southern and Texas history and through his scholarship has changed how we think about Texas’ past and its connection to the South. As one of the highest faculty achievers at UNT, the Eminent Faculty Award recipient serves as an inspiration for the entire UNT community.

Michael Clements

F A C U LT Y C O M M U N I T Y E N G A G E M E N T A W A R D Ruthanne “Rudi” Thompson, associate professor of biological sciences, was honored with the UNT Foundation’s Faculty Community Engagement Award. The distinction is given to a faculty member who has the sensitivity to understand and work across organizational boundaries and the leadership to build bridges among community institutions. Since joining UNT, Thompson has gained recognition for bringing innovative environmental research and education to her laboratory and classroom and to K-12 schools through outreach. In 1995, she helped develop UNT’s Elm Fork Education Center and since that time has introduced 65 school districts in the North Texas region to hands-on science and created events to engage 1,000 families in environmental science activities at UNT.

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Michael Clements

Michael Clements

Faculty awards and recognition Showcasing faculty greatness is at the heart of Salute to Faculty Excellence Week, but it’s also an opportunity for students to say thanks to teachers for their hard work. UNT’s faculty members help students by challenging and supporting them — principles embodied in UNT’s new Succeed at UNT campaign. This fall’s week of celebrations and networking events included the Thank-A-Teacher Ice Cream Social, at which students shared an ice cream sundae with their favorite professors. UNT also bestowed 30 awards and cash prizes on faculty for their accomplishments in teaching, research, leadership and service. The top three awards are supported by the UNT Foundation.

F A C U LT Y L E A D E R S H I P A W A R D

Angela Wilson, Regents Professor of chemistry, received the UNT Foundation’s Faculty Leadership Award. The honor acknowledges a faculty member who makes a significant impact on the academic enterprise through innovative initiatives, leadership and service. Wilson has excelled in this respect, earning national and international awards for being a trailblazer in the field of computational chemistry. She is leading a research team that is working to create chemical models that will accurately compute energetics across the periodic table. She also is a fellow of the American Chemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Today Pass it on: Great things are happening at UNT. Learn about them here and share our successes with your family and friends. • Eagle Feather soars for decade. The UNT Honors College’s student research publication, The Eagle Feather, celebrated its 10th issue this fall. Since 2004, the online journal has prepared undergraduate students for publishing peer-reviewed articles as graduate students and professionals. Visit the journal’s anniversary issue at eaglefeather.honors.unt.edu. • HackFest Winners. UNT joined forces with LeadingAge — an association of nonprofit aging service providers — to host its first ever HackFest in Dallas this fall. Professionals and students from UNT and other universities competed for three days to develop new and innovative technologies that allow seniors to live independently while receiving necessary home care. Clinching first place was UNT doctoral student David Adamo Jr. and his four teammates from other universities for their videoconferencing app. • You gotta Lovett. Jazz studies senior Chad Willis, right, got the offer of his life this fall when saxophone professor and alumnus Brad Leali (’89), left, invited him to fill in as a trumpet player on a 24-city U.S. tour with singer-songwriter Lyle Lovett. Willis, former lead trumpet player for UNT’s One O’Clock Lab Band, gained valuable experience and, of course, delighted in meeting Lovett. “It was really exciting,” Willis says.

B R I L L I A N T LY GREEN

Thomas Judd

James Gilmer

Murphy luncheon

Daymond John, founder of the fashion brand FUBU and a cast member of ABC’s Shark Tank, spoke on entrepreneurship at the Murphy Center for

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Entrepreneurship’s 2013 Leadership Luncheon this fall. As founder of the fashion brand “For Us By Us,” John made and sold tie-top hats on the streets of Queens, growing the brand to $350 million in annual sales. In 2009, John joined Shark Tank, in which he serves as one of the “sharks” listening to entrepreneurial business plans and choosing ideas in which to invest. During this year’s luncheon, alumnus Norm Miller (’62),

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chair of Interstate Batteries, received the Murphy Award for Lifetime Achievement in Entrepreneurship. Every year, the Leadership Luncheon brings together students and business and community leaders to network and celebrate rising stars. Crime certificate

Participants delve into the reality version of CSI in a new state-of-the-art crime scene investigations class offered by

UNT’s Professional Development Institute. Designed for the working professional, the class teaches real-world skills — from dusting for fingerprints to processing trace and impression evidence — to earn a crime scene investigations certificate. Classes are taught in UNT’s Crime Scene City, a simulated community, and at local law enforcement agencies. Learn more at certificate.pdi.org/ online_programs.html.

Rainn Wilson spoke this fall at the UNT Coliseum as part of UNT’s Distinguished Lecture Series.

Michael Clements

Distinguished lecture

You can help ensure UNT students — among the best and brightest — keep learning more by helping shape UNT’s Quality Enhancement Plan focused on improving student learning. Visit the plan’s website at qep.unt.edu for details.

Rainn Wilson is best known for playing Dwight Schrute on NBC’s The Office, but it was a cause dear to him that he spoke to students about as a guest speaker for UNT’s Distinguished Lecture Series this fall. Wilson discussed SoulPancake: Chew on Life’s Big Question, a New York Times best-selling book and social project he developed to encourage discussions on spirituality, creativity, arts and philosophy. Wilson, who was raised in the Baha’i faith, says his life didn’t come full circle until he realized his dream of acting wasn’t fulfilling and he returned

to his faith. Through SoulPancake, he hopes to help others find their happiness in life. Students also participated in a Q&A session with Wilson. The series’ past speakers have included former President George W. Bush, former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, musician John Legend and Mythbusters Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman. Autism grant

A new $1.2 million federally funded project at UNT will provide full scholarships to 40 special education teachers who are seeking master’s degrees in special education with a concentration in autism intervention, and on-the-job

coaching in evidence-based practices for students with autism. Systematic Training for Autism Teachers, also known as Project STArT, will furnish a professional clinical supervisor with a graduate degree in special education and certification in applied behavior analysis to help train teachers. Housed in the College of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology and funded by a U.S. Department of Education grant, the program will launch in 2014 and build on UNT’s efforts to become a leader in autism research and resources. In fall 2012, the UNT Kristin Farmer Autism Center opened as a resource for families.

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Gary Payne

PA R K A N D R ECR E AT I O N F E L LOW M. Jean Keller, interim vice president for community engagement and professor of kinesiology, health promotion and recreation, was named a fellow of the American Academy for Park and Recreation Administration for her dedication and leadership in the profession and active involvement in communities and state, regional and national organizations. As a fellow, Keller will conduct research, publish scholarly papers and sponsor seminars. She also will work to advance the knowledge of recreation practitioners and educators and promote a broader understanding of why parks, recreation and conservation are important for the public good. |

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Hahnfeld Hoffer Stanford

brick pavers that will become part of the center’s porch and walkway. Learn more at greeklife.unt.edu/center/pavers. New speaker series

New Greek center

UNT’s thriving Greek system soon will have a new home when the university’s new Greek Life Center is completed on Welch Street. The new center will house UNT’s Greek administration and serve as a central location for fraternities and sororities to host Greek activities.

The 6,000-square-foot center — slated to open in spring 2014 — also will provide a site for Greek alumni to meet and stay engaged with UNT, home to 41 fraternities and sororities. The center will be the first stand-alone Greek Life Center in the U.S. Students, alumni and faculty can leave their legacy by buying

The new UNT Kuehne Speaker Series on National Security showcases the university’s excellence in military history, political science, economics, sustainability, logistics, peace policy studies, engineering, computer science and cybersecurity. The first series launched this fall in collaboration with the World Affairs Council of Dallas-Fort Worth as an opportunity to highlight UNT’s nationally and

internationally recognized programs and faculty engaged in multidisciplinary research related to national security issues. The series is named for alumnus Ernie W. Kuehne Jr. (’66), who pledged $300,000 to support it. Guest speaker Gen. Michael Hayden, a retired four-star general and former director of the National Security Agency, will speak Feb. 4, and guest speaker Robert Kaplan, an author, geopolitical analyst and senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, will lecture May 6. Buy tickets and learn more at kuehneseries.unt.edu.

Basketball opens first season in Conference USA

Rick Yeatts

The Mean Green men’s and women’s basketball teams will enjoy more media exposure, tougher competition and regional rivalries as members of Conference USA. The men’s basketball team opened its 2013-14 season Nov.1 with head coach Tony Benford leading the team to its first win of the season with the help of Vertrail Vaughns, Kelvin Gaines, Brandan Walton, T.J. Taylor, Armani Flannigan, Maurice Aniefiok and Colin Voss. Men’s basketball entered the season on a high note. Former player Tony Mitchell was selected 37th overall in the NBA draft by the Detroit Pistons, becoming the highest NBA draft pick in Mean Green history. Mean Green women’s basketball also looks to take major steps forward its first season in C-USA under the leadership of head coach Mike Petersen. Point guard Candice Adams, one of the top players in Texas, will be important to helping the team secure victories on the court this season. Returning top scorer and Sun Belt third-team selection Alexis Hyder, left, also is one to watch. And in Mean Green football, the team became eligible for a bowl game for the first time since 2004. Read more on the back cover and get the latest bowl updates and ticket information at meangreensports.com.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

N OTA B L E A LU MS CR OSS PAT H S Two UNT alums — former U.S. House of Representatives clerk Lorraine Miller (’75) and Getty Images photographer Chip Somodevilla (’95) — crossed paths on the web. The photo taken by Somodevilla of Miller, left, was published in a USA Today online story about Miller’s appointment as interim president and CEO of the NAACP. Miller made history as the first African American and only the third woman to serve as a House officer. Read more about them at northtexan.unt.edu/cross-paths.

Gerontology partnership

GLOBAL CONNECTION

>>

and Sustainability in Nigeria. In March, UNT and Nigeria’s National Universities Commission entered a formal agreement to create Nigeria’s program. Under the agreement, professors from 11 universities in Nigeria selected a total of 24 students to participate in the pilot program. The students completed their first series of hybrid courses this summer and are taking online classes from Nigeria this fall. In spring 2014, the students will come to UNT to take their final courses and the research portion of the certificate. James Swan, associate

professor of applied gerontology at UNT, says the program helps to foster research collaborations internationally, to address global issues and to increase international student recruitment. “This educational and research collaboration is helping bring recognition to an important and meaningful issue in the U.S. and abroad,” Swan says. Atumah believes this is just the beginning. “There’s so much that UNT can do and gain from this partnership,” he says.

Keith Turner

Oscar Atumah (’13 Ph.D.) wanted to study a subject that he could bring back to his homeland of Nigeria. And in just two years, Atumah helped establish an applied gerontology program for Nigerian universities with the help of UNT’s program. “I could not ask for anything better than identifying an area that is lacking in one’s home country and gaining knowledge in that area so as to go home and make improvements,” Atumah says. This summer, Atumah and faculty members from UNT’s applied gerontology program, including Keith Turner, associate professor and director of the certificate program, visited Nigeria to help their peers create courses at their respective universities that can be taken to earn a UNT applied gerontology certificate. The Nigerian professors also plan to work with the Nigerian Dave Omokaro Foundation on establishing a Center for Aging

From left, Oscar Atumah; Nassiru Eplong with NUC; UNT faculty members James Swan and Ami Moore; liaison Emem Omokaro; and UNT Dallas faculty member Iftekhar Amin visit a Nigerian market.

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Michael Clements

Today

M.P.A. scholarship

This fall,Tyler Brewer, a second-year student in UNT’s Master of Public Administration program, received the Edwin O. Stene Academic Scholarship from the Interna-

tional City/County Management Association. The scholarship is awarded to full-time graduate students specializing in local government at universities recognized by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Public Administration. Brewer hopes to pursue a career in city management. U.S. News & World Report ranks UNT’s city management/urban policy master’s program eighth in the nation and first in Texas.

