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ksa

KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 2017

EXHIBITION 2017 WWW.KENT.AC.UK/ARCHITECTURE

KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE


DISSECTING THE LOGO

Angle of KSA icon set to 10 o’clock, marking the start and finish of the show

Starting point of each line creates the outline of ‘17’, the year of the show

ksa

The angle of each line is dependant on the location of its start point. The angle is a tangent to the number outline. 60 lines emerge from each of the numbers 1 and 7 (120 total), symbolising the 60 seconds in a minute and 60 minutes in an hour

The length of the line is dependant on how the angle of the line relates to the current time of day. The image seen above represents the generated logo at 10am/pm


WITHOUT THE GENEROSITY AND SUPPORT OF OUR SPONSORS THE 2017 EXHIBITION WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN POSSIBLE.

THANK YOU TO: STUDENT PROJECT GRANT SCHEME BDB DESIGN RX ARCHITECTS CROWDFUND SUPPORTERS HMY MOOSEJAW WOODWORKS

Moosejaw Woodworks Moosejaw Woodworks Unit 1, 1, 22 Beresford Beresford Road Road Unit Whitstable, Kent Whitstable, Kent.CT5 CT51JP 1JP

MOOSEJAW BUSINESS CARD.indd 1

01227 281806 / 07931 287807 01227 281806 info@moosejawwoodworks.com moosejawwoodworks@gmail.com www.moosejawwoodworks.com www.moosejawwoodworks.com

20/02/2012 21:46


+44(0)1227 456699 info@bdb-design.co.uk www.bdb-design.co.uk

ARCHITECTURE

PLANNING

PROPERTY


MADE POSSIBLE BY:

Student Project Grant Scheme

The Student Projects Grant Scheme, funded by the Kent Opportunity Fund, seeks to enable students to be more entrepreneurial. The scheme allows individuals to bid for funds, provided by donations from our alumni, in order to run their own projects. The scheme has been very successful and in 2016 we had ÂŁ50,000 available to fund student projects. This year the Student Projects Grant Scheme has enabled some incredible projects. Projects have helped run The Canterbury University Film Festival, set up summer schools in Paris and Brussels and funded a public exhibition organised by the Kent Architectural Student Association. The true value of the scheme, however, is the philanthropic spirit inspired in our students. Philanthropy is most powerful when it inspires future action and we hope that our students will take their experience of the Students Projects Grant Scheme into the wider world and carry a charitable spirit far beyond their years with us. Student Project Grant Scheme 2016-2017


CONTENTS EXHIBITION 2017 KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

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01

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION 8 HEAD OF SCHOOL KASA FOREWORD

10 12

02 M ARCH

M ARCH 14 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 ARTEFACT DISSERTATION PEDAGOGY

03

COMMUNITY 322 CASE CREAte KASA STUDENT SUCCESS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS CREDITS

324 326 328 330 332 334

BA (HONS)

BA (HONS) 128 STAGE 3 STAGE 2 STAGE 1 POSTGRADUATE 292

04

16 42 70 100 122 124 126

06 RESEARCH & COMMUNITY

130 280 286

POSTGRADUATE

MA ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN MSC ARCH. & CONSERVATION MSC ARCH. & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS MA ARCH. VISUALISATION PHD IN ARCHITECTURE INTERNATIONAL 314

294 298

302 306 310

05 INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

OPPORTUNITIES 314 FIELD TRIPS VENICE BIENNALE TESSENOW SOCIETY

316 318 320 7


01

INTRODUCTION

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HEAD OF SCHOOL PROFESSOR DON GRAY Ten was easy. Our celebration of ten years of Kent School of Architecture was simple to communicate, and the competition which resulted in the design of the exhibition catalogue in 2015 was a celebration of the number 10, albeit a Roman numeral “X”. The catalogue allowed us to look back as well as forward. Last year, our eleventh, gave us clues about teamwork, double digits and continuation. I focused on the Story of the Hare, which should feature large in this year’s exhibition. This year is our twelfth year of producing a catalogue to accompany the KSA End of Year Exhibition. Twelve is an interesting number. It is highly composite and the smallest to include as factors numbers 1 to 4. Duodecimal – the counting system based on the number 12 - has some advantages over the base-10 decimal method of counting. Ten is factorable only by 2 and 5 whereas 12 can be divided by 2, 3, 4 and 6. The number twelve dominated in early civilisations. There are twelve months in a year, twelve signs of the zodiac. Units of time are in duodecimal multiples: 24 hours in a day, 60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour. There are 12 inches in an imperial foot, and there were 12 pennies in a British shilling. Many other items were counted – are counted - by the dozen or in multiples of twelve. Old English (or Anglo Saxon) had a duodecimal counting system - which is why our “teens” start at thirteen, and eleven and twelve have non-derived names. Having ten fingers is the usual reason given for the dominance of the decimal system. However, counting in duodecimal (or dozenal) is simple too. Using the thumb as a pointer, it is easy to count to twelve on one hand using the bones of the fingers, while noting multiples on the fingers of the opposite hand. Numbers are important. As the School continues to grow in reputation, it retains its place in the top ten of the Guardian University League Tables 2018. We are third for employability, an excellent result. As the KSA adventure continues, this catalogue serves as a reminder of the extraordinary quality of creative work produced by our students. The catalogue is designed, printed and published by the students themselves – the product of many hands. It is also a yearbook of the many activities undertaken by staff and students over the past twelve months. (There is that number 12 again…) I am sure that you will enjoy the 2017 edition. Professor Don Gray Head of School Chair of Standing Conference of Heads of Schools of Architecture – SCHOSA 10


