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The UK’s European university

PART-TIME STUDY AT KENT Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge

2011

Part-time study


www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

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CONTENTS

Studying part-time at Kent you can be sure that whether you attend a day school or work towards a degree, whether you are learning for pleasure or studying to gain a qualification, you will find quality teaching, a friendly atmosphere and lots of support.

Part-time study at Kent 2 Where are you now?

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Choosing how to study

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Entry requirements

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Locations

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Student support and facilities

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Fees and funding

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What to do next

15

FAQs

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Glossary

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Programmes

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Classical & Archaeological Studies Criminal Justice Studies

20 26

English and Comparative Literature – Joint Honours English and Comparative Literature with Creative Writing French History History & Philosophy of Art Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Law Social Sciences Substance Misuse Management

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32 36 40 46 50 56 60 62

Additional programmes

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Visit the University

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PART-TIME STUDY AT KENT

Every year, the University of Kent attracts thousands of part-time students, usually local people who work or live in the region. We have students of all ages and backgrounds, each with their own reasons for wanting to study on a part-time programme. We offer a variety of courses ranging from day schools to postgraduate programmes; some can be studied in order to gain academic credits and others purely for leisure.

Why do you want to study? There are lots of ways you can study at Kent, and what you choose will depend on why you want to study. We have given three of the most popular reasons below along with some of our suggestions about what you might like to consider.

Purely for pleasure and interest • Attend one of the regular open lectures, college events or exhibitions • Day Schools are a great opportunity to indulge your interest in a subject in the company of a specialist lecturer and other enthusiasts

For personal development – enjoy learning while gaining credits • Certificates, diplomas and degrees are available in a wide range of subjects at Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge • There are over 100 part-time postgraduate programmes ranging from Anthropology to War, Media and Modernity

Please note: This publication provides programme information from only a selection of our creditbearing undergraduate certificates, diplomas and degrees that are specially designed for part-time study and taught at our main centres in Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge. For details on other degrees that may be studied on a part-time basis please see p67.

For career development • The Kent Business School offers business and management programmes including the prestigious Kent MBA • There is an extensive range of degrees and short courses available in the health and social care fields including Clinical Practice, Mental Health, Learning Disability, Community Care, and Substance Misuse.

“I’d really like to inspire those who aren’t students yet – I’d say do it, do it, do it. I’ve never regretted it for one moment – the involvement and knowledge you get is worth every effort. I don’t think I’ll stop learning after this BA degree. Once you love studying, you can’t stop!” Gillian Flegg BA (Hons) Social Sciences, Medway campus


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WHERE ARE YOU NOW?

The table below will help you understand the value of any qualifications you already have. In general, you will need Level 3 qualifications to apply for university-level credit-bearing study; however, our Day Schools programmes do not require any prior academic qualifications.

Level 8

Level 7

In addition, for students who are returning to learning, we may be able to consider previous experience including work-related skills, alternative qualifications and other information instead of traditional entrance requirements.

Please note: if you have studied at university level before you may be required to pay Equivalent or Lower Level Qualification (ELQ) fees. For more information on ELQ fees please see p14.

Advice is available to guide you about the level of skill needed for all our courses. Please call 01227 827272.

Qualifications are: Doctorate (PhD) To apply for a Level 8 qualification, you need: Level 6-7 qualification Qualifications are: MA ie, Master’s Degree in Arts MSc ie, Master’s Degree in Science or equivalent To apply for a Level 7 qualification, you need: Level 5-6 qualification

Level 6

Qualifications are: BA (Hons) ie, Bachelor of Arts Degree BSc (Hons) ie, Bachelor of Science Degree To apply for a Level 6 qualification, you need: Level 3-5 qualification

Level 5

Qualifications are: NVQ 5, Diploma of Higher Education (= second year at university), Foundation Degree, Higher National Diploma To apply for a Level 5 qualification, you need: Level 3-4 qualification

Level 4

Qualifications are: NVQ 4, Certificate of Higher Education (= first year at university) To apply for a Level 4 qualification, you need: Level 3 qualification Qualifications are: NVQ 3, A levels, International Baccalaureate, BTEC National Certificate/Diploma, Advanced Diploma, Advanced Apprenticeship, Access to HE course (adults)

Level 3

To apply for a Level 3 qualification, you usually need: 4-5 GCSEs at grade A*-C It is possible to apply with Level 2 qualifications such as: GNVQ Intermediate (Merit) or BTEC First Diploma (Merit). Not sure of your qualifications or experience?

Level ?

If you are unsure where you fit into the levels shown above then please contact the Information and Guidance Unit for assistance on 01227 827272.


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CHOOSING HOW TO STUDY

There are many different options available if you wish to study part-time, from courses purely for pleasure and interest to a complete undergraduate or postgraduate degree.

Open Lectures and college events The University has a wellestablished series of Open Lectures that has been running for over 40 years. They are hugely popular, cover a wide range of topics and are delivered by respected academics, politicians and other professionals. Lectures are free, open to all and no booking is required. The colleges run an exciting programme of events including: • Art exhibitions • Grass roots lectures • Musical recitals • Poetry readings.

Further information Request the Open Lectures and College Events booklet or visit www.kent.ac.uk/openlectures

Day Schools Day Schools are held on various days, including Saturdays, and allow you to spend time exploring a subject purely for the pleasure of learning, in the company of other people who share your interests and are similarly motivated. Subjects covered include:

• • • • • • • •

Architecture Creative Writing Ecology History – ancient and modern History of Art Law Literature Music.

Further information

Subjects vary but may include: • Archaeology • Classics • Creative Writing • Ecology • History • History & Philosophy of Art • Literature • Modern Languages • Philosophy • Science.

Request the Regional Day Schools programme or visit www.kent.ac.uk/dayschools

Further information

Short courses

Visit www.kent.ac.uk/locations/ tonbridge

If you want to extend your knowledge of a particular subject, or are simply curious to know more, a short course is a good choice for you. Short courses are of variable lengths and allow you to spend time over a few days or weeks exploring a subject. They are also an ideal starting point before making the decision to study for a creditbearing certificate or degree. The courses are available at our Tonbridge centre during the day and evening.

DID YOU KNOW? There is sometimes the option to join full-time students in the daytime timetable which may work well if you have a young family.


www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

Tizard Centre The Tizard Centre offers a range of programmes in Intellectual Disability, Autism and Community Care for individuals who would like to develop their professional practice and want to learn while working. You can study a range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes through work-based learning and workshops, short courses and distance learning. The Centre has excellent links with Social Services departments and Health Authorities, particularly with service users, families and service providers in the south east of England. Courses on offer include the opportunity to study areas such as: • Analysis and Intervention in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Applied Behaviour Analysis • Applied Psychology • Autism • Clinical Psychology of Learning Disability • Community Care • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Learning Disability • Mental Health • Person-Centred Support • Positive Behaviour Support.

Further information Request the Undergraduate or Postgraduate Prospectus or visit www.kent.ac.uk/tizard

Undergraduate – certificates, diplomas and degrees There is a huge range of traditional degree programmes which lead to BA or BSc or other specialised Bachelor’s honours degree (Hons) awards. Some courses in Kent’s Undergraduate Prospectus can be studied part-time and some subjects, such as History and Social Sciences have developed a distinct programme of study for part-time students. In addition, our partner colleges offer Foundation Degrees, HNCs and HNDs on a part-time basis in subjects including business, construction and engineering. You can study in stages – at certificate, diploma and degree level. The first two levels can be taken either as stand-alone programmes or as stepping stones to a degree. Here, we explain how the three programmes are linked and how to progress through the levels.

Gaining credits The programmes in this brochure are built up from smaller individual courses called modules. These modules are worth academic credits – usually 15 or 30, but sometimes more. Part-time students normally take 60 credits a year, although some subjects offer more flexible timetables. Each programme level is made up of 120 credits.

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Stage 1: certificate level Stage 1 is equivalent to the first year of a full-time degree. If you are studying part-time, this stage usually takes two years and involves studying certificate level modules totalling 120 credits. On successful completion, you are awarded a certificate. Stage 2: diploma level Stage 2 is equivalent to the second year of a full-time degree. If you are studying part-time, this stage usually takes two years to complete and involves studying for a further 120 credits, taking intermediate level modules. On successful completion, you have a total of 240 credits and are awarded a diploma. Stage 3: degree level Stage 3 is equivalent to the third year of a full-time degree. If you are studying part-time, this stage usually takes two years to complete and involves studying for a further 120 credits, taking higher level modules. After successfully completing this stage, you have a total of 360 credits and are awarded your degree.

Gaining your award In order to gain any of the three levels of award, you must successfully pass all the assessments and attend a certain number of teaching hours. Methods of assessment vary, but generally use a combination of exams and coursework, while some include project work. A number of modules, especially those at certificate level, use continuous assessment with no CONTINUED OVERLEAF


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CHOOSING HOW TO STUDY (CONT)

examination. You are given further details about assessment at the start of your programme.

Further information Request the Undergraduate Prospectus or visit www.kent.ac.uk/ug

Postgraduate If you already have a first degree or equivalent then postgraduate study offers the opportunity to further your studies in that area, or perhaps change direction for either personal or career development. Kent delivers both taught and research postgraduate qualifications from MA/MSc to PhD level as well as being a highly regarded provider of executive education, including the MBA. There are over 200 areas of study based at Canterbury, Medway and Brussels which give you the opportunity to find a part-time programme to suit both your current lifestyle and future ambitions.

“I’ve always liked history, but I left school after my O levels and I didn’t think I could do it. But the tutors help you with essay writing and you soon learn to be organised. “The best bit for me is when you’ve finished an essay and you think to yourself, ‘I wrote that!’ ” Lynne Sowa Certificate in Local History, Tonbridge Centre

Humanities

Social Sciences

• American Studies • Architecture • Classical & Archaeological Studies • Comparative Literature • Drama • English • European Languages: French, German, Italian, Hispanic Studies • Film Studies • Fine Art • History • History & Philosophy of Art • Medieval and Early Modern Studies • Philosophy • Theology and Religious Studies

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sciences • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Actuarial Science Biosciences Chemistry Computing and IT Digital Arts Electronics Forensic Science Applied Mathematics Pure Mathematics Medical and Health Sciences Pharmacy Physics Statistics

• • • • •

Anthropology Biodiversity Management Criminology Economics Environmental Social Science Journalism Law Management Migration Music Technology Operational Research Philosophy Politics and International Relations Psychology Social and Community Care Social and Public Policy Sociology Sports Studies

Further information Request the Graduate Prospectus or visit www.kent.ac.uk/pg

Other academic credits If you have been studying elsewhere, you may apply to transfer your credits to a relevant programme at Kent. This credit needs to be recent (within the last six years), relevant and at the right level. The transfer is agreed during the admissions process with your programme director. Likewise, other universities may accept credits gained on the courses listed in this brochure – you should enquire directly with the relevant university’s information office.


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STUDENT PROFILE

Drummond Watson Diploma in History & Philosophy of Art, Tonbridge Centre Why did you choose to study part-time at Kent? I had started a part-time History of Art course at the University of Sussex but the classes for the second year were at unsuitable times in the evening. Kent offered a part-time course during the day that suited me better.

How is the course going? I am retired, but spent my professional life in Finance and although this course is in a totally different area, I have found that there are cross-discipline skills, such as report and essay-writing. I am pleased with my progress. History & Philosophy of Art is a broad subject and the topics studied on a modular basis have been sufficiently varied to reflect that breadth and maintain student interest. I was particularly surprised that I so enjoyed studying Byzantine Art. The course has opened up a completely new world, a world in which I had a passing interest, but no real knowledge. I feel that I am now starting to look at art in a new and more informed light.

What do you think of your lecturers and fellow students?

What about the facilities at Kent for part-time students?

In my three years at Tonbridge, I have experienced three different lecturers, each knowledgeable in their own fields and each with different styles of lecturing, but all three have been very supportive and approachable. My fellow parttime students are friendly and although the part-time factor can limit the level of contact, the group visits to galleries and museums each term help to cement the friendships.

I regularly use the library at Tonbridge, where staff are extremely helpful, and occasionally the coffee shop – very friendly staff and a good supply of cakes to keep up the energy levels!

Would you recommend the course to others? I would have no hesitation in doing so. And am planning to continue from diploma to degree stage myself.


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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Kent accepts a very wide range of qualifications. Most part-time students are not school leavers, so we try to take into account your work and life experiences and your personal interests, as well as any academic qualifications you may already have.

applications from adults who have no formal qualifications, provided they can demonstrate an interest in and an aptitude for their chosen subject. For instance, some programmes may ask you to provide evidence of your potential – for example, by producing a short piece of written work, to ensure that this is the appropriate starting point for you. You may also be invited for an informal interview.

Although individual programmes sometimes have specific requirements, here are some general guidelines for what is required for entry on to a certificate programme.

These entry requirements are set to help you to choose an appropriate level of study, and to indicate the level of work involved and whether prior knowledge is needed to support the successful completion of your studies.

Entry at certificate level A certificate programme (see p5) is the first stage of an undergraduate degree programme at Kent. Some certificate programmes accept

If the certificate programme you wish to study requires more specific entry qualifications, these can be gained in a number of ways:

• Taking an approved Access to Higher Education Diploma or a Youth Entry to Higher Education programme is a standard oneyear entry route to study at degree-level. You should check with the University that the syllabus of the access course is appropriate for the degree programme you intend to take. You may be required to obtain particular grades in the credits allocated to particular subjects and/or be required to obtain a specified number of credits in particular subjects. (See www.accesstohe.ac.uk for further information) • Two relevant A level passes or their equivalent can be used to gain entry to most certificate programmes, although most programmes will require minimum grades and for some programmes, one or more specified subjects at particular grades. You may also be able to transfer credits gained elsewhere. Work-related experience and learning may also be accepted and for some courses it is a requirement. To check the specific entry requirements for a particular programme, please refer to the individual programme facts in this prospectus. If you are in any doubt about your own entry qualifications, you can call the Information and Guidance Unit for advice on 01227 827272.