TAMS turns 25

Thousands of Texas’ best and brightest high school students have gone through UNT’s Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science to complete their first two years of college while earning a high school diploma. This year, the program celebrates 25 years since enrolling its first class. Today, 4,000 gifted students with an interest in mathematics and science have graduated from TAMS, one of only seven

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such programs in the U.S. This year, two TAMS students were named Siemens competition regional finalists and 18 students were named semifinalists, more than any school in the nation. To mark the 25-year milestone, TAMS is digitally preserving photos, documents, letters and a scrapbook from one of its first classes on the UNT Digital Library. Read more at northtexan.unt.edu/ tams-25.

Ask an Expert

How can you give an effective presentation?

I

t’s something that nearly every employee has to do, and something many people hate: standing up in front of coworkers — or even worse, at a conference where you barely know anyone — and giving a presentation. Anyone can learn to bury the butterflies in their stomach and give a stellar presentation, says Michael Gibson, associate professor of communication design. Gibson teamed up with communication design and theatre alum Megan Mead (’10) to speak before 1,000 people at the 2013 South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin about the most effective ways to present ideas to small and large groups. The conference is a leading go-to venue for presenting innovative ideas. Gibson offers the following advice to help others make their presentations confidently:

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Get physical • Deep breathing exercises prior to the presentation can help calm you. • Shake out your arms. Stand up. Walk around. Don’t go from a sedentary position straight into a presentation. • Tongue twisters prepare your mouth muscles. Repeat: “Buh, duh, fuh, duh, guh, duh” or “Toy boat, toy boat, toy boat.” — Margarita Venegas

Jonathan Reynolds

Remember the three P’s • Plan what to say. Think carefully about the structure of your presentation. Few can “wing it” successfully. • Prepare yourself. Good presentations make clear arguments, not assertions. Present facts that prove points based on evidence. • Practice speaking out loud in a quiet area. Speak to a chair or objects in the room and direct your gaze.

Focus on your audience • Break down complex concepts to make them understandable. Give two or three “take-aways” that show why your idea is important. • Create empathy about your idea so that audience members care about the idea and understand why they should care. • Be engaging. Don’t read directly from slides. Show enthusiasm.

Fulbright honors

Quail research

This fall, chapters of the statewide Quail Coalition contributed $100,000 to the UNT Quail program’s research, which focuses on linking fragmented populations of Northern Bobwhite Quail to form large, sustainable populations across the North Texas Quail Corridor. The hope is to make the quail more resilient and able to better withstand stressors such as heat. UNT Quail also works to teach younger generations to be stewards of the land, wildlife and environment.

FW Creations

PLANT SIGNALING Ron Mittler, professor of biological sciences, led a research study outlining how plants identify stress factors, such as heat, disease or toxins, and signal to the rest of the plant to defend itself against those incoming stressors. Mittler worked with Vladimir Shulaev, professor of biological sciences, and researchers from Bar-Ilan University on the study, showing that plants have signaling mechanisms almost as fast as those in humans to help them survive. The research could allow farmers to one day control these defenses to better protect crops from threats. Mittler’s study was published in The Plant Cell, the journal of the American Society of Plant Biologists.

Glen Biglaiser, associate professor of political science, earned a Fulbright teaching and research grant to the Catholic University in Santiago, Chile, where he lectured and researched economic policies in Latin America this spring. Gabriel Carranza, adjunct research professor of biological sciences, was chosen for a Fulbright Specialist Project at the Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa in Brazil this fall to help build a universityalumni relationship program. With a Fulbright Specialist grant, James Meernik, professor of political science, lectured at Soochow University in Taipei, Taiwan, and worked to advance peace, democracy and human rights in the Asia-Pacific region this fall.

From left, Ben Joyner (’74), Mark Miller (’80), Michael Monticino, President V. Lane Rawlins, UNT System Chancellor Lee Jackson.

UNT Alumni Association This fall, the UNT Alumni Association celebrated a new agreement that more closely aligns the association and the university and provides more services to its members. At a ceremony before the Mean Green’s football season opener Aug. 31, the association and UNT’s Division of Advancement announced the new partnership, which will enhance alumni engagement and student networking opportunities and create new membership services. “Alumni are the university’s strongest advocates and supporters,” says Michael Monticino, vice president for advancement. “Together we will accomplish great things as one UNT family.” The alumni association remains a nonprofit with an independent board of directors while taking advantage of new ways to connect with the university’s 361,000 alumni on a broader scale, says Ben Joyner (’74), who was the UNT Alumni Association president at the signing of the agreement. “We’re writing a new chapter in the history of alumni relations at UNT,” Joyner says. In September, alumnus Mark Miller (’80) assumed duties as the association’s president. To join the association or learn more, visit untalumni.com, email alumni@unt.edu or call 940-565-2834.

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Steering

UNT Forward

Joining UNT in 2010, President V. Lane Rawlins brought boldness, vision and discipline to the university. by Ernestine Bousquet

“UNT is more than a place of learning. We are an agent of change. We believe that students deserve the best, and we work hard to make sure they get it.”

Jonathan Reynolds

— V. Lane Rawlins, UNT’s 15th president President V. Lane Rawlins likes to talk life lessons — many reflect the homespun philosophy of his farm upbringing. One of his favorites is about the farmer who cherishes his 40-year-old ax. It’s had 10 new handles and three new heads, but it’s a great old ax, the farmer says. The lesson underscores a point Rawlins made often as UNT’s 15th president — UNT always will excel as a student-focused university, no matter what changes occur. Now that Rawlins is retiring as president, that example is very pertinent. “I’ve often said that UNT is more than a place of learning. We are an agent of change. We believe that students deserve the best, and we work hard to make sure they get it,” Rawlins says. “So while people come and go, the UNT spirit remains the same.” Known for his sense of humor and down-to-earth persona, Rawlins, who joined UNT in May 2010, is a leader with vision. At UNT, he pushed for a more effective organization to give students the best education possible and to create opportunities at every turn. Driven by the declaration of four bold goals spearheaded by Rawlins, UNT is growing its reputation with high-quality education, innovative programs for research and scholarship, and leading researchers, scholars and artists. It’s also creating cuttingedge facilities and providing more effective service and engagement. Rawlins will remain involved with UNT through a President Emeritus appointment to work on special projects to help the university in key areas. “President Rawlins was the right president at the right time for UNT,” UNT System Chancellor Lee Jackson says. “He brought the wisdom and experience of having already been a university president. He brought a passion to help students succeed. And he brought great vision and discipline to our flagship university.”

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Michael Clements Michael Clements

Michael Clements

President V. Lane Rawlins and his wife, Mary Jo. ride in the 2012 Homecoming Parade; Rawlins speaks with students on campus. Driving force Under Rawlins’ leadership, UNT has continued its advance as a driving force in higher education, enrolling and graduating record numbers of students. This fall, UNT reached an enrollment high of 36,221 students, which included its most academically talented freshman class as well as the largest enrollment of doctoral students. And more importantly, UNT is a graduation leader — third behind only Texas A&M and UT Austin in the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded each year by Texas public universities. During Rawlins’ tenure, UNT strengthened its research and scholarship activity while attracting and cultivating distinguished faculty. UNT now has two National Academy of Engineering members and a National Academy of Sciences member on faculty. And research funding increased across the board. Federally reported research expenditures grew 55 percent from fiscal year 2010 to fiscal year 2013. Culture of engagement In addition to focusing on education and research, Rawlins also worked to strengthen UNT’s engagement culture. He sounded the drum and pounded the pavement to remind people that UNT is the University of and for North Texas. Rawlins concentrated on fundraising, community partnerships and image building. During his tenure, UNT landed milestone gifts, created a new community engagement division and launched a new brand campaign, “A green light to greatness.” The formula worked. UNT had a banner year of giving in 2011 with more than $51 million in gifts and sponsorships that impact virtually every area of the university. This year, UNT unveiled the public phase of its fundraising campaign, The light is green. The time

is now. The Campaign for UNT, which introduced an era of stronger fundraising and engagement. Believing that athletics fosters engagement, reputation and pride, Rawlins helped to strengthen UNT’s athletic program. Just two years after opening Apogee Stadium with a $20 million sponsorship, UNT joined Conference USA this year, which has brought more competition and media exposure. Foundation for growth Shared decision-making and strategic planning were the hallmark of Rawlins’ administration. He created President’s Councils that bring together campus leaders to collaborate on key decisions for the university’s future and led the creation of UNT’s new strategic plan. “President Rawlins did so many things to steer UNT on the path to excellence,” Provost Warren Burggren says. “And he continually reminded us to develop stretch goals - indeed, bold goals - and reach for the stars.” Lifetime in higher education Rawlins has devoted his career to public universities, starting as a college student and ending as a three-time university president, because he believes that great education should be available to everyone able and willing to pursue it. “There is nothing else that has the power to change people’s lives like public universities do — especially ones as good as UNT,” Rawlins says. “I’m honored to have been a part of the greatness that exists at this university.” Read more about Rawlins’ accomplishments at northtexan.unt.edu/rawlins-farewell. Winter 2013

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ART + PERFORMANCE + CULTURE = UNT Open your mind. Catch some inspiration. At UNT, we host events to broaden your horizons, engage your intellect and turn on your heart. Please join us this winter and spring.

Kiki Smith, Transformations

Internationally renowned sculptor and printmaker and 2013-14 artist-inresidence for UNT’s Institute for the Advancement of the Arts

Jan. 29-Feb. 27

UNT on the Square — 109 N. Elm St. in Denton untonthesquare.unt.edu

The Vocal Majority Chorus

Dallas-based men’s chorus of 100-plus volunteers from all walks of life that’s been billed as “America’s Premier Pops Chorus,” presented by the Fine Arts Series

8 p.m. Feb. 4

Murchison Performing Arts Center — Winspear Performance Hall Tickets: 940-369-7802 thempac.com

Ron English (’84), Brandit Popmart

UNT alum and one of the most prolific and culturally pertinent artists alive today, presented by the Fine Arts Series

March 3-8

UNT on the Square — 109 N. Elm St. in Denton union.unt.edu/fas

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee 7:30 p.m. April 17, 19, 24, 25, 26 2 p.m. April 18, 27

Radio, Television, Film and Performing Arts Building — University Theater Tickets: 940-565-2428 danceandtheatre.unt.edu

JUstin CUrtin

The 2005 Tony Award-winning musical comedy, presented by the UNT Department of Dance and Theatre

Muse

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Television and Film

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Christie A. Wood (’78)

Books

ABBY’S WISH Member of first lab band and longtime instrument repairman makes flute-playing dreams come true.

For a link to the schematics and to read more about Wood, visit northtexan.unt.edu/abbys-wish.

WHEN 10-YEAR-OLD ABBY GIESEKE, WHO WAS born without a fully developed left hand, was determined to play the flute, there was no one better to help her than Clarence “Woody” Wood. Wood — who played clarinet in UNT’s first lab band from 1946 to 1949 — is not your average instrument repairman. He reconfigured the keys on the flute so it can be played with the right hand only and built a stand to support it. Now, not only has Abby’s dream come true, but Wood shared the schematics online for others after requests poured in. “I didn’t think I could do it,” he says of the complex alterations. “But I thought I’d give it a try.”

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Muse Books Race and the Cold War In English professor Jacqueline Foertsch’s “Cold War Literature and Culture” class, she and her students explored novels that featured an interracial cast of characters trying to survive the atomic age. That inspired her to write Reckoning Day: Race, Place and the Atom Bomb in Postwar America (Vanderbilt University Press), which examines African Americans’ response to the Cold War in novels, press coverage, films, protest work

of civil rights leaders and even popular music. “In addition, the ‘atomic’ era in U.S. history also was the civil rights era, and many progressively minded white authors interested in atomic survival wanted to diversify the characters who populated their novels,” Foertsch says. “Each did so in remarkable ways.”

Custer and the media In his book Shooting Arrows and Slinging Mud: Custer, the Press and the Little Bighorn (University of Oklahoma Press), journalism professor James Mueller examines the press coverage of

Custer’s Last Stand in 1876 — the battle between federal troops and Northern Plains Indians that has been mythologized through the years. “Many newspapers were sympathetic to the Indian side and blamed the government for starting the war,” Mueller says. “Although Custer was a national hero, journalists made jokes about the battle, writing things like ‘Custer’s death was Sioux-icide.’”

