Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT 2011 The Wollotuka Institute


Contact Details Mob – family: This painting hangs in the Birabahn Building and was purchased by The Wollotuka Institute at the 2010 WAAP Art Exhibition. The painting by local Aboriginal artist, Sareeta Fielding, represents her family (mob) and reflects the relationships and strong ties that exist within Aboriginal family, extended family and community. The circles interwoven throughout the painting represent family groups and extended family connections. The painting is acrylic and aerosol on canvas.

UoN B6747

Cover artwork

The Wollotuka Institute Birabahn Building The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 Australia T: +61 2 4921 6863 F: +61 2 4921 6985 E: Wollotuka@newcastle.edu.au


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

CONTENTS 02 Introduction and Highlights 10 Teaching and Learning 14 Research and Research Training 18 Student Experience 24 Community Engagement 30 Employment 31 Indigenous Health Unit 32 Moving Forward... 2012

|


02 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

INTRODUCTION AND HIGHLIGHTS


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

03

The Wollotuka Institute is designed to consolidate all Indigenous activities of the University into one operational and strategic body in order to serve the University’s strategic priority and commitment to Indigenous Collaboration. The four functions of the Institute incorporate Academic, Research, Indigenous Student Support and Development, and Indigenous Staff Employment and Development. The Institute is located within the Academic and Global Relations Division and reports through the management group of three Directors to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Global Relations). 2011 saw changes in roles within this management group which built on the already strong leadership structure in place for Indigenous education at the University. Professor John Maynard, Chair and Director of Academic and Research of the Wollotuka Institute commenced work on his ARC Discovery Indigenous Researcher Development Scheme grant in 2011 for a period of three years. Professor John Lester was selected to serve as Chair for 2011-2014. Professor Lester’s outstanding contribution to Indigenous education in the national and NSW state arena further strengthens leadership in the area of Indigenous research. Associate Professor Peter O’Mara, Director of Indigenous Health, relocated to the Birabahn Building with the other two Directors where his role was expanded to provide expert advice and assist with the development and implementation of Indigenous Health majors and courses across the University as well as health related research and research projects under the Institute. Leanne Holt, Director of Indigenous Student Support, Employment and Collaboration expanded her role into the academic and research area where she developed, implemented and managed a number of academic projects. These include coordination of the implementation of Indigenous inclusive curriculum across the University, development of articulation arrangements and academic opportunities with educational and business organisations, in addition to an academic teaching

workload. An additional Senior Administrative position was established to maximise Leanne’s expanded teaching, research and management roles and to provide strategic advice and senior administrative support to the other Directors. This position has been filled by the very experienced Cheryl Newton and provides a structured succession development activity to understudy in Cheryl’s prior lead administrative role as Institute Executive Officer. The focus for 2011 was to ensure that effective strategies and programs were developed and implemented to meet the following goals: continue to enhance and promote the educational outcomes of our Indigenous students

n

further strengthen and explore opportunities for the quality teaching of Indigenous pedagogy

n

enhance the learning of non-Indigenous students to instill a social justice and human rights ethic

n

increase our research activities and collaborative research opportunities

n

further develop and strengthen positive and sustainable relationships with our community

n

ensure the continual development of academic and general staff to form a strong and innovative team

n


04 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Governance The management structure of Indigenous education at the University of Newcastle guarantees strong Indigenous community participation in the setting of key directions and priorities. Activities are governed by a Board of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education and Training (BATSIET) that has all Indigenous membership, including community representatives with skills and experience in Indigenous educational and community matters. Genuine consultation with Indigenous communities and leaders is integral to the University’s approach to supporting Indigenous education and has been the foundation of the University’s successes. An executive committee with a membership of the Directors and team leaders for Research, Academic, Support and Development, Community Engagement, Employment and the Executive Officer also contribute to the decision making and future planning of the Institute. This leadership allows the Institute to have a high level of input and influence both within the academic and research profiles, and within the university services profile. The University recognises the importance of Indigenous education by high level staff appointments that encourage Indigenous self determination and governance.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

The Wollotuka Institute – Organisational Chart DIRECTOR Indigenous Student Support, Employment and Collaboration

DIRECTOR Indigenous Health

Lecturer B

Senior Administrator (3 days p/w)

Portfolio Leader Student Support & Development

Portfolio Leader Community Engagement

Lecturer B (1 day p/w)

Indigenous Employment Coordinator

Elder in Residence - Callaghan

Elder in Residence – Ourimbah

ITAS Coordinator

External Relations Officer

Access & Retention Officer

Community Engagement Officer

Project Officer/ Marketing Officer

Success & Collaboration Officer Accommodation & Scholarships Officer (3 days p/w) Administrative Assistant

Rural Education Officer Indigenous Perspective Student Advisor Parent & Community Engagement Officer Kunarr Indigenous Alumni Coordinator (3 days p/w) Indigenous Education Coordinator (Port Macquarie) WAAP Coordinator (2 days p/w) Administrative Assistant

DIRECTOR Academic and Research

Academic Coordinator

Research Coordinator

Senior Lecturer

Research Fellow / Lecturer B

Lecturer B/ Yapug Coordinator 3 x Lecturer B 2 x Associate Lecturer A Casual Lecturers Cultural Competency Officer

Research Support Development Officer Yuranna Research Study Centre Coordinator

Executive Officer

Admin Assistant

Admin Assistant/ Receptionist

05


06 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Following are some of the Institute’s major highlights of 2011 with other initiatives and core activities outlined throughout this report.

Indigenous student numbers 2011 has once again confirmed that the University’s strategic commitment to Indigenous education coupled with Wollotuka’s outstanding service to Indigenous students has deemed the University of Newcastle to be a number one choice for study by Indigenous students. The total enrolment of 665 Indigenous students for 2011 shows a marked increase over previous years to which the staff of Wollotuka are very proud. Tables 1 to 3 outline the increase since 2004 as well as the spread of students across the University (the data represents full year program enrols up to 2010, and year to date data as at 30 August 2011).

Table 1 Indigenous enrols by Program Level 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011 YTD

Undergraduate

284

282

323

341

344

357

409

446

Postgraduate Coursework

29

33

32

37

47

44

59

76

Research

30

24

15

19

29

23

29

24

Enabling

33

39

44

75

74

113

133

119

376

378

417

472

495

537

631

665

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011 YTD

English Lang & Foundation Stud

33

39

44

75

74

113

133

119

Fac of Business & Law

43

46

54

45

48

55

62

73

Fac of Education & Arts

186

180

187

203

214

202

224

241

Fac of Engineering & Built Env

16

18

21

29

31

27

36

41

Fac of Health

65

68

77

84

95

102

117

118

Fac of Science & Info Tech

31

26

31

35

30

37

57

71

Student Admin Services

2

1

3

1

3

1

2

2

Grand Total

376

378

417

472

495

537

631

665

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011 YTD

Commencing

155

169

173

229

240

258

344

338

Continuing

221

209

244

243

255

279

287

327

Grand Total

376

378

417

472

495

537

631

665

Non-Award Grand Total

3

1

1

Figure 2 Indigenous enrols by Faculty

Figure 3 Commencing Indigenous enrols


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Indigenous Cultural Competency

|

07

University Cultural Competency Workshops

One central plank for achieving Indigenous Collaboration as a strategic priority is the development of cultural competencies in the University’s staff and student populations, both as a measure to provide an environment free from racism and as a means of producing graduates who are culturally aware global citizens.

This program aims to increase participants’ knowledge and understanding about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and cultures and help them develop skills, values, and critical reflexivity to enable positive changes in professional practice. The program also aims to build capacity for staff and students in working effectively within inter-cultural contexts.

The Cultural Competency program has been promoted to obtain the following outcomes:

The Indigenous Cultural Competency Program comprises three stages:

Embedding diversity

n

Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community

n

Achieving academic Indigenous inclusive curriculum

n

Developing resources and strategies

n

Moving forward together – Indigenous collaboration

n

The Cultural Competency program has incorporated professional and academic University Cultural Competency workshops, induction half day workshops, embedded content in the Graduate Certificate in the Practice of Tertiary Teaching, and also offers one off specialised workshops. One of these workshops was organised by the Faculty Education and Arts in collaboration with The Wollotuka Institute. The workshop invited Dr Christine Asmar from the University of Melbourne to present on her research outcomes in relation to ‘teaching Indigenous content to non-Indigenous students’. Dr Asmar co-presented with Indigenous academics from the Wollotuka Institute and attracted over 30 staff across all Faculties of the University. Although feedback was very positive participants noted that the University was already implementing much of what was being promoted at the workshop from a national perspective. All feedback highlighted the need for further workshops that looked at further enhancement of current quality teaching strategies.

1. Cultural Competency Pre-Workshop The pre-workshop provides an online interactive multi-media resource that provides scenario-based examples and both broad and localised material aimed to give participants a grounding in Indigenous cultural awareness and sensitivity. Note: This component is a compulsory pre-requisite to enrol in Stage 2, and participants will be required to demonstrate learning outcomes through completing a worksheet and providing a hardcopy completion statement. 2. Cultural Competency Workshop This is a face-to-face session that exposes participants to ways of applying cultural competence in their professional practice and encompass inclusivity organisationally. Participants will be given opportunity and scope to develop their own Indigenous Collaborative Action Plans. 3. Post-Evaluation Participants will evaluate their Indigenous Collaborative Action Plans, share their successes and engage in further critical reflexivity. Further to our internal Cultural Competency program we also continued our engagement, with local businesses and organisations to promote the value of Cultural Competency principles in graduate attributes of students graduating from the University of Newcastle, as well as providing resources to organisations and employers that encourage relationships to enhance outcomes of Indigenous collaboration both at the University and within the wider communities.


