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FALL 2019 • VOLUME 19, NO. 1

ALBERTO RUIZ VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

ACADEMIC

MISSION AND VISION FOR ULM


photo by Emerald McIntyre

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

FROM OUR PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.

Dear Alumni and Friends of ULM, We’ve reached one of my favorite times of year once again. The campus is beautiful with the changes of seasons and the students and faculty are well into the coursework of the fall semester. The enthusiasm and the optimism can be felt everywhere I go. It is a time of hope and energ y. On the north bank of the bayou, VCOM’s beautiful new medical school building nears completion. It is another architectural jewel for the campus that will be ready to welcome students for its first classes in 2020.

PRESIDENT Speech and Hearing Center. We c e l e brate o th er c ommun i t y connections as well. UL M tr ump eters in the S cho ol of Visual and Performing Arts are attending the memorial ser vices of veterans to make sure a live rendering of “Taps” is provided. Without these student volunteers, our departed heroes would likely receive this final salute of gratitude through a recording. ULM is vital to the sustained and future growth of the region. University supporters have proven their confidence in our ability to attract top students and faculty with donations to the ULM Foundation’s SOAR Campaign.

www.ulm.edu

The vision set forth by VCOM will assist ULM in achieving its own vision, “to be recognized among the top 200 universities in the nation for excellence in teaching , research and innovation, with an emphasis on the health sciences.”

The campaign ended on June 30, 2019 and exceeded its $55.4 million goal with a total of more than $56 million. This issue is packed with stories about the success of SOAR .

It has become a perfect example of how a private/public partnership can advance all participating parties.

The pag es of this mag azine have much more good news to report about our university, such as:

We’ve continued to also carr y out our vision by shining a light on how our six campus clinics connect with and help the community on a daily basis. In this edition of the magazine, we introduce you to a clinic that helps community members with speech and hearing limitations at the Kitty DeGree

• The launch of the Educators Rising program by the School of Education to recruit high school students to choose careers in teaching. • A USDA grant of $597,000 to a ULM College of Pharmacy researcher to a ssist p e d iatric hear t p atients

through telemedicine and drug therapy management. And you’ll find much more to be proud of with in these p a g es . Al l universities ebb and flow with the chang ing times, but you can rest assured that ULM is always excelling and moving forward, making our new slogan an easy one to tout: the best is on the bayou! Go Warhawks,

TAKE FLIGHT!

Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. ULM President


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

CONTENTS

VP OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ACADEMIC MISSION AND VISION FOR ULM

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YOUR UNIVERSITY: ERIC DAVIS, CARROLL HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

30 HOOVER FAMILY ENDOWMENT HONORS THEIR PATRIARCH

14 FINDING THEIR VOICE AT KITTY DEGREE SPEECH AND HEARING CENTER

36 SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS: CAMPAIGN EXCEEDS $56 MILLION

www.ulm.edu

CELEBRATING THE BIEDENHARN FAMILY LEGACY

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CONTENTS

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MAGAZINE FALL 2019 • VOLUME 19, NO. 1

EDITORIAL TEAM

PRESIDENT Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR EXTERNAL AFFAIRS & COMMUNITY OUTREACH Julia B. Letlow, Ph.D. (BA ’02, MA ’05) DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS Hope Young, Editor CREATIVE DIRECTOR Srdjan Marjanovic (BFA ’12) GRAPHIC DESIGN COORDINATOR Shanette L. Washington (BFA ’02) DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR Emerald McIntyre (BFA ’13) EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, ULM ADVANCEMENT, FOUNDATION AND ALUMNI RELATIONS Susan Chappell (BBA ’82, MBA ’87) PRESIDENT, ULM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Sara Benecke Brice (BA ‘90) DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS Melissa Kiper (MBA ’07) ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS Jenny Pankey (BS ’97) CONTRIBUTORS Sharon Bratton Caroline Courville Mark Henderson John Jones Paul Letlow Heather Pilcher Jeanette Robinson

The ULM Magazine is published for members of the ULM Alumni Association and friends of the University of Louisiana Monroe and friends of the ULM Alumni Association. Send letters & comments to: The ULM Magazine Office of Marketing & Communications 700 University Ave. Monroe, LA 71209–2500

www.ulm.edu

Email: ulmmagazine@ulm.edu Any letters or comments may be published and edited for length and style. Contents © 2019 by the University of Louisiana Monroe and the ULM Alumni Association. All rights reserved. The University of Louisiana Monroe is a member of the University of Louisiana System.

FACULTY NOTES • University of Louisiana Monroe Library Director and Associate Professor Megan Lowe, M.A.,M.L.S., B.A., has co–written a book published by IGI Global. “Examining the Emotional Dimensions of Academic Librarianship: Emerging Research and Opportunities” studies the emotional experiences of academic librarians. “Librarianship is very people–oriented work, making librarians prone to burnout,” Lowe explained. “We wanted to get a better understanding of the emotional experiences of academic librarians as a means of identifying solutions and supporting those librarians in their careers.” • Long–time educator and community advocate Dr. Pamela Saulsberry of the University of Louisiana Monroe has been appointed to the state’s Empowering Families to Live Well Council. Saulsberry, Ph.D., LCSW–BACS, is Director of the ULM School of Behavioral & Social Sciences, Professor and Social Work Program Coordinator. “I am excited to have this opportunity to make an impact on the issue of poverty and its impact on families in the state of Louisiana. Because poverty is one of the greatest barriers to the human well–being, especially the family system, a coordinated and well–managed state plan developed to address this issue is of paramount importance.” • Dr. Derle R. Long, Director of the University of Louisiana Monroe School of Visual and Performing Arts, served as conductor/clinician for the Texas Private School Music Educators Association All State Band that met, rehearsed and performed in Richardson, Texas. High school band members from private schools across Texas auditioned to become members of the group. “I was given the chance to work with some very talented young musicians, and we had a great time making wonderful music together," Long said. "I have invited all of the TPSMEA All State Band students to the ULM campus for a visit and to investigate our degrees and programs." • Dr. Joni Henry Noble, Professor of Art in the School of Visual and Performing Arts, participated in Art Flow 2019, a statewide art exhibition held in downtown Baton Rouge. Noble’s work, "Fiddle 1," a black and white archival print, was displayed at The Heron, a luxury condominium in Baton Rouge’s convention district. More than 100 individual artworks were exhibited throughout downtown Baton Rouge in a variety of venues. The goal of this exhibition is to present quality artwork by Louisiana artists in a way that allows the community more access to artwork in a non–gallery setting. • Jana Sutton, Ph.D., has been named Interim Dean of the College of Health Sciences. Sutton has been Interim Director of the School of Allied Health since January 2018. Prior to her appointment to Allied Health, she was Program Director of Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling Studies since May 2009. Sutton has been with ULM for 14 years. Sutton is a Louisiana Licensed Professional Counselor–Supervisor and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy–Supervisor and American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy–Approved Supervisor. She is past–president of the Louisiana Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.


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DIRECTOR

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Director of Alumni Affairs (318) 342–5244 mkiper@ulm.edu

Our team has been working since the summer to increase awareness and membership, and we are excited to say that the membership drive has been extremely successful! We are so thankful to our Lifetime Legacy Members and those that renewed their annual membership or joined for the first time this year! There’s still time to join for 2019–2020 and reap all the benefits of membership.

Also, we are reactivating chapters and clubs across the country and we need your help. If you’d like to get involved or volunteer to cohost events in your area, please contact us.

We love to spotlight alumni in this magazine and on our social media outlets. You are the face of the university and your accomplishments make us proud. So, please share your story with us! We want you to continue to be an ambassador for the university by recruiting local students to take a tour of campus. Once they visit, we know they’ll want to enroll! We want our alumni to feel connected to the university, engaged in all facets, and proud of ULM. The Alumni Association is the primary link between the university and alumni across the world. The university’s mission is to seek students who find value in our programs and prepares them to compete, succeed, and contribute in an ever–changing global society through a transformative education. We feel confident that our alumni feel they received the necessary skills and education, while they were at ULM. Follow us on our website and all our social media outlets for upcoming events and fun posts about what’s going on at ULM! Be sure to create or update your profile on our website with current contact information. And of course, please let our team know how we can better serve you. As always...the Best is on the Bayou,

TAKE FLIGHT!

MELISSA KIPER Director of Alumni Affairs

www.ulm.edu

We have some exciting upcoming events planned to keep you connected: VIP tailgates in the new Pecan Grove, the 2nd annual HawktoberFest, the Annual Alumni Awards Brunch and Homecoming Court Presentation, the 35th Annual Chili Cook– off, The Golden Society Brunch, the Women’s Symposium, the 15th annual Wine Over Water, the LA Louisianne Crawfish Boil, and many chapter and club events across the country. Through these events and generous donors, we are able to support scholarships to a diverse group of students and stay connected to our valued alumni.

If you are local to Northeast Louisiana and want to volunteer in some capacity, please contact us. With your help, we can reach more alumni and prospective students.

FROM THE DIRECTOR

Melissa Kiper

he Alumni Association recently revised our bylaws and elected a new Executive Committee and Board Members. Executive Committee Members are: President – Sara Benecke Brice; VP Administration – Julie Harlan O’Brien; VP Operations – Joseph Beard; VP Finance – Ash Aulds; Secretary/Parliamentarian – Keith Beard; and Immediate Past President – Brenda Dudley. Board Members are: Jennifer Goodwin Ables, Matt Bridges, DeJaneiro Davis, Lance Futch, Renee Hebert, Dr. Jeff Hood, Kay LaFrance–Knight, Justin Mailhes, Mary Linda McCann, Wally Mulhearn, J. Eric Newton, Doug Nielsen, Thad Schaeffer, and Paul Wilkening.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

FROM THE ALUMNI


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he University of Louisiana Monroe’s new Vice President for Academic Affairs Alberto “Bert” Ruiz, Ed.D., remembers distinctly the first thing he saw the day he came to interview in the spring of 2019. “There’s a giant bronze hawk, flying, with talons out. It’s a beautiful way to enter. I felt at home as soon as I stepped on campus,” he said. Ruiz interviewed with a search committee and had a one-on-one meeting with President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. “I met with Dr. Bruno, and within the first 40 minutes I knew without a doubt that I could work for this man. He is a leader and his passion for the university shines through. He is here for the students,” Ruiz said.

DR. ALBERTO RUIZ VP ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

BY HOPE YOUNG

VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

ACADEMIC

MISSION AND VISION FOR ULM

When asked by Bruno why he applied here, Ruiz responded, “ULM has a wonderful academic reputation, and I also want to work for a president who is student-oriented.” That interview was enough for both men. By June, Ruiz was at work. “We are delighted to have Dr. Ruiz as ULM’s Vice President of Academic Affairs,” said Bruno. “He brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the university. Dr. Ruiz is an asset to the Warhawk family and the community.” From Texas A&M to ULM Ruiz came from Texas A&M University in Kingsville (TAMUK) where he was Dean of the College of Education and Human Performance and Professor of Kinesiology. During his 25 years at TAMUK, Ruiz served in several capacities in teaching, research and administration. The youngest of 10 children, seven boys and three girls, Ruiz grew up in a military family in the small town of Alice, in South Texas. Finances were always tight. Ruiz recalled his decision to pursue a career in higher education. “My dad asked me, ‘What are you going to do?’ I said I’m not going into the military, and he said, ‘Then you are going to college.’ ”

www.ulm.edu

Ruiz attended TAMUK and obtained his Bachelor of Science, as well as his Master of Science in Kinesiology with a specialization in Athletic Administration in 1995. He earned his Doctorate of Education in 2001 from the University of Houston in Physical Education Pedagogy. His primary areas of expertise are academic program development and management, assessment of teaching/learning and program


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"The beauty of this campus, the facilities and the architecture are amazing. There is a sense of pride and energy. That attracts people when they come to visit, especially parents and future students."

www.ulm.edu

photos by Emerald McIntyre

DR. ALBERTO RUIZ VP ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

– DR. ALBERTO RUIZ


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effectiveness, identifying external funding for program growth and development, planning longitudinally and thinking strategically, outreach connection to public schools, leading successful doctoral programs and management and development of distance education and remote site programs. Ruiz has taught sports coaching and officiating, sports administration, sports law and college physical education. His research has focused on children’s attitudes toward physical activity, self–reported physical activity, youth physical activity,

“The community has been gracefully receptive to my wife and me. Wherever we go, people say, ‘Oh you’re the new vice president of academic affairs.’ This is a family–type community. It reminds me a lot of where I was born and reared in south Texas,” Ruiz said. “There’s always an adaptive stage when you move, but the transition here has been easy.” Ruiz is a runner (five marathons and one ultra–marathon) and self–proclaimed sports fanatic. “My first two months we stayed in Monroe

“The beauty of this campus, the facilities and the architecture are amazing. There is a sense of pride and energy. That attracts people when they come to visit, especially parents and future students.” Vision and mission At about four months into his position, Ruiz has one distinct observation about ULM. “My first impression is there is a lot of loyalty to this institution from the faculty and the staff. A lot of our employees are

photos by Emerald McIntyre

DR. ALBERTO RUIZ VP ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

“We have to go out and recruit students. We have to tell students who we are and why ULM is an exceptional university. This will require cognizant and strategic decisions in recruiting.” – DR. ALBERTO RUIZ Grace and Alberto "Bert" Ruiz, met faculty, staff and members of the community at an event at Bayou Pointe.

sports coaching and officiating, athletic administration and education. As a result, Ruiz has published scholarly articles and abstracts and made several presentations at international, national and state conferences.

at the Delano House. Every morning I would get up at 5:15 a.m. and run this beautiful campus. Even though it was completely dark when I was running, you could see the beauty of it,” he said.