Fig. 1: Counting in duodecimal

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KASA FOREWORD FROM THE STUDENTS

The students of KASA believe that by building a community between all programmes we can inform a positive learning environment and together produce exceptional results. In practicing this philosophy, KASA organised a variety of whole school events which were integrated into the school calendar. Whether these were academic events such as open lectures or social events such as film nights, all activities sought to integrate students within the school. The End of Year Show was proposed as an opportunity to extend student integration beyond school programmes and engage with the external community. Drawing on the Show’s theme of time, the event would also encourage prospective and former students to attend the event. It was therefore fitting that the show opened with a notion towards its future by hosting organised outreach workshops running over the course of the morning. These invited local school students of various ages to participate in design based activities. Collaboration with local schools aimed to integrate students within the local community. The event also aims to look to its past as it places new emphasis on its predecessors. The evening features a dedicated alumni event which includes an interactive networking map, allowing former and graduating students to mark their career locations since leaving KSA. The event provides a unique platform for networking while creating a visual art installation; in this way, alumni will recognise their continued significance to the school community. The idea to expand the event amongst a much larger community was encouraged and supported by the Student Project Grant Scheme, we therefore express our utmost gratitude to the Scheme. This year KASA used a blog to record our progress and demonstrate our ethos of unity, pride, commitment and dedication in curating the event. A complilation of photos and videos recorded students working together on the creation of the catalogue and show. (https://ksaexhibition2017.tumblr.com/) Charles Hope Stage 5 MArch Kayleigh Buttigieg & Mandy Roberts KASA Presidents 2016-17 12


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02 M ARCH

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE RIBA PART 2

Configured into a series of discrete and specialised teaching groups or ‘Units’ constituted by a blended population of both Stage 4 and 5 students for the teaching of design (and technology); this year the MArch operated four Units, reassuming the simple 1,2,3,4 nomenclature the programme has evolved and diversified from since the initiation of a Unit system four years ago. Aside from the redistribution of title numbers, Units 1 & 3 retained their teaching teams. New Unit 2 saw Unit Leader Diana Cochrane joined by former Technology_5 tutor Matthew Woodthorpe. Brand-new Unit 4 jointly led by Annarita Papeschi and Mattia Gambardella takes the MArch into exciting new territory of non-traditionally visited geographic environments. Their departure point is a forensic ‘data-mining’ of social media #sentimentanalysis, conjured into complex data models, interpolated into architectural propositions. Unit 1 (Michael Richards and Michael Holms Coats) Great Expectations: The Hoo Peninsula Unit 2 (Diana Cochrane and Matthew Woodthorpe) Walworth and Elephant Dreams: In between utopias Unit 3 (Adam Cole and George Thompson) The Thousand Dreams: London’s Square Mile Unit 4 (Annarita Papeschi and Mattia Gambardella) Outlands: Uncharted Territories – Iceland 14


The MArch promotes Unit-thesis-specific field trips in the autumn term and this year journeyed to Essex; Amsterdam and Rotterdam; Vienna and Budapest; and Iceland (as beneficiaries of successful parallel bids against the Faculty of Humanities Internationalisation Fund & Faculty Mobility Fund) respectively. Further abroad and closer to home two Stage 5 students spent their autumn term studying abroad at Virginia Tech (USA) whilst one Stage 4 student is currently enjoying her spring and summer term in Venice. At the same time we welcomed incoming Erasmus students from Lille and Venice, for the academic year. This year the MArch enjoyed considerable success at international and national level. Current Stage 5 student Louise Cook represented the school as a British Council ‘Venice Fellow’ at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, while MArch students Abbie Sobik, Robert Joyce, and Charlie Hope received a special invitation to participate in the government’s Thames Estuary Commission (formerly chaired by Lord Heseltine) with direct influence on informing future planning policy for the region. Recent MArch graduates were also recognised this year for their graduating thesis design projects: James Bussey (MArch Unit 3 2016) won the RIBA President’s Medal ‘Serjeant Award’; whilst Jennifer Bull (MArch Unit 1 2014) and Hannah Couper (MArch Unit 1 2015) won SPAB Philip Webb Award 2016 Book Prizes. Following the recent validation visit by the Board of Architects, Singapore (BoAS), KSA, and specifically the MArch programme, is now listed by the BoAS as accredited, for the purposes of those seeking registration in Singapore; whilst as the end-of-year show, Exit 2017 opens, we hope also to be able to report a successful validation visit by the Malaysian Board of Architects (LAM).