08 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Reconciliation at the University The annual Reconciliation Scholarship Dinner Dance attracted a record attendance in 2011 with 325 guests dining and dancing the night away at the Wests Club in Lambton during Reconciliation Week in May. The increase in attendances show the commitment by University staff, students and community to making reconciliation a reality as well as providing a lasting academic gift with all profits to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Scholarship Fund. Following on from the success of the Dinner Dance, staff, students and community celebrated the launch of the University’s Reconciliation Action Plan in the Birabahn Building on 6 September 2011. Partnering with Reconciliation Australia to deliver the plan which outlines the University focussing on education, research and employment to boost outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and build on their established leadership in providing access to higher education for Indigenous Australians.

Focus on on-line teaching and learning An additional seven Aboriginal Studies courses were made available on-line to students in 2011 making a total of 15 courses now available. The flexible delivery of courses is seen as a high priority to improving the student experience and meeting the increasing employment demands current students hold to finance their studies. To further enhance the development and quality teaching in these programs a leading online specialist academic staff member has been given specific responsibilities to focus more specialised support to staff to extend online course delivery across the viable majority of core courses in the new Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice. The expansion of courses to these levels will ensure greater access to students attending other university campuses in particular at Ourimbah and Port Macquarie.

Industry based Indigenous Scholarships (IBIS) The IBIS Program was implemented in March 2011. The program, was initiated by Angela Samuels Manager Industry Scholarships, who recognised that Indigenous applicants were seriously underrepresented in Industry Scholarships, and developed in consultation with Industry -. As a result of collaboration with Wollotuka and in keeping with Universities Australia’s commitment to Closing the Gap through the Cultural Competency Program, a dedicated Indigenous position was funded by Wollotuka to support the staff of Industry Scholarships and Indigenous students under the program. The program commenced with Hunter New England Health supporting seven Indigenous nursing students and Rio Tinto and Coal and Allied supporting two students in Civil Engineering and Business. Industry Scholarships currently work with a total of 12 Indigenous scholarship placements across the study disciplines of Nursing, Civil Engineering, Business, Teaching, Surveying and Construction Management. There are also discussions in process that may realise a further 6 scholarship opportunity during 2012. Also, through the commencement of a relationship with Rio Tinto’s Aboriginal Development Consultative Committee a program has been developed that will support up to four Indigenous students with short term scholarships per year in whatever discipline the successful applicant studies. An informal partnership has also commenced with the Department of Aboriginal Affairs’ Jobs Compact program.

Staff achievements 2011 saw a number of staff achievements including Luke Halvorsen receiving an Indigenous Staff Scholarship from DEEWR which assisted with his completion of the Masters of Marketing program at the University. Liz Cameron was nominated as an Indigenous Education Ambassador by the Hon Peter Garrett MP, Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and Youth where she acted as a mentor to promote education with Indigenous students from early childhood to secondary levels. Two staff received awards at the annual Newcastle/Lake Macquarie Aboriginal Education Pathways Event: Professor John Lester – Lifetime Achievement Award in Aboriginal Education and Cheryl Newton – Outstanding Contribution to Aboriginal Education. These awards showcase our commitment to community engagement at both local and national levels.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

09

get on-the-job experience: with ibis industry placements For one young member of the Dunghutti tribe, industry placement experiences are a rewarding part of the journey toward her career choice. With three uncles in nursing, it’s not surprising that Samantha Hoskins, a young member of the Dunghutti tribe around Kempsey, ended up doing a nursing degree at the University of Newcastle. Ultimately, Samantha sees herself pursuing a career working with children in paediatrics or possibly midwifery, but for now she’s focused on finishing her degree and enjoying the hands-on experience she gets through the wide range of practical placements at hospitals such as The Royal Newcastle Centre.

“We get 12 weeks a year in a hospital setting,” says Samantha, “which is giving me great insights into all the different facets of a career in nursing, such as a surgery environment and pre-op and post-op.” Samantha’s valuable industry experience is largely thanks to her Industry Based Indigenous Scholarship (IBIS) in collaboration with Hunter New England Health, which supports Indigenous students by providing sponsorship and a link back to their workplace via industry placements.

Apart from the obvious benefits of financial support (up to $17,000 a year, tax-free), the IBIS industry placements give Indigenous students real responsibility and the opportunity to contribute to the organisation while developing the skills necessary to be successful in their chosen profession.


10 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

TEACHING AND LEARNING Academics in Wollotuka continue to offer leadership to the rest of the University in Indigenous education particularly matters of inclusive curriculum and teaching into other program areas. We currently teach into disciplines external to Wollotuka such as education, health and enabling studies, as well as provide guest lectures in a number of courses across key faculties of Education and Arts, Engineering & Built Environment, Health and Science and Information Technology. The Directors and academics also provide invaluable cultural and academic advice to a number of academic boards such as University Council, Academic Senate, Teaching and Learning Committee, and the ELFSC Board. 2011 saw a significant improvement in student feedback on our Aboriginal Studies courses with the mean scores of over 4 (out of 5) in both semesters. This makes the Institute’s teaching unit one of the highest performing academic units in the University.

Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice Program 2011 was the first year in which the newly developed Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice was offered with 17 students enrolled. This is a totally innovative program not available at any other University that greatly enhances employment prospects for participating Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. The program gives students a strong framework to assist them to take on the responsibilities of becoming successful advocates for equity in the workplace. The two core streams are structured around the development of cultural understandings to maximise critical awareness and positive positioning of Indigenous peoples in the professional workforce and as clients of professional services. The professional skills element gives students the opportunities to develop knowledge of effective advocacy, critical writing skills in both academic and professional fields, and an understanding of policy directions and legislative frameworks from a social justice perspective. The program also provides the equivalent of a six week professional placement. Another unique feature of the program is the opportunity for students to pursue an extensive range of major options across vocational and professional offerings across 26 courses including Leisure & Tourism Management, International Affairs, Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management, Economic Policy Analysis, Community Welfare and Human Services, Creative Arts and many more. As part of our commitment to continuous improvement and the delivery of high quality academic programs a second semester audit was undertaken of all of the entries on the Curriculum Tracking System for accuracy. Following this audit a specific workshop held on the two courses perceived to be our flagship programmes, ABOR1110: Introduction to Aboriginal Studies and ABOR3500: Aboriginal Education, Policies and Issues. During these review workshops we revisited and reviewed curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Academic staff were intimately involved in these reviews and external stakeholders were invited to participate.

The graduation ceremony in April 2011 saw our last student to graduate from the former Bachelor of Aboriginal Studies program and the October ceremony saw the first two graduates in the newly revised Bachelor of Aboriginal Professional Practice program, which were great ongoing landmarks in The Institute’s continuing academic evolution.

Yapug Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Enabling Program Yapug continues to be an extremely important part of The Institute and University’s commitment to increasing Indigenous enrolments by providing opportunities for students to gain tertiary skills to tackle University. Yapug enrolments in 2011 continued to increase, with 25 new enrolments in semester one and eight (8) continuing students and 12 new enrolments in semester two, bringing total Yapug enrolments to 45. Implementation of a range of recommendations from the external review of Yapug, including the use of intensive support for Yapug students, has lead to increased completion rates. Seven (7) students graduated from Yapug in 2011. An important development in Yapug for 2012 will be the tying of skills assessment to the enrolment processes. This will mean that upon entry to Yapug staff will be able to provide options for literacy and numeracy development that are responsive to student skill levels. To undertake these reviews students will be encouraged to attend a workshop in orientation week as well as the Wollotuka Orientation Camp for commencing students. We also began preliminary investigations and data collections to establish the feasibility of offering Yapug on the Central Coast campus to meet the needs of a large Indigenous population in the area.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

Other Academic Functions The academic team has been very busy this year in their teaching with 2,122 students enrolled in our Aboriginal studies courses across three campuses and online as shown in Tables 4 and 5.