He has served as an NCAA basketball and track official for more than 20 years.

Ruiz and his wife live off Forsythe Avenue and he no longer runs the campus in the dark. But he’s still up and running.

New campus, new home

www.ulm.edu

Ruiz has a packed schedule of administrative and faculty meetings, speaking to groups such as faculty and staff senates and planning sessions for ULM’s academic future. Plus he and his wife Grace have been busy making their new home in Monroe. They’ve bought a house, joined a church and met many people.

“I live about two miles from campus and I still run every morning. Every once in awhile I take a day off, but I still get up,” he said. “I like to be a positive role model for the kids. You’ve got to practice what you preach. If you run or you say you should be physically active, that’s what you should do.” In the late afternoon, the Ruizes often drive to campus and take a walk.

ULM grads,” he said. He has definite thoughts on where the university should be headed, and at the top of that list are two things: recruitment and research. The immediate goal “Is to increase enrollment. We’ve seen a high of 9,400 students. I’d like to see us go above that in the near future.” “We have to go out and recruit students. We have to tell students who we are and why ULM is an exceptional university. This will require cognizant and strategic decisions in recruiting,” he said. Ruiz believes it is imperative that research at the university increases significantly in order for ULM to reach its goal to be ranked


9 Vice President of Academic Affairs Alberto "Bert" Ruiz in his office overlooking the ULM campus.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

“ We must increase our research expectations. That is going to be key if we want to go to an R2. The designation we have as an R3 is a great accomplishment to the faculty and the staff. If we want to improve ourselves to be an upper–echelon university in the state and the nation, then we have to go to an R2 designation,” he said. Both goals, Ruiz said, are attainable by building on the established foundation of the university coupled with the power of a unified vision and mission. “We are strong in student retention and student accomplishments, as well as faculty accolades. Now we must put all of this together to move forward as one,” he said.

“We are in a prime position to move this

university forward if we make a concerted effort to move in one direction . I think we are in for a great future. We’ve got to be diligent in the things we do and the decisions we make,” he said.

“At the end of the day, we are here for three things: the students, the students, and the students.” – DR. ALBERTO RUIZ

Ruiz sees the addition of the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM) medical school as a catalyst to furthering the university’s vision to be among the nation’s top universities with an emphasis on health sciences. “I am excited about VCOM coming to campus. I envision implementing new and expanded academic programs as ULM attracts an increasing number of pre–med, health sciences and pharmacy students,” Ruiz said. “That kind of growth will be founded on the strength of ULM’s existing programs in all disciplines.” While he works to propel ULM forward, Ruiz remains steadfast to the precedence he has based his career upon. “At the end of the day, we are here for three things: the students, the students, and the students,” he said.

www.ulm.edu

“ULM is a place with great traditions and values, and I want to expand on that. I want to continue to provide excellent academic programs to Northeast Louisiana, the state, region and the country,” Ruiz said.

DR. ALBERTO RUIZ VP ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

an R2 research institution according to the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. In 2016, ULM gained an R3 Carnegie ranking for “moderate research.” The higher “R2” designation is for “high research activity.”


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YOUR UNIVERSITY

YOURUNIVERSITY

2019 LA. OVERALL PRINCIPAL OF THE YEAR ERIC DAVIS www.ulm.edu

Alumnus


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BY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

and remains an avid sports fan. “Once I got to year three or four, I knew I wouldn't be teaching my whole career,” he said. “I started setting my sights on administration and got into administration a little earlier than I expected. I thought I would coach for a good little while, but the opportunity presented itself. I jumped on it and got in as an assistant principal.”

“I had no aspirations of doing administration work,” he said. Then, a group of us who coached together decided, ‘Maybe one day we might want to do this administration thing, so let’s go ahead and do the master’s degree program at ULM just in case.’ We got in there together and did it as a group.”

Davis also earned a Master of Business Administration (2017) and a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (2014) from Walden University. He graduated with a Bachelor of Business Administration from Miles College (1996) to become the first person in his immediate family to earn a college degree.

Davis graduated with a Master of Education in Educational Leadership from the on–campus program in 2003. He became an assistant principal in 2005 and principal at Wossman High School, in Monroe, in 2016. Davis was named the 2019 Overall Principal of the Year by the Louisiana Department of Education. In June, 2019 he was named principal at Carroll High School.

Two of Davis’ colleagues in the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership program, Vincent Landrum, assistant principal at North Crowley High School in Fort Worth, Texas, and LaShondra Allen, principal at Berg Jones Elementary in Monroe, also became administrators. His brother–in–law, Orlando Freemont, also earned an M.Ed. from ULM shortly after Dr. Davis graduated. Freemont is now a principal at Richwood Middle School in Monroe. “I never considered another school,” Davis said. “At the time, ULM was ranked very high in the country for the master’s program. It still is. All of that was a plus. It was convenient with me coaching. I left practice around 5 p.m. and went to school in the evenings. That was convenient.” The program also laid the foundation for Davis’ career as an administrator.

Davis coached football, basketball and baseball at his alma mater, Carroll High School, before moving into administration. He played multiple sports for the Bulldogs

– ERIC DAVIS

Davis’ favorite course in the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership curriculum was EDLE 5015: Legal, Ethical, and Regulatory Issues. “That course was the basis of what we really needed to know,” he said. “We were also made aware that the experience that you get will be hands on. They said, ‘We can teach you what you might see, but you’re really going to learn when you get your hands dirty.’ They were absolutely right.” With the prestigious 2019 Louisiana Principal of the Year award added to Davis’ long list of accomplishments as an educator, he is extremely proud of the training he received in the M.Ed. in Educational Leadership program at ULM. “The master’s degree makes you more attractive, more so now than then,” he said. “I didn’t aspire to do anything after the master’s degree. I never dreamed that would happen. I was good with getting the master’s degree and certification for administration.” “Now, the degree definitely will open some eyes to what I do. At the Louisiana Association of Principals Conference last month, I saw the ULM booth. I said, ‘This is the perfect opportunity to put ULM on the map. I want people to know this is where I got my training.’ ”

www.ulm.edu

“At ULM they taught us how to be accountable for the lives we have in front of us and how serious the job is,” he said. “You have to put in time and effort to make it what it needs to be. A lot of the professors had already been in the position of superintendents, so they gave us little nuggets that weren’t necessarily in the books to help us prepare and to be ready when that time came.”

"At ULM they taught us how to be accountable for the lives we have in front of us and how serious the job is."

“I was talking with Harrington Watson III, the principal at Robinson Elementary,” Dr. Davis said. “He said he was going to do his doctorate. He started six months before I did and completed his doctorate degree at ULM. That inspired me to go back for a doctorate. We were both assistant principals at Richwood High School at the time. With him graduating from ULM and doing what he did, it put a fire in me to do something else, too.”

YOUR UNIVERSITY

“It’s awesome,” he said. “I am very excited about the award. It gives me a platform to put Monroe on the map. At the time I was at ULM, I learned from Dr. Otis LoVette and Dr. George Rice. They’re retired now, but those guys really got us ready to be in the positions we are in now.”

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oaching motivated Dr. Eric Davis to become an educator, and he makes no bones about it.


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YOUR UNIVERSITY

YOURUNIVERSITY

SEEN ON CAMPUS

THE DYNAMIC DUO CHRISSIE AUTIN & MEGHAN OLINGER www.ulm.edu

Alumni


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BY ULM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

on to a position with the American Red Cross helping victims of disaster. But her connection to ULM was strong, and she began looking to return in 2017.

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graduate of Neville High School in 1994, Chrissie Autin naturally enrolled at the University of Louisiana Monroe with many of her classmates, but after two years found herself ready to dive into the workforce. She took a job at State Farm, but when the Monroe office closed in 2004, she made her way back to ULM.

Meghan Olinger graduated Lafayette High School in 2003, and came to ULM for the atmospheric science program. She calls herself a “weather nerd/storm chaser,” a passion she’s promised her husband to forgo for the time being. Olinger later changed her major to Speech Communication. Heavily involved on campus during her tenure at ULM, Meghan danced as a Warbonnet all four years, was a member of AOPII, SGA, 31 Ambassadors, Mortar Board and vice president of the Campus Activities Board. She served as an RA, hall director and executive director of Up ‘Til Dawn. Olinger feels she grew up in college, “bled maroon and gold” and graduated in 2007 with a B.A. in Communication Studies.

Autin and Olinger take tremendous pride in their work and in the building. From experience, Autin knew many venues would just hand over the keys, with little attention to customer satisfaction. Autin and Olinger vowed to do the opposite by focusing on customer service, being on hand during events and demanding perfection in an atmosphere where it is almost impossible. Bayou Pointe opened in March 2018 as a facility available to the Warhawk family, as well as the community. The facility has different size meeting rooms to accommodate gatherings of all sizes, from small staff meetings to lakrge wedding receptions and conferences. The rooms are Cypress Hall, DeSiard Room, Bayou Room, Lagniappe Theater, Lagniappe Reception Hall, Spirit Hall plus a patio and stage overlooking Bayou DeSiard. For more on reserving Bayou Pointe, visit http://www.ulm.edu/bayoupointe or call 318-342-1900.

www.ulm.edu

She began working in ULM Recruitment and Admissions and loved interacting with potential students. She took a job in 2011 with the city of West Monroe managing Americorps volunteers. She got her first taste of nonprofit work and discovered her enthusiasm in making a difference in the lives of the less fortunate, going

Chrissie Autin and Meghan Olinger vowed to focus on customer service, being on hand during events and demanding perfection in an atmosphere where it is almost impossible.

Vice President of Student Affairs Camile Currier first hired Autin and then soon after hired Olinger as assistant event director. Both were nervous, not knowing what to expect with the opening of a new facility, but they knew their relationship was integral to the success of Bayou Pointe. Autin said it was “like an arranged marriage,” but one that has turned out beautifully. The ladies soon discovered they each were heavily invested in the success of Bayou Pointe, and that has made all the difference.

YOUR UNIVERSITY

Autin started in the controller’s office as an administrative assistant but was drawn to student accounts, craving the interaction with the student body and the newness of each work day. From 2004–17, she loved every minute of her time in that department. She hadn’t even thought of a change until she was searching the ULM job postings for her husband and saw the listing for event director for the new Bayou Pointe Student Event Center.

Autin was a natural fit for the event director position. She enjoys jobs that keep her constantly moving and problem solving. She had an event planning business for seven years and knew she could handle the responsibility.