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Those students living outside the European Union should note that it may not be possible to study on a part-time basis due to visa restrictions imposed by the UK Border Agency. Please check the UKBA visa eligibility requirements at www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk before applying for a place.

Making your application We recommend that you make your application online at www.kent.ac.uk/studying/part-time For those without web access, there is also a paper application form available upon request.

What IT/computer skills do I need? Computer skills are important for all students. If you are returning to study after some time you may not feel confident in using computers to assist with your work and to fulfil the requirements of the University. As a part-time student, you will be expected to demonstrate the following skills: • Word processing documents • Manage an email account (send/receive/attach files) • Log on to and successfully navigate the internet • Enter basic information into a website, such as log-in and password details where required. Further advice can be found at: www.kent.ac.uk/student/skills/it-skills

If you have registered for a part-time programme, but are concerned that you do not have any or all of the skills listed above, we are able to help with a variety of training courses to suit your needs and prepare you for studying at university level.

General conditions of entry for part-time degreelevel study There are also some general requirements that apply to all parttime students. We recommend that you are aged 17 or over. You should also, with some exceptions, live or work within easy travelling distance of the University.

Information and Guidance Unit T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Office opening hours Canterbury campus, 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday

“It’s pretty scary when you haven’t studied for 20 years but don’t be put off. Everyone at university is there for the same reason and I’ve never felt out of place – it is a mixture of ages and nationalities, all with a common goal. It’s good to be with people who have a passion for the same things you do.” Kate Sutton English and American Literature, Canterbury campus


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LOCATIONS

Canterbury campus The Canterbury campus, Kent’s original site, was founded in 1965. It is built on 300 acres of parkland overlooking Canterbury and is still growing and evolving. Modern buildings are surrounded by open green spaces, courtyards, gardens, ponds and woodland. Campus life centres round the Templeman Library, the Students’ Centre, purpose-built science laboratories and teaching buildings. There are also plenty of places to eat on campus, including a traditional dining hall, bistros, cafés and sandwich bars which serve all types of food at good prices. The campus is a 20-minute walk from the city centre and is easily reached by car or by public transport. For those travelling by car, there are car parks on campus; however, parking restrictions do apply. Please see www.kent.ac.uk/estates/parking for the latest information. If you are travelling by public transport, the city centre (with its two main railway stations) has a Unibus service up to campus.

Medway campus Medway offers a multi-million-pound campus, with state-of-the-art buildings and facilities including the Drill Hall Library. You can expect high-quality teaching and an exceptional level of personal support. The University has invested millions of pounds in new, purpose-

built facilities. These include lecture theatres, teaching and seminar rooms equipped with the latest technology. There is a wide range of cafés and bars for anything from a coffee to a full meal. The Medway campus can be easily reached by car. Free parking is available close to the main campus, at the Historic Dockyard. There are also car parks on campus; however, parking restrictions do apply. Please see www.kent.ac.uk/estates/parking for the latest information. If you are travelling by public transport, there are bus services running from the centre of Chatham and from local towns such as Rochester, Strood, Gillingham and Gravesend.

Tonbridge Centre Most of our part-time courses in West Kent are taught at the Tonbridge Centre, which is a small, friendly centre dedicated to parttime study. Facilities, including the

University Library at the Tonbridge Centre are open to all Kent students and our seminar rooms are equipped to the same high standard as on our Canterbury and Medway campuses. Of course, you have full access to all the resources available at our other campuses. The Tonbridge Centre is ideally situated in the heart of Tonbridge, just off the High Street (in Avebury Avenue), a five-minute walk from the railway station and close to numerous car parks.

Associate and Partner Colleges The University of Kent validates programmes taught at the following Further and Higher Education colleges: • Canterbury College • K College – Ashford, Folkestone and Tonbridge • MidKent College – Medway and Sittingbourne


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STUDENT SUPPORT AND FACILITIES The Student Learning Advisory Service (SLAS) provides information and guidance on studying in a number of ways. It is a free and friendly resource for students from all subjects and accredited levels of study.

Academic guidance We offer a limited number of confidential appointments during term-time for individuals (or for small groups of students, on request). Both the workshops described below and advice appointments provide friendly, impartial advice in a relaxed environment.

produce, save and retrieve essays, and submit them, either by emailing them to the school or via Moodle (the University’s Virtual Learning Environment). Places are limited and you should contact us as soon as possible to discuss any needs you have.

Information SLAS has books, software, videos, audio tapes and leaflets on a wide range of themes related to study. Leaflets are free and you can borrow other resources. You can also get a lot of information from our website, which includes free printable downloads and links to other useful sites.

Maths and statistics Workshops and other events We run a series of workshops and other events on study techniques, including sessions on Saturdays, especially for part-time students. They include revision and exam strategies, dissertation planning, and getting started with university study.

IT and Study Skills A certain level of study and IT skills are necessary in order to study at university level. If you are returning to study or concerned about the level of work required, we can help you to incorporate these skills into your learning. We offer introductory sessions for students who feel they need extra assistance, including information on how to find books in the library, monitor your account,

SLAS provides maths support materials. The Statistics Desk, based in the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, offers advice if you are doing a project involving statistics. We can help with maths queries by phone or email as well.

Referrals This ‘human signpost’ service helps if you are experiencing any kind of difficulty with your studies. If we don’t know who can help we will find out; we work closely with other support services within and outside the University.

Value-Added Learning in University Education (VALUE) VALUE MaP is a free programme of study skills development for mature

and part-time students. It is run as a series of Saturday workshops on effective study and also takes place at varying times of the week to allow for flexible attendance.

Facilities Being a part-time student* allows you to gain access to the full range of University study resources – for instance, the library collections which contain over a million books, periodicals, pamphlets, audio tapes, videos, DVDs, slides and microforms. Information Services also provides hundreds of PCs for student use on the Canterbury and Medway campuses and at the Tonbridge Centre. If you are interested in sports or the arts, you may also want to take advantage of the University’s leisure facilities. On the Canterbury campus, these include a fullyequipped sports centre, the Gulbenkian Theatre and Cinema. At Medway, students have access to the on-site sports facilities and various student societies. A state-ofthe-art sports centre, Medway Park, is also available to students at discounted rates. * the level of access varies for students taking accredited or non-accredited courses.

Further information See our website: www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning/


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FEES AND FUNDING

Tuition fees Your university tuition fees are due at the start of each academic year and vary according to your programme of study. For a general explanation of how your credits build up into a certificate, diploma or degree, see p5. Most of our part-time programmes are based on 60 credits per year (50% of a full-time programme). However this rate of study can vary, so please check your specific programme entry for details. The tuition fees listed below and on the course pages are for the academic year 2011/12 and may be subject to an increase in subsequent years of study. Please note: fees may vary substantially in 2012 due to changes in central government funding. For information regarding Equivalent or Lower Level Qualification (ELQ) fees, please see p14. To gain a certificate, you need 120 credits. You can then study 120 credits at diploma level and a further 120 credits at degree level.

Certificate-level study Archaeological Studies English and Comparative Literature Creative Writing Criminal Justice Studies English and American Literature French modules A and B French modules C and D History Law and Society Local History Person-Centred Support* Social Sciences

60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 120 credits 60 credits

£730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £3,375 £730

Diploma-level study Archaeological Studies Comparative Literature Criminal Justice Studies English and Comparative Literature English and Comparative Literature with Creative Writing French History History & Philosophy of Art Law Local History Positive Behaviour Support* Social Sciences Substance Misuse Management overseas students

60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 120 credits 60 credits per year** per year**

£730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £3,375 £730 £2,315 £4,205


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Financial support Kent’s part-time students may be eligible for funding from either Student Finance England or the University. The financial support is designed to help you with your tuition fees or with other studying costs, such as books and travel. To qualify for any of the available sources of funding, you need to be a home fee-paying student. Please note that if you already have a Higher Education qualification you may not be eligible for funding. (See ELQ information on p14.) Before making an application for funding, you need to be accepted and registered on to a specific programme of part-time study.

Your household income Degree-level study Archaeological Studies Comparative Literature Criminal Justice Studies English and Comparative Literature English and Comparative Literature with Creative Writing French History History & Philosophy of Art Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities* Law Social Sciences Substance Misuse Management overseas students

60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 60 credits 120 credits 60 credits 60 credits per year** per year**

* Please call for details of financial assistance available ** approximately 60 credits

£730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £730 £3,375 £730 £730 £2,315 £4,205

Most of the funding available is dependent on your household income after certain deductions are made. As a rough guide, take the total gross income of your household, and deduct £2,000 if you have a partner. Then deduct £2,000 for your eldest dependent child and £1,000 for every other dependent child in the household.

DID YOU KNOW? You may not need any formal academic qualifications to study at certificate level.

CONTINUED OVERLEAF


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FEES AND FUNDING (CONT)

The amount you are left with will, in most cases, be the household income that your funding is assessed on. However, please bear in mind that other deductions may be possible.

Student Finance England (SFE) SFE may be able to contribute towards the cost of your fees and study costs. Please refer to www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance for full details.

University of Kent The University of Kent may also be able to contribute towards the cost of your studies. The following criteria will help you to decide whether you are eligible for University funding: • Students taking less than 60 credits a year are not entitled to funding from the SFE. However, if your household income after deductions is less than £20,100*, you may apply for University funding for your tuition fees • If you are eligible to receive a SFE fees grant, but this does not cover the full cost of your tuition fees, the University of Kent may waive the remaining fees. Further support for the difference may be available from the Additional Fee Support Scheme

• Another possible source of financial support towards your living costs is the Access to Learning Fund, if you are studying at least 60 credits a year and can demonstrate that you are in financial difficulties. * 2010/11 figures

Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications (ELQ) The Government no longer provides funding for students who wish to study a higher education qualification that is equivalent to, or at a lower level than one they have already achieved. The University will therefore charge a different (higher) rate of tuition fees to students who already have such qualifications. The University continues to welcome applicants who wish to return to university for a further university level qualification, either to enhance their skills or improve their employment prospects, as we believe that re-skilling is important both to individuals, as part of their personal and professional development, and to the economic growth of the country. However, in response to the Government’s decision to change the funding model for higher education, the University is required to charge a higher-rate fee to all students, whether part-time or fulltime, who hold an equivalent or higher level qualification and,

therefore, are not eligible for Government funding. The ELQ fee will be the same as that currently charged to students from the Channel Islands (pro-rata for part-time students). Applicants are required to disclose details of all qualifications they hold at the point of application in order that a proper assessment of fee status can be made. The University will take action to reclaim fees retrospectively from registered students who are undercharged, if such undercharging was the result of the applicant failing to provide complete or accurate qualifications data on which their fee status was based, or as a result of a failure of the applicant to disclose their ELQ status when asked to do so. Please visit www.kent.ac.uk/elq

Find out more University of Kent www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student E: financialaid@kent.ac.uk T: 01227 823488/824876 Student Finance England For an application form, help and advice, call 0800 300 5090. The pack will also be available from: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance


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WHAT TO DO NEXT

Interested and want to know more? • We hold open days at Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge several times a year. These give you the opportunity to talk to both members of our guidance team and academic staff. For further information please see www.kent.ac.uk/opendays • You can make a private appointment with our information and guidance team at any time in the year. T: 01227 827272 T: 0800 975 3777 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Apply online

• Have a look at all the additional information on our website www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

To apply, simply go to our website: www.kent.ac.uk/part-time and fill in the online application form.

• Phone to speak to one of our Information and Guidance Team T: 01227 827272 T: 0800 975 3777

Further information If you know which level of study you are interested in, then you can request what you need: • Regional Day Schools programme • Open Lectures and College Events booklet • Undergraduate Prospectus • Postgraduate Prospectus • Tonbridge Centre brochure.

Please note there is no fixed closing date, but you should apply for your programme as early as possible.

“I began studying for my own pleasure but it has certainly helped my personal development. I hope to continue my studies as I am really enjoying myself.” Jenny Sharman Comparative Literature, Tonbridge Centre

If you need more advice on making an application or choosing your programme, please contact the Recruitment and Admissions Office. Recruitment and Admissions Office The Registry The University of Kent Canterbury Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 T: 0800 975 3777 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

DID YOU KNOW? If you gain a certificate, diploma or degree from Kent, you have the chance to graduate in an impressive ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral or Rochester Cathedral.


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FAQS

How do I apply? For part-time study you can apply direct to the University. Either use the online application form at www.kent.ac.uk/parttime/apply or phone us for a paper application.

Where can I study? Our main centres are in Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge, but we also run postgraduate programmes at our Brussels centre.

How much will it cost? The fees will vary according to the course you select. For full information, please phone us or visit the website www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

Is there any help to meet the cost of fees?

I have a disability – what help is available?

The type of help available will depend on the course you choose.

We will do everything we can to make your time at the University of Kent a positive experience.

For courses such as Day Schools, there are concessionary rates for tuition fees for those on state benefits. For courses leading to a certificate, diploma or degree qualification, there is help available to meet the costs of fees and some study costs. Further information is available on page 12 or please contact us.

CONTACT US T: 01227 827272 T: 0800 975 3777 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

I have not studied for some time – is there help if I need it? What about advice and guidance in the academic department? Further information is available on page 11.