Michael Richards 15


UNIT 1 GREAT EXPECTATIONS

When Charles Dickens opens his 1860 novel Great Expectations with Pip tending the graves of his parents and five siblings, he exposes a debate on bloodline, genetic and social inheritance. Dickens’s canvases for Great Expectations are the North Kent marshes of the Hoo Peninsula. Dickens drew on his affection for the area in which he was raised as a child, and lived as an adult. Unit One’s interests are similarly vested in the county. We believe the past is never far behind us, and that our challenge is to critique our cultural landscapes to unearth their stories, and to posit architectural propositions for their future. Our work develops fundamental attitudes to design practice and methodology, and is rooted in making. The Hoo Peninsula could be said to have paralleled the same break in the arc of ‘natural order’ that forms the central theme of Dickens’s Great Expectations. A major research project commissioned by Historic England and published in 2015 formed our point of departure this year as Unit 1 engaged with Kent’s isolated Hoo Peninsula, Isle of Grain, and the (Yantlet) channel that separates them. Historic England’s thematic tripartite assertion is that the Hoo’s character is a legacy from the activities of agriculture and fishing, national defence, and industry and innovation respectively. We are particularly interested in the conception that if the past exists to inform the present, then the present informs the future. When that’s speculated upon, salt harvesting, smuggling, agrarian land reclamation, prison hulks, cement mining, gunpowder manufacture, long range munitions testing (here is an amusing link to our field-trip to Essex), aborted new-town coastal resorts, declining transportation infrastructure, fossil fuel storage, power station decommissioning, and the still-born Thames Estuary Airport, offer an intriguing mix of time-related readings – how 16


place, space, time, movement and light might relate to a future architecture of this part of the county. We first engaged with these notions in a series of iterative, short projects - the design, construction, deployment of a Pin Hole Camera, the processing of its captured recordings, and then a series of ‘live’ Camera Obscura - before students were asked to design individual ‘Observatory’ structures on the banks of the Yantlet Channel. Emerging themes became foregrounded on landscape, free from the constraints of programme. A temporal dialogue with the landscape established, individual students dispersed to develop critical architectures within the peninsula’s diverse cultural landscape. This year Unit 1 thesis projects included Stage 5: A Pheasant Shootery, Analogue Radio Theatre, Live Stock Market, Secular Women’s Priory, combined Gin Distillery/Dispensary/Mosquito Hatchery, Silicosis Research Centre, Psoriasis Treatment Spa, Equidae Companionship Centre. Stage 4: Memorial Parachute Pavilion, Centre for Meteorology and Archaeology, Centre for Oak Gall Ink Tattoo Art Graphic History, Equestrian Therapy Centre, Apiary and Botanical Photographic Archive, Cystic fibrosis Treatment Clinic, Offenders Rehabilitation Centre, Botanical Garden, and Centre for Contemporary Alchemy. Unit 1 Leaders: Michael Richards & Michael Holms Coats Technical Tutors: Tim Carlyle; Lawrence Friesen Guest Critics:

Luciano Cardellicchio; Diana Cochrane; Adam Cole; Charles Drozynski; Mattia Gambardella; Kyriakos Katsaros; Vincent Nowak; Annarita Papeschi; George Thomson; Lorenzo Vianello; Seamus Ward; Matthew Woodthorpe

Collaborators:

Alison Bucknall, The Churches Conservation Trust; Philippa Cheetham; Roanna Mitchell, School of Arts; Matthew Orme; Neal Ross, Allhallows Holiday Park, Shaniqua

Michael Richards Unit 1 Leader 17


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JONATHAN BUSH, Stage 5 Defining the Western boundary of the Hoo Peninsula, the ‘Bombhole’ is an abandoned canal boat passing place which breaks the Strood and Higham tunnels. A pheasant shooting ranch, linked by rail to the city, has been assembled from peninsula’s obsolete and redundant infrastructure, reclaimed via the Hoo rail line. 19


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LOUISE GRACE COOK, Stage 5 Cooling Radio Station, built in 1939, was used to communicate with Lawrenceville, USA. Inspired by the work of Eduardo Paolozzi and transatlantic 1950s architecture, this project builds upon Cooling station to include a radio theatre for David Niven’s rendition of George Orwell’s 1984, an archival space for the tinkering of vintage Bakelite radios and a receiving house for historic short wave radio signals. 21