Supreme decisions Paul M. Collins Jr., associate professor of political science, and Lori Ringhand, a law professor at the

University of Georgia, were frustrated by how the media and academia portrayed confirmation hearings for the highest judicial office in the U.S. as empty rituals. They use historical and statistical methods to challenge that view in Supreme Court Confirmation Hearings and Constitutional Change (Cambridge University Press). “The hearings are an important democratic check on the discretion inevitably exercised by Supreme Court justices,” Collins says. “Through the hearings, the people are able — over the long run — to influence the constitutional choices made by the court.”

Woodworking talent Austin Heitzman (’02) once created his own artifacts, such as a dime novel cover and a costume, for a character he made up that he claimed was a member of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show and was his great-great grandfather — for a painting class. But his imagination and education at UNT helped lead him to found Five Fifths Furniture. His designs use the outside edges of trees — the gnarly bark — as a sculptural embellishment to mimic the classical furniture of the 18th and 19th centuries. His highboy piece won the notable 2012 NICHE Award for Cabinetry from the Buyers Market of American Craft in Philadelphia. “The conversation in class with my professor Annette Lawrence was never ‘Why would you do such a thing in a painting class?’ but ‘What intellectual merit does this idea have?’” he says. “I believe without this I would never have had the audacity to move into furniture making.” After he graduated from UNT, he earned his M.F.A. from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University and moved to Portland, Ore. He was growing bonsai trees as a hobby, and he became fascinated by how lumber is derived from trees. He made a plan. In five years, he would make all the furniture in his house from trees. “At the end of that five years, I was doing it for a living,” he says. It’s a business that he loves. “The moment the first coat of finish goes on a piece is one of the most exciting moments for me,” he says. “Through experience I usu-

Ashley May Heitzman

ally know what to expect, but since I’m working with nature, there are always surprises. The finish is the window into the wood that finally lets me see if my efforts will be rewarded or not. After this point, I’m ready to send the piece on its way and begin the next one.”

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Learn more about Heitzman at northtexan.unt.edu/austin-heitzman.

Dani Brubaker

Young and Restless Redaric Williams compares his time at UNT to a marriage. “I got memories and a ring,” he says. He earned that ring as a member of the Mean Green football team that won the 2002 New Orleans Bowl. And his experiences helped lead him to a role on the CBS soap opera The Young and the Restless. The actor, who attended UNT from 2002 to 2004 as Jimmie Williams, wanted to pursue a professional football career, but he was sidelined by injuries. He then realized he wanted to pursue a career in acting. He had taken theatre classes in high school and at UNT. “If you’re going to embark on something that’s not guaranteed,” he says, “what’s going to sustain you is your passion.” He worked in independent movies, commercials and modeling jobs — then, after auditioning last year, won the role of Tyler Michaelson on The Young and the Restless. He’d like to pursue producing or directing in the future. “There’s really no ceiling,” he says. “There are so many things you can do in this industry. It’s creating to the fullest extent.”

Dance and Theatre Rising star

Poppy Carter

Daniel Rowan describes his performance in a legendary off-Broadway play as “fantastic — ha ha.” Rowan, who attended UNT from 2007 to 2010 as a philosophy and religion studies major, spent nearly a year in The Fantasticks, one of the world’s longest running musicals. He called it a “rite of

passage for a young actor in this industry.” He played the romantic lead, Matt, and the silent puppeteer of the show, The Mute. He took time off to play Chris in Miss Saigon at Casa Mañana theatre in Fort Worth, which he described as “the most rewarding theatrical experience of my life.” He hopes to “continue sharing with people my soul, and tell a story as truthfully as possible, through the music, stage and film.”

Upcoming Events The Faculty Dance Concert will feature works by guest artist Elizabeth Rhodes, a Fulbright award recipient and co-director of the Stephen F. Austin State University dance program. UNT faculty members Shelley Cushman, Teresa Cooper, Sue Collins, Amiti Perry and Mary Lynn Babcock also will present choreographed pieces. The event takes place at 8 p.m. Feb. 6-8 and 2 p.m. Feb. 9 at the University Theater. Tickets cost $7.50 for students, UNT faculty/staff and seniors, and $10 for adults.

This year, the College of Visual Arts and Design renovated its former Fashion on Main gallery, 1901 Main St. in Dallas, and opened its inaugural show in conjunction with the open house for the UNT System Building and UNT Dallas College of Law on Dec. 4. The fall show, which runs through Jan. 11, includes artwork from UNT’s Institute for the Advancement of the Arts faculty fellows (pictured is Study for DS 13-3 by studio arts professor Vincent Falsetta). A grand opening will be held for the new UNT ArtSpace Dallas from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 8.

The exhibition Marking a Course, part of the Fine Arts Series, will feature works in which artists use distinct mark-making to convey their point of view. Artists David Bailin, Matt Duffin and Michael O’Keefe are featured in the show, curated by Tracee W. Robertson. The exhibit will run Feb. 18 to March 29 at the UNT Art Gallery. The opening reception is from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 20.

Two spring plays from the Department of Dance and Theatre take on topics from the serious to the lighthearted. Permanent Collection, which examines the issue of racial politics, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. March 5-7 and 2 p.m. March 8 at the Studio Theater. The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is a musical comedy that puts the audience in the middle of a grade school spelling competition. It runs at 7:30 p.m. April 17 and 19, 24-26 and 2 p.m. April 18 and 27 at the University Theater.

Visit calendar.unt.edu for more upcoming events.

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Muse Winning conductor

Jonathan Reynolds

Work of art

Music Denton tribute The six-time Grammynominated One O’Clock Lab Band pays homage to its hometown with its latest CD, Lab 2013. Released in September, the CD includes compositions that are about uniquely Denton experiences, such as graduate student Aaron Hedenstrom’s tribute to his favorite breakfast eatery, Old West, and jazz professor Richard DeRosa’s 4:30 a.m. wake-up calls to the

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blaring of the A-Train horn. “This CD pays tribute to our beloved Denton, a town that has supported our jazz program since it started in 1946 and continues to provide a welcoming and diverse live music scene,” says Steve Wiest, director of the One O’Clock Lab Band. Order the CD through a link on the band’s website, jazz.unt.edu/oneoclock, or by calling the jazz studies office at 940-565-3743.

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Music research

Richard Hatheway

Internationally renowned sculptor and printmaker Kiki Smith (left) is creating a true Texas piece of art while she’s spending her time as 2013-14 artist-in-residence for the Institute for the Advancement of the Arts. “I plan to use it as an experimental time for learning ways new to me to create large landscape prints celebrating the Texas wildflowers,” she says. Smith will exhibit pieces of her work in the exhibit Transformations Jan. 29-Feb. 27 at UNT on the Square. She also will visit classes to talk about her work. “Kiki Smith creates some of the most empathetic, intimate, imagistic and figurative works of our era,” College of Visual Arts and Design Dean Robert Milnes says. “Her work is deeply spiritual and at the same time politically charged, addressing philosophical, social and spiritual aspects of human nature through prints, drawings, sculpture and installations.” Watch a video of Smith at northtexan.unt.edu/kiki-smith.

Jason Lim (’03 M.M.) won third place in two categories — Conducting-Professional Orchestra Division and Orchestral PerformanceProfessional — from The American Prize Conducting Competition this year. In 2011, he won the Young Conductor Citation Award. He submitted recordings from a concert by the Denton-based Odysseus Chamber Orchestra, which boasts 35 members and performs three concerts a year. “The awards are a means of validating my struggles, hard work and determination,” he says. “I feel that conducting as a profession is more than usual a profession based on luck, timing and connections.” Watch performances by Jason Lim at northtexan.unt. edu/jason-lim.

live clubs from Deep Ellum and multiply it by 10,” he says. Mann lived in South Korea for five years and credits his radio/television/film major and time at NT Scene and KNTU for giving him the tools to create the podcast. He wants to have his own television show exploring the music of countries around the world. Find the podcast at northtexan.unt.edu/koreanmusic-fan.

Melissa Hatheway, a senior music education major and Honors College student, earned the Performing Arts Medicine Association’s Alice G. Brandfonbrener Young Investigator Award for her research on the health issues of marching band musicians. She is the second undergraduate to win the award and the first from the U.S. She also Korean music fan David B. Mann (’94) wanted is the first non-medical student to earn the honor. Hatheway to expose more people to was inspired to conduct the Korean music after seeing the research after she experienced popularity of the “Gangnam pain while playing her clarinet Style” music video. So he created The Flying Burrito podcast during high school. Working with faculty mendevoted to bands based in the tor Kris Chesky (’88 M.M.Ed., Hongdae area of Seoul, near ’92 Ph.D.), professor of music, Hongik University. “Imagine UNT in the heart Hatheway developed the first of its kind study on collegiate of the 10th most populated city in the world, throw in the marching band health issues.

Television and Film

and editing of the video. “The response has been overwhelmingly positive,” he says.” Watch the video at northtexan.unt.edu/game-ofthrones.

Visual Arts Record-breaking mural

Giovanni Valderas

1990s, will appear on the Food Network TV show Rachael Vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off starring Reality stars Three alumni are making their Rachael Ray and Guy Fieri. mark on TV reality shows. Animated work Tamara Chauniece (’12), a Imagine if Game of Thrones journalism graduate who went featured Denton. Danny Wilby Tamara Williams while at liams (’09), a radio/television/ UNT, appeared on the NBC film graduate, made it happen. singing competition The Voice, The motion graphic artist making CeeLo Green’s team. Ashley Poe (’09) is scheduled created an animated video that to appear on the upcoming sea- copies the opening sequence of son of the ABC dating show The the popular HBO drama but with Texas landmarks, includBachelor, which will premiere ing UNT’s Apogee Stadium. in January. Poe was a sociology Williams, who also works major and taught at E.P. Rayzor for KXAN in Austin, says his Elementary School in Argyle. TV and film classes helped Former Bachelor star Jake him with camera angles, music Pavelka, a UNT student in the

A group of UNT art students helped create the largest makeup painting, according to the Guinness Book

of World Records. The 8-by-76foot mural was painted for Mary Kay cosmetics’ 50th anniversary this summer using 3,500 of the brand’s products with 300 make-up brushes. Giovanni Valderas (’07, ’12 M.F.A.), an adjunct faculty member, participated in the project along with seniors Kristen Nesbitt, Laura Nave and Jenn Smith and post-baccalaureate student Carmen Wright. Valderas says the project built up their experience and confidence. “I asked them if they were intimidated by the scale of the project,” he says. “They replied no, because our summer mural painting had prepared them well.”

Vespers of 1610 A new edition of Claudio Monteverdi’s Vespro della Beata Vergine of 1610, also known as the Vespers of 1610, was prepared by 10 College of Music students and music history assistant professor Hendrik Schulze. Prestigious music publishing company Bärenreiter requested that Schulze edit the Vespers, 14 movements for soloists, chorus and orchestra considered a master work that defines 17th century sacred music. Schulze enlisted students Clare Carrasco, Kimary Fick, Emily Hagen, Devin Iler, Sean Morrison (’12 M.M.), Stephen Lucas

J. Cole Ritchie, Jonathan Sauceda, Brandon Stewart, AnnaGrace Strange (’13 M.M.) and Chia-Ying “Charles” Wu to begin work in fall 2011. The edition was published in April 2013. They transcribed the original source materials into modern notation and corrected inconsistencies as they deemed fit according to their research.

Hendrik Schulze, assistant professor of music history, works with students on the Vespers of 1610 project.