We are committed to improving access to learning for all students and provide a wide range of educational support services. For more specific information, please contact us. T: 01227 823158 F: 01227 827330 E: accessibility@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/ddss


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GLOSSARY

Associate Learner: Those who register on a course for pleasure which has no assessment demands. BA/BSc: Bachelor of Arts or Science. Certificate: Stage 1. Equivalent to the first year of a full-time degree (120 credits). Credits: The academic value given to a module, usually in increments of 15 credits. One year of part-time undergraduate study is usually equivalent to 60 credits. Degree: Stage 3. Equivalent to the third year of a full-time degree (120 credits). Diploma: Stage 2. Equivalent to the second year of a full-time degree (120 credits). ELQ: Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications. The government no longer provides funding for students who wish to study for a qualification that is equivalent to, or at a lower level, than one that they have already achieved. Universities are now required to charge a higher rate ELQ fee to all students who hold an equivalent or higher level qualification. First Degree: Another term for a BA or BSc (undergraduate) degree. Foundation Degree: A two-year degree programme, which can be linked (but is not limited to) the following areas: industry, commerce, health and social care, early years,

learning support, performing arts, textiles and photography. Further Education: Post-16, usually in a college or sixth-form environment. Higher Education: University-level study.

HND: Higher National Diploma, equivalent to the first two years of an undergraduate degree. Modules: Small individual courses for credit that can be built up towards completion of a level or programme. Pathway: A defined area of study.

Home-fee paying: Broadly speaking this applies to: • Persons who have permanent residence in the UK and have been resident in the UK for three years • EEA migrant workers and their families in the UK who have lived in the EEA for three years • EU nationals and their children who have lived in the EEA for three years • Refugees (recognised by the UK government) and their families • Persons who applied for asylum and have been granted exceptional leave to enter/remain, and their families.

Postgraduate: Advanced-level university study, usually follows an undergraduate degree. Programme: The accumulation of a series of modules, worth 120 credits (two years of part-time study). Registered Student: Those who register and enrol on an accredited programme or course. Undergraduate: University-level study, often referred to as a BA, BSc or degree.


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PROGRAMMES

Rochelle White English Literature and Creative Writing, Tonbridge Centre Why did you choose to study English Literature and Creative Writing at Kent? I have always been interested in creative writing and looked at quite a few creative writing courses, but chose this one because I felt the link with the University of Kent gave it credibility. I live near Tonbridge and the fact that the University has a Centre here makes the University very accessible to me. I also liked the fact that I was able to start at certificate level – this gave me the opportunity to build up my confidence as I went along.

How is your course going? Really well. Initially, my main interest was in creative writing. As the course has gone on though, I have

begun to enjoy the literature side of it more and more. For example, I am taking a module on modern American literature and, through this, I am learning a great deal about America and the American psyche. One of the books we have studied is a slave narrative, a firsthand account of the experience of being a slave and of obtaining freedom. It is not something I would have thought of reading before I began studying, but reading it meant that when I listened to President Obama’s inauguration speech I had a much deeper understanding of all that he was saying.

What about the tutors? All of the tutors are knowledgeable, very good at what they do, and excellent communicators. They make you think and give you the tools to read something and be critical of it in a constructive way.

They encourage you to take part in discussions and, if they notice that you are a bit reticent about joining in, they find ways to make you feel comfortable and more confident so that you can take part.

Would you recommend the course? Absolutely, it has been a positive experience for me. I would suggest that people start at certificate level as this allows you to study without too much pressure, and then you can choose to move on if you want to. The facilities at the Tonbridge Centre are excellent, the librarians are both knowledgeable and helpful, and there are also very good University online services that have helped me with my research.


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Canterbury

CLASSICAL & ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES Archaeological Studies is a fascinating discipline which allows us to understand past peoples and cultures. You explore the historical past as well as more distant times, many millennia before the appearance of written evidence. Your studies introduce you to the archaeology of Britain and ancient cultures around Europe and the Mediterranean. Our programmes focus mainly on developing your understanding of archaeology as an academic discipline. However, if you are interested in gaining practical skills in field archaeology, you can apply to take part in the University’s

training excavations, or we can advise you on how to gain experience elsewhere. You can progress from certificate level to diploma and on to a full honours degree programme. You have the opportunity at diploma and degree level to study a favourite topic in depth via an extended written assignment and a project.

Certificate in Archaeological Studies The programme introduces archaeology as an academic discipline and looks at the approaches archaeologists use, depending on the sources available. You learn about the archaeology of varying historic and prehistoric

societies, including ancient civilisations, and study the development of archaeology as a discipline. You gain an understanding of archaeological evidence and how it furthers our knowledge of past societies (sometimes in combination with other sources of evidence). There are no formal entry requirements, but you do need to demonstrate that you have the ability to study at this level. If you have already studied on another programme, you may be able to use your credits towards the certificate, replacing one or two of the modules. Students who successfully complete this programme may continue their studies on the diploma programme (see p22).

Programme content The programme consists of four modules. Archaeology: Its History, Themes and Personalities In this module, you study the way that archaeology became a field of study in its own right, from the history of early antiquarians to the development of museums and the relationships between archaeology, heritage and the media. You explore changing approaches to


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both excavation and interpretation and gain an understanding of the wider cultural context of archaeological studies. (Location Canterbury 2011/12, code CL348, 30 credits). Egyptology: Chronology and Sources You examine the chronological framework constructed for ancient Egypt during the dynastic period. You cover the principal categories of data, whether archaeological, artistic or textual, and learn how the various sources of data combine to improve our understanding of social organisation and religion in dynastic Egypt. The principles applied when using different types of evidence can be employed in the study of any ancient civilisation. (Location Canterbury 2012/13, code CL322, 30 credits). Introduction to Aegean Archaeology A great many aspects of the Greek world in archaic and classical times can be traced back to the Great European Bronze Age civilisations of the second millennium BC. This is the world of the Mycenaean palaces, of Minoan Crete, and the Greek heroic age of The Iliad and The Odyssey. In this module, you examine the Minoan and Mycenaean world by studying its religion, its art and architecture, and its politics and script. (Location Canterbury 2012/13 code CL338, 30 credits).

Roman Britain The archaeology of Britain is explored as it emerges into protohistory during the last century BC. Sources include the accounts of classical authors and the evidence of British coinage. You then examine the conquest of Britain and its development as part of the province of Britannia in the Roman empire, looking at both historical and archaeological evidence. We discuss the interaction between native British culture and that of the Romans and other peoples of the empire. (Location Canterbury 2011/12, code CL334, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment Weekly meetings, which include presentations and seminar discussions, may be supplemented by a day school and/or class site or museum visit. Please note that these do not always take place on the same day as the weekly meetings.

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Certificate in Archaeological Studies Fee ÂŁ730 per annum (60 credits). Visits to sites and museums are not included in this fee. Location Canterbury. Times Wed 7pm-9pm. Length Usually two years. Entry requirements No formal requirements: open to all those who can show an ability to study at this level. Progression Students who successfully complete the certificate can go on to diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Each module is continuously assessed by written assignments. You need to attend a minimum of 60% of the classes.

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CLASSICAL & ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES (CONT)

Diploma in Archaeological Studies This programme broadens your knowledge and critical appreciation of archaeology in a European and Mediterranean context. It enhances your understanding of how archaeologists explore various aspects of the prehistoric and ancient past, drawing on combinations of data from archaeology and related disciplines. This programme is suitable for those who have a Certificate in Archaeological Studies or an equivalent level of attainment and knowledge. Graduates of this diploma may go on to study for a BA (Hons) degree in Archaeological Studies, see p23.

Programme content You take 120 credits to gain the diploma. In the year beginning 2011, you take the modules listed below. The Archaeology of Belief, Cult and Ritual This course examines the diversity of archaeological material which we can use to study belief, cult and ritual. Focusing mainly on the Roman period, you study both the power of established religions, through, for example, their standing buildings and iconography, and accompanying mystery cults and daily rituals. The transition from Roman paganism to Christianity is also examined. Categories of

evidence include plans and inscriptions, standing buildings, burials, religious art and ritual artefacts. (Location Canterbury, code CL614/tbc, 30 credits). Minoan Art and Architecture Aegean Art was arguably the most innovative and technically superior art of its time and can be seen as a precursor to the naturalism of the later Greek classical art. It has given us small wonders such as the Cycladic figurines, the frescoes of Santorini, Minoan rings and Mycenaean helmets. This module considers Aegean arts and crafts from their very beginning in the Neolithic period and follows their development through time, considering style, iconography, religious and political use, technique and preservation. (Location Canterbury, code CL623/523, 30 credits).

In the second year, your studies include writing an extended essay (see below) on an archaeological theme. Extended Assignment You choose your topic in consultation with an academic supervisor and then work independently under the guidance of your supervisor. The result is an in-depth study that draws mainly on a range of secondary source material. (Location Canterbury, code CL592, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment Regular weekly meetings include presentations and seminar discussions and may be supplemented by small group tutorials, a day school, and/or class site or museum visit (please note that these do not always take place at the same time as the weekly meetings). Assessment is by written assignments.


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Diploma in Archaeological Studies Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Visits to sites and museums are not included in this fee. Location Canterbury. Times Wed 7pm-9pm. Length Usually two years. Entry requirements Certificate in Archaeological Studies or its equivalent. Progression Students who successfully complete the diploma can go on to degree level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

BA (Hons) degree in Archaeological Studies The BA (Hons) degree programme extends your knowledge of the ancient past of Europe and the Mediterranean and deepens your understanding of archaeology as an academic discipline. This programme is suitable for those who have a Diploma in Archaeological Studies or an equivalent level of attainment in a relevant programme.

Programme content Students with a diploma take a further 120 credits to obtain their degree. All students complete an Archaeological Project at some stage during their degree studies (see below). Archaeological Project This project focuses on the study of primary data. It may involve antiquarian literature; archive documentation involving cartographic sources; sites and

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monuments records; museum collections; observations of monuments in the field or other forms of approved fieldwork or participation in excavation. You choose your topic in consultation with an academic supervisor who guides you in your studies, helping you to develop skills of autonomous study and research. (Location Canterbury, code CL598/CL599, 30 credits). The range of modules that may be on offer are listed below. You also have the option to choose a module from another diploma or degree programme. • The Archaeology of Belief, Cult and Ritual (Code CL614, 30 credits) • Archaeology of the Romans in the West (Code CL612, 30 credits) • Barbarians in the West (Code CL591, 30 credits)

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CLASSICAL & ARCHAEOLOGICAL STUDIES (CONT)

BA (Hons) degree in Archaeological Studies Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Visits to sites and museums are not included in this fee. Location Canterbury. Times Wed 7pm-9pm. Length Usually two years. Entry requirements Diploma in Archaeological Studies or its equivalent.

• Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean (Code CL596, 30 credits) • Foundations of Britain (Code CL610, 30 credits) • Greek Art and Architecture (Code CL608, 30 credits) (Code CL620, 30 credits) • Heads, Heroes and Horses: In Search of the Ancient Celts (Code CL568, 30 credits) • Late Antique Archaeology: Mediterranean Life from Constantine to Muhammed (Code CL638, 30 credits) • Minoan Art and Architecture (Code CL623/523, 30 credits) • Origins of the Medieval City (Code CL639, 30 credits) • Roman Art and Architecture (Code CL609, 30 credits)

Many of the modules listed are also available during the daytime at the Canterbury campus. You are welcome to take these and other daytime modules if you wish to increase your choice of topics or accelerate your progress. Please ask for guidance.

Teaching and assessment Regular weekly meetings include presentations and seminar discussions, which may be supplemented by small group tutorials, a day school, and/or class site or museum visit (these do not always take place at the same time as the weekly meetings). Assessment is by written assignments.

Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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BA (Hons) degree in Classical & Archaeological Studies Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Visits to sites and museums are not included in this fee. Location Canterbury. Times Varies according to modules chosen. Length Usually two years (with a diploma), four years (with a certificate), otherwise six years.

BA (Hons) degree in Classical & Archaeological Studies This degree programme is available to students on a part-time basis, provided they are able to attend daytime lectures during the week and can meet the general entry requirements.

“When I look back now at the essays I wrote at the beginning of my course I’m amazed at how far I have come. I have a real sense of achievement – I wanted to study for a degree and I have accomplished that, which is wonderful.” Carole Scott Archaeological Studies, Canterbury campus

It is possible for students with the Certificate or Diploma in Archaeological Studies to apply to transfer to the BA (Hons) degree in Classical & Archaeological Studies on a full-time or a part-time basis. For more details, please see the Undergraduate Prospectus.

Entry requirements An appropriate level of formal education, or other proof of academic ability. Please refer to the Undergraduate Prospectus for details. Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Medway

CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES

The demand for criminal justice practitioners is growing both nationally and internationally, leading to a wide range of career options, within crime prevention, probation, the prison service, the courts, the police, community safety, social services, and drug and alcohol services. Criminal Justice draws on a range of human and social sciences and is a fast-developing field, reflecting the rapid social changes it tries to examine. The degree covers the key elements of contemporary crime policy: policing; the courts; punishment and prevention. Other areas covered include: drugs and the criminal justice system; crime and justice in Europe; and gender, crime and justice. This degree gives you the chance to study in an internationally renowned

department. In the last Research Assessment Exercise, the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research at Kent gained the highest ratings possible. Please see our website (www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr) for more details.

BA (Hons) degree in Criminal Justice Studies The degree gives you the chance to study practices within the criminal justice system, and how crime policies are developed and implemented. Students gain an in-depth knowledge of the complexities of the criminal justice system; how it responds to social problems; and the economic, political or theoretic basis for its responses. You gain practical skills and knowledge that can be valuable in a variety of careers within the criminal justice services or in public services. You also gain key skills that are relevant to a wide range of other professions.

Programme content The programme allows you to understand and develop views on crime control policy, the scope of human rights, the links between criminal and social justice, the expanding knowledge bases of the crime prevention, security, policing and justice-related professions. You become involved in key debates within the subject, for example, on methodology and technical expertise, or how to manage the sensitive ethical issues arising from research. A part-time student usually takes modules worth 60 credits a year. This means you would reach certificate level in two years, diploma level in a further two years and degree level in the final two years. During the course of your degree, you also gain many key skills in writing, IT, presentation, research and analysis, which are of great importance within your future career whatever field you choose to go into. The modules you study are as follows. In the first two years (at certificate level), all students take the following modules: • Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice • Introduction to Sociology • Reading Law and Law for Forensic Science • Social Problems and Social Policy.