Table 4 Week 1, Semester 1 2011 Student enrolments in Aboriginal Studies Courses Subject ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR ABOR EPHUMA EPHUMA EPHUMA EPHUMA

Catalog 1110 1110 1110 1370 1370 1410 1901 1996 2022 2241 2330 2330 2330 2440 3021 3024 3024 3080 3251 3251 3450 3500 3500 3500 3999 4010 4020 6001 6003 6005 9501 9501 9502 9502 110 111 112 158

Class Description Intro to Aboriginal Studies Intro to Aboriginal Studies Intro to Aboriginal Studies Work with Abor Communities Work with Abor Communities Academic/Career Communication Aboriginal Studies International Exchange Studies Aboriginal Cultural Immersion Aboriginal Political Protest Traditional Aboriginal Society Traditional Aboriginal Society Traditional Aboriginal Society Abor Health Past & Present Aust Indig Language & Culture Aboriginal Community Advocacy Aboriginal Community Advocacy Indigenous Research International Indigenous Study International Indigenous Study Hlth Equity Indig Aus Clos Gap Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss Aboriginal Prof Experience Aboriginal Studies Honours I Aboriginal Studies Honours II Aboriginal Foundation Studies Contemporary Aboriginal Studies Abor Ed 1st World/Third World Research Thesis – Full Time Research Thesis – Full Time Research Thesis – Part Time Research Thesis – Part Time Community & Research Professional Practice I Aboriginal Tertiary Foundation Aboriginal Studies 1

Campus CALLA CALLA CCSTC CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CCSTC CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CCSTC CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA CALLA

Location CALLAGHAN ONLINE_CAL CENTRALCST CALLAGHAN ONLINE_CAL CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN ONLINE_CAL CENTRALCST CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN ONLINE_CAL CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN ONLINE_CAL CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN PORT_MAC CENTRALCST CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN WEBLEARN WEBLEARN WEBLEARN CALLAGHAN DIST_CAL CALLAGHAN DIST_CAL CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN CALLAGHAN TOTAL

Student Enrolments 134 64 24 42 54 12 4 2 14 15 2 8 9 10 9 11 3 7 10 277 20 157 4 2 2 17 5 5 3 1 4 1 18 16 28 23 1,017

11


12

| THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Table 4 Week 1, Semester 1 2011 Student enrolments in Aboriginal Studies Courses Subject

Catalog

Class Description

Campus

Location

ABOR

1110

Intro to Aboriginal Studies

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

Student Enrolments 104

ABOR

1110

Intro to Aboriginal Studies

CALLA

ONLINE_CAL

98

ABOR

1112

Torres Strait Islander Studies

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

10

ABOR

1112

Torres Strait Islander Studies

CALLA

ONLINE_CAL

17

ABOR

1390

Human Rights & Abor People

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

37

ABOR

1420

Communicating with Abor

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

20

ABOR

1420

Communicating with Abor

CALLA

ONLINE_CAL

58

ABOR

1998

International Exchange Studies

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

1

ABOR

2242

Abor Labour: Past & Present

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

7

ABOR

2243

Indig Global Warming Environ

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

10

ABOR

2244

Reconcil Aust Col Past & Prese

CALLA

ONLINE_CAL

34

ABOR

2245

Aboriginal People and Law

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

7

ABOR

2381

Human Rights & Minority Worker

CALLA

ONLINE_CAL

11

ABOR

2450

Aboriginal Health Practices

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

9

ABOR

3380

Human Rights & Indig. Comm.

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

6

ABOR

3440

Indig Health Around World

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

8

ABOR

3500

Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

323

ABOR

3500

Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss

CALLA

PORT_MAC

43

ABOR

3500

Aboriginal Edu, Policies & Iss

CCSTC

CENTRALCST

148

ABOR

4030

Aboriginal Studies Honours III

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

2

ABOR

6002

Decolonisation: An Aust Contex

CALLA

WEBLEARN

7

ABOR

6004

Community Development

CALLA

WEBLEARN

10

ABOR

6006

Black Power back on Indig Lear

CALLA

WEBLEARN

3

ABOR

9501

Research Thesis – Full Time

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

5

ABOR

9501

Research Thesis – Full Time

CALLA

DIST_CAL

1

ABOR

9502

Research Thesis – Part Time

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

6

ABOR

9502

Research Thesis – Part Time

CALLA

DIST_CAL

1

EDUC

6912

Aboriginal Education

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

64

EDUC

6274

Indigenous Education

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

3

EPHUMA

113

Professional Practice II

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

13

EPHUMA

135

Directed Study I

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

25

EPHUMA

258

Aboriginal Studies 2

CALLA

CALLAGHAN

14

TOTAL

1,105


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

As with every year the academic team supported a number of Indigenous student support and recruitment programs. This year staff provided valuable assistance and leadership through attendance the Indigenous Employment Market, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Entry Program, and NAIDOC activities. Individual academics are continuing to develop their research and scholarship skills. Of the eleven full-time academic staff, seven are enrolled in their research higher degree. One academic was granted study leave in second semester to develop a monograph project. In addition to the Director with responsibilities in Indigenous Health, we also have a lecturer employed within the Indigenous Health Unit, School of Medicine and Public Health. In 2011, the lecturer’s activities included assisting in the review and development of curriculum in medicine and nursing, provision of specific Indigenous health focused lectures and tutorials, and co-ordination of the provision of tutorials and tutorial staff for nursing students. During the year the lecturer was also involved in the development of a pre-medical program and all that entails including curriculum and logistics. Medicine also uses special entry processes and the health lecturer has been involved in 2011 with the review of admission process and the interview processes.

|

13

Other external projects Wollotuka was approached this year by a number of organisations external to the University to assist with the skill developments of their staff. Wollotuka is in the process of developing appropriate curriculum and articulation processes for these organisations. Within the University we have been responsible for work on a number of curriculum development projects. After being approached by Environmental Sciences the Wollotuka Institute was contracted to write a module for students in the area of Indigenous knowledges. A review of the Public Health program lead to a recommendation for the inclusion of Indigenous knowledges and content. This led to the specific development of a course which will fulfil the requirements of accreditation by the Public Health association. That course successfully went through the University’s accreditation processes for new courses and will be offered in 2012. Continuing the directions established within the University for Indigenisation of curriculum, the Wollotuka Institute responded to an approach by the school of Midwifery to write a course for the Midwifery program which has been through accreditation in late 2011. The course will be offered in second semester 2012.


14

| THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

RESEARCH AND RESEARCH TRAINING After 14 years of successful operation Umulliko Indigenous Higher Education Research Centre, which is the primary focus for research and research training within the Wollotuka Institute, started an exciting era of operation in 2011. There was a revitalisation in research directions and a specialist group established to lead Umulliko for the next decade. This research leadership group prioritised new pathways of research and research training that is relevant and of significant importance to our communities.

Research Training Research Higher Degree (RHD) student enrolments showed a marked increase within Wollotuka during 2011 with a total enrolment of 14. Umulliko also provides support to 18 Indigenous RHD students enrolled in other disciplines across the University. This year we also saw one PhD (Aboriginal Studies) student graduate. Five Indigenous RHD students were confirmed this year. To create significant improvements in the RHD student experience, students were provided with an opportunity to participate in writing workshops to increase their academic skills. The writing workshop provided the students with the opportunity to share their work with a group and to receive feedback on their work. This opportunity proved invaluable to students who attended. A dedicated Academic Research Support Development Officer was also employed to provide support to these students through facilitation of research forums, workshops and providing daily support to students on process and research matters. On 16th June 2011 Umulliko celebrated the Launch of the Kulumun On-Line Journal and Opening of The Yuranna Research Study Centre The Launch was well attended by RHDstudents, Wollotuka staff and other university staff and community who had a vested interest in the research area. Kulumun Journal The word “kulumun” is an Aboriginal word that describes a tool used both ceremoniously and to gather foods. It was chosen as the name for the journal to symbolise the gathering of knowledge. Kulumun seeks to provide a balanced overview of a wide range of social issues that are pertinent to Indigenous society, including health, history, education, human rights and justice. The first volume published at the time of the launch included several quality peer-reviewed articles drawn from the 2009 National Indigenous Education Conference in Hobart, Tasmania. Editor Dr Greg Blyton says Kulumun gives Indigenous academics a voice in an environment previously the exclusive domain of non-Indigenous academics.

Yuranna Research Study Centre This Centre is housed in Birabahn and is a home away from home for RHD students. Shelves of Indigenous resources, internet access, quiet study areas and proximity to other researchers and support staff make it an ideal environment for students to gather and work, discuss the progress of their studies, have a yarn, and find ways to support one another. This year many of our RHD students have made use of the support and resources available.

Research Projects Awabakal Strategic Plan Project – $65,000 Late in 2010 the local Awabakal Co-operative conducted a tender process for the writing of their strategic plan for the following five years. Umulliko won the tender and has just completed a final draft of the strategic plan after undertaking extensive consultations with stakeholders including directors, staff, service agents and members. The final document will be presented to the 2011 Annual members meeting in February 2012. This was an important project for Umulliko as it represented the clear direction of the Centre to work positively and closely with its Indigenous communities. Wide level consultation ensured that the document will be relevant to this large community run organisation, and assisted in individual section planning and close liaison with staff of the organisation. Early advice is that the Board and CEO of Awabakal are very pleased with the process and results. The Hunter Valley Aboriginal situational analysis 2011 in partnership with HVRF – $46,300 The Hunter Valley Aboriginal situational analysis 2011 was undertaken by Jenny Williams of Hunter Valley Research Foundation (HVRF) in partnership with the Michael Donovan of the Wollotuka Institute at the University of Newcastle on behalf of Coal & Allied/Rio Tinto Coal Australia (CNA) and its Aboriginal Development Consultative Committee (ADCC). The study reported here had two main objectives of the study they were: n

Collection and analysis of data to provide CNA and the ADCC with an evidence-base to inform the ADCC’s work in promoting community and economic development in the Upper Hunter through the trust fund it administers, and provide a basis for identification and prioritisation of partnership programmes relevant to the Upper Hunter Aboriginal community.