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BY HOPE YOUNG

EDUCATORS

COLLEGE OF ARTS, EDUCATION, AND SCIENCES

“We are thrilled to be a university partner for the Educators Rising initiative, and we are so encouraged by the commitment of our partner schools that are piloting coursework for the 2019–20 school year.” – DR. AMY L. WEEMS

RISING

ENCOURAGING THE NEXT GENERATION OF TEACHERS

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ationwide, there is shortage of qualified elementary, middle and high school teachers. The University of Louisiana Monroe School of Education has made a commitment to change that in Northeast Louisiana by partnering with three area school districts with an initiative to encourage and guide students at four high schools toward careers as teachers. The School of Education is launching Educators Rising during the 2019–20 school year at Neville, Wossman, Oak Grove and Ruston high schools. The project is under the direction of Dr. Amy L. Weems, Assistant Professor of Education.

www.ulm.edu

“We are thrilled to be a university partner for the Educators Rising initiative, and we are so encouraged by the commitment of our partner schools that are piloting coursework for the 2019–20 school year,” Weems said. Weems said the high school partners began recruiting students for Educators Rising at the beginning of the school year. ULM will support the program through

virtual professional learning communities, by mentoring teachers and students, hosting campus visits and skill–development days for Educators Rising competitions. ULM provided the EdRising Academy Curriculum to the four pilot schools for the 2019–20 school year. Normally it is purchased by the schools. The curriculum is being used to teach a dual enrollment course at Ruston High School and as a dual credit course at Oak Grove, Neville and Wossman. “Both are taught as a partnership between ULM and approved instructors in these high schools,” Weems said. Also part of the program is the EdRising Virtual Campus, available to pilot school students and teachers. “It’s like a social media connection for schools that are implementing Educators Rising,” said Weems. The School of Education has chartered a collegiate chapter of Educators Rising to provide ULM education students access to this network of mentors and future


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Dr. Amy L. Weems, ULM Assistant Professor of Education.

educators as well. Chapter members also serve as ambassadors working with community partners and aspiring educators. “High school and collegiate members can compete in various events that show their expertise in the field of education at state and national competitions and conferences to earn college scholarships,” Weems said. The mission of Educators Rising is to expand opportunities for high school students to experience the high–impact

empowerment teaching can offer, help students develop leadership skills and have experiences to advance career choices, increase diversity in the local teacher workforce and support local teachers as they recruit and mentor students to enter education. “We know that our best and brightest future educators include high school students who want to make a difference in their communities, and we will be passing on our passion for teaching and learning to them through Educators Rising,” Weems said.

www.ulm.edu

– DR. AMY L. WEEMS

COLLEGE OF ARTS, EDUCATION, AND SCIENCES

“We know that our best and brightest future educators include high school students who want to make a difference in their communities, and we will be passing on our passion for teaching and learning to them through Educators Rising.”


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photos by Emerald McIntyre

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Benefits abound for students and clients alike at the Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center — just one of several campus centers or clinics which are available to the community. Students, especially those in Health Sciences, need clinical hours before they can obtain their licenses or certifications. ULM clinics provide that opportunity for students, under the supervision of faculty members. For that to happen, however, the students need clients. Those come from the community. In many cases the clients would not be able to access help if it weren’t for ULM.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

Anne Marie Sisk, a speech–language pathology clinical assistant professor in the ULM College of Health Sciences who serves as director of the Kitty DeGree Center, says the most a client will pay at the center is $10 a visit. Funding for the Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center, which opened in 2009, comes from the Kitty DeGree Foundation. A Speech–Language Pathology graduate student works with a young client at the Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center. BY MARK HENDERSON

FINDING

She was taught to read lips by ULM speech–language pathologists. Services provided

THEIR VOICES CLIENTS OVERCOME OBSTACLES IN COMMUNICATION AT KITTY DEGREE SPEECH AND HEARING CENTER

DeGree, a philanthropist who was, during her lifetime, a major contributor to ULM and whose legacy lives on through the foundation, was diagnosed with a profound hearing loss as a young woman.

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he clients at the Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center cover the age spectrum.

Toddlers come because their speech skills are delayed. Seniors come to regain that which a stroke has robbed from them — their ability to speak coherently.

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They all come to the center at the University of Louisiana Monroe’s Sugar Hall in pursuit of a common goal – to improve communication skills. There they work with ULM Department of Speech– Language Patholog y graduate students intent on becoming speech–language pathologists.

All speech relies on the ability to hear. Hearing screenings for adults and children are offered in the center’s audiological suite. The screening determines if people are able to hear at different modulations where speech occurs. The therapy rooms for children have shelves of toys used to encourage interaction with the student clinician. Child clients obtain help with articulation, spoken language, social use of language, stuttering and voice disorders. Speech assistance with those born with cleft palate also is available. “I remember a little girl of 2 who barely had any language when she came to us,” Sisk said. “Her parents were told she had autism, but after a year she had completely caught up. That was one of our big success stories.” Among the adults served by the center are those who have suffered a stroke, traumatic brain injury or laryngectomy.


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Not all of the adults seen at Kitty DeGree Speech and Hearing Center suffer from a medical problem. Help is available for accent modification. Accent modifications are designed to enhance business, social and academic Standard American English speaking skills, and clients have included international students, faculty and other professionals.

– ANNE MARIE SISK Helping now and preparing for the future Sisk said the clients are served by graduate speech–language pathology students whose work is overseen by five faculty members who are licensed and certified pathologists. “We are required to watch them directly 25 percent of the time they are with clients,” Sisk said. At times, the faculty member will sit in the room while the student is working with a client. Each room is equipped with a two–way mirror through which the therapy session can be watched. Cameras also provide faculty with the means to watch a session from an office.

“We have a 100 percent job placement. It’s a growing field, and there’s a lot of demand,” she said. The center serves 60 clients over the summer and 80 during the regular school year. “We do try for a 50 percent adult, 50 percent children split ideally, but the reality is more like 30 percent adult and 70 percent children,” Sisk said. Sisk said the center will take equipment out to private schools, day cares and health fairs to provide hearing checks. “We do take self–referrals, people who know they need help,” Sisk said. Other clients come through referrals from pediatricians and neurologists. “And we get referrals from local speech therapists who have worked with a client but whose insurance has run out,” she said. A second clinic operates at the Adm. E.A. Barham Speech and Hearing Clinic on University Avenue, housed in a Scottish Rite Temple. That clinic is funded through the Scottish Rite, a men’s group that works to help those with speech disorders. The Scottish Rite sponsors six full–time scholarships and provides free clinical services for six clients. “Over there, we have just children,” Sisk said. Improving the quality of life At the center, much of the work involves efforts to improve speech patterns. Not all success is measured in words, though. Sisk likes to tell the story about a child with autism whose inability to communicate was frustrating a mother. The student clinician noticed something, however, that the mother was missing. “She saw that when the child saw her mother, she smiled and became more animated. You see, she was communicating with her mother, showing her how much she loved her, but it wasn’t in words. The mother had never noticed,” Sisk said. “My definition of success is when we see a systematic improvement in the quality of life. We succeed, for instance, when parents are happier,” she said.

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Before a graduate student can earn a master’s degree, they must accrue 400 clinical hours. Each student starts with one client, will have two during the summer and four or five the next fall. The students also are required to work at a medical facility

Sisk says ULM’s Speech–Language Pathology students are snatched up when finishing the program.

COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES

“My definition of success is when we see a systematic improvement in the quality of life. We succeed, for instance, when parents are happier.”

before becoming certified.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

Clinicians also work with clients with voice disorders in need of help with such issues as pitch, loudness and resonance.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY HOPE YOUNG

USDA AWARDS $597K FOR TELEMEDICINE PROJECT BY PHARMACY'S DR. BRYAN DONALD

T COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

he University of Louisiana Monroe has received a federal grant of $597,274 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the “Expanding pediatric cardiology services with telemedicine and collaborative drug therapy management” project written by Dr. Bryan Donald, a faculty member of the College of Pharmacy.

The project, in collaboration with Ochsner Health System and the Northeast Louisiana Economic Alliance, aims to provide affordable pediatric cardiology services via telemedicine to patients throughout the rural areas of Northeast Louisiana.

www.ulm.edu

Donald stated, “What we’re doing is partnering pharmacy with physician specialists to follow our patients better and improve outcomes. Pharmacists are trained in drug therapy management, can optimize therapy while reducing adverse drug events, and can take some of the workload from physicians, freeing them to see more patients. We can also use telemedicine, using phones or video, to reach patients where they live and reduce the burden on families trying to get care.”

This project is an example of the commitment of ULM’s Health Sciences to serve the community and improve the health and well–being of Northeast Louisiana citizens. “There is something special about a researcher's first big award,” commented Dr.

John W. Sutherlin, Director of the Office of Sponsored Programs and Research. “This project was Dr. Donald’s first grant submission; therefore, making it a significant accomplishment.” Meghan Risinger, Grants/Projects Developer in OSPR, said, “Our office is committed to assisting faculty in preparing and submitting grants. Dr. Donald and this project is one example of the extraordinary faculty at ULM and their service to improve the health outcomes and workforce and economic development of Northeast Louisiana.” Dr. Sutherlin continued, “Our office was glad to play a role in developing this project, but it takes committed faculty willing to do the work that makes the difference."

“Dr. Donald and this project is one example of the extraordinary faculty at ULM and their service to improve the health outcomes and workforce and economic development of Northeast Louisiana.” – MEGHAN RISINGER


With the end of the year approaching, here is a checklist of some tax–wise year–end charitable gifts that can provide you with tax savings and possible income benefits:

IDEAS FOR YEAR–END

• MAKE A GIFT OF APPRECIATED ASSETS • FUND A CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITY • ESTABLISH A CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUST • MAKE A GIFT OF LIFE INSURANCE • CREATE A CHARITABLE LIFE ESTATE

2018 KICKOFF WITH DOUG PEDERSON

BENEFITS

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018

SMART

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TA X–WISE GIVING STRATEGIES

To learn more about how you can benefit from these gifts, please contact us.

ULM Foundation | 318.342.3636 |foundation@ulm.edu 700 University Avenue| Monroe, LA 71209

What are the tax benefits of an IRA charitable rollover gift? An IRA rollover has several significant tax advantages. It allows you to give from pre-tax assets. If you do not itemize or are subject to charitable deduction limits, the IRA rollover still allows you to give while receiving tax benefits. An IRA rollover gift could also help you avoid income that could push you into a higher tax bracket.

May We Help You? To learn more, please contact us. Please check off your preferences, fill in your information, and mail this form back to us. We would welcome the opportunity to answer further questions and work with you. Please send me more information on IRA charitable rollover gifts. The best way to contact me is by: Email Mail Phone I’ve already included your organization in my estate plans. Street __________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________ State/Zip ________________________________________________ Phone __________________________________________________ Email___________________________________________________ (All inquiries are treated with complete confidentiality.) This information is not intended as tax, legal or financial advice. Gift results may vary. Consult your personal financial advisor for information specific to your situation.

701/2 or older | Direct up to $100,000

Satisfies your annual required minimum distribution, or RMD, up to the amount of your gift Allows you to give from pre-tax assets and your distribution is excluded from taxable income Helps avoid limits on charitable deductions and prevents you from being pushed into a higher tax bracket Simplifies the giving process. It's easy to do— just notify your IRA custodian Minimizes the effect your giving has on your cash flow. The gift is from your assets, not your checkbook

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Name __________________________________________________

IRA

Charitable Rollover Gift


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2018 2019

COLLEGE OF HEALTH &LEGACIES PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

ULM Foundation | 318.342.3636 |foundation@ulm.edu 700 University Avenue| Monroe, LA 71209

PLACE POSTAGE HERE

www.ulm.edu

University of Louisiana Monroe Foundation Laird Weems Center 700 University Ave. Monroe, LA 71209


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MONDAY

10.28

11 pm CAB Free Lunch Social @ Bayou Park 5:30 pm Homecoming Pep Rally @ Student Grove Stage 8 pm CAB Silent Disco @ The Hangar ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

#WEARE1

SCHEDULE

TUESDAY

10.29

11 am SGA Free Lunch Social @ Bayou Park @The Hangar

WEDNESDAY

10.30

COLLEGE OF COLLEGE HEALTHOF & PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SCIENCESSCIENCES

6 pm Miss(ter) Arkansas State Pageant

11 am 31 Ambassadors Free Lunch Social @ Bayou Park 5 pm University Mile @ Hemphill Hall 9 pm SGA Halloween Ball @ Bayou Pointe Event Center

THURSDAY

10.31

11 pm Chi Alpha Free Lunch Social @ Bayou Park 4-7 pm Trunk or Treat @ Brown Stadium* 5-7 pm CAB Fall Festival @ Bayou Park*

FRIDAY

11.1

5:30 pm Greek Unity Step Show @ Student Grove Stage

SATURDAY

11.2 www.ulm.edu

12-3 pm CAB Barbecue Cook-off @Student Grove RSO’s ONLY

*Visit ulm.edu/homecoming for a full schedule.

1:30 pm Homecoming Parade @ ULM Grove 4 pm ULM vs. Arkansas State @ Malone Stadium


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A faculty-supervised graduate student works with a client at the ULM Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling Clinic. ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

COLLEGE OF COLLEGE HEALTHOF & PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SCIENCESSCIENCES

BY HOPE YOUNG & CAROLINE COURVILLE

A PATHWAY TO HEALING

THROUGH TALK

ULM THERAPY CLINIC ENHANCES MENTAL HEALTH THROUGH HUMAN RELATIONS

H

Clinical Director, and Dr. David Hale, Assistant Professor and Interim Director of Marriage and Family Therapy programs.