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BA (Hons) degree in Criminal Justice Studies Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Medway. Times Various evening and daytime modules. Please note: although some modules may be available in the evenings, you will need to attend daytime modules.

In the next two years (at diploma level), you take the following core modules: • Criminal Law • Issues in Criminal Justice • Research Methods in Sociology.

In the final two years (at BA degree level), students take the following core modules: • Crime, Punishment and Penal Policy • Dissertation.

You then choose 45 credits from optional modules including: • Drugs, Crime and the Criminal Justice System (15 credits) • Forensic Psychology (15 credits) • History of Police and Policing (15 credits) • Principles and Practice of Social Policy (30 credits) • Social Ethics (30 credits) • Social Justice Practice (30 credits). • Youth, Crime and Criminal Justice (15 credits)

The list of optional modules is currently under review, but includes the following: • Crime and Justice in Europe • Key Welfare Issues • Politics of Criminal Justice • Prisons, Probation and Offender Rehabilitation • Reporting Crime. • Restorative Justice • Women, Crime and Justice

Teaching and assessment Most modules involve weekly lectures and small group seminars. Modules are usually assessed by a combination of coursework and written examinations.

Length Two years takes you up to certificate level; a further two years takes you up to diploma level; a final two years gives you a degree. Entry requirements A levels or a relevant Access course, or the equivalent. Mature students with non-standard qualifications or work experience are also welcome to apply. Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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Canterbury and Tonbridge

ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE – JOINT HONOURS Do you like to read literature and want to take your interests further? Do you want to explore not only English texts but also writings from Europe and beyond? Our programmes give you the opportunity to study literature from a wide range of cultures, everything from Greek drama to present-day theatre, from the tales of Ovid to the novels of Tolstoy and Woolf. Studying literature broadens and deepens our understanding of written experience and enables us to evaluate ideas about critical thinking. It helps us to appreciate the historical conditions, literary movements and individual authors who have written in English over several centuries. It also gives us a greater sensitivity to language and its varied meanings across time, and to what commentators have said about literature. We aim to give you a broad understanding of different literary genres and their historical context, as well as the chance, later in your studies, to specialise in themes or authors of your own choosing. Our approach is both international and interdisciplinary. It illuminates many aspects of culture and we draw on material from history, philosophy and film.

Joint Honours Certificate in English and Comparative Literature This programme introduces some of the key ideas in English and American Literature and Comparative Literature and is the first step on a pathway that can lead to a BA (Hons) degree in either subject area. Places are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis and all classes are run subject to student numbers.

Programme content This programme combines modules from the Certificate in English and American Literature with the Certificate in Comparative Literature. Over a two-year period, you study the following year-long, 60-credit modules.

Aspects of Myth and Folktale in Literature (Running 2011/12) In this module, you study the roles that myth and folklore have played in the making of literature. You begin by examining major classical writers such as Apuleius, Euripides, Homer and Ovid. You then explore the development of the folktale tradition in texts by, among others, Boccaccio, the Brothers Grimm, Perrault and Wilde. Lastly, you investigate how myth and folklore have been used by modern and contemporary writers, including Angela Carter, Caryl Churchill, Max Frisch and Derek Walcott. (Code CP304, 60 credits).


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Romanticism and Critical Theory This module examines some of the most significant writing of the Romantic period (1780-1830) – a period in which the role and forms of literature were being redefined – alongside recent debates in critical theory. You study a wide range of literary texts from the poetry of Blake and Wordsworth to the novels of Jane Austen and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, with reference to the period’s turbulent history (the French Revolution, the growth of cities, industrialisation). In parallel, you explore key critical questions about literature: why read it? What is an author? What is the role of poetry in society? How is literature shaped by culture? What is 'Art'? (Code EN307, 60 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via seminar discussion. Assessment is by coursework and seminar contribution.

Joint Honours Certificate in English and Comparative Literature Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury or Tonbridge. Times Canterbury Tue 6.30pm-8.30pm Tonbridge Wed 10.30am-12.30pm Length Two years Entry requirements Please submit an analysis of a poem, novel, short story or play (up to 500 words) and a short explanation of why you wish to study literature (100 words). This should be included with your application form. Progression Students who successfully complete the certificate can go on to diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Diploma in English and Comparative Literature BA (Hons) degree in English and Comparative Literature This programme suits students who have a Certificate in either Comparative Literature or English and American Literature. It allows you to study literary texts from ancient Greece to the present day, investigating how literary forms have evolved in different cultures and from around the world. To gain a diploma, you complete two years of part-time study. Then, if you wish, you may continue studying for a further two years to gain your degree.

Programme content Diploma students take four modules in total, usually studying two modules (60 credits) per year. If you wish to continue towards a degree, you take a further four modules which may include a dissertation on a subject of your own choosing. For 2011/12, the following modules are available.

DID YOU KNOW? Kent was ranked 20th in the UK for English in the Times Good University Guide 2011.

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ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE – JOINT HONOURS (CONT)

Diploma Magic Realism (Spring 2012) ‘Magic realism’ offers an exciting fusion in which impossible events are introduced into everyday life, not to question ‘reality’, but to reveal its marvellous and strange aspects. The term originated in post-WW1 Germany, was adopted by Latin American writers in the 1940s, and has since spread around the world. Frequently, magic realism engages with historical and political conflict, and has become a source of resistance. You read a selection of texts by writers such as Laura Esquivel, Franz Kafka, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Salman Rushdie. (Code CP606, 30 credits).

Tragedy through the Ages (Autumn 2011) Since its beginnings in ancient Greece, tragedy has often been regarded as the highest literary genre, addressing political and ethical questions such as the limits of private and public freedom, the relationship between the individual and society, and the nature of justice. These topics, though, have been treated in different ways from the Renaissance (Racine, Shakespeare) to Romanticism (Buchner, Schiller) to nineteenth and twentieth-century literature (Beckett, Chekhov, Ibsen). This module examines how the genre has evolved with reference to key theorists such as Aristotle and Nietzsche. (Code CP595, 30 credits).

Degree American Crime Fiction (Autumn 2011) This module explores the history and practice of crime fiction in the United States from the early detective stories of Edgar Allan Poe in the 1840s through the development of hardboiled and procedural genres to postmodernism and beyond. Attention is also paid to developments in cinema and television which parallel those in fiction, such as ‘film noir’ and the contemporary cop series. During the course of the term, you use your reading of key theoretical texts by Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin


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and others as a critical framework for examining crime narratives. Issues addressed include the relationship between high and low culture, how historical change relates to the development of new genres, and the way crime fiction engages with questions of gender and race. (Code EN658, 30 credits). The Brontës in Context (Spring 2012) While the so-called ‘Brontë myth’ remains potent in popular culture today, the lives-and-works model associated with it continues to encourage readers to seek partially concealed Brontë sisters in their fictions. Beginning and ending with the problematic of mythmaking – its origins in Gaskell’s Life of Charlotte Brontë and its subsequent perpetuation in film and other rewritings – this module restores attention to the rich literary contribution made by the sisters through an intensive focus on their novels and selected poetry in the context of Victorian debates about gender and the woman question.

Situating the Brontë myth in relation to other forms of mythmaking in the period (for example, ideologies of class, gender and empire), you cover a small selection of film adaptations and go on to examine the Brontës’ experiments with narrative voice and form, their variations upon the novel of education, the tensions between romance and realism in their writing and their engagement with the political, economic and social conditions of women in midVictorian culture. (Code EN657, 30 credits) Note: Canterbury students may elect to study in the daytime alongside full-time students. For a full list of available modules, please see the relevant School web pages.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via seminar discussion. Assessment is by coursework and seminar contribution.

“Studying part-time has been a fun and rewarding journey. There’s been a nice group of people taking the course from the very beginning which has generated a level of enthusiasm that keeps you going.” Roland Marshall BA (Hons) English Literature

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Diploma in English and Comparative Literature BA (Hons) degree in English and Comparative Literature Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury or Tonbridge. Times Tonbridge Diploma: Wed 1pm-3pm Degree: Mon 6.30pm-8.30pm Canterbury Wed 6.30pm-8.30pm and various daytime options. Length Two years for diploma; two more years to gain a degree. Entry requirements Open to those who have studied successfully at certificate level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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Canterbury and Tonbridge

ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE WITH CREATIVE WRITING Certificate in Creative Writing This programme is for anyone with a real interest in imaginative writing and a commitment to exploring his or her own potential as a writer. To gain entrance to the programme, you are asked to submit some recent writing (up to two pages of A4) in any style, genre or form, with a short explanation of why you wish to study creative writing (100 words). Over the two years you take four modules, two of which are broad ‘survey’ courses, and two of which focus more specifically on the areas of prose fiction and poetry. We encourage you to read widely, to question what you do and to challenge yourself as a writer and extend your range of achievements and possibilities. If you wish to progress to the Diploma in Literature or the Diploma in Literature and Creative Writing, you are required to replace one certificate-level creative writing module with a literature module. Since modules for these programmes are very popular, you are strongly advised to apply for them as early as possible. Places are filled on a first-come first-served basis.

Programme content Over two years, you take the following modules. Poetry The main emphasis in this module is on the rich resources available to the poet. Using both poetry and poetic prose as stimuli for discussion and writing exercises, you study the concept of poetry as play, its sound effects, visual impact, vocabulary, structure and relationship with metaphor. You also experiment with one or more traditional forms, with a view to devising your own personal forms. (Code CE166, 30 credits). Prose Fiction Study of narrative, character and dialogue, time and structure, description of people and places, and the different forms of prose fiction, such as the short story, novella and novel are covered in this module. There is a mixture of discussion and practical writing assignments so you can experiment with the range of skills and techniques used by writers of prose fiction. (Code CE167, 30 credits). Voice and Vision This module offers you the chance to get to grips with some of the most fundamental questions that face all writers, from the beginner to the most experienced: it aims to give you a solid base on which to take important decisions in your own

writing. Through a combination of practical exercises, reading and discussion, you study such questions as genre, length, fictionality, persona, dramatic emphasis, craft, inspiration, self-editing and self-trust. (Code EN319, 30 credits). Writing and Audience This module focuses on the relationship between writing and its real or potential audience. Through a range of short texts and writing exercises, it moves from the freedom of ‘audience-less’ writing towards an exploration of forms more obviously aimed at a particular public. The genres studied and practised include fairytale and writing for children, science fiction and humorous writing. (Code CE165, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is seminar-based with usually one Saturday workshop per module. Assessment is by regular written assignments that form the basis of a portfolio of work submitted at the end of each 12week module. You need to record your insights and reactions informally in a writer’s notebook, which provides the material for a commentary essay on the creative work you submit. Class participation is also taken into account.


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Certificate in Creative Writing Fee ÂŁ730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury or Tonbridge. Times Canterbury Tue 2pm-4pm. Tonbridge Mon 6.30pm-8.30pm. Each module includes one Saturday workshop. Length Two years. Entry requirements Please submit some recent writing (up to two pages of A4), in any style, genre or form, with an explanation of why you wish to study creative writing (100 words). This should be included with your application form. Please note: you are advised to apply as early as possible. Places are filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Progression Students who successfully complete the certificate can go on to diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Diploma in English and Comparative Literature with Creative Writing This programme is open to those who have studied English and Comparative Literature or Creative Writing at certificate level. It offers you the chance to develop the skills you have learned, and to broaden and deepen your understanding of the experience of reading and writing. The literature and creative writing elements are complementary – you use the skills you develop in one to enrich your experience of the other. If you successfully complete this programme, you can move on to degree level.

Programme content The programme is designed to offer a mix of literature and writing modules. During the course of the programme, all students study the following two writing modules.

Reading and Writing the Self This module introduces you to a range of ways in which real life can be incorporated into creative writing. You read a variety of autobiographical texts and are encouraged to ask questions about the relationship between fiction and truth, and the relationship between the writer and the contemporary world. As well as considering contemporary approaches to memoir, you are encouraged to consider other forms of writing the self, such as psycho-geography. (Code EN613, 30 credits). Individual Writing Project You focus on the development of one major project throughout the term, in either prose fiction or poetry. You are encouraged to read a wide range of contemporary writing, including poetry, short stories, manifestos, novels and novellas. Group discussions of this material and about the mechanics of writing, combined with writing exercises and

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ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE WITH CREATIVE WRITING (CONT)

the production of a short statement/ manifesto, will all inform your final project. At the end of the module, each student gives a presentation based either on the statement/ manifesto, or on the larger writing project. You are expected to work independently, but to consult the tutor about your work according to need. (Code EN614, 30 credits). You also take literature modules worth 60 credits from the selection on p30.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is through a combination of seminars, lectures and workshops which include studying texts, discussion, student presentations, group and pair work, and sharing of your own work in class. Literature modules combine essays, seminar performance and examination. Creative writing modules are assessed through projects in the form of a portfolio of work submitted at the end of the module, and by written commentaries on the processes involved. The ‘Individual Writing Project’ also has a presentation day where students formally present their work to others, and this is included in the assessment. Requirements for different modules may vary in details and we confirm them at the beginning of the course.