Evaluation of awareness and perceptions of the ADCC fund and its role in contributing to the Upper Hunter Aboriginal community. These results are reported under separate cover.

n


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

15

An underlying objective was the identification of opportunities for partnership and/or capacity-building between CNA, and its ADCC, with stakeholders in the Upper Hunter Aboriginal community. The study design used a mixed methodology approach, including: Review and analysis of relevant published research and information on the websites of service providers.

n

n

Discussions with over 30 key stakeholders and groups, including relevant state and local government agencies and non-government service providers in the areas of health, education and employment. In accordance with appropriate protocol in working with Aboriginal communities, discussions with Aboriginal organisations were held, and their cooperation sought, prior to commencement of the study. These organisations included the Wanaruah Local Aboriginal Land Council, Wonnarua Nation Aboriginal Corporation, Ungooroo Aboriginal Corporation, and St Clare Aboriginal Corporation.

A telephone survey of a sample of Upper Hunter Aboriginal households whose contact details were provided through a combination of membership lists of nominated local Aboriginal organisations, public schools and snowball samplings (word of mouth). Permission to provide contact details was sought from prospective survey participants by the relevant organisations in accordance with protocols approved by the University of Newcastle’s Human Research Ethics Committee. The study area defined for the survey was the area within the boundaries of the Singleton, Muswellbrook and Upper Hunter Shire Local Government Areas (LGAs).

n

The reporting back of information in appropriate formats for the funding organisation and Aboriginal community participants.

n

Other Projects The launch of Professor John Maynard’s book The Aboriginal Soccer Tribe at the Football Federation Australia headquarters in Sydney on 19th October 2011 received extensive media coverage and was attended by at least 70 people including the Matildas Soccer Team. The book interweaved personal stories and extensive research with links to the broader Indigenous world community. Photo of Maynard and Matildas As of August 2011 for a period of six months Professor Maynard also acted as Chairperson of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

Professor Maynard was also invited to accept professorial Fellowship status with: Professorial Fellow – National Centre for Indigenous Studies at the Australian National University

n

Professorial Fellow – Australian Centre for Indigenous Knowledges and Education at Charles Darwin University

n

John Maynard accepted the role of Deputy Chairperson ARC College of Experts (Humanities) An Indigenous social work book was proposed by a team of Australian Indigenous Social Workers which included two Wollotuka staff members, Stephanie Gilbert and Karen Menzies, and was accepted by Palgrave McMillan publishers.


16 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Grants Staff of Wollotuka have a number of successful grant applications for 2011 as shown in Table 6. Table 6 Grant Statistics Research Team

Initial Year Duration

Funding Body

Title of Project

Amount

Doctor Kathleen Butler

2011

3

Australian Research Council

Indigenous Research Higher Degree candidature in Australian universities: Exploring identity at the cultural interface

150225

2011

2

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Stronger Smarter Learning Communities HCC Regional Partnership – North & Western Regional NSW

110728

2011

2

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Stronger Smarter Learning Communities HCC Regional Partnership – Hunter Central Coast NSW

124555

2011

3

Australian Research Council

Land, Children and Politics – Native America and Aboriginal Australia 1900 – 1930

376221

Professor Allyson Holbrook Doctor Wendy Miller Mr Michael Donovan Doctor Wendy Miller Mr Michael Donovan Prof John Maynard

Publications Cameron, Liz (2011) Supporting Indigenous Nursing Students – Australian Nursing Journal, Australian Nursing Journal: ANJ, Volume 18 Issue 6 Cameron, Liz (2011) Celebrating Australian Indigenous Art: Valuing Culture, Relationships and Building Strength through Art – Common ground publishing Cameron, Liz (2011) Associate Editor – The International Journal of the Arts in Society Volume 6, Issue 3 Donovan, M., (2011) Aboriginal landscapes and their place in the classroom, In The International Journal of Science in Society, edited by Bill Cope and Michael Peters, Common Ground Publishing, Melbourne, 12 (3), 243-252. Lester, J and Munns, G (2011) Closing the Gap. Teaching Aboriginal Studies: A practical resource for primary and secondary teaching. Craven, R. (Ed) Allen and Unwin, Sydney. Maynard, J (2011) The Aboriginal Soccer Tribe, Magabala Books, Broome. George, R., Nesbitt, K., Donovan, M. & Maynard, J (2011) ‘Focusing on Cultural Design Features for an Indigenous Website’, Paper accepted to Australasian Conference on Information Systems. Sydney, Australia.

Conferences and Professional Development Programs The Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) Indigenous Leadership Program provides the opportunity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to develop their leadership capacity and encourages participants to continue their journey in becoming inspiring and effective leaders who will make a positive difference to the lives of Indigenous Australians. This week-long program was attended by: Nat Heath, Portfolio Leader Student Support and Development; Jenelle Hammond, Rural Education Officer; Kelly Staines, Scholarships and Accommodation Officer; and Denise Emmerson, Administrative Officer during differing dates in 2011. World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education (WIPCE), Cusco, Peru, 14-18 August – This conference is held every three years and is hosted by the Indigenous Peoples of countries that bid to host at the previous conference. This is the world’s premier conference on Indigenous Education and brings together Indigenous organisations, academics, professionals of education and students from around the world to share, disseminate, and promote best practices in education policies and development programs for Indigenous peoples of the world. This conference was attend by 6 staff members of Wollotuka, 1 Indigenous student and 1 Aboriginal Community Elder. Each presented a paper to the international audience: Professor John Lester, Director – “Blowing the myths out of Indigenous Education: What Aboriginal parents/carers and students really think about schooling!”

n

Leanne Holt, Director and Colleen Perry, Elder – “Elders in Residence – Empowering future generations”

n

Michael Donovan, Lecturer – “When culture comes to school, Aboriginal students will follow”

n


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Joe Perry, Lecturer – “A Reserved Education: Karuah Mission School”

n

n

Cheryl Newton, Senior Administrator and Krystal Ronning, Nursing Student – “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Entry Program at The University of Newcastle: Ensuring a cohort of students with cultural pride.”

Renee Chambers, Administrative Officer – “National Indigenous Tertiary Education Student Games”

n

Liz Cameron was invited to present a paper “A reflection of The Wollotuka Acquisitive Art prize – the success with engaging community through the arts” at the International Arts in Society Conference in Berlin, Germany, 9-11 May. Liz’s paper was published in The International Arts Society Journal. This international conference concerned both fine arts and performing arts and looked at how the arts can be used to strengthen community development initiatives. Professor John Lester attended the Launch of the Eidos Institute Congress, Capetown, South Africa, 1-3 June. Karen Moran, Access and Retention Officer, attended the 14th Pacific Rim FYHE, Conference 2011, Fremantle WA, 28 June – 1 July. The conference enabled Karen to gain insight into strategies designed for student success with focus on principles and practices for commencing students. Lillian Eastwood, Indigenous Alumni Coordinator attended the Inaugural Work Integrated Learning Forum in Melbourne during May and co-presented a paper at the WACE Summer Institute held at Cape Ann, USA , 11-15 July. Madelene Davy, Community Engagement Portfolio Leader and Leanne Ah-See, Community Engagement Officer, attended the AIATSIS ‘Young and Old: Connecting Generations’, National Indigenous Studies Conference held at ANU in Canberra, 19 – 22 September.

|

17

Gail Tillman, Lecturer, attended the 24th ICDE ( International Council for Open & Distance Education) World Conference on Open and Distance learning “Expanding Horizons – New Approaches to open and Distance Learning (ODL)” in Nusa Dua. Denpasar-Bali-Indonesia, 2-5 October 2011. As Wollotuka’s On-Line Support Academic, the conference allowed Gail to explore new developments within online course delivery, gain further understanding in self regulated learning from an international forum, and gain insight into online course instructional design. Leanne Holt as the acting Deputy Chair of the National Indigenous Higher Education Network attended the Tenth Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York, USA during May. Leanne also attended the Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Academic Doctors Forum as facilitator and participant in Canberra, 7-8 November. Stephanie Gilbert, Lecturer, attended the Public Health Association’s Annual Conference in Brisbane, 26-28 September to gain further insight into the public health system with the introduction of our new postgraduate course on Indigenous Public Health at the University. Stephanie also attended ACER’s “Measuring and Improving Student Engagement and Experience Conference held in Melbourne on 22-23 November. Catherine Phoenix, Executive Officer attended the 1st International Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education in Adelaide, 5-7 December. The conference was the fourth in a series of National Committee for Enabling Educators (NCEE) biennial conferences. The theme was ‘Aspirations, Access, Attainment: Adding Value & Transforming Lives through Widening Participation’. Delegates from around the world gathered to exchange ideas, perspectives and experiences, whether as researchers, practitioners, policy makers, or students.

Hearing a higher calling With a passion for story telling and a deep connection with her Spirit Country, Beverly Shipp is breaking new ground in research at The Wollotuka Institute A Wiradjuri woman raised near Dubbo, Beverly has come a long way to live in Newcastle and study for a Master of Philosophy (Aboriginal Studies). Beverly is used to being a trailblazer, being the first Aboriginal student to earn a Social Work degree from the University of Newcastle. Her passion is creative writing and she weaves her life story into the pieces she writes about “the girl from the Turtle”, in reference to her Spirit Country with which she has a continuous, powerful connection.

“My role and a key role of The Wollotuka Institute is educating and doing it through arts, and my art is my writing.” “I’m a vessel to tell our stories and through my research I identify the people from my country that lived back in my parents’ day and during my childhood.” “We need institutions like Wollotuka to be there and support us so we can come out strengthened as an Aboriginal person and pave the way for others who come after us.”