Receiving this real-world experience is rare and will help the students in academic or publishing careers, Schulze says. “As these students enter the academic job market, this experience will give them a big advantage,” he says. “When I talk to potential employers, the fact that our students have practical experience in editing is met with truly enthusiastic responses. It makes our students stand out in a highly competitive job market and opens up for them alternatives to traditional jobs in academia — they’re now equally qualified to work with publishers and collected editions projects.” Proceeds from sales of the edition go into a scholarship fund to support UNT musicology students’ research. The UNT Collegium Singers and members of the Baroque Orchestra premiered the new edition Oct. 25-26 in Dallas and at the Murchison Performing Arts Center in Denton. The extraordinary opportunity for students may not be at an end. Schulze has already received an offer from Bärenreiter for a follow-up project. Winter 2013

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LEADERS IN HIGH TECHNOLOGY Alumni working at high-profile companies use their UNT foundation to stay a step ahead of ever-changing technological industries and keep consumers connected.

Michael Clements

by ADRIENNE NETTLES AND LESLIE WIMMER

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Modern technological phenomena such as the web, cloud computing and mobile apps bring information to our fingertips and the ability to connect with people instantaneously. And technology evolves at an exponential speed. As director of engineering at Microsoft, one of the nation’s leading computer software makers, Larry Sullivan (’92) is at the forefront of this revolution by helping to redefine how people come together through technology. At the company’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash., Sullivan manages a team of 25 developers and engineers in Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise group who have built and run the next-generation cloud computing platform Microsoft Azure, assisting millions of consumers through everyday activities.

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Thanks to their innovations in cloud computing, a grandmother in France can join her 3-year-old grandson’s birthday in the U.S. via Skype with reduced lag time. Gamers can compete with one another together in a virtual world more quickly through the interactive video game platform Xbox Live. And employees separated by oceans can more productively meet face-to-face at a moment’s notice through video technology. “Azure provides a secure infrastructure for computer, gaming and mobile applications to stream media, and store and process large amounts of consumer data within minutes,” Sullivan says. “It also provides the platform for huge data centers around the world to run efficiently and effectively.”

“When I look back at the foundation I got at UNT, I’m very grateful,” Sullivan says. “I’m in a position now to give back. I want other students to have the same experiences I had. Microsoft and UNT are alike in that they’re both about achieving quality with great value.”

Larry Sullivan (’92), director of engineering at Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash., leads the team of engineers and developers who have built and run Microsoft Azure, the next-generation cloud computing platform.

Big data Every day, BNSF Railway train cars travel across 32,500 miles of tracks, delivering goods through the U.S. and Canada. Employees at the company’s Fort Worth headquarters use the latest technology to monitor operations, market their services and keep the trains running safely and efficiently. One of the leaders behind

Ahead of change

Sullivan is among UNT alumni impacting consumers’ lives through their professions in high-tech communications fields. They’re driving innovation, creativity and discovery at leading national companies as pace-setters in software development, rail logistics, copper and fiber optics assembling, cybersecurity and learning technologies. And they credit UNT’s distinguished faculty and state-of-the-art facilities for giving them real-world experiences and the skills and knowledge they needed to become forward-thinking industry leaders.

Microsoft employs 90,000 people across 190 countries, but Sullivan sets himself apart among the many engineers, researchers and developers by staying ahead of change. In his 20 years with the company, he’s served on teams responsible for building Microsoft’s Windows 95 and Internet Explorer versions 2, 3 and 4 and creating the .Net Framework. “Having the desire to continually want to learn is critical to being successful in a high-tech field because, in our business, things are constantly changing,” Sullivan says. “UNT gave me a great foundation and prepared me well.” Sullivan chose UNT’s computer science program for his undergraduate studies because it was ahead of other universities’ programs. He says his mentor, retired professor of computer science and engineering Tom Jacob, instilled in him the drive to learn and stay relevant in his field. Today, Sullivan is an avid supporter of the College of Engineering, the fastest growing college at UNT. He serves on its capital action team to help steer the direction of the college in preparing future engineers — such as electrical engineering technology alumni Kenneth Adam Marlowe (’09), Bryan Cotanch (’09) and James Parker (’09). The trio recently received a patent, the first undergraduates to do so, for work on motorcycle safety that was part of their senior design project.

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“Having the desire to continually want to learn is critical to being successful in a high-tech field because, in our business, things are constantly changing.” — Larry Sullivan that technology is UNT alumna Lettie Haynes (’82). When Haynes was a student studying computer science, she gained hands-on experience in the university’s microcomputer lab working with Texas Instruments990s, which were among the most innovative technologies of the early ’80s. Today, Haynes is BNSF’s assistant vice president of technology services, overseeing IT initiatives involving everything from the company’s customer web and mobility software and intermodal hub logistics systems to future cloud computing applications that will help streamline business processes.

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upgrades, which are all appealing, all while having strong security processes in place.” And while in her current role Haynes focuses on the latest industry trends, she credits UNT with giving her an opportunity to build a strong knowledge base around computer science, programming techniques, basic logic and database design. “Once you really know the fundamentals of software and development, you can learn anything,” she says. “Today, information technology is everywhere. It’s a large part of every industry. When students leave UNT, they will be able to apply those skills to any business function.”

Big applications

Currently, she also leads teams who are creating mobile applications for the company and its clients and are researching how large amounts of data from transactions, events and other sources can be leveraged to gain insights and help predict trends for the company. “‘Big data’ has become somewhat of a buzz word in the IT industry, and corporations mostly use large amounts of data to look backward and evaluate past performance,” Haynes says. “But we’re creating an environment for our data that will enable us to explore patterns of information so we can identify opportunities and take action focused on preventative measures.” And Haynes is investigating how cloud computing can improve BNSF’s technology offerings. “It’s exciting to see how we can leverage the cloud for certain services,” she says. “We’re looking at quicker information delivery speeds for our business partners and faster, better software and application

“When I arrived at North Texas, I was certain I wanted to work with technology or computers,” she says. “At the time, I wasn’t sure whether it would be software programming or the actual computer hardware configurations, but I knew computer science was the right field for me.” In her 20-year career at BNSF, Haynes has worked on a range of technology initiatives, covering areas such as application development, infrastructure, budgeting, marketing and strategic planning.

“Today, information technology is everywhere. It’s a large part of every industry. When students leave UNT, they will be able to apply those skills to any business function.” — Lettie Haynes

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Consumers might not think much about the technology behind the checkout system they use at a convenience store or how the government works to keep our borders safe, but Jay Chenault (’84) does as CEO of Custom Computer Cables of America. Since acquiring the multi-million dollar manufacturing company in 1999, Chenault has taken a hands-on approach to improve consumer experiences and help U.S. military operations through cutting-edge engineering and cable and fiber optic technology. As a leading manufacturer of custom copper and fiber optic assemblies, the company is the force behind tiny and often unseen materials driving technology at some of the country’s major cell phone and automobile companies and retailers. When consumers talk and text on their cell phones, miniscule fibers manufactured by Custom Computer Cables enable their devices to process the information. The company also supplies retailers such as 7-11 convenience stores and Chili’s restaurants with cable products that help to power point-of-sale systems, making customers’

checkout experiences more efficient. The Garland-based company also manufactures and supplies products for the U.S. Army’s Patriot Missile program and ship-to-shore power systems. And U.S. Department of Homeland Security contractors depend on engineering services and cable harnesses supplied by Chenault’s company to plant radiation detection devices at U.S. border crossings to “sniff ” for radioactive goods coming into the U.S. “Our company relies on skilled technicians and advanced automated equipment to design and supply products that benefit consumers,” says Chenault, who studied industrial technology at UNT, a program that served as a precursor to today’s College of Engineering. Chenault adds that his UNT degree has helped him succeed in a very competitive and ever-evolving industry. “Industrial technology touches everything in my line of work,” he says, “from the inception of a new product design to what

materials will be used and how that material will be manufactured to make it scalable, cost-effective and ready to take into the market.” Chenault credits UNT’s engineering metal shop and plastics labs and supportive faculty such as Phil Foster, associate professor of engineering technology, for giving him the perspective on how things work in the professional world. “I’m still building off what I learned as a student,” he says, “and putting it into everyday life.”

Secure networks Consumers are on a constant search for the latest technologies and the next generation of cell phone devices, says Prakash Kolan (’07 Ph.D.). He knows that first-hand through his role as a senior engineer at Samsung Telecommunications in Richardson. Samsung is one of the nation’s leading companies for high-tech electronics, manufacturing and digital

media with national research centers across the country. “The growing demand is driving mobile device manufacturers to support new features that require even more computing power, storage and network bandwidth,” Kolan says. “The result is that companies such as Samsung have to support these new consumer applications by having mobile devices that can interface with high computation servers in enterprise data centers.” As a member of the Samsung Research America Dallas group, Kolan helps research next-generation server solutions to transform tomorrow’s offerings in wireless communication, as well as stay ahead of major competitors who are pushing the boundaries in mobile technology. “Most of Samsung’s current cell phone and tablet models — Samsung Galaxy S3, S4 and Note10 — have some of the features that our group has developed,” Kolan says. “Our objective is to get on top of

Lettie Haynes (’82), assistant vice president of technology services at BNSF, oversees payment processing software and cloud computing applications. Jay Chenault (’84) is CEO of Custom Computer Cables of America, a leading manufacturer of custom copper and fiber optic assemblies.

Michael Clements

taken at UNT has some sort of an application in my everyday job at Samsung, from IP networking to security and multimedia communications.” Kolan says CICS is among the many resources at UNT he draws from for his work at Samsung, along with the cuttingedge research of Dantu, whose expertise continues to play a vital role in his professional development. “Dr. Dantu actively involved me in collaborative research projects with other universities and research centers, which helped me get industry exposure,” Kolan says. Today, Kolan and his Samsung colleagues collaborate with the National Science Foundation Net-Centric Software and Systems Industry/University Cooperative Research Center housed in UNT’s College of Engineering. Led by Krishna Kavi, professor of computer science and engineering, the center — which includes three other universities and more than 20 high-tech companies — is pioneering research to revoluPrakash Kolan (’07 Ph.D.), senior engineer at Samsung Telecommunications, is a member of the Samsung Research America Dallas group innovating next-generation server solutions for wireless communications.

Michael Clements

this new technology as soon as we can to get a major share in tomorrow’s server market.” Kolan says the knowledge he gained from working in UNT’s Networking Security Lab and as a graduate research student of Ram Dantu, professor of computer science and engineering and director of UNT’s Center for Information and Computer Security, has been invaluable. UNT has become a leader in cybersecurity education and research with the help of Dantu’s expertise and research. Under his direction, the center has been named both a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education and a National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Research, designations held by only 31 other institutions nationally. “The thing that attracted me to Samsung is its commitment to research in the area of networking and security, which I also found in UNT’s computer science and engineering program,” Kolan says. “Every course I have

tionize how complex information is gathered, shared, secured and used. “The knowledge I acquired at UNT continues to be the foundation for the work I do now,” Kolan says.

Learning technologies As McAfee Inc.’s global learning consultant, Angie Rackler (’11 Ph.D.) is responsible for designing and analyzing consumer product training programs for the world’s largest security technology company. Rackler has been with McAfee in Plano for more than 15 years and has extensive experience in designing training programs in the form of classroom and online lectures to help customers learn to use the company’s newest products. She also is in charge of evaluating the results of training programs to make sure customers walk away with as much knowledge of new products as possible. “What I love about my global learning consultant role is that I get to start from scratch and create entire training programs from the ground up,” Rackler says. “I love

Angie Rackler (’11 Ph.D.), global learning consultant for McAfee Inc., designs and analyzes consumer product training programs for the company, the world’s largest security technology company.

Michael Clements

taking on a challenge.” Rackler’s determination to tackle big issues helped her with the decision to enroll in the applied technology and performance improvement doctoral program in UNT’s College of Information. The program is geared toward people in corporate training fields who are interested in developing their research skills as well as skills in development, implementation and evaluation of technical training programs. At the time, Rackler was looking for opportunities to continue her education and grow her career while balancing her work life and life as a single mother. Researching doctoral programs in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, she reached out to Regents Professor Jerry Wircenski, coordinator for the applied technology and performance improvement doctoral program, for information. “Angie is so full of energy, and she’s very determined to succeed,” Wircenski says. “She was looking to move up in her organization and was a little apprehensive about starting a doctoral program while working full time and raising a family. But, with our support and support from McAfee, she knew she could do it and she did.” Soon after she enrolled in the program, Rackler took a class on using statistical analysis to evaluate learning outcomes and realized she could apply the analysis skills she was learning to the audiences she trained at work.