The clinic helps members of the campus and the community with issues ranging from stress to relationships to mood disorders and more.

Frusha and Hale agree the name of the clinic limits common perception of the services provided.

Clinic.

elp is just a chat away at the University of Louisiana Monroe Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling

www.ulm.edu

Founded in 1983, the MFT Clinic is a teaching facility where graduate student interns work with clients while under direct supervision from a licensed, American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy–approved supervisor or supervisor candidate. The MFT Clinic is under the direction of Dr. Van Frusha, Instructor and Interim

What’s in a name?

“We’re not marriage counselors. We don’t go in with two people and say we’re going to do marriage counseling. We do everything that anyone with any other mental health degree does other than prescribe medication. And we wouldn’t want to. Quite often we’re the ones they send them to when the medication stops working. Because what’s going on is not a medication thing, it’s a human relations thing,” Frusha said.


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Among the issues treated at the clinic are depression, anxiety, infidelity, grief and loss, family conflicts, communication problems, abuse issues, school–related problems and other concerns.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

and a supervisor behind the (one–way) mirror,” Hale said. “It’s literally a team effort as opposed to an individual one–on–one.”

All client information is confidential in accordance with Louisiana law and the ethical standards of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and the American Counseling Association. HIPAA guidelines are in place, as well.

COLLEGE OF COLLEGE HEALTHOF & PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SCIENCESSCIENCES

I need to talk … Yet, people are often reluctant to see a therapist.

photo by Jeanette Robinson

“That term (marriage and family therapy) came out a long time ago when they didn’t know where to put folks thinking like us because we don’t see just a problem within an individual,” Frusha explained. “We see the larger context that the human being lives in. There’s relationships and there’s interaction, and we take that into account.” “In my 31 years of experience, I have seen more individuals than I’ve seen couples or seen families,” Hale added. A training clinic There are approximately 72 agencies in the immediate area that provide mental health services. Many of the mental health professionals at these public and private agencies trained at ULM, which has the only on–campus MFT Clinic in the state. The students are required to have 500 direct client contact hours to graduate.

“One of the things that really sets us apart is because we are a training institute. We’ve got one person doing therapy and three students

– DR. DAVID HALE

“Quite often people don’t understand therapy,” Frusha said. “We change lives through conversation, through talk. We’re trained very intensely on what we do in there. We’re not just having a little chat.” “When our students graduate, they feel competent and confident that they will succeed,” said Dr. Jana Sutton, Interim Dean of the College of Health Sciences. “We are the best kept secret on the bayou – at the university that’s the best kept secret on the bayou. I think the reason is – maybe because people say, ‘Oh you’re a training institute, and I’m getting somebody who doesn’t have any experience.’ But the thing is, you’re getting a ton of experience because there’s a supervisor behind the mirror and there’s a supervisor that meets every night with students throughout the week.” The MFT Clinic is free to ULM and Louisiana Delta Community College students, faculty and staff. Clinical services to all in the military, veterans and their families are also free. The clinic is also available to the community. The standard fee is $25 for the first session and $20 for the following sessions. Adjustments can be made on an individual basis. Each session lasts approximately 50 minutes. The MFT clinic is located in Strauss Hall, room 112. Regular fall/spring hours are noon–8 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m.–noon Friday.

www.ulm.edu

“That’s actually in the room for an hour, face to face,” Hale said. “We are the only MFT accredited program of this kind in the state of Louisiana. One of only a few of its kind in the South like this.”

“One of the things that really sets us apart is because we are a training institute.”

“I think it has something to do with the fact that going to a therapist is still not acceptable. Still, people have to feel comfortable taking that step and saying, ‘I need to go see a therapist.’ That’s not an easy decision,” Hale said.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

BY HOPE YOUNG

A GROWING FIELD:

GERONTOLOGY PROGRAM IN HIGH DEMAND

G

erontology focuses on issues and services that address the needs of older adults. The University of Louisiana Monroe offers a unique graduate program in gerontology housed within the College of Business and Social Sciences. What makes this program so unique? There are several reasons:

www.ulm.edu

1. ULM Gerontolog y Program is the first and the only graduate gerontology program in the state. 2. ULM is the first and the only university to have established an Institute of Gerontolog y

in Louisiana through funding provided by the National Institute of Aging.

concentration. This concentration allows students to prepare for certification in thanatology.

3. It is the only program in the United States that offers seven different concentrations that cover the continuum of health care, business and technology. The “Health Care Management” concentration combines geriatric training with business management skills.

5. In 2018, ULM’s Gerontolog y Graduate Program received three national rankings: No. 1 Most Affordable Online Master ’s Program in Gerontology, No. 9 Best Master’s Program in Gerontology and No. 14 Best Online Master’s program in Gerontology.

4. It is the only program in the United States that offers Grief Care Management as a master’s

In 2017–18, the Program Coordinator, Dr. Anita Sharma, resurrected and redesigned the Gerontolog y Graduate


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photo by Koca777/BigStock.com

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

Currently, the program offers the following seven concentrations: (1) Aging Studies; (2) Grief Care Ma n a g e m e n t ; ( 3 ) He a l t h Ca r e Management; (4) Long–term Care Administration; (5) Mental Health; (6) Program Administration; and (7) Small Business Management.

Dean Berry said, “ULM’s Gerontology Program has been redesigned to focus on current and future needs of students, our society, and the organizations that serve the aging baby boomer population. Dr. Sharma has reinvigorated this important program with new concentrations and connected with many great partners in the community to offer timely and relevant workshops and seminars. We are excited about the opportunities provided by the program and look forward to continued growth and success.”

– DR. RON BERRY

www.ulm.edu

The program is 100 percent online, which allows students to complete the degree at their own pace. A student– focused program, it continues to grow and expand. Students receive individual attention, and the program coordinator tailors each student’s program of study to match their individual career goals.

The coursework prepares students for the licensing exam in long–term care administration and certification in geriatric care, case management and thanatology. The program provides plenty of opportunities for internships and field education. As the ULM Gerontology Program continues to gain a reputation for having one of the best curricula, organizations are more eager to offer internship opportunities to ULM students.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

Program with support from Dr. Ron Berry, Dean of the College of Business and Social Sciences. Sharma streamlined the curriculum, added four new concentrations, reinstated a fifth concentration that had previously been removed and created five new courses to meet the career needs of students.

“Dr. Sharma has reinvigorated this important program with new concentrations and connected with many great partners in the community to offer timely and relevant workshops and seminars.”


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

www.ulm.edu


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

COLLEGE OF HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

www.ulm.edu


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY JOHN JONES

BIEDENHARN FAMILY'S

$1.8 MILLION

IN DONATIONS ENDOW CHAIRS, PROFESSORSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIP

W

hen residents in Ouachita Parish and along the I–20 Corridor hear the name, “Biedenharn,” they recognize a longstanding family name that has become synonymous with Monroe, Louisiana, the arts and almost unmatched business and entrepreneurial success in multiple fields.

ULM FOUNDATION

And fortunately for thousands of ULM students and faculty, support for higher education can be added to that list. The ULM Foundation and Louisiana Board of Regents recognized the Biedenharn

“We are grateful to the Biedenharn family for their continuous financial support of the university.” – DR. NICK J. BRUNO

Family Legacy with the University at a press conference on Monday, August 26, 2019 on the seventh floor of the ULM Library. ULM and the Biedenharn family announced their private donations of $900,000 for a Chair and five Professorships and they have received $600,000 in matching funds from the Louisiana Board of Regents, resulting in $1.5 million in faculty endowments. “We are grateful to the Biedenharn family for their continuous financial support of the university,” said President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.. “Their donations, like this Chair for photos by Emerald McIntyre

www.ulm.edu

The Biedenharn family was recognized Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, for their legacy of support of the University of Louisiana Monroe. Pictured are members of the Biedenharn family with President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. and Executive Director of ULM Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Relations Susan Chappell. From left to right, Carrie Robison, Susan Chappell, Murray Biedenharn, Kathy Patrick, Dr. Nick J. Bruno, Mac Oakley, Jody Johnston, Keith Biedenharn, Kathy Biedenharn, Jody Lyle, Hank Biedenharn, Elizabeth Guerriero and Bernard Sager.


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Murray Biedenharn speaks at a reception recognizing the Biedenharn Family Legacy for its generous, longtime support of the university. ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

our College of Business, have enabled ULM to attract and retain world–class scholars as faculty members. The vision of this family in advancing education is inspiring, and we will honor and match their generosity with a renewed commitment to continue to excel in all areas.”

Susan Chappell, ULM’s Executive Director for Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Relations, said the Biedenharn family’s support for the university has been broad and far–reaching. “When we say the ‘Biedenharn Family Legacy,’ we are talking about a true legacy of generosity and support for educational excellence and ULM.” The Biedenharn Family Legacy has established the following chairs and professorships at ULM with principal corpus amounts: • B.W. Biedenharn Chair in Business – $million • Emy–Lou Biedenharn second Professorship in Music – $100,000

• Francesca and C.D. Oakley Professorship in Academic Innovation Center – $100,000 • Doll and Henry Biedenharn Jr. Professorship in Communication – $100,000

• Emy–Lou Biedenharn Memorial Scholarship, 1989 – $170,033

“When we say the 'Biedenharn Family Legacy,' we are talking about a true legacy of generosity and support for educational excellence and ULM.”

• Joseph A. Biedenharn Chair in Gerontology, 1993 – $2,047,074 • Emy–Lou Biedenharn Endowed Professorship in Music, 1996 – $181,414 • Emy–Lou Biedenharn Chair in Music, 1999 –– $1,575,965 So today we celebrate the Biedenharn Family Legacy contributions totaling $1,880,000 and the partnership with the Louisiana Board of Regents. We celebrated with the Board of Regents sponsored programs matching funds and investment earnings, the Biedenharn investments now total $5,512,211 in endowments which provide crucial funding for the development of faculty, their programs and student scholarships. Family background

– SUSAN CHAPPELL

Joseph Augustus Biedenharn was born in Vicksburg, Miss., in 1866 and was the first bottler of Coca–Cola. In 1913, Biedenharn moved his family to Monroe to expand his Coca–Cola bottling business. Today the family is known for its philanthropy in northeast Louisiana. ULM’s Biedenharn Hall, built in 1939, was named for the family patriarch and Emy–Lou Biedenharn Recital Hall, built in 2003, was named for his daughter.

www.ulm.edu

• Elizabeth and Haydn Cutler Professorship in Biotechnology – $100,000

In addition to these endowments, the Biedenharn Family Legacy has also established scholarships and faculty endowments in earlier years with current principal balances:

ULM FOUNDATION

Dean Ron Berry, author of the B. W. Biedenharn Chair in Business, wrote a competitive proposal to the Louisiana Board of Regents for the $400,000 in matching funds, and shared his gratitude to the Biedenharn family and the Louisiana Board of Regents for providing the opportunity to leverage private donations.

• JoAnn and Miles Sager Professorship in Computer Information Systems – $100,000


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

ULM FOUNDATION BY HOPE YOUNG

FAMILY ENDOWS

WILLIAM D. HOOVER

SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING, FINANCIAL AND INFORMATION SERVICES

T

he University of Louisiana Monroe hosted family and friends of the late William D. “Bill” Hoover at an event Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, announcing an endowment fund for scholarships and faculty development and the naming of the William D. Hoover School of Accounting, Financial and Information Services in the College of Business and Social Sciences.

www.ulm.edu

Hoover graduated from ULM in 1960 with a degree in accounting. He went on to become a successful Northeast Louisiana CPA and businessman. Hoover was an advocate for education and a long–time

“This is a significant occasion here at the university due to the generosity of the Hoover Family.” – DR. NICK J. BRUNO

financial supporter of the university. His wife of 62 years, Lois Pelanowsky Hoover, and their children and spouses, Gary and Cindy Hoover, Richmond and Terri Hoover Odom, Scott and Gayle Hoover Frick, established an endowment fund in Hoover’s name after his death at age 82 on Jan. 24, 2018. “This is a significant occasion here at the university due to the generosity of the Hoover Family,” said President Nick J. Bruno, who had fished and hunted with Hoover, who was an avid outdoorsman.


photo by Emerald McIntyre

The family of William D. “Bill” Hoover was honored by the University of Louisiana Monroe on Monday, Sept. 9, 2019, for establishing an endowment fund and the naming of the William D. Hoover School of Accounting, Financial and Information Services in the College of Business and Social Sciences.