Beverly is one of 16 Indigenous research higher degree students enrolled with Umulliko Indigenous Higher Education Research Centre at the University of Newcastle. Umulliko is the research and research training centre for The Wollotuka Institute providing opportunities for students like Beverly to conduct research that is nationally relevant and of significant importance to our people.


18 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

STUDENT EXPERIENCE Ensuring that the Indigenous student experience at the University of Newcastle is both commensurate with that of non-Indigenous students and culturally appropriate is a number one priority for the Wollotuka Institute, and in particular, the Indigenous Student Support and Development Portfolio within the Institute. During 2011 this Portfolio provided support and development services in relation to access and participation of Indigenous peoples in higher education and conducted activities to raise the profile of Indigenous students and graduates. The establishment of the Portfolio is a structural acknowledgement that high achieving Indigenous students need to be recognised by the University community and encouraged to enhance their professional opportunities through postgraduate or professional readiness programs. The work of the Portfolio ensures that students have the opportunity to develop a strong profile within and outside the University, especially in their own communities.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Entry Program For the 2011 intake 126 students were interviewed for admission, excluding medical students. Of those 126 students, 88 were made offers, five students were made offers elsewhere and some who were not given offers enrolled in the Yapug Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Enabling Program, Open Foundation and Newstep. In total, 210 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students were made offers to the University of Newcastle (excluding JMP students). There were 14 students interviewed for the mid-year Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Entry Program with all receiving offers. In October 2011 the Admissions and Enrolments Unit forwarded Wollotuka a list of 362 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students who applied to the University for study in 2012. In total, 197 of these students accepted our offer to attend the Entry Program interviews in December 2011.

2011 Orientation Cultural Camp 35 students and staff attended this orientation event held at the Wollombi Camp. The camp ran over two days and incorporated social getting-to-know-you activities as well as cultural activities. The participants had the opportunity to visit cultural sites where local Aboriginal Community members spoke about local knowledge and the significance of the local sites. Ray Kelly and family provided a cultural performance of dancing and spoke about the meaning of the dance. The feedback was extremely positive and attendance increased from 2010.

2011 Orientation Day 69 students attended Wollotuka Orientation Day. The Access and Retention Officer delivered a program that incorporated a welcome by the Wollotuka Institute Elder in Residence, Aunty Sandra Griffin, the introduction of Wollotuka staff members, and provision of information needed by students to prepare for a successful first year experience at University. Participants were given a presentation on the journey of UNI life which included clear expectations of the standard of work required from students, guidance in relation to access to library and information technology resources, as well as the quality of course-related materials and the availability of study resources. Students were given a tour of the Campus by our Student Reps and SOS Mentors (Supporting Other Students).

2011 Tai Chi In Semester 1 students and staff members participate in Tai Chi classes (meditation) to help with students to soothe their minds and relax their body. These classes were a result of student suggestion as they felt it would provide a good strategy to staying focused and relieving tension from academic and personal workloads.

Student BBQ and Workshops Student BBQs are held weekly and attract approximately 40 participants. The BBQs offer the opportunity for students and staff to sit down and talk about their academic journey as well as listen to invited guest from on-campus services to come along and chat about the support service they provide to students to assist with their studies. Services who participated included Scholarships, Library, Career Service, iLead, and Counselling Services, as well as off campus services including Career Trackers and RTA.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Student Convenors To enhance the quality participation of Indigenous students at Wollotuka, the Indigenous student convenors were invited to work with Wollotuka students and staff to help organise events and advocate for the students. The convenors have played a big role in organising the Blackout social events this year as well as organising a Family Day at the end of the year for students and prospective students to bring their families to Wollotuka.

|

19

Intensive Student Support Program (ISSP) The ISSP program works with students that are ‘at risk’, ‘show cause’ or recommended by the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander entry panel. Students are provided with case management throughout the year in consultation with the relevant Faculties. In 2011 the program was reviewed and an enhanced program will be offered in 2012.


20 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Graduation This year saw a total of 121 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander graduates across the Callaghan and Central Coast Campus. This was the first year that Graduations were held in Port Macquarie however we did not have any graduates. Table 7 shows graduation statistics for 2011.

Student Support Program. This required working closely with the Indigenous Student Support & Development Officer, Nat Heath, in developing support programs for the students. The program has worked with final students throughout the year, with requests for the following services and information: Seeking information on graduate programs

n

Assistance with resume writing

Table 7

n

Uncertainty of what they want to do next year

n

Indigenous graduates by Program Level

Progress in relation to their program

n

Semester 1, 2011

Semester 2, 2011

Callaghan

Ourimbah

Callaghan

Enabling

30

8

2

Undergraduate

44

5

12

Postgraduate Coursework

5

Research

Ourimbah

3 1

Semester One Graduations took place late April with our Wollotuka Graduation Cocktail Party being held on Friday 29th April. An increased number of graduates attend the event each year bringing with them families and friends to celebrate this exciting time. Central Coast Graduations were held on 29th June with a Luncheon at the Gibalee Centre to celebrate our Central Coast Graduates. The attendance continues to be small but with a numbers of enrolments and graduates on the Central Coast increasing each year it is expected that these numbers will grow. Wollotuka staff look forward to the first Indigenous graduates at the Port Macquarie Campus as well as to celebrating our 2012 graduates which is estimated at this stage to be over 100 – which could be our largest number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander graduates to date.

Success and Collaborations Program As part of the Wollotuka Success and Collaborations program we have approached our final year students in a number of ways throughout the year. We provide: Letter at the beginning of each semester introducing the Success and Collaborations Officer and providing students with relevant information for their final year.

n

Email that follows on from the letter to reiterate what was addressed in the letter and informing students of any Graduate, Programs Expos and Postgraduate Expos

n

Individual contact with students who have sought out assistance with anything relating to their final year studies.

n

This year the Success and Collaborations Officer, Adelle Grogan, also worked with any final year students who were placed on the Intensive

ISSP

n

Responding to emails on visits by Government departments discussing graduate programs

n

Assistance with final placement for their degree

n

Postgraduate studies

n

This year has seen the program evolve and students becoming more aware of the service available and the opportunities provided by this program.

Cadetships, Internships & Graduate Programs This year has seen an increased level of success with a growth in the number of Indigenous students applying and receiving cadetships or internships. 10 students have been assisted in accessing Cadetships or Internships in 2011 through the Success and Collaborations program. Ongoing discussions with students and external organisations are conducted to enhance opportunities for students and ensure appropriate support is provided. With more promotion this year of the three types of programs, Indigenous students were more aware of what was available. This year we had visits from: Roads and Traffic Authority

n

Hunter/New England Health

n

Australian Public Service

n

Career Trackers

n

Australian Taxation Office

n

Careers Service

n

Regular emails advertising Cadetships and Graduate Programs were sent to students. This year a brochure has been developed for our students informing them about Cadetships, Internships and Graduate Programs. With further development it is hoped that this brochure will be a valuable resource for our students. To coincide with the brochure, links will be added to our website http://www.newcastle.edu.au/institute/ wollotuka/indigenous-student-support-and-development/student/ for students to view the information online. This is still a work in progress but it should be up and running by the start of Semester 1, 2012.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Wollotuka would also like to acknowledge Career Trackers who were introduced to our students at one of the weekly BBQ’s both at Callaghan and Central Coast Campus. Career Trackers provide Indigenous University students with the opportunity to access internships within the private sector. We currently have four students who are on internships facilitated through Career Trackers with companies such as: Leighton Contractors, PVH Architects and Cellarmasters. Career Trackers have proven to be a successful alternative to our Public Service Indigenous Cadetships. Information regarding opening and closing dates of Graduate Programs have been sent to final year students throughout the year as well as referrals provided to Career Hub online and University Careers Service on campus especially for assistance with their Resumes and advice on Interviewing Techniques and Addressing Selection Criteria. Currently processes are being investigated to establish a way of monitoring the success of our graduates in obtaining employment whether it be through Graduate Programs or other means. Discussions are currently taking place with the Indigenous Alumni Officer to ensure that effective process is established for collecting this information.

International Exchange/Study Abroad Programs & Conferences Exchange opportunities continue to develop and have the potential to grow in a way that will benefit The Wollotuka Institute and any Indigenous student at The University of Newcastle. Students are becoming more aware of the opportunities they have to study abroad, go on Student Exchange and attend conferences locally, nationally and internationally. A brochure similar to the one developed for Cadetships/Internships & Graduate Programs has also been developed for our International Exchange Study Abroad and Conferences. A link has also been added to our Wollotuka Website for students to access. http://www.newcastle.edu.au/institute/wollotuka/indigenous-studentsupport-and-development/student/ Once again this is still work in progress with the addition of videos of students talking about their experiences on an exchange, participating on a short study abroad program and conference attendance. Promotion of all three activities is once again via email, word of mouth and targeting individual students that satisfy the selection criteria. Negotiations for the Success and Collaborations Officer to be based in the International Office once a fortnight in 2012 are ongoing. Discussions with the International Office have provided the opportunity for the position to learn the processes involved in assisting students to participate in International Exchange and Study Abroad Programs. Location in International Office will provide important knowledge and skills that will be of great benefit for the position and Wollotuka, and benefits for our students. This year we had students participate and attend conferences and study abroad programs. 2 students attend the National Indigenous Legal Conference; 1 student attended the World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education in Cuzco, Peru; 1 student participate in the upcoming Shohoku College Study Tour; 1 postgraduate student attend the 1st International Australasian Conference on Enabling Access to Higher Education.

|

21

Additional promotion of these opportunities are resulting in students being more aware of them and are becoming familiar with the required processes involved in applying to attend. There are annual events that now allow the Wollotuka Institute to market these opportunities and promote them to students and in some cases target potential students to participate. The University’s iLead program is also highly promoted and students are encouraged to join and participate in this program because it increases their chances of being successful in being chosen when submitting applications and applying for travel grants to assist with travel costs. Steve McDonald from the International Office has promoted iLead and International Exchange to our students. This was met with great success in that a number of students were interested in obtaining further information on both programs. These are both programs that Wollotuka plans to promote heavily during Orientation Week 2012 and throughout the early period of Semester One. In 2012 the Success and Collaboration Officer, Indigenous Alumni Officer and our Research Staff will be running workshops to target students to go onto further postgraduate studies and to participate in research. The idea of growing our own Indigenous researchers and staff has been an initiative discussed not only level but also at a national level. Wollotuka will be delivering a number of strategies in 2012 to move forward in this area.