“Because I had these captive audiences, I was able to jump in with real-world case studies comparing different types of product training,” Rackler says. “It was exciting for me to actually see statistical results for my work, and that gave me the ability to go back to my team and show them the impact of our programs.” Rackler encourages others, especially women, who may be considering an advanced degree in their field to find a support network and get started. She

adds that a person who continues to learn about the latest changes in the field can help shape the industry’s future. “I really encourage people to stay in and know that their involvement can diversify the conversations that happen and the direction technology moves,” she says. “For me, this has been an exciting field. Technology is always changing, and it’s fun to be on the cusp of what’s next.”

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Business alum Shane Henderson (’97), vice president of technology at Match.com, is using his tech savvy to help people meet. Learn more at northtexan.unt. edu/online.

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Peter Weller

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by Margarita Venegas

A hobby turned into a life-long career when actor and director Peter Weller (’70) first stepped on stage at UNT.

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ention Peter Weller’s (’70) name and you’ll get a pretty strong reaction. Usually it’s, “I loved him as RoboCop,” though fiercely loyal sci-fi fans declare, “He was Buckaroo Banzai first.” However, Weller’s life expands well beyond his two iconic characters. He has dozens of acting and directing credits, a jazz sextet, a master’s degree, a Ph.D., and what he describes as his most rewarding role as a first-time father to a toddler. When Weller first studied at North Texas in 1966 as a trumpeter, he wanted to emulate the music his mother taught him to love — Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, John Coltrane. Weller’s father was in the military and the family had lived in Germany but settled in San Antonio, so he knew of the reputation of the jazz program. Although he was a member of the Four O’Clock and Five O’Clock lab bands, Weller realized at 20 that he might always have a job in the band, but he might not get the chance to be the headliner. “I was always goofing around on stage,” Weller says, adding that acting was his childhood hobby. “I wasn’t serious until I realized I didn’t want to be just another musician on the bandstand. I wanted to be Miles, and that was not going to happen.” So he started taking theatre classes and soon changed his major. His college productions included Death of a Salesman and All the King’s Men, plus an original production, The Guest. Earning his degree

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appeased his father, Weller says. “My dad taught me to finish what I started,” he says. “He gave me a good sense of discipline and resolution.” Those qualities moved Weller to land a scholarship to continue acting classes in New York. He studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and, professionally, with legendary Tony Award-winning actress Uta Hagen. He was brought into the Actors Studio in the 1970s by another legend, Elia Kazan. As a professional actor and director, Weller has more than 70 credits, including an appearance earlier this year in Star Trek Into Darkness. With a master’s degree in Italian Renaissance art history from Syracuse University in Florence and a doctorate in 15th century intellectual and art history from the University of California at Los Angeles, Weller is dedicated to learning, teaching and his love for visual art. “Film is the continuation of Western narrative painting,” he says. “If you look at Giotto’s work in the Arena Chapel in Padua, you’re seeing a 14th century movie.” Weller continues to play trumpet and sing in his LA-based jazz sextet, which he started when Miles Davis, whom he befriended, and actor/director Woody Allen urged him to play in public again. And he directs a quarter of each season of the FX’s Sons of Anarchy, in which he also acted in 2013. Weller also directs Hawaii 5-0 for CBS, Longmire for A&E (in which he also acts) and Guillermo del Toro’s new series, The Strain, also for FX. Reflecting on his accomplishments, Weller credits his commitment. “There is no dress rehearsal,” he says. “The secret is determination and tenacity. Get up and hit it from ‘jump street.’” Weller will receive a Distinguished Alumni award and an Emerald Eagle honor this spring. See pages 41 and 42 for details.

Renée Vernon

Peter Weller (’70) Los Angeles Degree in: Theatre

Advice for students: Tenacity is the key to everything. You can learn what you don’t

know through education, but you

Favorite sci-fi:

On being a father:

reach your goals with persistence.

I like best older classics, like Rob-

Having my son has made me feel

ert Wise’s The Day the Earth Stood

more vulnerable and alive than

As a musician in college:

Still (1951), Stanley Kramer’s On

anything else I have experienced

It was a great time to be at North

the Beach (1959), based on Nevil

in this life. When you get your

Texas, where there was a music

Shute’s book about a post-apoca-

first “daddy hug,” you never look

epicenter. It was the ʼ60s — there

lyptic world, and the old Twilight

back, baby!

was a social revolution and music

Zone episodes. But you cannot

was on the cutting edge of all the

disregard Stanley Kubrick’s 2001

Visit northtexan.unt.edu/

arts. Music led the way. Not just

or the Spielberg or J.J. Abrams

online to read more of

rock ’n’ roll, but jazz, classical,

classics (Close Encounters and

Weller’s answers.

gospel, folk and funk.

Star Trek).

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Gary Payne

On the Big Screen UNT campus plays leading role in Homecoming 2013 with Hollywood theme

This November’s Homecoming week — themed “Mean Green on the Big Screen” as selected by students — was celebrated with excitement and spirit. The campus community kicked off the festivities with the Homecoming Picnic and Pep Rally. Later in the week, students exemplified Mean Green spirit and tradition at the Yell Like Hell contest, bonfire and parade, as did reuniting alumni of the Floyd Graham Society, the Black Alumni Network and the Golden Eagles Class of 1963. And Mean Green football took the starring role with a 41-7 victory over UT-El Paso. It was the team’s fifth win in a row. See some of this year’s Homecoming highlights in a photo slideshow and watch a video of the Golden Eagles reunion at northtexan.unt.edu/homecoming-2013.

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Left : Mean Green running back Brandin Byrd rushed for a career-high 202 yards and had two touchdowns in the win over UT-El Paso. Right: Fans at the game celebrate Scrappy’s new “Meaner and Greener” look. The updated mascot costume was unveiled at Homecoming. Middle row: President V. Lane Rawlins and Elizabeth With, vice president for student affairs and enrollment management, pose with Homecoming King and Queen, senior Jake Schumann and junior Irae Yoo; spirited fans enjoy the game; UNT dancers perform to the crowd. Bottom row: The Talons prepare to light the bonfire; a student float makes its way through the parade. Michael Clements Jonathan Reynolds

Jun Ma

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Jane Massey (’79 M.P.A.)

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Reviving

Communities

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by Ellen Rossetti

How do you create a strong community — a safe community — a place where people want to gather, experience culture, shop, dine, work and live? Alumni who earned their master’s degrees in public administration from UNT’s College of Public Affairs and Community Service know how and are doing just that. They fight homelessness. They find ways to turn crime-ridden eyesores into safe, new buildings. They breathe new life into old neighborhoods. They are creating economically viable communities through their work with government agencies and housing and economic development organizations. Their training at UNT has armed them to tackle complex and sometimes politically sticky issues while working side-by-side with a wide variety of community partners — often while juggling tight budgets. “It was when I was at UNT that I really came to appreciate the importance and dignity of public service,” says Jane Massey (’79 M.P.A.), director of neighborhood research and revitalization for Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity. “We hear so much bashing of bureaucrats and the government. I think we have lost that concept of people being public servants and really working to try to advance the common good — and I learned a lot of that at UNT.”

Alumni restore economic viability of neighborhoods compromised by urban decay

Making a difference Massey began her career in the community development office in Lubbock, later working in the same capacity in Garland while going to graduate school. “It was convenient for me as an already-in-career student,” she says. “And UNT was very supportive of students.” After earning her degree, she taught as an assistant professor of political science at Georgia State University before becoming a budget analyst in Charlotte, N.C. Massey also worked at the University of South Carolina Institute of Public Affairs and the Georgia Future Communities Commission and has consulted for the public sector and nonprofit organizations.

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Michael Clements

Jay Chapa (’93 M.P.A.)

lives day to day. And in our own small way, we are helping change the face of Dallas in a good way.”

Now, with Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity, she evaluates the impact of housing programs. This summer, she worked with four UNT researchers in releasing a study to identify the most blighted areas of Dallas. The study, commissioned by Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity, resulted in a forum of community leaders discussing possible solutions, including setting goals and priorities for blight reduction, establishing a data-based system that measures progress and working on targeted high-priority properties. “My career has led me to Dallas Area Habitat in a way that I kind of marvel at,” she says. “I took 30-plus years of experience and found myself in a place where we are making a difference in neighborhoods and

Producing talent U.S. News & World Report ranks UNT’s city management and urban policy graduate program eighth in the nation. And the program has a strong history of producing highly ranked talent. More top-level city executives in Texas hold a master’s degree from UNT than any other university. “The program is ranked really high when it comes to city manager and local government programs, and it’s for a good reason,” says Jay Chapa (’93 M.P.A.), housing and economic development

“It is projects like these that involve community partnerships where my education at UNT has proven so valuable.” — Jane Jenkins, president and CEO of Downtown Oklahoma City Inc. 36

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director and interim finance director for the city of Fort Worth. “They require internships that give you real-world experience, and they bring in professors who have worked in municipal or local government.” Chapa’s internship with the city of Carrollton helped him get the experience he needed to land a job with the city of Fort Worth as a budget analyst in 1994, he says. He served in the city’s economic development office where he eventually became director of what is now housing and economic development. In his career with Fort Worth, Chapa has been involved in such projects as including affordable apartment units in the city’s West 7th mixed-use development and revitalizing southeast Fort Worth with Renaissance Square, a new retail hub anchored by a Walmart Supercenter and other major stores. “I have always had a sense of and have enjoyed politics and was involved in nonprofits growing up,” Chapa says, but he found his niche within public administration while getting his UNT degree. “The UNT program shepherded me to the local government side of things.”

Jane Jenkins (’95 M.P.A.)

Jonathan Reynolds

Reaching out UNT’s M.P.A. program inspired an unexpected career change for Barbara Ross (’87 M.P.A.). Ross was teaching government at Trinity High School in Euless when she decided to pursue a master’s in public administration — simply with the goal of bringing more knowledge back to her classroom. Instead, her degree sparked a longlasting career creating stronger communities. For nearly three decades, Ross has served in the community development office for the city of Denton — and for the last 25 years, she has overseen the department. She and her team administer community development block grants from the federal government in an effort to prevent and end homelessness, provide housing assistance and conduct public improvement projects in low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. One of those recent projects is a renovation and expansion of Denton’s Fred Moore Day Nursery School, which provides affordable child care with tuition set on a sliding-scale basis. Expanding the facility gives more families access to child care, allowing them more opportunities to

Michael Clements

Barbara Ross (’87 M.P.A.)

“The economics of a downtown district are very much tied to the number of permanent residents,” she says. “Once home only to the homeless, downtown is now a neighborhood with expanded opportunities for business, cultural and economic activities.” Discussions are now centered on exploring an outdoor soccer cage and volleyball court due to the tremendous response to the community basketball facility. “It’s well taken care of because people value it. It is projects like these that involve community partnerships where my education at UNT has proven so valuable,” Jenkins says. “Collaboration can make a difference. It’s amazing.”

work. That, in turn, helps keep the community’s economy strong, Ross says. Whether they’re building community facilities or writing a work order to install new flooring in a single-family home, they’re making a difference, she says. “I particularly think my staff has done a very good job of reaching out to the community,” says Ross, a former president of the National Community Development Association. “That is something I learned from the M.P.A. program. Being a manager or administrator doesn’t mean telling everyone what to do. You get opinions; you listen.”