Diploma in English and Comparative Literature with Creative Writing Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury or Tonbridge. Times Canterbury Daytime: times vary (timetable available in September). Evening: Wed 6.30pm-8.30pm. Tonbridge Mon 6.30pm-8.30pm. Length Two years. Entry requirements Open to those who have studied at certificate level. Progression Students who successfully complete the diploma can go on to degree level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

BA (Hons) degree in English and Comparative Literature and Creative Writing This degree programme is open to students who have already studied English and Comparative Literature and Creative Writing at diploma level. At degree stage, your study of literature and/or creative writing moves into more specialised areas of study and research, with modules exploring specific authors, genres, or topics. There is also the chance to complete a supervised dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Programme content You take four modules (120 credits) in total over two years, including one writing module each year. For 2011/12, the following modules are available. Reading and Writing Short Fiction (Autumn 2011) The line of short story development, which can be traced from Chekhov through Katherine Mansfield to Raymond Carver, is frequently seen as particularly searching and inspiring. In this module, you look at that acknowledged vein of influence from the point of view of the practising contemporary writer. You make a close study of a small selection of stories by each author with a view to gaining inspiration


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and technical expertise in your own work. The emphasis of the module is analytical and practical: seminar discussions and writing clinics will be interspersed with workshops for the constructive criticism of students’ own stories in progress. (Code EN600, 30 credits)

“All of the tutors are knowledgeable, very good at what they do, and excellent communicators. They make you think and give you the tools to read something and be critical of it in a constructive way.”

The Brontës in Context (Spring 2012) See p31 for details.

Rochelle White English Literature and Creative Writing, Tonbridge Centre

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via seminar discussion. Assessment is by coursework and seminar contribution. (See Diploma entry opposite for more detail).

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BA (Hons) degree in English and Comparative Literature and Creative Writing Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury or Tonbridge. Times Canterbury Daytime: times vary (timetable available in September). Evening: Wed 6.30-8.30pm Tonbridge Mon 6.30pm-8.30pm Length Two years. Entry requirements Open to those who have studied successfully at diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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www.kent.ac.uk/secl/french

Canterbury

FRENCH

The French programmes are designed for those who have a taste for French culture and who want to develop their fluency in the language by studying French language and culture. The three French programmes are linked, allowing students to progress through the levels of study from certificate to diploma to degree. After the diploma, a further two years of part-time study leads to a degree. If you are not certain of your level, you can ask to be tested to see which is the best programme for you to begin studying on. The running of all French courses is subject to adequate recruitment levels.

Certificate in French This programme develops language skills and looks at French literature and culture. It is suitable for students who know that their level of knowledge is a good O level or GCSE. Those with A level French or equivalent normally enter the second year of the certificate (modules C and D).

Programme content You take the following four modules. Module A: French Language and Culture I and 2 This module allows you to practise and improve French language skills at post-GCSE level. It also serves as an introduction to French culture and institutions. (Code CM342, 15 credits, autumn term; Code CM343, 15 credits, spring term).

Module B: French Language and Culture 3 You improve your French language skills at post-GCSE level and deepen your knowledge of French culture and institutions. (Code CM344, 30 credits). Module C: French Post-A Level Language This module aims at improving language skills. (Code FR306, 30 credits). Module D: Introduction to the Study of French Literature This module introduces you to French literature/culture with the chance to study complete texts, including drama and fiction. (Code FR307, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment The teaching is by seminar and language class. We also provide support materials (hand-outs and tapes) for the literature module. Seminars require the active participation of all members of the group, with occasional individual or paired presentations. The language classes include the return of regular written work. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and class test.


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Certificate in French Fee Modules A and B: £730 for both modules. Modules C and D: £730 for both modules. Location Canterbury. Times Year 1: Wed evening (module A), then Wed afternoon (module B). Year 2: Tue 6pm-9pm (modules C and D). Length Two years. Entry requirements Good O level or GCSE in French. Direct entry to Year 2 is available to those with a good A level in French. Those without standard qualifications who wish to enter either Year 1 or Year 2 may be invited to take an entrance test. Applications should normally be made before 15 June (if you wish to make a later application, please call for details). Progression Students who successfully complete the certificate can go on to diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Diploma in French This programme develops language skills and deepens your literary and cultural knowledge. It is suitable for those who have a Certificate in French, or its equivalent.

Programme content During the programme, you choose 60 credits of literature/ culture, which may include those in the list below (subject to confirmation). If you wish, you may also choose a module from another subject area. • Literary Trailblazers – Four 20th-Century Women Writers (Code FR600, 15 credits) • Occupation and Resistance (Code FR598, 15 credits) • Paris: Myth and Reality (Code FR593/FR594, 15 credits) • Short Narrative Fiction (Code FR546, 15 credits)

You also take the French Language module and the Extended Essay module. Extended Essay The extended essay consists of an intensive study of a particular theme or writer (students choose from topics encountered in the previous literature/culture modules). The essay is 4,000-7,000 words and students write it under supervision. (Code FR569, 30 credits). French Language This language module is split into four sections: translation from French, translation into French, free composition in French, résumé from French – two sections are taught during the first year of your diploma, the remaining two sections are taught in the second year. (Code FR610/FR614, 30 credits).

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FRENCH (CONT)

Teaching and assessment All teaching involves discussion in literature/culture seminars and language classes. Some seminars are supported by lecture notes or audio recordings of lectures from the full-time programme. Time is also set aside to meet you and return marked essays. Assessment in the first year is mostly by coursework, but also by class test. In subsequent years, modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and written examination. Literature/culture modules are assessed by a combination of coursework, class test and oral. The extended essay is assessed entirely on its content.

Diploma in French Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury. Times Tue 6pm-9pm. Length Two years. Entry requirements The normal entry requirement is the Certificate in French. However, candidates with an appropriate level of French may be invited to take an entrance test. Applications should normally be made before 15 June (if you wish to make a later application, please call for details). Progression Students who successfully complete the diploma can go on to degree level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

DID YOU KNOW? Kent was ranked 10th in the UK for European Languages and Area Studies in the 2010 National Student Survey.

BA (Hons) degree in French This programme takes you up to degree level, improving your fluency in the language and deepening your understanding of French literature and culture. It is suitable for those who have a diploma in French and who wish to work towards a full BA (Hons) degree.

Programme content The programme involves a further two years of part-time study. You choose 60 credits of literature/ culture, which may include those in the list below. If you wish, you may choose a module from another subject area such as another language or comparative literature. • Contemporary French Cinema (Code FR561, 15 credits) • Introduction to French Autobiography (Code FR551, 15 credits) • Molière and Classical French Comedy (Code FR541, 15 credits) • Mothers and Daughters in 20th-Century Literature (Code FR601, 15 credits) • The Reader and the Text (Code FR613, 15 credits) • Surrealism (Code FR634, 15 credits)


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BA (Hons) degree in French Fee ÂŁ730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury. Times Tue 6pm-9pm. Length Two years. Entry requirements Usually a Diploma in French. Other qualifications, such as a French DEUG de Lettres, may be accepted in some cases, subject to an entrance test. All students also take the following modules. French Dissertation The essay consists of an intensive study of a single author or theme, chosen from those already studied in your literature/culture modules. The dissertation is similar to the extended essay completed at diploma level, but more developed and substantial. (Code FR567, 30 credits). French Language This module is split over two years. Your first year involves advanced translation work, both from and into French. The second year involves advanced work in oral French with a native speaker. (Code FR602/603, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment All teaching involves discussion in literature/culture and language classes. For some modules, there are lecture notes or audio recordings of lectures from the full-time programme. We also set aside time to meet you and to return your marked essays. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, except for the dissertation which is assessed entirely on its content.

Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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www.kent.ac.uk/history

Canterbury and Tonbridge

HISTORY

The School of History at Kent is recognised as one of the leading History departments in the country. We were ranked second in the Research Assessment Exercise 2008, and consistently score above 90% for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey. Our part-time students are given the chance to pursue a wide range of historical studies ranging from local to international history from the early medieval to the 20th century, with teaching at both Canterbury and Tonbridge. Our programmes cover a range of levels: many of our students start at certificate level, with little prior experience of studying history, and progress on to a diploma and then to a degree. Students are offered the opportunity to work with a variety of primary sources, and are encouraged to make use of both University and local facilities during their studies. By studying history at Kent, you have every chance to develop your abilities as a historian, discovering and analysing a range of sources to gain a deeper insight and understanding of the past.

At Tonbridge, students may take a BA in Local History, while in Canterbury, students study for the BA in History. For those based at our Canterbury campus, we offer a range of ‘twilight’ evening sessions for those who must study around full-time work commitments. For those who are able to study during the daytime, we are able to offer the full range of over 70 undergraduate modules to our part-time students. Please note, all classes are run subject to student numbers.

Certificate in Local History The programme introduces students, who may have no previous relevant experience, to the study of local and regional history with particular reference to the history of south-east England. It also allows students to evaluate the relationship of local history to the wider region. You acquire the techniques and practical skills required for the

effective study of local and regional history. If you successfully complete this programme, you can progress to the Diploma in Local History or a Diploma in History.

Programme content In your first year, you take two modules which provide the basic skills for the study of local history. The modules currently scheduled to run for 2011/2012 are: The Maritime Trade of South East England This module examines the fascinating role of the sea throughout Kentish history, examining topics as wide-ranging as the impact of the Vikings, Roman Kent, the role of the sea in the dissemination of Christianity, Cinque Ports, trade, smuggling and the Royal Navy. (Code HI383, 30 credits).


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Towns and Townspeople in Late Medieval Kent This module investigates the social and cultural aspects of life in the late Middle Ages, whilst observing the main characteristics of medieval towns in Kent and examining how they differ from those of other English towns. (Code HI410, 30 credits) Alternatively, you may be able to choose certain modules within the daytime history programme at Canterbury. Modules available in other years may include the following (subject to recruitment and tutor availability): • Paleography, Documents and Sources (Code HI371, 30 credits) • Poverty and its Problems in England, 1834-1914 (Code HI317, 30 credits)

• Using Historical Sources: Kentish Local History Research (Code HI405, 30 credits).

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Certificate in Local History Fee £730 per annum (60 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is usually via weekly seminars, supported by short informal lectures. Students are encouraged to develop their historical skills by working with a wide range of primary and secondary sources and completing project work and field studies. Assessment is by essays, document and source-related exercises, field study reports and projects.

Location Tonbridge. Times Currently Tue 1pm-3pm for both the autumn and spring terms (subject to change). Length Usually two years. Entry requirements No formal entry requirements. Open to those with an interest in history and an ability to study at this level. Progression Students who successfully complete the programme can go on to diploma level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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HISTORY (CONT)

Diploma in Local History For much of its history, Kent’s geographical position gave it a special importance in relation to London and the continent. This programme examines the growth of the community of Kent within the context of regional and national history. You extend your understanding of the sources and methodologies of local history and are encouraged to make use of primary documents and sources. The programme is a rolling one and you may join at the beginning of any module. It is suitable for those who have a certificate from the School of History or a certificate which includes two appropriate history modules.

Programme content You choose four modules, usually taking two each year. You may choose from modules available at our Tonbridge campus. You may also include ‘wild’ modules in your study, selected from programmes offered at the Canterbury campus. The modules currently scheduled to run for 2011/2012 are:

Reformation and Restoration: Kent in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries The repercussions of the Reformation in the early years of the 16th century had far-reaching consequences for the social, political and economic life of society in England for the following two centuries. This module examines the impact of these events on the community of Kent, within the context of both European and national developments. As well as looking at the immediate impact of the Reformation on the church and community, this module also examines religious refugees and immigrant communities and their influences on the local economy and landscape, the structure of society and management of the poor, the Civil War in Kent, the Restoration and the politics of the Glorious Revolution. (Location Tonbridge, code HI596, 30 credits). Medieval Kent Kent is a distinctive county and has been crucial in establishing links between England and the continent. Local and broader themes are combined throughout this module by using the historical evidence of Kent. This module examines political, economic, social and religious themes and cultural developments from the late-Saxon to the late-Medieval period. (Location Tonbridge, code HI691, 30 credits).

Modules available in other years may include the following (subject to recruitment and tutor availability): • Economic and Social Change in Kent from the 16th to the 20th Century (Code HI740, 30 credits) • Images of Kent 1: The Creative Landscape (Code HI784, 30 Credits) • The Landscape of Kent to 1500 (Code HI694 30 credits) • Late Iron Age, Roman and Early Anglo-Saxon England (Code HI633, 30 credits) • Peasant Society (Code HI674, 30 credits) • Reformation to Restoration: Kent in the 16th and 17th Centuries (Code HI596, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via informal lectures, seminars, documentary studies and fieldwork. Assessment is normally by two essays and one other assignment.


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Diploma in Local History Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Tonbridge. Times Tue 10am-12noon. Length Usually two years. Entry requirements Certificate in Local History, Certificate in History, or the necessary certificate-level credits. Progression Students who successfully complete the diploma programme can go on to degree level. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

BA (Hons) in History Any study of history engages a natural human curiosity about the past. History is an exciting and diverse subject, a fact which is reflected in the flexibility and breadth of the programmes offered at Kent. Our programmes invite you to study anything from the history of the Crusades to the Cold War; from the impact of science on 19th century culture to the totalitarian regimes of Stalin’s Russia and Hitler’s Third Reich; from AngloSaxon England to the French Revolution. This programme is aimed at all those who have a fascination for the past and who wish to learn something of the historian’s methods. You use materials such as documents, diaries, films, newspapers and memoirs. This allows you to gain a sense of working with the primary materials of history, rather than merely looking

at secondary works. Each module assumes no prior knowledge of the subject. For those who do not wish to commit to a full BA in History, part-time students are eligible to receive the following awards: • Certificate in History awarded after successfully completing Stage One (two years of parttime study) • Diploma in History awarded after successfully completing Stage Two (four years of part-time study).

Programme content All Stage 1 students take the core module Making History (see below). You may then choose from a selection of ‘twilight’ modules (taught in the evenings at Canterbury) or from the full-range of modules offered during the daytime at Canterbury. CONTINUED OVERLEAF


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www.kent.ac.uk/history

HISTORY (CONT)

Making History This module introduces you to the theory and practice of history through a series of case studies, each focused on a particular historiographic problem. You are encouraged to think critically about the kinds of questions historians ask, and the methods they use to pursue answers. How do historians frame historical questions? Why do we pursue some questions but not others? How do we locate, interpret and cite evidence? Who is history written about, and for whom is it written? How do we negotiate the tension between investigating the past, critiquing the present, and imagining the future? You also develop skills in research, writing and debating that are essential for the historian and most professions. Stage 1 twilight modules Twilight modules are chosen from our popular range of undergraduate modules, and are taught in the evening for those with daytime commitments. Example modules for 2011/12 include: • The Emergence of America from European Settlement to 1880 • Monarchy and Aristocracy in England 1460-1640 • The Rise of the United States since 1880 • Victorian Britain – Politics Society and Culture.