Accommodation The role of the Accommodation Officer, Kelly Staines, has encompassed the following activities: n

To assist perspective and current students with accommodation options

Build relationships with on and off campus accommodation providers

n

To inform students of the accommodation options available

n

To assist students with application forms when applying for accommodation.

n

The outcomes have resulted in the Accommodation Officer assisting over 38 students in finding accommodation since January 2011. On campus accommodation has changed its application so Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students can now identify their Indigenous status. This was achieved through the establishment of strong links with the on campus accommodation staff, who are now more aware of Indigenous students and their for prioritisiation due to poor access to tertiary education. From the relationship that has been formed between Wollotuka and the on-campus accommodation officer, any Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander student that identifies on the on-campus application form will be offered a position, on the condition they make the application deadline and they meet every other requirement. The accommodation hub on campus will inform the Wollotuka Institute of any house that is available before uploading it on the online database, thus giving Aboriginal students an earlier update on accommodation opportunities.


22 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Blackout

Cultural Day

‘Blackout’ was re-established in 2011, resulting in a social event outside of The Wollotuka Institute where students, staff and community members can interact and build relationships.

The aim of cultural day was to engage with the University of Newcastle’s students and staff, to share Aboriginal cultural and build relationships across the University with particular attention to International students.

Blackout increased the engagement surrounding community members, staff, Indigenous students and non-Indigenous students. Students formed excellent support networks and built important relationships that were called upon for the remainder of the semester.

The day consisted of Boomerang painting, spear throwing, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dancing, women and men’s workshops and bush tucker BBQ foods.

‘Blackout’ was also a great opportunity for current students to meet community members that had previously graduated from University. It was encouraging, inspirational and a great opportunity to source advice from the graduates that are currently in the workforce using their degree. Other outcomes from having ‘Blackouts’ were students moving in together, planning holidays together and making dates and times to meet at The Wollotuka Institute to catch up contributing to the student experience.

Cultural day was attended by 200 people consisting of staff and students across the University. Cultural day helped strengthen many of the relationships that had been formed on the University of Newcastle campus.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Scholarships

|

23

Wollotuka Acquisitive Art Prize (WAAP)

The role of the Scholarships Officer is to: To seek and advertise scholarships to current and perspective students.

n

WAAP was held in December this year and once again proved a success. 140 applications for 2011, with 83 selected for the exhibition. The prize money was increased from $2000 to $5000 improving the quality of applicants and geographic spread. The wider promotion, including a DVD, and increased value of the award resulted in applications from across Australia including Victoria, South Australia, Northern Territory, Queensland and New South Wales. Local and non-local Indigenous Artists participated in an art making demonstration. A preview show of the exhibition at the Central Coast campus was presented for the first time. Over 60 people attended the opening night at Ourimbah and there were in excess of 200 guests at Callaghan.

To assist in filling out applications and inquire on the students behalf surrounding any complications.

n

Contact current scholarship holders and support them in maintaining their scholarship criteria.

n

Coordinate The Wollotuka Institute Scholars Week scholarship presentation.

n

Work with external scholarship donors assisting with the scholarship process.

n

Organise scholarship panels

n

Work with the UoN scholarships office make sure students have provided the correct paperwork for the scholarship criteria

n

Set up new scholarships at the request of the donor.

n

Attend perspective student events to promote scholarships that are available

n

Since January 2011 the Scholarship Officer, Kelly Staines, has assisted over 110 students with Scholarships in person and phone (not including email). All internal Indigenous scholarship applications have increased since 2010 as demonstrated in Table 8.

Table 8 University Internal Indigenous Scholarship Applicants 2010-2011 (statistics provided by Scholarships Office) 2010

2011

Delta Electricity Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Scholarship

5

9

Faculty Science and Information Technology Undergraduate Scholarships for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students

6

13

GHD Indigenous Scholarships

n/a

7

Jack Doherty Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Scholarship

11

21

Koiki Eddie Mabo Scholarship

20

Xstrata Indigenous Scholarship

7

20

Dr Beryl Collier Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Scholarship

n/a

13

A new scholarship has been developed through donations received from the UoN Indigenous Scholarship Fund. This scholarship,p which will commence in 2012 is called the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Scholarship and is worth $10,000 per year. A new scholarship brochure is being developed which will be made available to both prospective and current students.

Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme (ITAS) ITAS still remains one of the core student support programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. In first Semester we had 154 students register for ITAS and 81 of those students passed all of their courses, 23 students only failed one course and 10 failed two of their courses. For the second semester 132 students registered and results are not yet known. Along with all these achievements we have been able to build some stronger relationships with other faculties and staff across the University. This is allowing us to better support our students and also allow us as staff to have a clearer understanding on individuals programs. Such degrees that we have built stronger relationships are Law, Nursing, and Teaching Early Childhood.


24 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

COMMUNITY engagement In 2011 staff in the Community Engagement Portfolio have participated, organised and implemented numerous local and regional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community events. Portfolio staff have also been part of many local and regional committees both internally and externally to the University.

Community Events Information stalls at NAIDOC week events in Newcastle and on the Central Coast.

n

Reconciliation Week morning tea and library display launch at Central Coast campus.

n

n

Reconciliation Week morning tea at Wollotuka held in Birabahn building.

Bush Tucker cafe for Reconciliation week activities at Ourimbah which was attended by over 100 guests consisting of staff, students and community members.

n

Bush food information session and informative walk around campus for Reconciliation Week. A local Aboriginal community member held an information session and tasting afternoon at Gibalee for which was attended by students, TAFE staff and University staff.

n

VIBE 3 on 3 community events at Gosford, Wyong and Moree

n

Try a Trade – Yakka Day at Toronto High School

n

ACE community days during NAIDOC week in conjunction with Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council.

n

Information stall and information sessions at Newcastle Indigenous Jobs Market held at the Newcastle Jockey Club.

n

Attendance at Aboriginal Interagency meetings on the Central Coast and in Newcastle.

n

Information stall at The Uma Purran Indigenous Careers Market at the Ka-Wul Centre at Singleton High School.

n

Information stall at the Windale PCYC Community Careers Day.

n

Elders Luncheon at Preview Restaurant at Central Coast campus for local Aboriginal Elders groups.

n

Koori Games activities at NAIDOC week event at Baker Park in Wyong.

n

Stepping Stones workshop with Yarnteen.

n

One Deadly Step workshop

n

Information stalls at Earn, Learn, Legend Indigenous Careers Markets

n

Valley Schools Cultural Day at Central Coast Campus with 120 Indigenous school students from Kindergarten to Year 12 attending.

n

Short film screening of ‘Our Generation’ at Greater Union Cinema’s Newcastle and Tuggerah followed by a discussion session facilitated by two prominent guest speakers from the local community.

n

‘Taste of Wollotuka’ event in partnership with Campus Central to showcase Aboriginal culture, art and musical talent on campus and in the local community. We provided a free bush food themed BBQ for students and staff.

n

Luncheon for the Freedom Riders at Wollotuka.

n

n

Information stall at the Awakabal Co-op Community Fair at Newcastle foreshore.