Expanded opportunities Jane Jenkins (’95 M.P.A.) earned her degree while working at the city of Denton as the downtown development director. Now president and CEO of Downtown Oklahoma City Inc., she has played an important role in managing Downtown Oklahoma City’s growth the last few years. Upcoming projects such as a new downtown elementary school, streetcar and 70-acre public park, and completed projects such as a community basketball court, have added to the city’s effort to create a place people desire to live as well as work — bringing the community together. Winter 2013

Learn more about the study by UNT researchers to identify the most blighted areas of Dallas commissioned by Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity and watch videos from a recent Dallas forum at northtexan.unt.edu/online.

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Circle

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F O U N D E R’ S

Members of the Founder's Circle gathered at The W Hotel in Dallas in November.

Legacy of generosity Founder’s Circle recognizes donors whose contributions have a deep and lasting impact.

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When the University of North Texas was founded on a dusty prairie in 1890, few could have guessed that it would grow to be the economic, academic and cultural engine of the North Texas region. Today, members of the university’s Founder’s Circle help ensure UNT’s continued success story by generously supporting initiatives that enhance the student experience as well as the university’s reputation for excellence — from scholarships to first-rate facilities to faculty research. The Founder’s Circle comprises the university’s top three donor recognition societies — UNT’s McConnell, Matthews and Kendall Societies — for individuals who have made cumulative lifetime gifts to the university of $250,000 or more. “UNT’s Founder’s Circle donors have given the kinds of gifts that make the university’s continued growth and success possible,” says President V. Lane Rawlins. “These gifts help us

RECOGNITION SOCIETIES

The Founder’s Circle consists of three recognition societies — the McConnell Society, the Matthews Society and the Kendall Society. Each is named for a former president who left a deep and lasting impact on UNT, just as members of the Founder’s Circle have with their support. •THE MCCONNELL SOCIETY

•THE MATTHEWS SOCIETY

The McConnell Society recognizes those with contributions of $1 million or more.

The Matthews Society recognizes those with contributions between $500,000 and $999,999.

Horace and Euline (’74) Brock Don (’52) and Ruth Buchholz Kristin Farmer (’95) Anne Fields Alan and Shirley Goldfield Ernie Kuehne (’66) Sue Mayborn Jim McIngvale Bryan Milner (’00) Ken (’60) and Gayle* Murphy Ken (’66) and Ann Newman Robert A. Nickell (’68, ’82 M.B.A.) G. Brint (’88, ’88 M.S.) and Amanda Ryan John (’72) and Lindy (’72) Rydman C. Dan (’62) and Le’Nore Smith Ed (’60) and Nikki Smith Charn (’73 M.B.A.) and Uraratn Uswachoke Paul Voertman (’47) and Richard Ardoin* Leroy (’50, ’52 M.S.) and Wanda Whitaker Bill* and Margot Winspear

Byron (’78 M.B.A.) and Marilyn Baird Nancy Dedman Nancy B. Hamon* Francis Kostohryz Charles* and Peggy (’61) Ladenberger Patty and Don Lovelace Charles Onstead* Fred (’47) and Patsy Patterson Jerry (’62) and Judy (’62) Pinkerton Bobby (’69) and Phyllis (’71) Ray Nicholas (’61) and Anna Ricco Robert and Virginia Toulouse

Elinore and Benjamin Brown Dan Cathy Mack* and Linda Christian Col. Guy Cloud Glenn (’85) and Brenda Gomez Tony (’61) and Toppy Goolsby Bob (’61) and Fran Kimmel Janice and A. Frank (’56) Kubica Elaine Mathes Jean and Richard “Mac” (’54) McCrady George (’69, ’73 M.B.A.) and Nesha (’73) Morey Ben (’67) and Margaret Morris Charldean Newell (’60, ’62 M.A.) Charles Nobles (’54) Sara Sue and Don (’63) Potts Bob and Bette Sherman Marc Smugar Frank (’44) and Connie Spencer* Charlotte (’69) and Terry (’67, ’68 M.B.A.) Strange Gayle (’67) and Virgil (’68) Strange John and Bonnie Strauss Ross Vick Jr. Fran Vick (’00)

•THE KENDALL SOCIETY

The Kendall Society recognizes those with contributions between $250,000 and $499,999. Christopher (’88) and Sue Bancroft Mercedes Bass Charlie Bond (’59) Janet and Frank (’63) Bracken

*Deceased Visit unt.edu/givenow to learn more about how private support helps students reach their potential and helps UNT achieve its goals of being a top research institution offering the best undergraduate education.

reach new heights in student and faculty excellence and set a precedent for future generations. And they send a bold message that an investment in UNT is an investment in one of the most economically and culturally significant regions in the country.” Members of the Founder’s Circle gathered for a dinner in November at The W Hotel in Dallas to learn about the university’s progress in key initiatives such as student scholarship, alumni and regional engagement, and research. Michael Monticino, UNT vice president for advancement, thanked them for their continued commitment to UNT. “Your profound generosity — not only in terms of dollars, but also in your engagement with us and your genuine

philanthropy helps UNT grow in size, program breadth and excellence. “As an alumna, former faculty member and administrator, I know what a great university UNT is, and my Mean Green blood leads me to be supportive,” she says. “I want UNT to remain an institution where any student can become the first college graduate in his or her family, and where research and service programs will help solve problems.” Monticino says support from Founder’s Circle members is a testament to their belief in UNT supporting its students. “Private giving allows UNT to offer life-changing opportunities to our students,” he says. “And it continues into those students’ careers and communities once they graduate.”

desire to lift up this institution — allows us to provide transformational experiences for our students,” he said. The Founder’s Circle supports the university, touching every college and school and numerous programs across campus. The group’s members have endowed scholarships and fellowships, supported the arts and athletics, helped fund new facilities such as the Business Leadership Building and Apogee Stadium and advanced some of UNT’s most innovative endeavors. Founder’s Circle member Charldean Newell (’60, ’62 M.A.), UNT Professor Emerita of public administration, supports many university initiatives, from the UNT libraries to athletics to student scholarships. She says private Winter 2013

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Gary Payne

EAGLES’

IN THIS SECTION

COMMITMENT TO SERVE Alum is recognized as the 2013 DFW Small Business Veteran Champion of the Year.

Learn more about Nguyen at northtexan.unt.edu/commitment-to-serve.

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AFTER SEPT. 11, ANDREW NGUYEN (’08) enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and served four years of active duty and seven in the reserves. He attended UNT for its strong entrepreneurship program and today owns the web and business development firm 03Entrepreneur. He also launched Honor Courage Commitment, a nonprofit that helps veterans start businesses and give back to their community. “The commitment to serve didn’t stop when I left Afghanistan or the Marine Corps,” says Nguyen, “My passion is to create jobs, see things grow and use the skills instilled in me from the military and the education I received.”

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Friends

after a teaching career totaling more than 50 years. He directed the symphonic and jazz bands, assisted with the marching band, and taught applied woodwind students and music education classes. He plays with area jazz bands and performs as a jazz duo with his pianist wife of 53 years, Jahn Holt Crews (’63).

Keep up with the latest developments in the UNT family and tell your peers what you’ve been up to since leaving the nest. Send your news to The North Texan (see contact information on page 7). Members of the UNT Alumni Association are designated with a . Read more, share comments and connect with friends at northtexan.unt.edu.

1962 1943

1955

Faye Lynn King, Sunnyvale ::

Peggy Pool Hurley, Clifton ::

1948 Keith Parks, Richardson ::

received a Global Impact Award from the Mission to Unreached Peoples for pioneering leadership in global mission work. He and his wife were missionaries in Indonesia for 14 years, and he later was president of the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board and global missions coordinator for the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship.

Gary Perkins/Texas Golf Hall of Fame

celebrated her 90th birthday in August. She taught full-time for 23 years and appraised teachers for five years after retiring in 1983. She says she still gets an occasional phone call or card telling her of the impact she had. Today, she plays bridge, still drives her car and enjoys living on Lake Whitney.

was named Professor Emeritus at Northwood University’s Texas campus. She has taught Spanish and social science there for 35 years.

1966

university in the 1960s, trained to compete in the Senior Olympics in Cleveland, Ohio, this summer.

1968 Francine Holland (’70 M.A.), Fort Worth :: retired in August

after 44 years in education to be a full-time writer and spend time with family and friends. For the past 14 years, she was deputy executive director at the Education Service Center Region 11 in Fort Worth. She earned her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.

1972 David R. Widder (M.M., ’83

D.M.A.), Blacksburg, Va. :: was

Floyd Eddy Swanzy, Spring-

town :: who pole vaulted for the

named a Professor Emeritus at Virginia Tech. He was the found-

A.J. Triggs, Tyler :: was inducted into the Texas Golf Hall of Fame this fall for distinguished service. He was a member of the North Texas teams that won four consecutive national titles from 1949 to 1952. He has been an active member of the Texas Golf Association for 40 years and twice served as president. His fellow Talons helped celebrate his induction.

1960 Norval Griswold Crews (’63

M.M.Ed.), Wichita Falls :: retired

in May from Midwestern State University as Professor Emeritus

Upcoming Alumni Gatherings Alumni and friends celebrate UNT. Here’s a sampling of events: Great Conversations 2014 — The Stars Among Us: Share dinner, dessert and stimulating discussions at the Honors College signature event, from 6 to 9 p.m. Feb. 25 at UNT’s Apogee Stadium Clubroom with community leaders, local celebrities and UNT faculty and alumni. Buy tickets at honors.unt.edu/greatconversations beginning Jan. 1. Proceeds benefit Honors College programs and scholarships. Contact Diana Dunklau at 940-565-2474 or diana.dunklau@unt.edu. Alumni Awards: A university tradition, the UNT Alumni Awards Dinner is an annual event that recognizes the outstanding achievement, service and support of UNT’s alumni and friends. The event begins at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. April 11 at UNT’s Apogee Stadium. RSVP by Feb. 13 to specialevents@unt.edu or 940-565-4851. For more information or to join the UNT Alumni Association, call 940-565-2834 or go to untalumni.com.

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ing director of the University Symphonic Wind Ensemble, conducting the ensemble for 30 years. He studied clarinet mouthpiece design and presented solo and chamber music performances.

1974 Tracy Mesler, Nocona :: was elected president of the Upper Trinity Groundwater Conservation District in July. He and his wife, Linda (’75), owners and publishers of the Nocona News since 1981, celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary.

for the Kemp ISD in March after serving as acting and interim superintendent since 2012. He and his wife have three children. At North Texas, he was a threeyear letterman/starter at tight end and a member of Sigma Nu.

1979 Sandra Harper (M.S., ’85 Ph.D.), Abilene :: is the new president of McMurry University, the first female full-time president of an Abilene university. She was president of Our Lady of the Lake College in Baton Rouge, La.

1984

1978

George Anson, Austin ::

Sam Swierc, Kemp :: was named superintendent of schools

wrote and directed the movie

Spring Eddy last year and has been showing it at film festivals around the country. It was chosen as the opening night movie at the Rainier Indie Film Fest in Washington and had a Denton showing this fall.

Fred Seidler (M.S.), New York, N.Y. :: has worked professionally as an actor in film, television and theatre, including New York Theater Workshop’s The Investigation of the Murder in El Salvador. His recent credits include Deadly Devotions and Person of Interest. Paula Pace Shepherd, Keller :: became grand president of Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women this summer. She is the financial manager for Roanoke Animal Hospital, which she and her husband own.

1986

Gregory Jones (M.M.Ed.),

Kirksville, Mo. :: completed his

26th year at Truman State University, where he teaches trumpet and conducts the brass choir. Joining him on his fourth recital tour of China in May was Professor Emeritus Leonard Candelaria (above at Tiananmen Square).

1987 Christina Ay-Chen Long

Join us March 5! The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas 6 p.m. — Reception 7:30 p.m. — Program

(’90 M.M., ’96 D.M.A.), Plano

:: released the world premiere

recording of a Dana Seusse piano concerto on the Dorian Sono Luminus label, was a featured soloist with the Dallas Wind Symphony and gave a duo piano recital at Boston’s Jordan Hall.