“He invested in people, he believed in people. I can think of no one more appropriate to name our school after. Thank you for allowing us to share in that legacy. It’s going to make us very successful. It’s going to impact our community, it’s going to impact our state. All because of who he was,” said Berry.

“In Monroe and this area there are a number of individuals who had remarkable entrepreneurial opportunities, and they took them and did extremely well,” Bruno said, referring to Hoover and his partners forming Long Distance Savers, his work with Clarke Williams, founder of CenturyLink, and his own accounting firm and business ventures.” “Bill did a lot to advance this area economically and of course, his loyalty to this university is evidenced today. I think this is a testament to Bill himself and the Hoover family,” Bruno said. “So many people have gotten their start at this great university, and so many people are coming back to the university and contributing to the future of this region by educating our students today.”

“There is no doubt in my mind that Mr. Hoover’s legacy is going to have a significant

“If he were here, and he knew all this was going on, he absolutely would not have it. Absolutely put his foot down,” said Odom. “He would also love it to pieces and never tell you.” “He had the kind of life and he did the kind of work that created enough value in so many people’s lives that his memory could be forever memorialized here at ULM,” Odom said. “The school was so near and dear to his heart. “This school, ULM, gave our Daddy education and opportunity but he had to pony up the dedication, commitment and the drive. And he did, he worked hard,” she said. Odom said many people in attendance made contributions to the endowment fund in her father’s name. “We just have the pleasure as a family, plus my uncle Chester (Hoover) and my cousin Stephanie Hoover Porter, in contributing so that we can provide scholarships through my Daddy’s memory and in his honor to so many people in the future,” she said. The Sept. 9 event coincided with Hoover’s birthday, which made the occasion even more meaningful to the family. “Today we feel like it marks the beginning of a legacy. A legacy of scholarships here at ULM, that each one of them can be made in his memory and in his honor,” Odom said. “Thank you so much.” ULM Foundation Scholarships are funded by individuals, organizations and businesses to assist students in pursuing degrees at the university. For more information on how to apply for a scholarship or in establishing one, please visit https://ulm.academicworks.com/.

www.ulm.edu

Dr. Ron Berry, Dean of the College of Business and Social Sciences, spoke on the living legacy the Hoover Family created to honor their patriarch.

– DR. RON BERRY

Daughter Terri Hoover Odom spoke on behalf of her family and introduced several friends who shared their thoughts about Hoover. The speakers were John Luffey Jr., Brian Harrison and Ouachita Parish Police Jury member Kay Katz.

ULM FOUNDATION

It was Hoover’s “entrepreneurial spirit” that Bruno recalled.

“Mr. Hoover invested in people, he believed in people. I can think of no one more appropriate to name our school after. Thank you for allowing us to share in that legacy. It’s going to make us very successful. It’s going to impact our community, it’s going to impact our state. All because of who he was.”

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

impact on the future,” Berry said.

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BY HOPE YOUNG

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

$56 MILLION

SOAR HELPS ULM REACH NEW HEIGHTS

UNIVERSITY OF LOUISIANA MONROE PRESIDENT NICK J. BRUNO, PH.D., HAS ANNOUNCED THAT THE SOAR CAMPAIGN IS THE MOST SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN IN UNIVERSITY HISTORY, EXCEEDING ITS $55.4 MILLION GOAL WITH A TOTAL OF $56,000,985 AS OF JUNE 30, 2019. photo by Emerald McIntyre

ULM FOUNDATION

D www.ulm.edu

onors to SOAR through the ULM Foundation were recognized at the Warhawks winning football game against South Alabama on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2019.

2014 and funds the President’s Distinguished Scholarship Program, endowed scholarships, endowed faculty positions and research funding, student–athlete scholarships and renovations and construction.

SOAR, which stands for ­S – Students/ Succeed, O – Opportunities/Educate, A – Athletics/Achieve, R – Renovations/Build, is the university’s only capital campaign and is under the direction of Susan Chappell, Executive Director of ULM Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Relations.

Louisiana’s public four–year universities and colleges – as well as those in most other states – experienced a decade of budget cuts to higher education beginning with the Great Recession in 2008.

The history of SOAR The SOAR campaign officially launched in

ULM is beginning to rebound thanks to no cuts in 2018 and extra funding in 2019 from the state Legislature. When the SOAR Campaign launched it was to encourage

private financial support from individuals, organizations and businesses that were positively affected by the university. “When the SOAR Campaign began, it was a time of uncertainty regarding state funding. We were having to make painful decisions which affected everyone at the university in some way. Thanks to Susan Chappell, her team and the ULM Foundation we reached out to the community and to partners and asked them to give back … for the future,” said ULM President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.. “The results are greater than we imagined. The goal of $55.4 million was met and then


surpassed. The friends of this university could see beyond current economics, and knew an educated population is the only way for our region, our state to grow.” SOAR endowments

• Students Succeed – $10.7 million to fund private Foundation Scholarships to assist students as they pursue higher education. • Opportunities/Educate – $24.2 million dedicated to innovative academic opportunities for both faculty and students. This includes technology improvements, research, professional development and attracting world–class instructors and researchers. • Athletics/Achieve – $10 million to bolster Warhawks athletic programs to enable the university to continue to raise the level of competition in the top division of college athletics and compete for Sun Belt Conference championships.

Scholarships Through the philanthropy of committed donors, endowed scholarships assure that future students with the willingness and desire for an education will receive the assistance necessary to achieve it. There are more than 400 ULM Foundation Scholarships available for undergraduate and graduate students in each of the four colleges: Arts, Education, and Sciences; Business and Social Sciences; Health Sciences; and Pharmacy; plus the Graduate School. Many scholarships are dedicated to students meeting specific requirements such as, program, major, high academic achievement, first–generation students and much more. For information on ULM Foundation Scholarships, visit ulm. academicworks.com. Endowed chairs and professorships

Endowed faculty positions support the salaries of endowed faculty, as well as assistance with travel and research.

Opportunities for ULM faculty come in many forms. From travel to presenting important papers to student incentives to new technology – all of this and more will continue to be funded through gifts to the SOAR Campaign. An important example is the Screening for Life program, funded by a $96,679 grant from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Louisiana Foundation. The ULM colleges of Health Sciences and Pharmacy are partnering with Ochsner LSUHSC–Monroe and local community organizations to conduct healthcare screenings and educational events in eight Northeast Louisiana parishes. President Bruno said the Screening for Life grant will allow ULM to expand its healthcare services to surrounding communities that rank high nationally for high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and obesity. SOAR Campaign also funds the Foundation’s Awards for Excellence which are presented annually to faculty and staff who have demonstrated exceptional service to the university and the community. These awards are $3,000 each. Another example is the ULM Risk Management & Insurance Program received a $50,000 donation through the SOAR Campaign made by the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of Louisiana. This is one of several gifts IIABL bestowed to the program. This follows a $50,000 gift from AmWINS Inc., the worlds largest wholesale insurance broker and ULM RMI’s largest employer. Program graduate and former IIABL Board of Directors member Ernest Finch commented on the importance of alumni and industry support, saying, “As a ULM RMI alumni and active member of the IIABL, I couldn’t be more excited about this gift. ULM’s RMI Program gave me a solid foundation to become a highly successful Louisiana independent agent.” Facilities Perhaps the most visible structure on the ULM campus to be funded completely with SOAR donations is the Laird Weems Center, the home of the ULM Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Association. The $1.5 million structure was completed in mid–2018 and is located on Bon Aire Drive. It is named in honor of Billy Laird and the late Don Weems.

Laird, who served as executive director of the ULM Foundation for more than 30 years and Weems, alumni director for almost as many years, established the vision to engage and serve alumni, friends and benefactors of the university. In April 2019, ULM opened its newest cutting–edge opportunity, the Thomas J. Nicholson Virtual Reality Lab. Thanks to a generous donation from the Jean and Saul A. Mintz Foundation, a lab with 28 student stations with Oculus Go 64GB VR headsets and headphones and an instructor’s station has been established in the ULM Library. It also features two networked projection screens. The new Wallace Jones Golf Complex was funded completely with donations to the SOAR Campaign. The 5,000–square foot facility is located between Brown Stadium and Warhawk Field. The $800,000 complex was designed by architects Brian McGuire and Robert Ellis and built by Bing Bishop Construction. The new golf complex features coach’s offices, men’s and women’s locker rooms, kitchen, putting greens, simulator and a driving range. Continuing to SOAR The SOAR Campaign officially ended on June 30, 2019, however donations to the university are continuously being made by individuals, organizations and businesses. ULM actively seeks partners to support its programs. The university is the economic engine which drives the region. By providing students with the finest programs to prepare them for successful, rewarding careers, supporters of ULM are making investments in the future. Recruiting the best faculty, increasing research and making improvements to facilities, are part of the equation which will lead to an increasingly dynamic, culturally rich and prosperous Northeast Louisiana. Those interested in making an investment in the future are encouraged to contact the ULM Foundation for more information. With the backing of alumni and the community, ULM will continue to be the Best on the Bayou.

www.ulm.edu

Being selected for an endowed professorship or endowed chair at a university is a recognition of exemplary achievement by an academic or research professional. Perhaps just as important is the university’s public acknowledgement that a particular field, research or college is so important that securing expert faculty in perpetuity is essential.

Opportunities

With the backing of alumni and the community, ULM will continue to be the Best on the Bayou.

ULM FOUNDATION

• Renovations/Build – $10.5 million for construction of new facilities and renovate existing facilities. A priority of this campaign, commitment of quality facilities will attract talented students, faculty, student–athletes and staff to ULM.

“Endowed chairs and professorships are the ‘gold standard’ in faculty recognition and achievement,” said Chappell. “The ULM Foundation works closely with the donors and the state Board of Regents to secure these critical endowments.”

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The Office of ULM Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Relations reports the following funds by SOAR categories:

ULM has 10 endowed chairs, and 80 endowed professorships.


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To assist undergraduate students whose lives have been affected by cancer, The Louisiana Cancer Foundation for Research and Education, LLC Endowed Scholarship for $50,000 goes to deserving students who are cancer survivors, undergoing treatment or have cancer in their immediate family that has led to financial hardship. Since 2000, the LCF has donated more than $216,000 in support of breast cancer research by Dr. Paul Sylvester, B.J. Robison/ Pfizer Endowed Professor of Pharmacology and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Pharmacy. LCF also supports the Theresa Marsala Memorial Nursing Fund in the Kitty DeGree School of Nursing.

LOUISIANA CANCER FOUNDATION

ULM FOUNDATION

The Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors is a longtime supporter of the School of Construction Management. In September, the board presented $154,815.58, to the SOCM. The support comes from voluntary donations from contractors. Since 2014, the Louisiana State Licensing Board for Contractors and Contractor’s Education Trust Fund has contributed more than $750,000 to the ULM SOCM for program development, facilities, technology and equipment. The School of Construction Management is in the College of Business and Social Sciences. Founded in 1966, the SOCM became the first accredited construction program in the United States by the American Council for Construction Education in 1976 and continues to maintain that accreditation.

TERRY M. DUKE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP LOUISIANA STATE LICENSING BOARD FOR CONTRACTORS FOR RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE Terry and Susan Duke have established the Terry M. Duke Endowed Scholarship for Risk Management and Insurance with a $25,000 donation. Duke is the Area Chairman for Arthur J. Gallagher and has been an insurance broker for 36 years. Mrs. Duke has an interior design business. They live in Monroe with their son, Michael. Through the years, many ULM students have interned under Duke’s mentorship and he has hired several ULM graduates. Currently, his office employs 10 ULM graduates, six from the RMI Program.

www.ulm.edu

In February 2019, ULM’s RMI Program in the College of Business and Social Sciences was ranked No. 9 nationally by Business Insurance.

TERRY M. DUKE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FOR RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE


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Sen. Mike Walsworth has established the Michael A. Walsworth Endowed Scholarship for Political Science for $30,000.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

Sen. Walsworth is a frequent guest to political science classes at ULM where he engages students in discussions on government, politics and public service. When he learned there was no scholarship for political science students, he decided to create one. The senator is a ULM alumnus. Two students have received a Walsworth Scholarship, Allie Lee and Shelby Rybicki. Both graduated with degrees in political science. Lee is a staff member with Louisiana 6th District Congressman Garrett Graves’ office. Rybicki is in ULM graduate school pursuing a Master of Public Administration. The Political Science Program is in the College of Business and Social Sciences and is under the direction of Dr. Josh Stockley.