Stage 1 daytime modules The following sample modules are available for stage-one students during the daytime at Canterbury. Each year, twilight modules are selected from a list such as this. • Autocracy, Reform and Culture in Russia, 1750-1905 • Britain and Europe 1500-1660 • Britain and the Second World War: The Home Front • Britain in the Age of Industrialisation 1660-1815 • Cinema and Society: 1930-1960 • The Emergence of America from European Settlement to 1880 • Empire in Africa, 1922-1980 • England in the Age of Chivalry • The Hundred Years War • Introduction to the History of Medicine • Introduction to Military History 1 and 2 • Medieval Europe c450-1070 • Medieval Europe c1066-1450

• Medieval Pilgrimage • Monarchy and Aristocracy in England, 1460-1640 • Renaissance Courts • The Rise of the United States since 1880 • Saints, Chroniclers and the End of Time: Narrative Art in England • Victorian Britain – Politics Society and Culture Stage 2 and 3 modules Our list of available modules is always changing, with new options being added and less popular options being retired. The following sample modules are currently being offered to undergraduates: • Anglo-Saxon England • Art for the Nation • The Art of Death: Representations, Rituals and Records in England, 1300-1450 • Britain and the American Revolution, 1750-1800


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• Britain and the Falklands War • Churchill’s Army: The British Army in the Second World War • Cinema and Society: Britain at War, 1939-1945 • The Cold War, 1941-1991 • Conflict in 17th Century Britain • The Crusades • The Cultural History of the Great War: Britain, France and Germany in Comparison • Divided Land, Divided History: Ireland, c1885-2005 • France in the Age of Absolutism • From Blitzkrieg to Baghdad: Armoured Warfare in Theory, Practice and Imagery, 1916-2003 • From Buffalo Bill to Bison Burgers: The American West in the 20th Century • The Global Burden of Disease • Gothic Art: Image and Imagination in Europe, c.11401500 • The History of Medicine, Mind, Body and Modernity, 1700-1920 • History of Modern Medicine and Medical Ethics • How the West Was Won (or Lost): The American West in the 19th Century • Inviting Doomsday: US Environmental Problems in the 20th Century • Late Stuart and Hanoverian Britain, 1688-1750 • Museums and the National Heritage • The Nature of Command • Pre-Industrial England, 15501720 • Politics, War and the State in Early Modern Europe

• The Politics of Progress: Science and Social Change, 1815-1895 • Redcoats: The British Army and Society c1660-1920 • Remaking the Body: From Robots to Recombinants • Revolution or Reform? Britain, 1815-1914 • Russia 1855-1945 Reform, Revolution and War • Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe • The Tools of Empire, 1760-1920 For a full list of modules (available at all stages), please visit our website www.kent.ac.uk/history

Teaching and assessment Teaching is usually via weekly seminars, supported by short informal lectures. You develop your historical skills by working with a wide range of primary and secondary sources and completing essays and project work. Assessment is by coursework or by a combination of coursework and examination.

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BA in History Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Canterbury. Times Various days. Details are available in the School of History handbook. Length Usually six years. Undergraduates who choose to cease study are eligible for a Certificate after two years (having passed Stage 1) or a Diploma after four years (having passed Stage 2). Entry requirements No formal entry requirements. Open to those with an interest in history and an ability to study at this level. Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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www.kent.ac.uk/arts/hpa

Tonbridge

HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY OF ART

Studying the history and philosophy of art introduces you to exciting issues and challenging ideas. Although art history has been traditionally concerned with the study of paintings, sculpture and architecture, we also explore other practices, perspectives and definitions of art with examples taken from the 14th to the 21st centuries. At Kent, we explore art history as an academic discipline which also engages with wider cultural and social values.

The part-time programme provides the opportunity to progress your studies and to extend understanding of works of art. Many of our students go on to postgraduate studies or use their studies as a way to change career direction, entering occupations such as gallery and museum administration, auctioneering and teaching. All of the modules listed are available to students on other programmes of part-time study, subject to appropriate prior levels of attainment and availability of places.

prospective students who may not have the traditional academic qualifications. What is essential, however, is the aptitude and motivation for undertaking part-time academic study. For an example of preliminary reading and some of the approaches developed through the programme, please look at: Art History: The Basics (Routledge 2008). If you have any queries, however, please contact Dr Grant Pooke on 01227 823457 directly for an informal discussion.

Programme content

Diploma in the History & Philosophy of Art This programme is suitable for students who have attained a certificate or an equivalent level of study. We also welcome nontraditional routes of entry or

You take four modules, usually over two years, to gain your diploma. The modules listed below run at Tonbridge. It may also be possible for you to take modules from the daytime undergraduate programme at Canterbury. These include: 19th-century French Painting; Photography; Renaissance Art and Architecture; and Contemporary Art and Aesthetics. Please contact Dr Pooke on 01227 823457. A selection of the modules which comprise the Diploma at the Tonbridge Centre are shown below. The modules which will be offered in the academic year 2011/12 are dated. Aesthetic Theories Starting with Enlightenment thinkers such as Kant and Hegel, and with reference to examples of art, we discuss the various definitions and


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purposes ascribed to the realm of the aesthetic. Should art and culture play their part in creating revolution as suggested by Marx? Or nullify the pain of being, as proposed by Schopenhauer? Other thinkers considered include Nietzsche, Adorno, Greenberg and Kristeva. (Code HA532, 30 credits).

of the avant-garde and the relevance of modernist theory. Artists considered include Walter Sickert, Wilson Steer, Paul Nash, Stanley Spencer, Jacob Epstein, Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore. (Code HA531, 30 credits, Sep-Dec 2011).

Art and Architecture in the United States This module looks at the theory and practice of modernist architecture and design from the Arts and Crafts movement to the ‘emigration’ of modernism to the United States in the late 1940s, from Art Nouveau, to the Bauhaus and Frank Lloyd Wright. What is the nature of modernist architectural and design theory and practice? Should form always follow function, or does this result in stasis and the denial of artistic licence? (Code HA585, 30 credits).

Dissertation Module Students are supported and given guidance on undertaking an extended essay of 8,000 words on a topic or subject area of their choice. Initial taught sessions provide guidance on formulating assignment questions, structuring the longer assignment and also provide assistance with research and methodological approaches. A pre-module orientation meeting will be held in the term before the start of the module. Although the taught lectures and group seminars will be delivered at Tonbridge, supervisory contact will require some travel to Canterbury as negotiated with the member of staff concerned. (Code HA540, 30 credits, Jan-Mar 2012)

British Art and Modernism, c1880-c1939 Between 1912 and 1916, London became one of the crucibles for the development of modernist avant-garde painting and sculpture. Italian Futurism and Cubist innovation found expression in the militant aesthetic of Vorticism and the polemical work of Wyndham Lewis and TE Hulme, which challenged the postImpressionism of the Bloomsbury group. This module considers the painting of the period, against emerging debates on the nature

European Painting and Sculpture, c1789-c1850 This module guides you through the innovations of style and content within painting, which accompanied the Enlightenment and the early industrial period. Artists studied include David, Friedrich, Delacroix, Goya, and the work of the watercolourists of the late 18th and 19th centuries. You also study

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the realists and symbolists working at the end of the 19th century. Lectures evaluate the contributions of such avant-garde figures and the role of art within wider social, political and economic change. (Code HA514, 30 credits). From Austerity to Prosperity: British Art, Architecture and Design, 1939-1979 You are introduced to the dynamic post-war developments in British art, architecture and design from the period around the Festival of Britain to the late 1970s. What was distinctive about the British art of the period and why did it develop in the way it did? (Code HA550, 30 credits). From Spectacle to Spirituality: Byzantine Art, c300-c1500 Constantine founded Constantinople and accepted Christianity in the 4th century, establishing the Byzantine Empire, which ran for more than a thousand years. Byzantine art, arising out of the pagan Roman Empire, was characterised in the early years by spectacular mosaics, such as those in Ravenna. In this module, you explore developments in icons, church decoration, monastic and court art in Byzantium; its spiritual significance and interaction with the West (during the Crusades and the Renaissance); and the re-birth of the icon in 15th-century Crete. (Code HA553, 30 credits).

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HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY OF ART (CONT)

The High Renaissance in Florence and Rome What do we mean by the term ‘Renaissance’ in the visual arts and how did it find expression in Florence and Rome in the late 15th and early 16th centuries? Lectures and seminars introduce and survey the extraordinary contribution of artists ranging from Michelangelo and Correggio to Parmigianino and Caravaggio. Is there such a thing as a distinctive ‘high Renaissance style’ and how might we characterise it? (Code HA515, 30 credits). The Modern Movement c1900-c1950 It was once said that the United States was a nation that had gone from adolescence to old age without passing through maturity, but this is hardly true for its 20th-century art and architecture. Mirroring the country’s political and economic rise, its art and architecture during the first half of the 20th century displayed all the growing maturity of an emergent nation, while from 1950 it evolved to determine the Western world’s culture. In this module, you look at various aspects of America’s vibrant 20th-century art and architecture, including realist and abstract painting, the family home, the city skyscraper, modernism and postmodernism. (Code HA513, 30 credits). Russian Art and Design c1870-c1932 For a brief time around 1912-1921, Russia arguably eclipsed Paris as a centre for modernist innovation

in art and design. The Bolshevik Revolution found its parallel in the work of artists like Malevich, Lissitsky, Goncharova and Tatlin, who for a time believed they embodied the spirit of political and social revolution. This module introduces you to the development of Russian art and design from the social agenda of the Wanderers through Symbolism and Abstraction to Stalinist proscription and the Soviet Socialist Realism of the 1930s. (Code HA533, 30 credits). Venetian Art and Architecture, c1400-1590 Venice established itself as a key player in the political and cultural histories of the Italian city-states in the 15th and 16th centuries. In this module, you explore the interplay of painting and patronage within wider Venetian institutions such as the scuole and the various contributions of painters such as Giorgione, Veronese, Titian and Tintoretto. To what extent can we talk of a distinctive Venetian aesthetic of the time? (Code HA530, 30 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via slide-based lectures and informal seminar discussions, and each module includes a gallery study visit. You are assessed by written assignments (two per module).

Diploma in the History & Philosophy of Art Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Fees do not include gallery trips. Location Tonbridge. Times Wed 1pm-3pm. Modules may also be chosen from the Canterbury daytime programme (times vary). Length Usually two years. Entry requirements Certificate in History & Philosophy of Art or certificatelevel studies in another subject. Progression Students who successfully complete the Diploma in History & Philosophy of Art may continue onto the degree programme, subject to recruitment. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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BA (Hons) degree in History & Philosophy of Art Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Tonbridge. Times Wed 1pm-3pm. Length Usually two years. Entry requirements Diploma in History & Philosophy of Art. Progression All postgraduate programmes are available on a part-time basis. Please refer to the Graduate Prospectus for details.

BA (Hons) degree in History & Philosophy of Art Students who have already successfully completed a Diploma in History & Philosophy of Art may continue onto the degree programme, subject to recruitment.

You are assessed by written assignments (two per module). For further information please contact Dr Grant Pooke, g.f.pooke@kent.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment Teaching is via slide-based lectures and informal seminar discussions, and each module includes a gallery study visit.

“I would have no hesitation in recommending the course to others. I am planning to continue from diploma to degree stage myself.” Drummond Watson History & Philosophy of Art, Tonbridge Centre

Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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Canterbury

INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES This is a professional development programme involving work-based learning and workshops. It is designed for students providing communitybased services to people with learning disabilities or working in schools. Typical students include home leaders, peripatetic team leaders, instructors, family members, community support staff, and special educational needs teachers. The programme meets the requirements of the recent Commission for Social Care guidance that managers of services for people with challenging behaviour should hold a specialist qualification. The final year of the BSc (the stand-alone Graduate Certificate or Diploma in Applied Behaviour Analysis) is approved by the Behaviour Analyst Certification Board. The Graduate Certificate provides course content only, while the Graduate Diploma provides course content and some of the required supervision hours necessary for successful students to apply for and sit the Board’s Assistant Behaviour Analyst exam.

Certificate in PersonCentred Support This programme prepares students to work with a vulnerable and, at times, complex client group. It is an evidence-based programme with the emphasis on practice, and is suitable for practitioners working with people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. The course encourages you to develop person-centred values and develops your skills so that you are able to support and encourage communication, choice, participation and independence among your clients. It also helps you to prepare for a local leadership role in families, schools, workplaces, homes and communities.

Programme content Over one year, you take the following modules. Academic Development This module provides an introduction to the academic skills you need to develop to ensure success for the rest of the course. It includes library and computing induction as well as topics such as critical thinking, essay writing, referencing and group work. Issues relating to values and consent to treatment are also examined in this module. (Code SO328, 15 credits).

Person-Centred Values and Support You explore the ethical and legal issues, and the role of values, in the development of intellectual disability services. You look at the development of approaches to individual planning and needs assessment, particularly the role of person-centred planning. You also work with an individual to support the development of a personcentred plan. (Code TZ310, 15 credits). Promoting Choice, Well-Being and Communication You study the physical, sensory and health problems commonly experienced by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the roles of health action planning and health facilitation. The module also explores a range of communication issues and you gain an understanding of the interventions that target communication skills. (Code TZ311, 15 credits). Supporting Participation and Independence This module looks at the rationale for supporting participation in community contexts by children and adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities. You use systems and structures at different levels within organisations to facilitate and maintain successful participation and teach new skills through the use of precision teaching. (Code TZ309, 15 credits).