Information stall at the Indigenous All Stars Careers Expo in Brisbane.

n


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

Committee Involvement/ Representation BATSIET

n

Central Coast Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Focus Group

n

Central Coast Advisory Group

n

Local AECG

n

Regional AECG

n

100% Knights Advisory Group

n

Central Coast Aboriginal Employment Interagency meetings

n

Newcastle Aboriginal Employment Interagency meetings

n

Central Coast Aboriginal Education Pathways Awards Committee

n

n

Newcastle/Upper Hunter Aboriginal Education Pathways Awards Committee

Rural Education Officer – Jenelle Hammond Lightning Ridge/ Goodooga/ Walgett Careers road show expo This travelling careers expo targeted remote Indigenous high school students focusing on educational pathways and mentoring opportunities. This program gave Wollotuka the opportunity to encourage remote school students to consider their university options and possibilities for further education. It also gave stall holders an opportunity to relate with the students on a cultural level as all of the stall holders got involved in dance workshops and made Johnny cakes with the students. Nowra Careers expo & Bega careers expo Organised by Regional Development Australia Far South Coast (RDAFSC) and the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) two Indigenous Employment Expos were held on the South Coast NSW targeting at school age students and the wider Indigenous community. This Indigenous expo aimed to provide students and the Indigenous community with information about career options and educational pathways. It gave UoN staff the opportunity to provide information and resources about the University of Newcastle and Wollotuka services. These expos gave great exposure of the University & Wollotuka in a community and area that is not normally visited by the university. From visiting these expos we have received interest from high schools in the south coast area to run Uni information workshops and the I.D program. This also brought exposure to the Wollotuka Acquisitive Art Prize (WAAP) and we had an increases of applicants from community members enter art in the WAAP exhibition for this year from the south coast.

|

25

Moree Vibe Alive Vibe Alive is a two day festival for young Australians of all backgrounds that celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Vibe travels to different remote communities with a number of Indigenous role models for two days of fun, dancing, rapping, singing, painting and sport. School age students from remote communities all came to Moree for the 2 days of fun and interaction. The careers expo has all the latest information on how to stay healthy and to encourage kids to stay in school and get an education. The Wollotuka Institute was a part of the information expo promoting higher education and the University of Newcastle. As part of the expo the students had to ask questions about Wollotuka to gain points for their team and win prizes. There were many students who had been a part of the I.D program and Uni info workshops who attended the festival. This was great to support the local community and reinforce a positive and consistent presence in the community with students who have already been in contact with the University of Newcastle. A lot of school teachers attended the event this giving opportunity to also promote Wollotuka’s programs and the university to school teachers from remote and rural communities. Parent University Information sessions Gulgong High School After successfully running the I.D program with Gulgong High school it was mentioned by the teachers that parents of the students were unaware of the post school options and educational pathways for their children. With this in mind the Wollotuka Institute organised a parent university information workshop for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous parents and students in senior years at the school and provided morning tea and afternoon tea. This gave the students and their parents the same information and opportunity to ask questions together about their options and to also navigate the university web site together in a non-confrontational way as well as give out any promotional material. Murri Carnival QLD This was the first year for the QMC Indigenous football carnival and over 20,000 people from all over Queensland pass through the carnival over the 4 days. The focus was not only on the football knockout but about also on the promotion of health, education and careers for Indigenous communities. The expo attached to the carnival had over 30 stall holders and gave us an opportunity to promote the university and Wollotuka services to a larger audience. Due to us being involved in the carnival 2 of our Indigenous media students had the great opportunity of gaining practical experience by working alongside NITV and the Barefoot Rugby League Show and filming the carnival over the 4 days.


26 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

Indigenous Development Program (I.D.) I.D. is a school based program for years 7 to 9 and is designed to increase Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students’ awareness of self, focusing on six topics that will enable students to make positive choices regarding their educational and career outcomes. Topics include: Identity, Self-Esteem, Learning Styles, Leadership Styles, Choosing a Career and What is University? This 6 lesson program was developed to target and engage high school students from year 7 onwards to start them thinking about tertiary education earlier on in their high school journey. The program has had positive feedback from teachers, principals and students. Many schools are impressed with the program being one of its kind, that it is free and is a program designed to target Indigenous students to encourage them in their educational development and set goals around their future careers. Data is collected from students with pre and post surveys to monitor the program’s effectiveness in reaching its desired outcomes. The Wollotuka Institute is in the process of seeking the best ways to collect the data from the pre and post surveys and gather statistics of outcomes. Feedback from the surveys suggests that students are gaining a deeper understanding of themselves and how to develop and increase their self-esteem. Students are gaining insight into their own learning styles and how they can apply this to their current studies. Students are learning more about university life and this is leading to a re-thinking of their post school options. The I.D program is attracting interest across a large part of NSW with many schools recommending the program to neighbouring high schools. Marketing I.D has undergone a name change so it would be relevant to its targeted audience of year 7/8/9 students and be inclusive of all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across NSW. Marketing material has been developed for the I.D Program including letterheads and a new flyer for promotional purposes. A student workbook is being developed for the students who undertake the I.D program and is in its final stages at the UoN marketing department. This workbook is for the students to keep of for the duration of the program and has worksheets for the students to complete as well as alumni stories of some of our Indigenous graduates. The van, which was purchased in 2010, has been a great marketing tool and is set up at outdoor careers markets and catches the eye of people as it is passing through rural NSW. Table 9 shows the number of students participating in this program from each school visited.

Table 9 Indigenous Development Program Statistics School Visited

Year

No. of Students.

Dubbo – Delroy campus

Year 9

60

Dubbo – South Campus

Year 9

60

Moree – Secondary College

Year 9

33

Moree St Philomena’s

Year 10

35

Cowra High School

Year 7/8/9

30

Gilgandra High School

Year 7/8/9/10/11 40

Cobar High School

Year 7/8/9

Nyngan High School

Year 7/8/9/10/11 220

18

Ballina Southern Cross College Year 7/8/9

12

Tamworth Oxley High School

Year 7/8/9/10

53

Gulargambone

Year 7/8

15

Gulgong High School

Year 7/8/9/10

25

Glen Innes High School

Year 7/8/9

58

Mudgee High School

Year 8/9

25

TOTAL

684

Feedback Hi Jenelle Thanks again for such a great session with our senior students – they got so much out of it and one student actually said it really changed what she thinks she can do in the future. It was awesome! Tamara Smith, Aboriginal Education Coordinator, Southern Cross Distance Education Centre East Ballina. Dear Jenelle, Just a quick note to say hello and to thank you for visit to St Mary’s, the students appear to have benefitted from the talk and the Year 11s got an insight to university life. It certainly got them thinking along different lines, so thank you. Best wishes for a happy holiday, Martine Moran, Indigenous Focus Teacher St Mary’s College Gunnedah


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

27

University Senior Insight Workshops

Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE)

The Insight workshops have been developed so students will develop an understanding of university. Participants gain knowledge about the Wollotuka Institute and learn how to navigate the University of Newcastle web page. Students explore and research the wide range of courses that are offered at the University of Newcastle, and learn a little about how classes work, including lectures, tutorials.

Initially when the PaCE program was established in late 2010 the target numbers for engagement with parents was set at 50 with the plan of engaging with at least 50 parents from the 4 target schools within the first year of the program. This target has been met and surpassed in the first year. During the past 12 months the Indigenous Parent Engagement Officer, Robyn Sutherland, has built a working relationship with the parents of the target schools and 2 other PaCE co-ordinators. Planning has also been initiated for the expansion of the program for 2012 to include 4 further schools from the Central Coast region and 4 from the Newcastle region increasing the possible engagement numbers considerably.

Resources used: University information PowerPoint, University and Wollotuka brochures. The University web site, wristbands, Jelly beans. Table 10 shows the number of students participating in this program from each school visited.

Table 11 for PaCE statistics.

Table 10 University Senior Insight Workshops Statistics Schools visited

No. of Senior Students

Gulgong High School

14

Mudgee High School

6

Gunnedah St Marys

5

Ballina High School

10

Southern Cross – Ballina

6

Cobar High School

15

Nyngan High School

55

Mudgee High School

6

Glen Innes High School

7

Gilgandra High School

15

Moree – St Philomena

35

Cowra High School

15

Kingscliff High School

20

Oxley High – Tamworth

25

TOTAL

234

Table 11 PaCE Statistics Target 2010

Schools

Student Numbers

Berkley Vale HS

65

Tumbi Umbi HS

53

The Entrance SC

15

Terrigal HS

29

TOTAL

162

Target 2011

Schools

Student Numbers

Berkley Vale HS

78

Tumbi Umbi HS

59

The Entrance SC

19

Terrigal HS

33

TOTAL

185

In 2010 there was minimal engagement with the program by parents due to varying external factor such as work and child care commitments. Last year there was an average of 6 parents attending information and empowerment workshops. However this year the numbers have increased to an average of 15 parents attending workshops and sessions on a regular basis. Over the period March to November 2011, the following PaCE events have been implemented by the Indigenous Parent Engagement Officer: 4 PaCE Insight Days

n

2 Empowerment Workshops

n

3 Collaborative workshops with regional PaCE co-ordinators

n

At a two day workshop held on 24th and 25th November at the Wollotuka Institute, 20 parents and students from Taree, Gloucester, Wingham and the Central Coast visited Wollotuka to get hands on experience of University life and explore post school options.


28 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

S2U – Schools to Universities Pathways Program Insight Days Insight Days were held across Newcastle and Central Coast campuses in June 2011 and we had 11 schools from the Central Coast participate from DEC and Catholic Dioceses schools and 23 DEC, Independent and Catholic Diocese schools from the Newcastle region participate across the two weeks.