MICHAEL A. WALSWORTH ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE Barry and Denita White of West Monroe established the Barry O. White Endowed Scholarship for $25,000 for Risk Management and Insurance in the College of Business and Social Sciences.

ULM FOUNDATION

By creating this scholarship, the Whites combined their support of the Risk Management Insurance Program and West Monroe High School, as the scholarship will be awarded to a West Monroe High School graduate enrolled in RMI at ULM. Mr. White is a 40–year veteran of the insurance industry. The Whites owned White & Robertson Insurance Agency for many years. In 2014 it was sold to Lincoln Agency Insurance Co., where he works today.

BARRY O. WHITE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FOR RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE

www.ulm.edu

Thank You!


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SCAN* & DOWNLOAD! *Open the Camera app from your device's home screen. Hold your device so that the QR code appears in the camera app's viewfinder. Your device recognizes the QR code and shows a notification. Tap the notification to open the link associated with the QR code.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019 BY HOPE YOUNG

NEW ULM SAFE APP

CAMPUS NEWS

REINFORCES CAMPUS SECURITY

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new app launched by the University of Louisiana Monroe will further enhance the institution’s reputation for safety. The safety of each person on the ULM campus is the number one priority of the administration of President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D. and the University Police Department. That priority has been recognized. ULM has the distinction of being named one of the Safest Colleges in America by Alarms.org, and thus, one of the safest in the state. ULM ranks highest of the University of Louisiana System institutions in the study. “We are committed to safeguarding our students, faculty, employees and visitors to the ULM campus,” Bruno said. “The fact that our ongoing efforts have been recognized on a national level substantiates our dedication to the safety of all.”

www.ulm.edu

Each semester, free workshops by professionally trained staff are offered on self–defense and crisis management strategies. During severe weather or other hazardous conditions, students and employees are notified through special alerts as text messages, and emails advising of the situation. This summer, ULM launched its new ULM Safe app in time to be available to incoming

freshmen who participated in PREP. The app is free from the App Store and Google Play. The download takes less than a minute to set up. Parents and visitors to campus are welcome to download ULM Safe. A short YouTube video gives an overview of the app. When the top Emergency button is pressed, UPD is instantly contacted with an emergency notification and the location of the smartphone. The smartphone’s location function must be turned on. If the Emergency button is activated off–campus, the message is routed to 911. With the Anonymous Tip button, a text, photo or video is sent to UPD. Tips can include safety concerns, suspicious activity and other non–emergencies. The user can communicate with UPD, and their identity will not be revealed. The FriendWatch is a peer–to–peer feature which lets friends know if a user is not where they are supposed to be after a set number of minutes. This works well when the user is out at night. “If someone isn’t where they are supposed to be or doesn’t reach their destination, ULM Safe lets trusted friends know so they can contact authorities,” said UPD Lt. Jeremy Kent, who manages ULM Safe.

With ULM Safe a user can request a security escort and access a safety map. The Safety Resources button provides links to informational pages on ulm.edu such as Campus Counseling and a ULM Parking Map. There is also a link to the ULM Student Handbook. “ULM Safe is another way for the campus community to contact us,” said UPD Chief Tom Torregrossa. “The app is the best safety technology available and we want everyone who comes to campus to utilize it.” ULM Safe replaced the existing emergency messaging system, Warhawk Alert. Alarms.org determined, its rankings, based on data submitted to the FBI and reviewed “relative to the surrounding area of campus.” Nationally, Alarms.org ranked 490 colleges and universities which it deemed exceptionally safe based on FBI and police data. ULM ranked No. 257. Alarms.org is the official site of the prestigious National Council for Home Safety and Security, a national trade association of licensed contractors, alarm installers and other U.S. trade groups. Institutions not considered in the Alarms. com survey are those with fewer than 1,000 students, or those which did not submit data to the FBI.


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

CAMPUS NEWS

www.ulm.edu


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY CAROLINE COURVILLE

SOBERING SALUTE PLAYS ON

TALONS FOR TAPS

PROVIDES SERVICE VETERANS DESERVE

CAMPUS NEWS

T

hey are 24 notes. Anyone who has ever heard those achingly beautiful, plaintive – even haunting notes – could be moved to tears by the sound alone.

www.ulm.edu

It’s likely everyone knows this bugle call – and that it is much more than a melancholy bit of melody. These, after all, aren’t just any 24 notes. These are the final salute of a grateful nation.

“An opportunity to give back to the community that serves us.”

The playing of “Taps” by a lone bugler or trumpeter is often the emotional high point at military funerals. Traditionally, the bugler is a member of the military. But the United States is losing veterans at such a fast rate that the demand outpaces the supply of musicians.

– DR. ERIC SIEREVELD

“Signaling ‘Taps’ is a brief, but moving tribute to our fallen and passed service men and women. As strange as this may seem,


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many service members are not given a live bugler for their memorial service or funeral. There simply are not enough military buglers available to provide ‘Taps’ live,” says Dr. Eric Siereveld, Assistant Professor of Trumpet in the ULM School of Visual and Performing Arts. A recording of “Taps” would have to suffice if it weren’t for a dedicated group of University of Louisiana Monroe musicians who stepped forward to recognize the service and honor the sacrifices of U.S. veterans by performing “Taps” at funeral and memorial services.

photo by Emerald McIntyre

“We are honored and humbled to provide live ‘Taps’ for those in our community who’ve served.” – DR. ERIC SIEREVELD

CAMPUS NEWS

Talons for Taps was developed and is led by Siereveld. Now, with regularity, the familiar 24 notes hover in the air across cemeteries in Northeast Louisiana. “Talons for Taps was formed to provide the ULM Trumpet Studio an opportunity to give back to the community that serves us,” Siereveld said. “This is where Talons for Taps comes in. We are honored and humbled to provide live ‘Taps’ for those in our community who’ve served.” Members of the ULM Trumpet Studio who provide this service along with Siereveld are students Kody Jernigan of Longview, Texas; William Joiner of West Monroe; Kris Balint of Longview; Sabrina Mata of Jena; Ian Lee of Columbia; Hawk Walker of Monroe; Solomon Abang of Lagos, Nigeria; Austin Pasche of Pollock; Vincent Capuano of Bossier City; and Ryan Blomquist of Pineville. Talons for Taps performances are free, however honorariums are accepted. The easiest way to get in touch with Talons for Taps is through the website https://www. ulm.edu/music/talons–for–taps.html or by emailing Dr. Siereveld at siereveld@ulm. edu. A Talons for Taps request form is on the website.

www.ulm.edu

Siereveld said Talons for Taps prefers to stay in a 30– to 40–minute travel radius, “However, since we understand the importance of this service, we will consider any and all requests for a Talons for Taps service. We may not always to be able to provide the service, but we attempt to fulfill all of our service members’ families in need.”


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY HOPE YOUNG

SHARING

THE PASSION TEACHER OF THE YEAR HANDS DOWN INSPIRATION OF ULM MENTORS TO OTHERS photo by Emerald McIntyre

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mily Ogden loves to teach – and she loves to learn.

CAMPUS NEWS

The University of Louisiana Monroe alumna and Louisiana High School Teacher of the Year for 2020 is enrolled in the ULM Educational Leadership Graduate Program. She earned her B.S. in Elementary Education from ULM in 2013.

“My passion is investing in other teachers to help them build their content knowledge and expertise while also providing them with the tools needed to hold high expectations for all kids.” – EMILY OGDEN

In her six years as an educator, Ogden taught math the first five years at Start Elementary School to middle– and elementary–age students. She then moved to teach math at Rayville High School for the 2018–19 school year. Ogden gives credit to two ULM professors who inspired her, Kathy Smart and Dr. Shalanda Stanley, an Assistant Professor in the School of Education. Smart gave Ogden the confidence to be a great math teacher by showing her how struggling in math makes a person better at teaching it. “Dr. Stanley ensured future educators knew the importance of creating a love for reading in our students,” Ogden said. “She also gave a piece of advice to my class that has been my mantra since becoming an educator. The advice was, ‘students are only going to rise to the expectation you set for them, so always set the bar high.’”

www.ulm.edu

When ULM’s School of Education presented Ogden with a $500 award in recognition of her achievements, Stanley was there. “The School of Education was proud to offer this award in recognition of Emily's outstanding endeavors, including her service as a mentor for current ULM

teacher candidates,” Stanley said. “We believe in Emily's academic and career goals and wish to support her as she pursues her graduate degree from ULM.” The $500 award was made possible by the Upshaw Family Endowed Professorship for the School of Education as through the ULM Foundation. “It is my honor to be here to present this award to my former student, Emily Ogden,” Stanley said. “I had the honor of teaching Emily in my literacy methods courses, and I recognized her star potential. We in the School of Education are so proud to call her one of ours.” Ogden understands that without student–teacher relationships, there can be no standards to hold each other accountable. She believes her experience teaching math in multiple grades led to her confidence in students’ ability to learn high levels of content if she, herself, is confident and holds high expectations. Ogden is also committed to her colleagues’ success by leading Math Content Leader Training in Richland Parish. “My passion is investing in other teachers to help them build their content knowledge and expertise while also providing them with the tools needed to hold high expectations for all kids. I plan to invest in teachers and students on a broader scale this year in my new role as assistant principal at Start Elementary,” said Ogden. Ogden started the 2019–20 school year in her new position in Start. In giving advice to current and future ULM Education majors, Ogden said, “You have to be a teacher, nurse, mom, dad, friend, and confidant to each and every student that comes through your door and you will go home mentally exhausted each day, but it is worth it to see the growth and development that happens for your students.”


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Dr. Derle Long, Director of the School of Visual and Performing Arts, conducts two students in the Master of Music Education Program. ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

CAMPUS NEWS

photo by Emerald McIntyre

BY HOPE YOUNG

MASTER OF MUSIC EDUCATION ADDED TO VAPA PROGRAMS

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he University of Louisiana Monroe School of Visual and Performing Arts has added a Master of Music Education to its music program. This new graduate degree is the only one of its kind in Louisiana.

“Our platform is the synthesis–analysis– synthesis model of teaching that is used in

The Master of Music Education courses are offered during summer terms. The new program began this summer with seven students. Students graduate after their third summer term. Courses in the first summer term allow high school band directors to work on their degree while having band camps in July. Long believes that a benefit to only offering courses for this degree in the summer is it allows teachers to keep their current jobs while working on a master’s degree.

– DR. DERLE LONG

www.ulm.edu

The face–to–face curriculum offers an emphasis on developing master teachers and leaders for music education where students work with actual ensembles. Faculty and student peers will provide instant feedback on teaching practices and alternative approaches to improve the delivery of instruction and retention of learning.

successful music rehearsals and classrooms throughout the United States,” said VAPA Director Dr. Derle Long.

“Our platform is the synthesis–analysis– synthesis model of teaching that is used in successful music rehearsals and classrooms throughout the United States.”


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY HOPE YOUNG

ULM WATER SKI

TEAM GETS BEST BOAT ON THE BAYOU photo by Emerald McIntyre

nation and allows us to be in a position, year after year, to compete for and win national championships,” Woodgate said. As a ULM club sport, the ski team is under the supervision of the Office of Student Affairs Vice President Camile Currier.

CAMPUS NEWS

“We are so proud of our national champion ski team. Not only have they excelled on the water, but they have excelled in the classroom and beyond,” Currier said. “To be able to purchase this first–edition, top–of–the–line boat with the assistance of MasterCraft Boats and B & L Marine is a testament to how truly gifted these world–class student–athletes are.”