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Certificate in PersonCentred Support Fee ÂŁ3,375 per annum (120 credits). Location Canterbury. Times A number of 2-4 day workshops. Length One year. Entry requirements NVQ2 or five GCSEs. Students must have access to work with children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Open to those who have practitioner experience or prior practitioner experiential learning. Work-Based Learning in PersonCentred Support In this module, you consolidate the knowledge and skills developed through previous modules, and apply that learning in your workplace or a comparable environment. (Code TZ312, 60 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include minilectures, individual and group exercises, some with the use of video feedback. Exercises vary in length, in some cases being guided practice simulations spread over several hours. There are exercises involving local services and people with intellectual disabilities.

Work-based learning includes the production of assessed work, systematic reflection on practice, participation in supervision/ mentoring arrangements and training/leadership of others. Assessment is mainly based on reports and videos of practical work undertaken with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This allows the integration of assessment with the development of practice.

Progression Students who successfully complete this programme may continue to the diploma level providing they can meet the other entry requirements. Further enquiries Trish Barton T: 01227 824739 E: p.m.barton@kent.ac.uk Jahanara Ahmed T: 01227 823075 E: j.ahmed@kent.ac.uk

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INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (CONT)

Diploma in Positive Behaviour Support This programme encourages a critical understanding of the factors underlying challenging behaviour. It develops your skills in conducting functionally-based assessments of challenging behaviour and in developing interventions. You also develop the skills needed to take on a local leadership role in implementing and evaluating behaviour support plans. Students who have a Certificate in Person-Centred Support and a Diploma in Positive Behaviour Support are awarded an FdSc (foundation degree) in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Programme content Over one year, you take the following modules. Assessing and Understanding Challenging Behaviour This module introduces you to functional assessment. You study personal, social, family, medical and treatment history and analyse the social, cognitive, biological, emotional and psychiatric factors contributing to challenging behaviour. (Code TZ520, 15 credits).

Designing Behaviour Support Plans This deals with the designing of behaviour support plans – you identify and design behaviour support strategies, which develop new and adaptive skills including the development of functional communication skills. (Code TZ519, 15 credits). Implementing and Evaluating Behaviour Support Plans You explore the barriers to implementation and learn how to evaluate behaviour support plans. The module looks at methods of data collection with particular reference to direct observation, and you also learn the best way of presenting and interpreting the data. (Code TZ518, 15 credits). Introduction to Positive Behaviour Support This module looks at the causes of challenging behaviour and the key elements of Positive Behaviour Support. You study models of assessment and intervention, and learn how to support behaviour change. (Code TZ517, 15 credits).

Work-Based Learning in Positive Behaviour Support Students consolidate the knowledge and skills developed through previous modules, and apply that learning in their workplace or comparable environment. (Code TZ525, 60 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include minilectures, individual and group exercises, some with the use of video feedback. Exercises vary in length, in some cases being guided practice simulations spread over several hours. We also use analysis of published papers and reviews of the literature relevant to practice, to explore the evidence base. Work-based learning includes the production of assessed work, systematic reflection on practice, participation in supervision/ mentoring arrangements and training/leadership of others. Assessment is mainly based on reports and videos of practical work undertaken with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This allows the integration of assessment with the development of practice.


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Diploma in Positive Behaviour Support

FdSc in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Fee £3,375 per annum (120 credits).

Fee £3,375 per annum (240 credits).

Location Canterbury.

Location Canterbury.

Times A number of 1-4 day workshops.

Times A number of 1-4 day workshops.

Length One year.

Length Two years.

Entry requirements Open to those who have studied at certificate level or have practitioner experience or prior practitioner experiential learning.

Entry requirements NVQ2 or five GCSEs if starting at year 1. Students must have access to work with children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Progression Students who successfully complete this programme may progress on to the degree programme. Further enquiries Trish Barton T: 01227 824739 E: p.m.barton@kent.ac.uk Jahanara Ahmed T: 01227 823075 E: j.ahmed@kent.ac.uk

Further enquiries Trish Barton T: 01227 824739 E: p.m.barton@kent.ac.uk Jahanara Ahmed T: 01227 823075 E: j.ahmed@kent.ac.uk

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BSc (Hons) degree in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities This programme is suitable for those who have completed the Diploma in Positive Behaviour Support. However, students who already have a degree may take the first four modules as a freestanding Graduate Certificate in Applied Behaviour Analysis, or all five modules for a Graduate Diploma in Applied Behaviour Analysis. The BSc prepares practitioners to support people with intellectual and developmental disabilities using a behavioural approach integrated with an ‘ordinary life’ philosophy. It enables students to work in constructive, non-aversive and ethically sound ways with people who are often marginalised and vulnerable. Students acquire expertise in theoretical and applied principles of Behaviour Analysis and develop the skills necessary to facilitate learning, self-help, adaptive functioning, community participation, and so on for children/adults with intellectual/ developmental disabilities, including autism.

Programme content During the course of the programme, you take the following modules. Concepts of Applied Behaviour Analysis In this module, you become familiar with the principles of the experimental analysis of behaviour CONTINUED OVERLEAF


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INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (CONT)

and applied behaviour analysis, and develop the ability to describe the principles of operant and respondent behaviour. You critically evaluate the strengths and limitations of applied behaviour analysis as an approach to understanding human behaviour and, specifically, the behaviour of children/adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities. (Code TZ521, 15 credits). Developing and Implementing Interventions You explore approaches to changing and developing new behaviour and the barriers to implementation. (Code TZ524, 15 credits). Observation and Analysis of Behaviour This module looks at different methods of data collection and the reliability and validity of observational data. You learn practical approaches to checking and calculating reliability and how to undertake descriptive assessment and experimental analysis including internal and external validity. (Code TZ523, 15 credits). Values, Ethics and Professional Practice This module examines ethical and legal issues confronted in professional practice. You look at issues such as choice, informed consent and capacity to consent. You examine what is meant by choice in situations where service users do not have control over resources and their surroundings,

and you consider the ethical principles underpinning the right to effective treatments and to supportive environments for persons with varying levels of intellectual/developmental disability, including autism. (Code TZ522, 15 credits). Work-Based Learning in Applied Behaviour Analysis You consolidate the knowledge and skills developed through previous modules, and apply that learning in your workplace or a comparable environment. (Code TZ526, 60 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include minilectures, individual and group exercises, some with the use of video feedback. Exercises vary in length, in some cases being guided

practice simulations spread over several hours. There are exercises involving local services and people with intellectual disabilities. We also use analysis of published papers and reviews of the literature relevant to practice to explore the evidence base. Work-based learning includes the production of assessed work, systematic reflection on practice, participation in supervision/ mentoring arrangements and training/leadership of others. Assessment is mainly based on reports and videos of practical work undertaken with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This allows the integration of assessment with the development of practice.


www.kent.ac.uk/tizard

BSc (Hons) in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Fee ÂŁ3,375 per annum (360 credits). Location Canterbury. Times A number of 1-4 day workshops. Length Three years. Entry requirements NVQ2 or five GCSEs if starting at year 1. Students must have access to work with children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Progression Please see our Graduate Prospectus for details. Further enquiries Trish Barton T: 01227 824739 E: p.m.barton@kent.ac.uk Jahanara Ahmed T: 01227 823075 E: j.ahmed@kent.ac.uk

Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma in Applied Behaviour Analysis Please note: those students who have an honours degree can take the final year of the degree programme as a stand-alone Graduate Certificate or Diploma. Please see our Graduate Prospectus or website for more details. Most students will already be in employment or have access to work with children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Tizard Centre is committed to widening participation, and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students. We consider applications from students with non-standard qualifications individually.

The year of admission and pathway will depend upon students’ prior educational attainment and practitioner experience. Accreditation of Prior Learning and Prior Experiential Learning may be possible on all programmes. Students may transfer between programmes and between levels, subject to meeting admission and progression requirements. Students who already hold the Tizard Centre Diploma in Applied Psychology of Learning Disability (Challenging Behaviour) qualification can enter directly into Stage 3. Further enquiries Trish Barton T: 01227 824739 E: p.m.barton@kent.ac.uk Jahanara Ahmed T: 01227 823075 E: j.ahmed@kent.ac.uk

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Medway

LAW

The Certificate in Law has been offered since 1985 and has attracted students from a wide range of backgrounds throughout Kent, including people who work full- or part-time and people returning to study after raising a family. The common element for all students on the programme is a wish to develop an interest in the law. Kent Law School is widely recognised as one of the leading law schools in the UK and is unique in the range of resources and opportunities it offers. These include first-class electronic resources via our website (www.kent.ac.uk/law) which are ideally suited to meet the needs of our part-time students. All modules have sections within our online learning environment, and many lectures are available as audio versions (using MP3 software) which you can access and listen to in your own time. You can sample a lecture by visiting our website.

Most students on the Certificate programme attend evening classes (usually two evenings per week during term-time). Students study in a supportive environment with space to explore fully the legal issues covered within the course. A Certificate in Law and Society is equivalent to Stage 1 of the degree programme. Students who successfully complete the certificate to a certain level may go on to Stage 2 of the LLB degree in Law. It is possible to study during the daytime, but we recommend that you contact us first if you are considering this option.

Certificate in Law and Society This programme can be taken as a stand-alone programme or as the first step towards a law degree. It is suitable for students from a wide range of professions and backgrounds.

Programme content During the course of the programme, you take the following modules. Criminal Law In this module, we examine the general principles of criminal law offences against the person and property and general defences, focusing on comparative, historical and philosophical analyses, casting particular light on the nature and aims of the criminal law.

A Critical Introduction to Law This module investigates and promotes a critical approach to topics within law and to law itself. Taking a small number of topics and debates within law, the module investigates each from a critical perspective, focusing on themes of knowledge, identity, justice and power. The aim is to enable you to acquire and develop the general skills required for critical thinking and analysis, and more particularly to consider critically our own conception of law and of the institutional structures and concepts within it. Introduction to Obligations This module introduces the law of obligations, which comprises the private law of duties and rights to which individuals and organisations are subject. Traditionally, it includes the law of contract and tort (but not property). As well as introducing some of the content, a key focus is on the institution of the common law through which most of the law of obligations has emerged. Foundations of Property ‘Property’ is something we tend to presume we know about and rarely examine as an idea or practice closely. Most often, we use it to connote an object or ‘thing’ and presume that it has something to do with ‘ownership’ of that object. This module begins to unpack and examine ideas and practices of property more closely: How are property claims constructed?


www.kent.ac.uk/law

Certificate in Law and Society Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Medway. Times Various times – evening and daytime. Length Two years. Entry requirements Mature students without normal entry qualifications are encouraged to apply. Most applicants are interviewed.

What do we mean by ‘ownership’? What happens when a number of competing ‘ownership claims’ in one object exist? Public Law I This module has four main parts: i) An introduction to the English legal system and its constitutional significance ii) Constitutionalism: What is a state? What is the relationship between the citizen and the state? What is the role of the law?

iii) Forms of government; democracy, federalism and supranational bodies iv) Constraining the power of the state: human rights, judicial review and administrative mechanisms.

Progression Students with the Certificate in Law and Society can go on to the degree programme. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment You must complete coursework essays during your studies. Modules are assessed by a combination of examination and coursework.

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LAW (CONT)

LLB (Hons) degree in Law Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Medway. Times Various times – evening and daytime. Length Six years, or four years with the Certificate in Law or an undergraduate degree.

LLB (Hons) degree in Law For those who want to continue with their studies, we offer a part-time flexible degree programme that builds on work already done in the Certificate in Law and Society. Or, if you already have an honours degree, you may be eligible to enter the degree programme at the same stage without taking the Certificate.

“I’ve really enjoyed learning that the law is not just a list of facts that are regurgitated in the exams or in front of a judge. It’s about people, and how you can use your knowledge to help them.” Alexander Wright Law, Medway campus

Completing the LLB degree gives exemption from the first set of qualifying examinations to become a solicitor or barrister, provided that you pass certain core modules within the degree (with an overall pass of at least 2.2 level).

Entry requirements We welcome applications from students with non-traditional qualifications who can demonstrate similar potential to students who have the usual A level points. Students who have the Certificate in Law and Society, or who already have a degree, are able to take the LLB degree as a four-year programme.

Details of the programme are given in Kent’s Undergraduate Prospectus.

Progression Training as a solicitor or barrister (see details in programme listing, left). Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


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STUDENT PROFILE

Gillian Flegg BA (Hons) Social Sciences, Medway campus Why did you choose to study at Kent? For me, it’s about location first and foremost because I wanted to fit my studies around my family commitments – I have three children, aged from 3 to 15. I was also impressed that Kent’s School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research was among the top research centres in the country. I work as an accredited Personal Coach and much of what I do is based on psychological study. I liked the fact that, with this degree, I could create a bias towards psychology by choosing certain modules. As I’m still working freelance, the part-time degree also had to be very flexible. I didn’t realise just how much I’d be able to dictate when I studied. I can do the school-run, start a lecture at 10 and be back home to pick up my three year-old from nursery at 12. It’s brilliant!

How’s the course going? The course is going really well. I went straight from school at 16 into a career in the retail industry. After 20 years with the Arcadia Group, I wanted to expand on my knowledge. I left Top Shop/Top Man as a successful Regional Training Manager wanting to better utilise my expertise; this meant raising my game on a host of skills. The extra support on this course has been

fantastic. Although I’ve done presentations and written hundreds of reports in my working life, I hadn’t studied for 15 years. The module I’ve enjoyed most is Sociology – I’m very keen to learn more about how structures influence people’s lives. The lecturer is one of the best and really has a style you can relate to. The other students are also a great bunch. There’s a real cross-section of people and the reasons why they’re here. I think it’s so important to learn from others.

What are facilities on campus like? They’re very good. I’ve lived in Medway most of my life and, initially, I was surprised at how great they were. There’s clearly been a huge investment. Everything you need is on tap.