Alumni Activities The Alumni Advantage Program is a professional development program. To complement this program a breakfast was hosted at Wollotuka on the 29 March 2011. The theme for the breakfast program was The National Apology: Is there still unfinished business? Guest speakers were Aunty Mary Treszac, author of Orphaned by the Colour of my Skin: A Stolen Generation Story, David Newham Program Manager of the 100% Knights Program; and Kevin Williams Lecturer School of Law at the University of Newcastle spoke on the NT Intervention.

n

n

During the two week period approximately 180 Year 10 students participated in the days where they got hands-on experience of university life and undertook research tasks to investigate what was required to gain entry into an undergraduate degree they were interested in. Kunarr Indigenous Alumni Chapter The Kunarr Indigenous Alumni Coordinator, Lillian Eastwood, participated in the University of Newcastle’s Executive Committee of Alumni (ECofA) and attended ECofA meetings in 2011 on 1 February, 1 March, 5 April, 30 August and 21 October. In 2011 three sub-committees were established to focus on the development of an Alumni House, Hunter Chapter and Strategic Planning. The Strategic Planning Sub-Committee provides direction, structure and drive to the projects of the ECofA and the Coordinator attended the Strategic Planning Sub-Committee meetings in 2011 on 25 January and 7 September 2011. The Hunter Chapter Sub-Committee is working towards developing a model for an Alumni Chapter to service local graduates and the Coordinator attended the Hunter Chapter Sub-Committee meetings in 2011 on 15 March and 1 April. ECofA commissioned an external marketing agency to develop a marketing strategy with consideration to naming, branding and positioning the ECofA and attended the marketing workshop held on the 26 September 2011.

The ECofA maintained the Alumni Awards and Recognition Program as its premier flagship event in 2011. The Alumni Awards event The Sky is the Limit was held at Newcastle City Hall on the 14 September 2011. The Committee received 56 nominations across the suite of 8 Awards, including the Indigenous Alumni Award. The Indigenous Alumni Award recognises outstanding achievement and/or contribution made by an Indigenous Alumni in their chosen field that demonstrates initiative and excellence. The recipient of the 2011 Indigenous Alumni Award was Dr Sarah McEwan, rural general practitioner working in Indigenous health at Port Headland in Western Australia.

A community screening of Our Generation, a film on the NT Intervention was shown at Newcastle and on the Central Coast on the 14 and 15 December 2011.

n


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

29


30 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

EMPLOYMENT The University of Newcastle Indigenous Employment Strategy Nauwai 2010 – 2012 has been formulated to redress the employment disadvantage faced by Indigenous Australians. The University values all of the Key Result Areas within the strategy and sees that all have a high priority in regards to providing Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people with pathways to employment that value the culture and aspirations of the individual.

Key Result Areas

Selection Committees

The strategy is developed and managed under 3 key result areas (KRAs):

Human Resources has requested that we assist in implementing the clause in the selection and recruitment process to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates are supported in selection committees.

Attraction and Recruitment

n

Environment and Retention

n

Development and Extension

n

New Positions Over the past twelve months Wollotuka has developed 4 new positions which have been successfully recruited to: Research Coordinator – Academic Level D – full time

n

Academic Coordinator – Academic Level D – full time

n

Senior Administrator – HEW Level 8 – part time 21 hours per week

n

External Relations Officer – HEW Level 7

n

Seconded Positions During 2011 there are 7 staff who were acting on higher duties and 1 staff member who has been seconded on higher duties to the University Student Administration Team. Acting on higher duties provides staff with the opportunity to further broaden their expertise and enhance their professional development capacities.

Positive Human Resources and Equity & Diversity Relationships The Indigenous Employment Coordinator, Dawn Townsend, has been working closely with Human Resources and Equity & Diversity to gain their assistance with the implementation of employment, training and development and equity outcomes. All of the staff across Human Resources and Equity & Diversity have gone to great lengths to assist in achieving the key targets of the Employment Strategy and to deliver on the HEW Enterprise Agreements.

Selection and Recruitment – The University of Newcastle Enterprise Agreement Where applicants for positions identify themselves in their applications as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, the Selection Committee will have appropriate Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander representation. After discussions with Human Resources the Wollotuka Institute is formulating a process that will allow all participants (staff as panel members and candidates) in the selection process to feel valued. This will include merit selection training as interviewers and convenors for University Indigenous staff. As a capacity building tool staff have be encouraged to participate on selection panels so that they can get an understanding on the recruitment process and when they themselves apply for roles they will increase their own chances of being a successful candidate.

Capacity Building An increase in Indigenous staff applying for mainstream positions within the University has been identified. A plan will be put into place to work with unsuccessful Indigenous applicants to offer them an opportunity to be trained in applying for a job at the University.


ANNUAL REPORT 2011

|

31

INDIGENOUS HEALTH UNIT In 2011 we saw the highest ever number of offers made for positions into the course, but unfortunately there were a number of students whom applied for leave from Semester 2 due to a range of circumstances. The Joint Medical Program has 4 staff including; Associate Professor Peter O’Mara (Director), Dr Anita Watts (Lecturer/ tutor), Mr James Charles (Lecturer) and Mr Luke Halvorsen (Project Officer) These staff service 32 students enrolled in B Medicine at The University of Newcastle and University of New England.

Student Enrolments There were 27 interviews that were held on Thursday 16th and Friday 17th December 2010, out of these interviewed there were 13 offers made. Of this group, 2 deferred their offers, and 1 student commenced from 2010 offer. In the past there were an allocated number of Indigenous places that were allocated to UNE. In 2011, we saw a precedence established, where Indigenous students were able to choose the campus on which that they complete their study. Choice tends to depend on the location and availability of support from family and friends. Also in 2011 there were some of the highest qualifying ATAR scores with school leaver students coming into the program with a 98 and 97.5 ATAR.

Support Services Joint Medical Program students are able to access all of the support services offered through Wollotuka and also through the University. Staff member, Anita Watts offers additional tutoring/ exam/ study preparation sessions for students throughout the year as either one-on-one or group sessions. Project Officer, Luke Halvorsen also supports students by liaising with year co-ordinators, assisting with providing supporting documentation and refers students to the appropriate person for any issues they may have.

Activities Pre-Med program – Each year the Wollotuka Institute hold a pre-med program for successful applicants to the Bachelor of Medicine. This activity introduces students to problem based learning, provides assistance for the completion of ITAS paperwork, and ensures students attend the Medical Service for compulsory injections. It also includes a tour of library and a dinner to celebrate the day. University of Western Australia Scoping Trip – JMP staff members Peter O’Mara, James Charles and Luke Halvorsen visited the University of Western Australia to meet with Professor Helen Milroy and her team to discuss the structure of their pre-med course. This was a

very productive trip as we were able to gather some good information and build on relationships between the University and University of Western Australia. Scoping Trip to Nth America – An Indigenous Medical and Health Students Scoping Trip to Nth America was organised by the Indigenous Health team to scope the possibility of a potential trip for Medical and Health students. The purpose of the trip will be to compare the cultures of Native Americans and Canadian Aboriginals to Australian culture particularly in relation to their respective health/medical and educational needs. The Success and Collaborations Officer also accompanied the Indigenous Health team to determine the potential of not only the medicine or health students participating in such a trip but for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students across all degrees. Places visited on the trip: Los Angeles, Oklahoma City (Oklahoma City Indian Medical Centre and the Assoc. of American Indian Physicians), Kansas City (University of Kansas and the Centre for American Indian Community Health), Washington DC (National Museum of the American Indian). New York City, Quebec City (Lavel University and Wedake Community) Montreal (McGill University, First Nations Peoples House and Kahnawake Mohawk Community). The opportunity that was provided for networking was invaluable and provided great potential for a pilot in 2012. The opportunity for students to visit first hand University’s with which the University of Newcastle currently has Exchange Agreements with and the possibility of collaboratively establishing networks within these International communities is of great benefit to all involved. Through networking that occurred on this trip Ms Paige Isaacs (Interim Coordinator – First People’s House) McGill University visited for 3 days to collect information on Wollotuka, the University and Newcastle. Medicine Camp – In August we went to the Blue Mountains for the annual Medicine Camp. This is a great opportunity for students to take their partners and children and relax. It is a great team building exercise between UoN and UNE students. Students were taken to a number of lookouts, the Three Sisters and Jenolan Caves. AIDA Symposium – The symposium was held in Broome, WA this year and 8 medicine students attended this event, along with 3 staff members. Students participated in a number of workshops that were designed to build their skills. Students network with other Indigenous medical students throughout Australia, go on cultural walks and experience some local Aboriginal dance performances. Proposal for Pre Med Course for 2013 enrolments – The Discipline of Indigenous Health staff have been working on a proposal for a pre medical course as a basis for admissions. This course is proposed to run for 3 weeks and will monitor and examine students completing problem based learning tasks, public health and professional practice. There will a number of short exams/ quizzes for students to undertake and attendance and contribution will also be monitored.


32 | THE WOLLOTUKA INSTITUTE

MOVING FORWARD... 2012 Following on from the successful outcomes in 2011, The Wollotuka Institute strives to further improve on: n access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education n student experience for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students n quality teaching and learning of Indigenous pedagogy n research output and activities n a positive university profile n sustainable relationships with our community


Contact Details Mob – family: This painting hangs in the Birabahn Building and was purchased by The Wollotuka Institute at the 2010 WAAP Art Exhibition. The painting by local Aboriginal artist, Sareeta Fielding, represents her family (mob) and reflects the relationships and strong ties that exist within Aboriginal family, extended family and community. The circles interwoven throughout the painting represent family groups and extended family connections. The painting is acrylic and aerosol on canvas.

UoN B6747

Cover artwork

The Wollotuka Institute Birabahn Building The University of Newcastle Callaghan NSW 2308 Australia T: +61 2 4921 6863 F: +61 2 4921 6985 E: Wollotuka@newcastle.edu.au


ANNUAL REPORT 2011 The Wollotuka Institute

The Wollotuka Institute Annual Report 2011  

The Wollotuka Institute is designed to consolidate all Indigenous activities of the University into one operational and strategic body in or...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you