The University of Louisiana Monroe Water Ski Team has a new 2020 MasterCraft ProStar Ski Boat. Recently a ceremony was held at ULM where the new boat was presented and team members were given their rings for winning the national title for the 29th time in 2018.

www.ulm.edu

“We are so proud of our national champion ski team. Not only have they excelled on the water, but they have excelled in the classroom and beyond.” – CAMILE CURRIER

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he University of Louisiana Monroe Water Ski Team is the best in the nation with 29 National Collegiate Water Ski Association National Championship titles. ULM recently gained an essential piece of equipment to help them ski faster and jump higher – a brand new 2020 MasterCraft ProStar with an Ilmor 6.0L engine. It is the first of its kind in Louisiana. At a ceremony on Sept. 10, 2019, the new boat was presented and team members were given rings for their spectacular skiing in 2018, which garnered the Warhawks’ 29th title. Michael Woodgate, ULM Water Ski head coach, is excited by this enormous gain for the advancement of the team. “Thank you to Camile Currier and President Dr. Nick Bruno for their continued support of the water ski team that enables us to train at the best collegiate facility in the

Currier thanked B & L Marine General Manager Nick McDonald, a ULM alumnus and former wake board team captain; Aarne Clowe with MasterCraft Boat Company, another ULM alumnus and former member of the ski team; Allen Otts with the ULM Foundation; Woodgate and Cheri Perkins and her staff in purchasing, who worked collaboratively to make the boat purchase possible. Through their efforts, the ULM Water Ski Team received the “first” 2020 Mastercraft ProStar Ski Boat to come off the assembly line. The 2019 ski team members include: Dominque Allard–Gronin, Veli–Matti Anttila, Emma Brunel, Amanda Bryans, Luiza Charnyshova, Danylo Filchenko, Viktar Gorbaczuk, Alex King, Sofiia Maksymenkova, Lily Meade, Lea Miermont, Katie Nutt, Sanchia Outram, Stefan Petrenko, Tom Poole, Lieke Rolvers, Brandon Schipper, Garrett Stallings, Katerina Svecova, Sara Vesterlund and Michael Woodgate. Forty years ago the first National Intercollegiate Water Ski Championships were held at ULM on Bayou DeSiard, Oct. 13–14, 1979 (http://www.ncwsa.com/ tbt–fun–and–good–skiing–at–the–first– national–intercollegiate–championships/). The ULM Water Ski Team was founded in 1977, but at the first nationals San Diego State edged the host team by 10 points.


photos by Emerald McIntyre

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

GEORGE H. SCHAEFFER, SR.

TYLER FLEMISTER

BY ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

ALUMNI HONORS GOLDEN Arrow Award – GEORGE H. SCHAEFFER, SR. The Golden Arrow Award is given to a person that has distinguished themselves through personal and/or professional achievement. They must have served the University of Louisiana Monroe and the Alumni Association above and beyond the call of duty over a period of years and they must be active with their alumni membership. This year’s Golden Arrow Award goes to a gentleman that exemplifies these qualities and more. George H. Schaeffer, Sr., is a graduate of West Monroe High School and attended ULM and the University of Louisiana Lafayette. He is a graduate of the Consumer Lending School, Norman, OK, and the Louisiana Bankers’ School for Supervisory Training in Baton Rouge. Mr. Schaeffer was actively employed in our community for 37 years. His first 30 years were at Central Bank where he rose from the ranks of a bookkeeper to vice president in charge of sales, business development and public relations. After Central Bank, he joined Progressive Bank where he was head of retail banking and oversaw the construction of Monroe, West Monroe, Bossier City and Shreveport locations.

“I have a deep love for the community and the University of Louisiana Monroe. This university has been the catalyst for many of my business relationships that have developed throughout the years. Now, with the addition of the medical school to its campus, we will see our region prosper as never before. I believe our university is the economic engine that supports everything that happens in our parish,” he said. He enjoys traveling, sports, and watching his grandson Kyle shoot sporting clays on a national level. Mr. Schaeffer is married to Stephanie LeLeux Schaeffer from Crowville. They have two sons, George H. Schaeffer, Jr., married to Mary, and Thad K. Schaeffer married to Becky. They have five grandchildren, and soon a fourth great– grandchild. All of his work in the community would not have been possible without the partnership he and his wife have had. RISING Young Alumni Award – TYLER FLEMISTER

The Rising Young Alumni Award is given to an alumnus who is active in their alumni membership, involved in other community organizations and exhibits philanthropy. The recipient must be a general supporter of their community and actively seeks to positively impact University of Louisiana Monroe

programs and influence others on behalf of ULM. This year’s recipient embodies all these criteria and more. Tyler received a Bachelor of Business Administration from ULM in the spring of 2008. While attending ULM, he served in numerous student organizations including the Campus Activities Board and Student Government Association. Along with being an active student leader during his undergraduate career, Tyler was a student–athlete as a member of the ULM Baseball team from 2004–07. After graduating, Tyler became committed to progressing ULM by serving as on the board of directors for the Warhawk Club (ULM Athletic Foundation) and being an active member of the ULM Alumni Association, L–Club and Ouachita Parish Alumni Chapter. Tyler has been instrumental in the success of several key events at ULM by serving on the following committees, Wine Over Water (12 years), The Pursuit and Night of Champions. Along with his service to ULM organizations and committees, Tyler is an avid ULM Athletics supporter and can be found cheering on the Warhawks during football, basketball and baseball seasons. Tyler is married to Becky Flemister, who is also a graduate of ULM (B.S. in Communicative Disorders, 2008). They have two adorable daughters, Madelyn and Molly, and they reside in Monroe. They are very active in their church, North Monroe Baptist, and in the community. Tyler works for Marsala Beverage as the vice president of marketing.

www.ulm.edu

He is currently on the Facilities Corporation Board at ULM, past–president of Bayou DeSiard County Club and the ULM Athletic Foundation. While serving on the ULM Foundation Board, he was honored with the ULM Ambassador Award. He oversaw construction of the Laird Weems Center.

Mr. Schaeffer is an Eagle Scout and an Order of the Arrow recipient. He has served on numerous boards, countless organizations and received many awards during his career. He is a member of Trinity Lutheran Church where he serves as an Elder.

ALUMNI AWARD WINNERS

SCHAEFFER; FLEMISTER


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

BY HOPE YOUNG

OUTSTANDING

FACULTY AND STAFF RECOGNIZED WITH

AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE

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FOUNDATION AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

ach year the ULM Foundation presents the Awards for Excellence to faculty and staff who have shown outstanding service to the University of Louisiana Monroe and the community. The five awards were presented following ULM President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.’s State of the University address on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, in Brown Auditorium. Career biographies of each recipient were read by Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Alberto Ruiz. The awards were presented by Bruno, ULM Foundation Board of Trustees President Jerry Allen and Executive Director of ULM Advancement, Foundation and Alumni Relations Susan Chappell. Awards were presented to three faculty and two staff members. The recipients include the following : Award for Excellence in Teaching – Dr. Michelle Zagar, Clinical Associate Professor of Pharmacy in the School of Clinical Sciences for the College of Pharmacy Dr. Michelle Zagar joined the College of Pharmacy in 2004 after eight years in kindergarten and elementary education. She earned her B.S. in Elementar y Education in 1990 and Master of Elementary Education in 1995 from the University of Southwestern Louisiana. In 2003 she completed her Pharm.D. at ULM.

www.ulm.edu

Zagar has served on 25 committees and subcommittees including nine years on the College of Pharmacy Curriculum Committee. She has received nine teaching awards and honors, coordinates and instructs eight courses, published four

peer–reviewed manuscripts that have been cited 39 times and has given more than 30 continuing education presentations. She strives to maximize the interactions of her clinical practice students with their learning material, and pharmacy practice, as a mentor and motivator, giving them autonomy and promoting confidence. Award for Excellence in Research – Dr. Jana Giles, Associate Professor and Endowed Professor in English Literature in the School of Humanities for the College of Arts, Education, and Sciences Dr. Jana Giles joined the university in 2009 and earned tenure in 2015. She has published 231 pages of research, presented 24 conference papers or invited lectures, received many grants of external and internal funding, supervised 64 students in research activity and taught 77 courses. Her current book project is titled, “The Post/Colonial Sublime : Aesthetics, Politics and Ethics in the Twentieth Century.” Giles was one of only eight people in Louisiana to receive the prestigious Board of Regents Awards to Louisiana Artists and Scholars (ATLAS) grant in 2018. She earned a B.A. in Liberal Arts from St. John’s College in 1988, a Master of Arts in English from the University of New Mexico, and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Cambridge. Award for Excellence in Service – Dr. Rhonda Hensley, Professor of Nursing and Associate Director of Graduate Nursing Programs for the Kitty Degree School of Nursing in the College of Health Sciences

Dr. Rhonda Hensley’s 45–year career began with a B.S. in Nursing from ULM in 1973. She went on to earn an M.S. in Nursing , a Doctor of Education and a Doctor of Nursing Practice. In addition to her professorship at Kitty DeGree School of Nursing, Hensley is editor–in–chief for the Online Journal of Inter–Professional Health Promotion, collaborates with Ochsner–LSUHSC Monroe to present Stanford Youth Diabetes Coach Training to Richwood High School students, coordinates grant activities for the Mobile Bridge to Health and has led five medical mission trips to underserved communities outside and inside the U.S. Hensley is president of BDR Advanced Education Associates in Continuing Education Services and is a family nurse practitioner part–time at Winnsboro Medical Clinic. In 2018, she received the state award for Nurse Practitioner Advocate of the Year. Award for Service by Unclassified Staff – Jessica Griggs, Student Advocate and Retention Coordinator for ULM Online With her professionalism, care and dedication, Jessica Griggs has many responsibilities with ULM Online. As Student Advocate and Retention Coordinator, she assists online students with academic advising and career planning , educates potential students on specifics of ULM Online, promotes student success in online courses by providing necessary tools for at–risk students and managing and maintaining social media for ULM Online. Griggs was the first person on either side of her family to graduate high


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Award for Ser vice by Classified Staff – Sharon Doaty, Administrative

Coordinator, Marriage and Family Therapy & Counseling Program Recognized Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, for 20 years of service to ULM, Sharon Doaty started as an administrative coordinator in the College of Education and Human Development/Curriculum and Instruction before joining the Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling programs in the School of Allied Health in the College of Health Sciences. Doaty is responsible for communicating effectively with multiple departments to plan meetings and prepare

welcome packages, coordinating dozens of recruiting events, managing the office when the supervisor is absent, and much more. Her dedication resulted in excellent marks on performance reviews and her ability to learn and master new concepts for administrative use. Her colleagues and supervisors have also given her praise for the wonderful work she has done saying that she an asset to the Marriage and Family Therapy and Counseling programs and especially to ULM.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

school and earn bachelor’s and master’s degrees. Her college experience had many challenges, but she overcame these with grace and determination. She is an example of perseverance to her students. When she isn’t on campus, Griggs devotes hours to coaching/sponsoring a flag cheerleading squad, judging social studies fairs, organizing events and promotions for her church and organizing multiple charitable events.

photo by Emerald McIntyre

FOUNDATION AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE www.ulm.edu

The 2019 ULM Foundation Awards for Excellence were announced Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, following President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.’s State of the University address. Bruno, left, and ULM Foundation Board of Trustees President Jerry Allen, right, presented the awards to, beginning second from left, Dr. Jana Giles, Jessica Griggs, Dr. Rhonda Hensley, Sharon Doaty and Dr. Michelle Zagar.


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ULM Director of Athletics Scott McDonald speaks at a press conference announcing his appointment. McDonald is an alumnus and played baseball at ULM.

ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

CAMPUS NEWS

NEW AD BY PAUL LETLOW

NO STRANGER TO ULM MCDONALD PLAYED ON SOUTHLAND CONFERENCE WINNING BASEBALL TEAM

T

www.ulm.edu

he new Director of Athletics for the University of Louisiana Monroe might look familiar.

Scott McDonald took the helm of ULM athletics, dropping the interim designation, in June.

Perhaps that’s because he has been serving in the position as interim AD, in addition to Chief Administrative Officer.

“Scott has been serving as Interim Director of Athletics and we are very happy he has chosen to remain and take the full–time, permanent position,” said ULM President Nick J. Bruno, Ph.D.. “Scott has a wealth of business experience and is connected in the community. Also, he is a former ULM baseball player, so he

Perhaps that’s because he was a member of the baseball team that won the 1983 Southland Conference Tournament Championship.


has multiple perspectives. “Most of all, Scott has a love for ULM and that love will lead to better success of the ULM athletic program,” Bruno said.

“It means a great deal to me to be named ULM’s Director of Athletics,” McDonald said. “I’m a former student–athlete here. This is my alma mater and my community. I’ve spent 48 years of my life in Northeast Louisiana, so I’m fully invested in this institution as well as this community. I also spent 10 years working professionally in the Midwest and chose to return to this area, so I have a special affinity for this community.

As Director of Athletics, McDonald will supervise ULM’s 17 intercollegiate teams that compete in NCAA Division I and the Sun Belt Conference and manage a $14.5 million operating budget. “We’re all fully committed to enhancing the student–athlete experience at ULM, and we’ll continue to achieve great things in the classroom and in the community while pursuing championships on the field and in the arena,” McDonald said.

photos by Emerald McIntyre

– SCOTT MCDONALD Scott McDonald, center, with his wife, Leazel, and their son Tucker.

www.ulm.edu

“I’m a former student–athlete here. This is my alma mater and my community. I’ve spent 48 years of my life in Northeast Louisiana, so I’m fully invested in this institution as well as this community.”