What are your future plans? I feel like I’m at the start of a new career. I don’t want to work in the private sector any more; I want to do something more worthwhile with the skills I’ve got. This course gives me an insight to the voluntary and public sector, which I’m enthused about. I’m not too hung up about what my future job will be – I would just like to combine my passions.

Have you any advice for other potential students? For women in particular, I’d say that you don’t need to wait until your children go to school. You can have a young family and study at the same time. You just have to be good at time management. And, don’t be put off by the fees. When you do the maths, the debt is never as bad as the media would make you think. This course is so flexible that you can carry on working as well.


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www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Medway

SOCIAL SCIENCES

Studying Social Sciences at Kent gives you an understanding of how society works. The degree programme offers the opportunity to combine different subjects – sociology, social policy, history and psychology – which provide you with an interdisciplinary and multi-perspective approach to investigating society and people.

BSc (Hons) degree in Social Sciences Contemporary issues and concepts such as poverty, health and welfare, inequality, ethics and identity are never simple to understand, but this degree programme teaches you the theories and practical techniques you need to analyse society. You will have the opportunity to select topics and modules, taught by dedicated research-active staff, which match your interests and needs in a flexible and coherent manner.

Programme content A part-time student usually takes modules worth 60 credits a year. This means you would reach

certificate level in two years, diploma level (Stage 2) in a further two years, and degree level (Stage 3) after the final two years. In the first two years (Stage 1), all students take the following modules. Introduction to Contemporary Britain This module gives you an understanding of the key political, economic and social changes in Britain in the 20th century. The period chosen facilitates discussion of some of the main political and economic ideas and events which have influenced contemporary society, and the approaches which historians have adopted towards them. (30 credits). Introduction to Psychology This is a general introduction to the study of psychology, including its historical development, major modern fields of research and application, perspectives and key issues. (30 credits). Introduction to Sociology This module enables you to understand the role sociology has played in explaining modern society. It introduces debates about the nature of economy, polity and culture, tackling traditional issues such as class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and age. It also explores key sociological topics such as the family, community, work, education, mass media, and religion. (30 credits).


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Methods of Social Research This module provides a general foundation to the key themes, concepts and methods of social sciences. (30 credits). In addition, you choose three modules from a range of options. Social Problems and Social Policy You are introduced to the study of social policy by looking at social problems and issues, such as poverty and social exclusion, truancy, homelessness, the ageing population, domestic violence, the changing family structure, the work/life balance, and the impact of migrants and asylum seekers. (30 credits).

At both stages, you are then free to choose additional modules according to your interests. Modules are offered on Social Policy, Welfare Issues, Health Policy, Social Ethics, Gender and Work, Social History through Film, Visual Sociology, and a wide range of areas within Psychology. You are also free to choose from Criminal Justice Studies modules.

Teaching and assessment Our teaching methods include lectures, seminars, group projects and individual tutorials. Assessment is by a mixture of coursework (essays and presentations) and examination.

At Stages 2 and 3, each module is worth either 15 or 30 credits. At Stage 2, you must take two of three available modules in Research Methods in Sociology, History or Psychology (which together total 30 credits). At Stage 3, there is a compulsory Dissertation module. (30 credits).

BSc (Hons) in Social Sciences Fee £730 per annum (60 credits). Location Medway. Times Day and evening. Length Students normally reach certificate level in two years, diploma level (Stage 2) in a further two years, and degree level (Stage 3) after the final two years. Entry requirements A levels or a relevant Access course, or the equivalent. Mature students with nonstandard qualifications or work experience are welcome to apply. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

“I visited Medway and liked the look of the campus – I was really impressed with the library. The psychology and sociology modules really complement each other and moving between the two quite different disciplines is a challenge but also enjoyable.” Chloe Dower BSc (Hons) degree in Social Sciences Medway campus

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Canterbury

SUBSTANCE MISUSE MANAGEMENT The Diploma and BSc in Substance Misuse Management provide you with the knowledge – both academic and skills-based – that you need to provide therapeutic care in an alcohol/drug treatment setting. The programmes take a broad view, looking at various treatment approaches, both from the perspective of the agency and in terms of the skills you need to work with clients. You also look at factors that include: social context and behaviour; individual psychology; family background; care planning; therapeutic interventions; treatment outcomes; service delivery; inequalities in social and health care; and social inclusion. These programmes incorporate the Drug and Alcohol National Occupational Standards (DANOS) and the NHS/National Treatment Agency’s ‘Models of Care’ framework with an emphasis on building recovery in communities.

Diploma in Substance Misuse Management This programme provides a framework for understanding the nature of addiction processes from biological, psychological and social perspectives, and focuses on the settings and approaches within which addiction treatment is provided. It is suitable for practitioners working in Tier 2, Tier 3 and Tier 4 services for people with drug/alcohol problems.

DID YOU KNOW? Kent was ranked 10th in the UK in the 2010 Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey.

You study a range of modules over two years: these include core modules and chosen modules.

Programme content All students take the following four modules: • Perspectives on Alcohol and Drug Use and Misuse (Code KI500, 30 credits) • Effective Interventions for Substance Misusers (Code KI501, 30 credits) • Policy, Processes and Practice in Substance Misuse Services (Code KI507, 15 credits) • Work-Based Learning (Code KI508, 15 credits).


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You then have the option to choose one of the following two modules: • Engaging, Assessing and Motivating Clients (Code KI509, 15 credits) • Service Management: Delivery of Services (Code KI522, 15 credits). Your final module is chosen from the following two options: • Complex Needs: An Integrated Approach to Dual Diagnosis (Code KI523, 15 credits) • Drugs and the Criminal Justice System (Code KI531, 15 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is based on workshops, lectures and discussion groups. Assessment is based on essays, seminar presentations and structured work-based learning. You are encouraged to link the material in the module to your own professional environment by developing skills and techniques and by evaluating practices within your own workplace.

Diploma in Substance Misuse Management Fee £2,315 per annum. The programme is 120 credits in total and students usually study 60 credits per year. £4,205 per annum for overseas students. Location Canterbury. Times One week per module; KI500 module: two weeks. Length Two years. Entry requirements To study this programme, you need:

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• relevant experience or employment in health/social care • support from your employing agency and access to clients with problems of addiction. If you are not currently working within the field, you must be able to demonstrate the availability of a placement in a work setting with appropriate mentoring • references indicating your academic and personal suitability for the programme. You will also be asked to attend an interview. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

• certificate-level learning relevant to the field (or, in some cases, evidence of an equivalent level of learning through prior experience and/or non-certificated educational/training events)

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STUDENT PROFILE

Stacey Bartlett Substance Misuse Management, Canterbury campus Why did you choose to study Substance Misuse Management at Kent? It was an ideal course for me as it directly links to the work I do in the drug misuse field. I’d heard through the different agencies that I work with that the course was very useful and informative so its good reputation also helped. My employer wanted all front-line staff to be DANOS accredited and this programme was a pathway to that. The course is held near where I live so that was also a factor.

How has it helped you in your professional career?

How do you think your course is going?

My course has helped greatly in my work as it has enabled me to get a qualification in my chosen field. It has given me a greater understanding of all the different aspects of substance misuse and also given me tools to use in my everyday work with my clients. I have notably bettered my counselling skills and knowledge of the funding process.

The course has gone well. It is a good forum for open discussion and debate. The highlight for me, so far, has been the counselling module which has given me practical skills and tips to use at work with clients.

What do you think of your lecturers? There has been a lot of support on hand if it is needed and the convenor, is only a phone call or email away. The lectures have all been of a high standard and very informative. We also have lectures from different agencies and professionals and I have found those very useful – you get a good mix of fact and practical skills.

And fellow students? Generally, the students have been very supportive and I feel comfortable in their company. We have all got to know each other well and look forward to seeing each other. Within any group there is a mix of opinion but I feel, on the whole, it has been managed well.

Would you recommend the course to others? Most definitely. I already have! It has been a good experience.


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SUBSTANCE MISUSE MANAGEMENT (CONT)

BSc (Hons) degree in Substance Misuse Management This degree programme provides a comprehensive study of the psychological, social and biological aspects of addictive behaviours, plus training in research methods and the development of a research project. The degree is aimed at a wide range of professionals working in health care, counselling, criminal justice and social support agencies. The programme looks at the wider relationship between drugs and alcohol use and social processes and policy formation in the UK and internationally. You gain a better understanding of addiction and management of addiction in different settings, including social care, drug and alcohol treatment, the criminal justice system and service management.

Programme content All students take the following five modules: • Psychological and Biological Aspects of Dependency (Code KI511, 30 credits) • Drugs and Culture (Code KI525, 15 credits) • Homelessness and Pathways to Social Inclusion (Code KI524, 15 credits) • Research Methods (Code KI536, 15 credits) • Research Project (Code KI533, 30 credits). You also choose one of the following two modules: • Drugs and the Criminal Justice System (Code KI531, 15 credits) • Complex Needs: An Integrated Approach to Dual Diagnosis (Code KI523, 15 credits).

Teaching and assessment Teaching is based on workshops and discussion groups, and assessment is based on essays and seminar presentations.

BSc (Hons) degree in Substance Misuse Management Fee £2,315 per annum. The programme is 120 credits in total and students usually study 60 credits per year. £4,205 per annum for overseas students. Location Canterbury. Times One week per module. Length Two years. Entry requirements To study this programme, you need: • diploma-level learning in a relevant subject • references indicating your academic and personal suitability for the programme. You will also be asked to attend an interview. Progression Students who successfully complete the degree can apply for a postgraduate research opportunity at Kent. Please contact the department for details, or refer to the Graduate Prospectus. Further enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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ADDITIONAL PROGRAMMES

Programmes at our Associate and Partner Colleges

Additional degree programmes at the University of Kent

The University of Kent works closely with its Associate and Partner Further Education Colleges to offer a range of vocationally related higher education qualifications. These programmes are designed to give students an understanding of the world of work and help them to develop a broad range of job-related skills. Courses are taught in the colleges by college staff but lead to a University of Kent qualification.

The degree programmes listed here can be studied on a part-time basis. You study alongside full-time students in classes held during the day and usually complete your degree in six years.

For details of the entry requirements for these programmes, please see the Undergraduate Prospectus.

K College • HNC Construction • HNC Electrical/Electronic Engineering

MidKent College • HNC/HND Applied Chemistry • FdA/HND Business and Management • FdEng Civil Engineering • FdSc Construction • FdEng/HNC Engineering • FdSc/HNC/HND Information Technology • FdSc Life Science Laboratory Technology

For details of the entry requirements for these programmes, please see the Undergraduate Prospectus. • Art and Film (Canterbury) • Biological Anthropology (Canterbury) • Business Administration* (Canterbury) • Business Studies with a Year in Industry (Medway) • Criminology** (Canterbury) • Economics (Canterbury) • English, American and Postcolonial Literature (Canterbury) • English and American Literature* (Canterbury) • English and American Literature and Creative Writing (Canterbury) • Fine Art (Medway) • Health and Social Care (Canterbury) • Hispanic Studies* (Canterbury) • Italian** (Canterbury) • Medical Anthropology (Canterbury)

• Philosophy* (Canterbury) • Politics and International Relations* (Canterbury) • Psychology* (Canterbury) • Religious Studies* (Canterbury) • Social Anthropology* (Canterbury) • Social Policy* (Canterbury) • Sociology* (Canterbury) • Sport and Exercise for Health (Medway) • Sport and Exercise Management (Medway) • Sports Science (Medway) • Sports Therapy (Medway) • Visual and Performed Arts (Canterbury) • War Studies (Canterbury)

*These subjects are also available as part of joint honours programmes, some of which you may be able to study part-time. **These subjects are only available as joint honours programmes. For further details on all of our undergraduate degree programmes, see the Undergraduate Prospectus.


www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

VISIT THE UNIVERSITY

Come along for an Open Day and see for yourself what it is like to be a student at Kent.

Open Days Open Days are held in the summer and autumn for potential students, and their families and friends, to have a look round the campus. The day includes a wide range of subject displays, demonstrations and informal lectures and seminars, and the chance to tour the campus with current students to view accommodation and facilities. For more information, see www.kent.ac.uk/opendays

Drop-in days at the Tonbridge Centre Our informal drop-in days give you the opportunity to learn about the subjects and types of courses that we offer, as well as visiting the centre and meeting our staff. Booking is not necessary. • Wednesday 22 June • Tuesday 19 July • Thursday 8 September All sessions run from 10am-3pm.

Informal visits You are welcome to visit the campus at any time. We produce a leaflet that can take you on a self-guided tour and you may be able to meet up with an academic member of staff. For more details, please contact the Information and Guidance Unit.

More information For more information about the University, or to order another subject leaflet, please contact the Information and Guidance Unit.

INFORMATION DAYS Canterbury 9 July 2011 14 September 2011 8 October 2011

T: 01227 827272 Freephone (UK only): 0800 975 3777 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Medway 25 June 2011 15 October 2011

You can also write to us at:

Tonbridge 14 June 2011

The Information and Guidance Unit, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ,

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www.kent.ac.uk/part-time

NOTES

Terms and conditions: The University reserves the right to make variations to the content and delivery of courses and other services, or to discontinue courses and other services, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary. If the University discontinues any course it will endeavour to provide a suitable alternative. To register for a programme of study, all students must agree to abide by the University Regulations (available online at: www.kent.ac.uk/regulations). Data protection: for administrative, academic and health and safety reasons, the University needs to process information about its students. Full registration as a student of the University is subject to your consent to process such information.


We hold Information Days at our Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge campuses throughout the year. For more information, see: www.kent.ac.uk/opendays

University of Kent, The Registry, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 (0)1227 764000 E: information@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk

DPC 111027 05/11 PUB216

COME AND VISIT US

Part-time study at Kent  

A guide to part-time study at the University of Kent - The UK's European university

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