1989 The Emerald Eagle Honors evening raises funds in support of the university’s premier college-access scholarship program to help more students achieve their educational dreams at UNT.

2014 Alumni Honorees include:

* Phyllis George, former sportscaster, 1971 Miss America * Peter Weller, actor and director For sponsorships or tickets, call Molly Morgan, director of UNT Foundation marketing and communications, at 940-565-4555 or visit endow.unt.edu.

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Allan Escher, Land O Lakes,

Fla. :: became secretary-treasurer

of the American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology for a three-year term in July. He is a D.O.

1991 Shirley Moxley, Fort Worth :: was named director of counseling for Traffick911 this spring. The

1992 Martha Werner, Austin :: was named principal of Deep Wood Elementary in the Round Rock ISD. She most recently was principal of Mina Elementary in the Bastrop ISD. She also is the first vice president for District 13 of the Texas Elementary Principals and Supervisors Association.

1994 Kimberly B. Burke, Dallas :: joined Skanska USA as senior director of business development for its Dallas office. She most recently worked at HOK as a vice president and director of business development for a five-state region.

Pradit Wanarat (Ph.D.), Bangkok, Thailand :: is the new presi-

dent of the National Institute of Development Administration, Thailand’s leading educational institution for graduate studies related to national development.

1998 Elizabeth Gourdie Marie,

Denton :: exhibited at the Gay-

lord Texan Hotel in Grapevine for The Art of Texas Atrium Art Tour. She created Kil’n Time Studio and Gifts in Denton, which she’s since sold, and now creates for home owners, businesses and art lovers. The Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival named her a 2010 Emerging Artist.

Kimberly Packard, Colleyville

:: won the 2012-13 general fiction category of the Texas Association of Authors awards for her debut novel, Phoenix. She was honored at the Texas Book Festival this fall.

1999

Cameron Hernholm, Dallas

:: was named chief development

officer of Resource Center Dallas, which operates the Nelson-Tebedo Community Clinic and John Thomas Gay & Lesbian Community Center. She is on the UNT Honors College advisory board.

Gary Payne

organization’s focus is to end domestic minor sex trafficking.

Neighborhood designs UNT alumni Erin (’06) and John Paul ‘JP’ Hossley (’03) are cultivating a creative community with Neighborhood, their eclectic home furnishing and design services boutique in the Bishop Arts District of Dallas. Their backgrounds in interior design and architecture helped them make their dream of offering affordable high-end custom design a reality. “We want to offer our design services with a walk up atmosphere,” says Erin, “to make the world of interior design and architecture as approachable and user friendly as buying a latte.” Interior design graduate Erin and applied arts and sciences graduate JP had never worked in retail but were inspired by the vibrant culture of places like Congress Street in Austin and the Mission District in San Francisco. So they wrote a business plan in early 2012 and by that spring held the grand opening of Neighborhood, the name which Erin says speaks to the community atmosphere of the Bishop Arts District. “We find like-minded people who are on the same page as we are,” she says. “That same community atmosphere doubles in the items we bring into

1997

the store — the work of local artists, designers and fabricators.”

Renee Day (M.S.), Dallas :: was

alums, including interior design graduate Shannon Dwyer (ʼ13), whom Erin

elected to the board of directors of Texas CASA, supporting programs across Texas as they recruit and train court appointed volunteer advocates who speak up for abused and neglected children. She is vice president of finance for Baylor Research Institute in Dallas.

With art as a key inspiration, Erin and JP collaborate with other UNT met in her studio class at UNT, and drawing and painting graduates Ty Wilcox (’04 M.F.A.) and Cabe Booth (ʼ95), Tom Sale (ʼ90 M.F.A.), Clay Stinnett (’04) and Chris Bingham. They offer their clients design services, furniture lines, one-of-a-kind accessories and unique local art pieces. “The music and art community of Denton was a strong part of our college

William Matthews (M.Ed.) and Amy Foraker Matthews

(’07 M.Ed.), Denton :: had a son,

Jack Davis Matthews, in May. Will is the grandson of former UNT president J.C. Matthews (’25).

experiences,” JP says. “The friends we met at UNT are still some of our best friends today.” Erin says the art at Neighborhood is modern, pop, minimal or local. “Staying ahead of the curve is sometimes challenging,” she says of the ever-changing world of interior design, “but we have found our niche.” — Lauren Frock

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Nest Jenn Sprinkle, Garland :: owns a design business, doing branding, marketing and stationery design. She has curated two editions of the CRAVE Dallas book on women entrepreneurs in Dallas, and her story of reinventing her business was featured in Melody Biringer’s Flipped It! e-book.

intensive care nurse at Fort Worth’s Harris Methodist Hospital.

2005

Michael Clements

2002

Lisa Hernandez (’07 M.A.),

Achieving a dream

Garland :: and her husband,

As an elementary school student in Fort Pierce, Fla.,Will Miller (’13) took one look at his sister’s high school band uniform and fell in love with the idea of wearing one and being in a band. Though he originally wanted to play drums, his seventh-grade band director guided him toward the trumpet, which would ultimately be the instrument he played for the One O’Clock Lab Band, for the U.S. Army Jazz Band and with celebrity musicians including Barry White, Aretha Franklin, Duke Ellington, Diana Ross and more. In ninth grade, Miller’s band director, Harry Grant, talked about his son, Gary, a trumpet player in the One O’Clock Lab Band. Miller continued to hear great things about the university, and after a year at college in Tennessee and a year off, he was accepted into the music program. The first semester, he made the Eight O’Clock Lab Band, then worked his way up — Five O’Clock, Four O’Clock, Three O’Clock and, in 1978, lead trumpet in the One O’Clock. Yet, with nine credits needed to graduate, Miller joined the Army Band. “I wanted to play professionally,” he says. “I wanted to make records.” After three years in the Army Band, Miller moved to L.A. where he met Gary Grant. With Grant’s help and the solid reputation of the jazz studies program behind him, Miller found steady work — but something still nagged at him. “Completing my degree was always in the back of my mind,” Miller says. With the help of online courses and a trip to Denton for a senior recital, Miller was able to achieve that dream this month, earning a bachelor’s degree in music composition. Miller still loves performing with bands and doing his own work, but having a degree will open up many more opportunities. And he says he’s thankful for the support from music professors Thomas Sovik and John Murphy (’84, ’86 M.M.). “They helped me discover the formula for success,” he says. — Margarita Venegas

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Tim Campbell, Bedford :: teaches pre-AP geometry for the HEB ISD. His wife, Faith, gave birth to their first child, Gavin Campbell, in May. He weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces, and came home in his Mean Green onesie.

2003 Andy Hogue, Austin :: who got married in January, is a press specialist with the Texas General Land Office after a year as a speechwriter for Texas Workforce Commission Chair Tom Pauken.

2004 Mark and Jonith Wilkinson

(’05), Fort Worth :: are the proud

parents of a baby girl, Brynlee Michele, born in April. They also have a son, Brady Patrick, 4. Mark is a teacher and coach at Birdville High School. Jonith is a neonatal

Jeromy, announce the birth of their daughter, Juliana Aracely Hernandez. Born in July, she weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces. She joins sister Loralei, 4. Lisa teaches Spanish and chairs the world language department at Irving’s Cistercian Preparatory School.

Pamela Thompson (M.S.), El

Paso :: had an article published in

the August-September issue of Library Media Connection. It outlines a teacher/library media specialist collaborative project with seventh-grade students in El Paso.

2006 Sarah Ayala-Marquez, San

Antonio :: and her husband,

Isaac, welcomed their first child, Gabriel Isaac, in June. Sarah is a band director and Isaac is a school teacher, both in the Northside ISD.

Erin Dorris Cassidy (M.S.),

Cleveland :: earned tenure and

promotion to associate professor in the Newton Gresham Library at Sam Houston State University.

2007 Winston T. Sutherland

(Ph.D.), Fort Lee, N.J. :: pub-

lished a book, Fatherly Influence: A Man’s Finest Legacy, with WestBow Press.

2008 Beth Gordon, Miami, Fla. :: received her juris doctor from the University of Miami School of Law in May.

Colony. The engineer/tech startup is developing a wireless water meter. At UNT, Jonathan was an SGA senator and student regent.

Travis C. Rogers (M.J.), Mid-

...... I N T H E //

land :: is the co-author of A Syn-

News

“From a student of North Texas State University: The radio sat in ... the second floor dorm window blaring out the sad news that our president

thesis of Qualitative Studies of Writing Center Tutoring, 1983-2006 (Peter Lang International Academic Publishers).

had been shot! People walking around in twos and threes stopped their happy chattering and stood silently on the street,

2013

waiting — listening — wondering — praying,” wrote English major

Eileen Mitchell (’66) in

Shana Gooch Joyce, Austin ::

the letter she began to Jacqueline Kennedy at 1:10 p.m.

married Mike Joyce. They met while Shana attended UNT, where she earned her degree in political science.

Nov. 22, 1963. She closed with, “Mrs. Kennedy, I love you and I will pray for you.” Featured in the November Texas Monthly, it was one of the more than 1.5 million condolence letters sent to the first lady and is preserved in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in

Derrick Murray (’11 M.B.A.),

Denton :: was promoted to direc-

tor of GENCO Information Technology — Enterprise Windows Systems.

2009 L’areal Hudson, Arlington :: works for Acuity Systems Inc. and is a certified Sandler trainer. She earned her degree in marketing.

Kathrin Yokubaitis, Houston

:: is the manager of community

relations and events at the Star of Hope Mission in Houston, which serves homeless men and women and their children.

2011 Jonathan S. Gallegos (’11

M.S.), San Angelo :: is controller

of Capstone Metering LLC in The

Boston. Mitchell, who is now a contract specialist and also teaches paralegal studies at Tulane University, says

Devin Eddleman, Southlake, and Ramsey Castaneda (’12),

she remembers returning from her canceled English class to her Marquis Hall dorm room, putting the radio in the

Los Angeles, Calif. :: former One

O’Clock Lab Band members, with students Zach Marley, Alex Hahn and Connor Kent (from left), represented UNT in the Disney All-American College Band this summer. They played five daily sets at Disneyland parks in Anaheim and at the openings of Monsters Inc. and The Lone Ranger.

Andreas Jaeger, Denton :: works for Acuity Systems Inc. in marketing communications. Andreas graduated with a journalism degree and a marketing minor.

window for others to hear, and in her grief wanting to comfort the first lady. Letter-writers later received printed cards expressing Mrs. Kennedy’s appreciation. Mitchell says she was shocked when her letter, which also was published in a 2010 book, re-surfaced. “I had forgotten about it and was very surprised it had survived and been chosen for publication. I’m still impressed that it is in a presidential library.”

Also making news this November was a collection of Dallas Police Department materials and Dallas Times Herald photos related to the assassination that are being made accessible on UNT’s Portal

to Texas History Johanna Hurley Military History Seminar Nov. 2 focusing (texashistory.unt.edu); the Alfred and

on the national security implications of the assassination; a Nov. 3 College of

Music program in which members

of the faculty re-created music performed at the White House during the Kennedy administration; and a Nov. 20 screening of the documentary JFK50: Eyewitness to History, co-sponsored by the Mayborn

School of Journalism and The Dallas Morning News.

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F R I E N D S

W E ’ L L

M I S S

UNT’s alumni, faculty, staff and students are the university’s greatest legacy. When members of the Eagle family pass, they are remembered and their spirit lives on. Send information about deaths to The North Texan (see contact information on page 7). Read more, write memorials and connect with friends at northtexan.unt.edu.

1930s Margaret Louise Frisby McAdams (’37), McKinney

:: She taught in Ysleta High

School and in the Bryan ISD schools, where she retired. She taught Spanish and English and later reading. When she and her husband moved to McKinney after retirement, she was an active member of the First United Methodist Church’s Lora Ryan Sunday School Class, the Clown

University Community

Band and the En Avant Club. At North Texas, she was a member of the Phoreffs, the Current Literature Club and the Pan American Student Forum.