McDonald is a 1983 graduate of ULM with a Bachelor of Business Administration Marketing. He completed post–graduate studies at both ULM and the University of Indianapolis. McDonald is a 2010 graduate of the LSU School of Banking. Most of his career has been

M c D o n a l d ’s c o m m u n i t y a n d professional activities include past president of the Monroe Chamber of Commerce and past member of the Red Cross of Northeast Louisiana Board of Directors. McDonald has served on the OIB Financial Services Board of Directors and Bankers Mortgage Board of Directors. He is a past member of the school boards of St. Frederick High School and Quest School. He also served on the Parent Advisory Council for Spring Hill College in Mobile, Ala.

CAMPUS NEWS

“What gives me confidence moving forward is the administrative staff and coaches here at ULM. I’ve had the pleasure to work with these individuals for the past nine months, and we’ve collectively accomplished a lot in a short period of time. I’m excited because our best days lie ahead,” McDonald said. “I appreciate the confidence the search committee and President Bruno have expressed in me by offering me this opportunity.”

An active alumnus, McDonald served as chairman of the ULM Facilities Corporation. He serves on the boards of trustees for the ULM Athletic Foundation and ULM Foundation. He previously spent 14 seasons on the ULM football radio broadcast team, including five years as color analyst. McDonald is past president of the L Club and recipient of the Slim Scogin Award from the Athletic Foundation.

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

McDonald was a four–year letterman as an outfielder for Lou St. Amant, from 1980–83. During his senior season, ULM won the 1983 Southland Conference Tournament Championship and became the first team in program history to advance to an NCAA Regional (Austin, Texas).

in banking. From 2006 to June 2018, McDonald was Executive Vice President and Chief Retail Officer with Ouachita Independent Bank, now Bancorp South. McDonald has worked with Student Loan Finance Corp., AmSouth Bank and USA Group (Sallie Mae).


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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

ALUMNI CL A S S NOTE S ALUMNI CLASS NOTES 1965 Paul Breaux (BS ’65) has practiced law at Lafayette for 30–plus years and his son, James Breaux, recently joined his law practice.

1970

Thomas Gibbs (BA ’70) has written a novel One Picture, Two Journeys that was released this past April. Visit his website, www.tackyrooster.com, for more information on the book or purchase it on Amazon.

1973

www.ulm.edu

Freddie Philley (BA ’73, MA ‘80) and Christine McGuffee Philley (BS ’72, M.Ed. ‘73) have retired and are living in Montgomery, AL. They moved to Alabama in 2016 to be closer to their children and grandchildren. Freddie, a former NLU Track and Cross Country athlete, is a Certified National Track Official and a Volunteer Track Coach at LAMP Magnet High School.

1980 Lance Haase MT(ASCP)SH (BS ’80) has retired after nearly 40 years working as a Clinical Hematology Specialist in a variety of settings around the southern U.S. He and his wife Karen recently returned from their second trip to Italy where they experienced the magnificent history and culture of Milan, Verona, Venice, Florence, Rome, Vatican City, Pompeii, and the Amalfi Coast.

1984

Ivonne Blanco (MSC ’84) Since 2016, she has been the Principal of one of the most prestigious schools in Venezuela: Institutos Educacionales Asociados.

1985

Lisa Miller (BA ’85) has been named Counselor and Development Director at St. Fredrick’s High School.

1992

Charleen Kennedy (MA ’92) was named a

Silver Medalist during Professional Photographers of America’s 2019 International Photographic Competition (IPC). She is among a select few Silver Medalist photographers. Tami Rolen–Tharp (BBA Insurance & Real Estate ‘92) In April 2018, she began working for Gallagher Benefit Services as the Area Vice President for both the Shreveport and Monroe offices.

1997

Alicia L. Mitchell (BA ’97, MAT ’06) received the Special Education Teacher of the Year Award – Monroe City Schools from the Pilot Club of the Twin Cities on July 16, 2019. Jenny Pankey (BS ’97) and her husband BJ welcomed their first grandchild Baylor Wayne Pankey, August 2018.

2002

Javvi Lewis (BA ’02) promoted to Computer Service Manager at the Federal Bureau of Prisons.


photo from 1958 provided by Special Collections & Archives

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ULMMAGAZINE FALL 2019

ALUMNI CLASS NOTES

2004 Karen Haase (BS ’04) recently earned her Master’s Degree in Healthcare Management from Western Governors University. She is currently employed as lab IT Coordinator at Christus Good Shepherd Medical Center in Longview, Texas. La’Tasha Marie Atkins (BA ’04) obtained her Doctorate of Social Work from Tulane University in May 2018. She can proudly say that ULM’s School of Social Work helped provide her with the foundation that started her journey. She works at the Orleans Parish District Attorney’s Office, assisting victims and witnesses of major crimes.

2007

Andrew Olinde ( MBA ’08) started a new job as a benefits consultant with Gallagher Benefit Services in the Louisiana region.

2012

Dr. David Fowler (BBA ’12) is the newly appointed Business Administration Department Chair at Newberry College in South Carolina. After 25 years in corporate America, he transitioned to higher education in 2018 following a BBA at ULM, and an MBA at Mississippi State University, and a Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Tyler. He is developing Newberry’s first master’s degree to be offered online in the next two years, focusing on organizational development and leadership.

2013

Emily Ogden (BS ’13) was named LA’s High School Teacher of the Year for 2020. She is currently enrolled in the ULM Educational Leadership Graduate Program.

2014 Max Chou (BS ‘14) and Stephanie Chou (MA ‘14) welcomed their daughter, Sienna Kristin Chou, in January 2019. Stephanie was promoted to Senior Editorial Project Manager at Elite Editing in 2019, and Max continues to work as a Certified Marine Chemist for Marine Chemist Service of Hampton Roads, Virginia (certified July 2017).

2016

Abbey Barton (BA ‘16) graduated from Mississippi College School of Law with a Doctor of Jurisprudence and a certificate in Civil Law Studies in May 2019. She has accepted a position with Perrier & Lacoste in New Orleans, LA and is awaiting results for the July 2019 Louisiana Bar Exam.

2017

Jeremy Harrell (ABC ’17) has joined Guarantee Bank & Trust as Senior Vice President of Commercial Banking and Senior Lender for the bank’s Monroe market.

www.ulm.edu

Jessica Helmer Brady (PharmD ’07) was promoted to the rank of Clinical Professor, School of Clinical Sciences in the ULM College of Pharmacy. Jessica was also recently recognized for 10 years of service at ULM. She resides in West Monroe with her husband Jacob, and daughters Nora, Helen and Ruby.

2008


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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS

RETIREMENTS

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:

JANUARY 2019 Henry Cole Jerry Burson Linda Gales

PRESIDENT: Sara Benecke Brice (BA ‘90) VICE PRESIDENT–ADMINISTRATION: Julia Harlan O'Brien (BA ‘80)

FEBRUARY 2019 Eric Pani

VICE PRESIDENT–OPERATIONS: Joseph Beard (BS ‘09)

MAY 2019 Claudia Kilcrease Judith Hughes Kathy Davenport Martha Oliver Mary Schmeer Robin Stephens

VICE PRESIDENT–FINANCE: Ash Aulds (BS ‘14, MBA ‘15)

BOARD OF DIRECTORS; RETIREMENTS; IN MEMORIAM

SECRETARY–PARLIAMENTARIAN: Keith Beard (BA ‘84) IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT: Brenda Dudley (BBA ‘84, MBA ‘86) BOARD MEMBERS: Jennifer Goodwin Ables (BA ’97, MS ’99) Matt Bridges (BS ’05) DeJaneiro Davis (BBA ’99, MAT ’13, M.Ed. ’18) Lance Futch (BBA ’95) Renee Hebert (BA ’98, M.Ed. ’00) Dr. Jeff Hood (BA ’91, MA ’94) Kay LaFrance–Knight (BA ’68) Justin Mailhes (BBA ’13) Mary Linda McCann (BBA ’91, MBA ’98) Wally Mulhearn (BS ’85) J. Eric Newton (MA ’11) Doug Nielsen (BA ’08) Thad Schaeffer (Alumni by Choice) Paul Wilkening (BA ’83, MA ’85)

Complete bios are available at HTTPS://ALUMNI.ULM.EDU/PAGE/BOARD

JUNE 2019 Alonzo Smith Eun Jung Smith Lisa Miller Roslynn Pogue JULY 2019 Kristin Neiman Peggy Moore

IN MEMORIAM

www.ulm.edu

Charlotte Adams Yvonne Anderson Jerry Anderson James Ashley Roy Aston Terry Aucoin Cline Averett Isabel Baff Robert Ballenger Gregory Baxter James Beaver Gladys Beavers James Becken Cynthia Bettinger Charles Bigelow Melba Binns Malcolm Bishop Jeff Blackshear Catherine Blaney James Boies Maple Book Kenneth Bowden Larry Bradley Larry Brown Russell Bryan Kathlena Bryan Kenney Bufkin Bob Burnley Chet Busby Ladonna Callender Harvey Campbell Evelyn Carter Barbara Carter Howard Cater Elizabeth Chance Adrel Chapman Leslie Clark Thelma Clement Charlie Cobb Charles Cochran Odette Cook Vernon Cottrell Richard Crockett Robert Crouch Dorothy Cruse Evelyn Cruse–Blanchard Joe Cummins Richard Curtin Paul Danna Sammy Danna Eunice Davis Jane Dean Lorin DeLancey Victor Denicola Michael Dispenza Jack Dollins Frances Downhour Gloria Dumas Reba Duncan Donnie Easterling Joyce Estes Rick Farrar Jettie Feazel Thomas Ferrell Linda Fisher Debra Fitzgerald Charles Floyd Joey Fox Samuel Free Mary Goode Jan Green Edward Greenlee Robert Greer

Marsha Griffin Janice Hanchey Edwin Handel John Hannon Sara Haring Lera Harris Robert Harrison Dean Hart Nolan Hastings Arthur Hayden Mary Hayes John Heath A. Hegan Dorothy Hendon Dennis Hennen Rick Herrington Nellwyn Hindmon Gary Hinton Larry Hires Patsy Holliman Robert Holt Frances Hood Theresa Horton Anna Humphrey Bobby Jenny Joy Johnson Roberteen Johnson Dan Kifer Janet King James Kokinos Harry Kokinos Patricia Kuby Betty Lancaster Philip Landry Kenneth Lane Cleta Lanningham John LaPrarie Bette Lebrun Robert Lee Mary Liles Milton Linder James Lohman Rosemary Luffey Annette Mason Denver McCarty Robert McGowen Patton McHenry Kenneth McIntyre Walter Meredith Mona Meredith Leonard Miller Anna Miller Gene Minchew Katie Monroe Addie Morehouse Wojciech Myrda Joe Newton John O'Connor Wallace Olinde Guy Pardue George Patton Joyce Payne Stephanie Payne Cynthia Perdue Emery Perkins Herbert Peterson Allan Placke Richard Porter William Powell Betty Powell John Ready Frank Relan Scott Renner

Marion Riley Thomas Ritter Sally Roach Nannette Roberts John Robinson Bennie Robinson Dennis Rogers Dorothy Romero Sheryl Rountree Robert Russell Larry Rutledge Larry Saulters Paul Schauf Rebecca Schroeder Harold Scott Jane Seeber Lorraine Slacks Sharon Slaughter Greg Slocum James Smith Charles Smith Judy Smith Sara Spencer William Standard Michael Stone Flora Strittman Brantly Surles June Swayze Sue Taylor Linda Thomas William Tisdale Francis Toups Gary Tullis Donna Volentine Hollis Wactor Joe Walcher Willis Watson George Watson Laurie Watson Agnes Welch Rose West Bonneal Whipp Kadie Whitard Cynthia White Willie White Meredith Williams Adell Williams Susan Williams Carlyle Williams Deborah Willis Vicki Wilson Angela Wilson Donald Wyble


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Profile for University of Louisiana Monroe

ULM Magazine FALL 2019 • VOLUME 19, NO. 1  

The ULM Magazine is published for members of the ULM Alumni Association and friends of the University of Louisiana Monroe and friends of the...

ULM Magazine FALL 2019 • VOLUME 19, NO. 1  

The ULM Magazine is published for members of the ULM Alumni Association and friends of the University of Louisiana Monroe and friends of the...