1950s Clarence Richard ‘Dick’ Lindsay (’50, ’54 M.S.), Tyler

:: He joined the U.S. Navy at

age 18 and served on the U.S.S. Buckingham in the Pacific theatre from the Philippines to

Japan. In 1946, he accepted a football scholarship to Tulane, then transferred to North Texas where he played offense, defense and special teams all four years. He was on the All Conference team two years. In 2006, he was inducted into UNT’s Athletics Hall of Fame. He coached in Waco and at R.E. Lee High School in Tyler, where he also served as assistant principal. He was later assistant superintendent of business in the Tyler ISD. He retired in 1987.

Vernon Lamar Smythe (’52), Houston :: He served in U.S.

Army Intelligence, including two years in Vietnam, and had a 25-year career with the Veteran’s Administration in Houston. He also supported animal welfare causes.

Ouida Lorraine Murrell Tolson (’53), Plano :: At North Texas, she studied education and was a member of Kappa Theta Pi, which affiliated with Chi Omega her senior year. She was married to her high school sweetheart for more than 30 years and enjoyed traveling the world with him.

William Harlan Trott (’58),

Clinton, Miss. :: He enlisted in

the U.S. Army and spent time in Germany before attending North Texas, where he received his degree in physics and math. His career included jobs at White Sands Missile Range in Alamogordo, N.M., with Rockwell International and work on the space shuttle program in Louisiana and Florida. He received two NASA Public Service awards and received a 1988 Engineer of the Year award from Rockwell.

included college counseling, coun-

versity of Kansas, a master’s from

istrative specialist in the Depart-

selor supervision, adventure-based

Emporia State University and a

ment of Counseling and Higher

Carolyn W. Kern, 61,

counseling and resilience, and she

doctorate from Oklahoma State

Education. She had worked at UNT

had researched suicide prevention

University. Memorials may be made

for 35 years, first in the 1970s and

Denton, associ-

with a grant from the U.S. Depart-

to support future counseling stu-

then continuously from 1989 until

ate professor

ment of Health and Human Ser-

dents’ scholarships through the

retiring in 2010. She served as

of counseling

vices. She had received numerous

Carolyn & Doug Kern Scholarship

the main contact for current and

who had worked at UNT since 1991,

distinguished service awards from

Fund at UNT.

prospective students in the depart-

died Nov. 2. She joined the faculty

professional counseling organiza-

after serving as a senior clinical

tions and was the immediate past

counselor at the University Counsel-

president of the Texas Counseling

ing Center at Oklahoma State

ment and was widely known for her patience, helpfulness and knowl-

Association and a fellow and former

Carolyn Joyce Phillips (’06,

University and also had worked as a

board member of the American

’10 M.S.), 63,

and a master’s in studies in aging

mental health and school coun-

Counseling Association. She earned

died Sept. 10

from UNT and was pursuing a doc-

selor. Her areas of expertise

a bachelor’s degree from the Uni-

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in Denton. She was a retired admin-

edge of the university. She earned her bachelor’s degree in sociology

torate in applied gerontology. She

1960s Lindon ‘Lindy’ Carl Endsley (’68), Waco :: He transferred

from Texas A&M in 1965 to finish his football career at North Texas. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs and played for two seasons before becoming an industrial manager for United Parcel Service. He was part of the team that established the expansion of UPS in nine midwestern states, including Texas. He moved home to Waco in 1975, working as the UPS center manager and with T-N-T Sales. He later started his own firm, ENDSCO Sales.

1970s George L. Flynn Jr., Houston

:: He was a veteran reporter

and editor, known for his dry sense of humor. He worked at the Houston Post, the San Diego Union-Tribune, the Houston Chronicle and the Houston Press. He attended North Texas from

ondary education and history at North Texas. He was employed by National Life Insurance Co. and retired from General Motors Parts Division in Fort Worth. He became a 33 highest degree Mason. His family says he was a person who never met a stranger and never missed being a blessing to others.

(’77), Boerne :: He retired this

1990s

18th Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg. He was the author of Iraq Full Circle: From Shock and Awe To the Last Combat Patrol in Baghdad and Beyond, based on his three tours in Iraq. On his third deployment, he served as a deputy brigade commander. His awards and decorations included the Bronze Star Medal with V device, Meritorious Service Medal, Army Commendation Medal with four oak leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with three oak leaf clusters and National Defense Service Medal with bronze service star.

Amrit Samuel Lall (’76 Ph.D.),

Michael Norton, Fort Worth

2010s

was a member of the Pakistan National Basketball Team and held Pakistan’s national pole vaulting record. He came to the U.S. in 1962 to study at Westminster College and earned his doctorate in counseling and secondary education at UNT. He earned his U.S. citizenship in 1978 and for many years was a

UNT in the 1980s and ’90s and was a leader in the Residence Hall Association and Kendall Hall. He worked as a logistics supervisor for Ceva Logistics.

Eric Samuel Jones, George-

1967 to 1970 and became the first editor of the North Texas Daily after it changed from the Campus Chat.

Denton area counselor and later conducted social studies for the Denton County Court System. He was a member of the drumming group “It Is What It Is.”

Henry Joe Jones (’73), Denton

:: He earned his degree in sec-

Denton :: As a young man, he

Carl Anthony Saltarelli

spring as an assistant professor at Texas A&M University at Kingsville, where he taught radio and television courses. He also served as the station manager of the university’s radio and television stations for several years.

:: He studied accounting at

Army Col. Darron L. Wright (’91), Mesquite :: A 26-year Army veteran, he was serving as assistant chief of staff with the

also earned a graduate academic

Professor Emeritus of engineering

trial education from UNT and his

certificate in 2008 in volunteer and

technology, died July 28. Richards

doctorate from Texas A&M Univer-

community resource management.

began teaching in the industrial

sity. He taught industrial arts in

A longtime community activist, she

arts department in 1965. He served

the Fort Worth public schools and

helped start the group that became

as department head for 13 years

owned and operated a residential

known as the Southeast Denton

and helped develop the program

construction business before join-

Neighborhood Association and

as its focus turned to preparing

ing North Texas, where he taught

was dedicated to representing the

students for careers in industry

industrial design and engineering

neighborhood’s concerns.

and its name changed to industrial

graphics and researched computer-

technology and then to engineer-

integrated manufacturing educa-

John Virgil Richards

ing technology. He retired in 1992.

tion. He spent his retirement years

Richards was a member of the U.S.

visiting with his children and grand-

Marines, serving as a master ser-

children and was an avid supporter

(’58, ’59

geant during the Korean War, and

of the arts.

M.Ed.), 85,

later earned his degrees in indus-

town :: He was a freshman last

enrolled in fall 2012 studying criminal justice. He was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma and volunteered as a Boy Scout camp counselor. In high school, he played football and ran track.

Memorials Send memorials to honor UNT alumni and friends, made payable to the UNT Foundation, to University of North Texas, Division of Advancement, 1155 Union Circle #311250, Denton, Texas 762035017. Indicate on your check the fund or area you wish to support. Or make secure gifts online at development.unt.edu/givenow. For more information, email giving@ unt.edu or call 940-565-2900.

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GOLDEN MEMORIES Members of the Class of 1963 gathered during Homecoming weekend for the annual Golden Eagles luncheon. Here are a few of their campus memories.

Gary Payne

My father, Eric Brown (’63), who passed in 2004, was a high school dropout who joined the Air Force, got his G.E.D. and then finished a bachelor’s degree at North Texas. I was a small child and have fond memories of living in Denton. Being at North Texas instilled a love of learning in my father, which he passed on to his children and grandchildren. He wore his class ring proudly until he passed. I don’t remember ever seeing his hand without it. — Cynthia Brown, Canton, Ga.

From left, R.L. Crawford Jr. (’63), Brenda Crawford (’63), Susan Stinson (’64) and James L. Stinson (’63) at the Golden Eagles luncheon. letter from him. My box was No. 6657 and I still remember the code, 3-7-2 ½. I bought the mailbox when the old UB was torn down to build another one. I was an Alpha Delta Pi, in student government, a cheerleader and a Green Jacket. We were married almost 48 years before he passed away in 2011. I have the mailbox sitting on a bookshelf in my den to this day as it means so much to me. — Libby Matthews (’63), Marshall

My most memorable experience at UNT was the surprise party R.L. hosted for me. We met as students and he stole my heart. R.L. played intramural sports and was a member of the Geezle fraternity. We enjoyed the social coffee breaks and dancing the North Texas “Push” to the music of the One O’Clock Lab Band on Thursdays at the UB. We are a Mean Green family. Both our sons, Trey and Guy, also graduated from UNT. We have a lifetime love affair with UNT and deeply appreciate the first-class educations we received. It’s a thrill to come back to campus to visit. We are amazed by the excellence we experience every time. — Brenda (’63) and R.L. Crawford Jr. (’63), Lewisville

My father, Dr. F. S. Hamilton, taught at UNT for almost 30 years. I attended the Lab School from kindergarten to ninth grade. There is a large group of us who are still friends. Most of us got our driver’s license when we were 14 years old. From the time I was 12 until I was a junior at North Texas, I took riding lessons at the Estes Stables. Horseback riding was a P.E. class. — Carol Lynn Hamilton Pierce (’63), Denton My most memorable experiences at North Texas were becoming a Geezle and a manager for the football program and being the first in my family to finish my

I wrote my fiancé, Ronnie Matthews, every day I was at North Texas and checked the campus mailbox expecting a

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degree. But the best memory was going on a “blind date” to a Delta Gamma spaghetti dinner with Sue Kennedy. She became my wife in 1965. About five years ago, I had the honor of being a chair of the “Geezle Eagle” committee, which brought the “Spiriki” eagle statue to Apogee Stadium. — James L. Stinson (’63), Richardson I proudly attended North Texas during the time it became a university. I have fond memories of dorm life at Kendall Hall and our ever-present dorm mother, Mrs. Pipkin, who strictly enforced the 10:50 p.m. curfew. Later, I lived in the Alpha Delta Pi “ramp” in Chilton Hall where “Sing Song,” fraternity “pinnings” and rush week filled my days. The early 1960s were idyllic. Our main concerns were making it to class on time and getting a date for Homecoming! I married John “Sonny” Phillips (’65), my high school and college sweetheart. We recently celebrated 50 years of marriage. — Frances George Phillips (’63), Duncanville See a video of the event at northtexan.unt.edu/ goldenmemories-2013.

Rising to greatness

Senior team captain Laura McCoy and junior shooting guard T.J. Taylor aren’t average athletes. They’re Mean Green. McCoy is a business major on the Student-Athlete Advisory Board and is the third all-time 3-point scorer in UNT women’s basketball history. Taylor is a former third-team All American player with plans to earn his master’s in behavior analysis to help people with disabilities. With hard work, they’ve managed to strike the perfect balance between a demanding collegiate basketball career and academic greatness. Get to know Mean Green men’s and women’s basketball — growing every day, on and off the court.

800-UNT-2366 | 940-565-2527 meangreensports.com

— LAURA MCCOY MEAN GREEN

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL POINT GUARD

— T.J. TAYLOR

MEAN GREEN MEN’S BASKETBALL SHOOTING GUARD

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The North Texan

Rick Yeatts

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS Division of University Relations, Communications and Marketing 1155 Union Circle #311070 Denton, Texas 76203-5017

PA RT I N G S H O T Proud Mean Green football fans congratulate players following a hard-earned 28-16 Halloween victory over Rice that made the team eligible for a bowl game for the first time since 2004. After compiling an 8-4 overall season record and a 6-2 conference record, the Mean Green accepted an invitation to play at the Heart of Dallas Bowl. Purchase tickets to cheer the team to victory against UNLV at 11 a.m. New Year’s Day 50 T h e NCott o r t h T e x a n | northtexan.unt.edu | W i n t e r 2 0 1 3 in the historic on Bowl stadium at meangreensports.com/tickets.


The North Texan - UNT Alumni Magazine - Winter 2013