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KEY: 01. EXISTING BRICK WALL PERIMETER TO HOLDING 02. PROPOSED CAST INSITU CONCRETE RETAINING WALL/DEFENCE 03. PRE-CAST CONCRETE SLURRY DRAIN (MIDDEN)

04. UNTREATED EUROPEAN OAK FRAME REF: BS5756:2007 VISUAL GRADING OF HARDWOOD SPECIFICATION. UV SENSITIVE GEOTEXTILE FABRIC CLADDING W/ PROPRIETARY RATCHET STRAP RESTRAINT

05. GAS LAMP FITTING 06. PRE-CAST CONCRETE GUTTER 07. CONTIGUOUS PILE AND CAP 08. SHOTCRETE, TANKING DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE, CAVITY DRAIN MEMBRANE, DRAIN AND

09. INSULATED PRE-CAST CONCRETE PANEL, RUSTICASTED FINISH TO MAXIMISE INTERNAL FACE SURFACE AREA 10. THERMAL LABRYRINTH/RAFT FOUNDATION 11. INTERMEDIARY DRAINAGE RUNNEL

12. PRE-CAST CONCRETE STRUCTURAL BARRIER 13. PRE-CAST CONCRETE POST, EMBOSSED 14/15. INSITU CAST TEXTURED CONCRETE PANEL PRE-CAST CONCRETE SEATING MODULE (REF DETAIL DRAWING)

16. ETFE INFLATED DOORS INTO THERMALLY CONTROLLED AUDITORIUM 17. RECEIVING POCKET FOR TEMPORARY FLOORING SUBSTRUCTURE 18. SLURRY GULLEY

19. PUMPED SEWAGE PIPE 20. MAIN RING: REMOVABLE FENCING, WEIGHING SCALES, HGV AIR SUSPENSION, SERVER ROOM & SAFE 21. LED DISPLAY BOARD

22. METHANE FUELLED SPOTLIGHTS: LAMBDA OXYGEN SENSORY, CATALYTIC CONVERTER FOR CARBON MONOXIDE EMISSIONS 23. PRE-CAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL 24. ETFE CUSHION, 3 PANEL SYSTEM, FRITTED

INTERNAL CUSHIONS FOR VARIABLE SOLAR GAIN 25. GAS FEED 26. ETFE ROOF PANELS 27. HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM 28. AIR OPERATED ETFE DOOR

29/30. SLURRY RUNNELS 31. EXISTING BARN FOUNDATION 32/33. EXISTING OAK FRAME W/ELM BOARDING 34. ASBESTOS DEBRIS TROUGH 35. METHANE EXTRACTION

36. PRE-CAST CONCRETE SUPPORT/DEFENCE 37/38. SEALED ETFE ENCLOSURE TO EXISTING ASBESTOS ROOF 39. VENTILATED RIDGE FILTER

SWIGSHOLE BUILDING SECTION AA, 1:50 DETAIL DESIGN TECH 5; UNIT 1 CHARLES HOPE

KEY: 01. EXISTING BRICK WALL PERIMETER TO HOLDING 02. PROPOSED CAST INSITU CONCRETE RETAINING WALL/DEFENCE 03. PRE-CAST CONCRETE SLURRY DRAIN (MIDDEN)

04. UNTREATED EUROPEAN OAK FRAME REF: BS5756:2007 VISUAL GRADING OF HARDWOOD SPECIFICATION. UV SENSITIVE GEOTEXTILE FABRIC CLADDING W/ PROPRIETARY RATCHET STRAP RESTRAINT

05. GAS LAMP FITTING 06. PRE-CAST CONCRETE GUTTER 07. CONTIGUOUS PILE AND CAP 08. SHOTCRETE, TANKING DAMP PROOF MEMBRANE, CAVITY DRAIN MEMBRANE, DRAIN AND

09. INSULATED PRE-CAST CONCRETE PANEL, RUSTICASTED FINISH TO MAXIMISE INTERNAL FACE SURFACE AREA 10. THERMAL LABRYRINTH/RAFT FOUNDATION 11. INTERMEDIARY DRAINAGE RUNNEL

12. PRE-CAST CONCRETE STRUCTURAL BARRIER 13. PRE-CAST CONCRETE POST, EMBOSSED 14/15. INSITU CAST TEXTURED CONCRETE PANEL PRE-CAST CONCRETE SEATING MODULE (REF DETAIL DRAWING)

16. ETFE INFLATED DOORS INTO THERMALLY CONTROLLED AUDITORIUM 17. RECEIVING POCKET FOR TEMPORARY FLOORING SUBSTRUCTURE 18. SLURRY GULLEY

19. PUMPED SEWAGE PIPE 20. MAIN RING: REMOVABLE FENCING, WEIGHING SCALES, HGV AIR SUSPENSION, SERVER ROOM & SAFE 21. LED DISPLAY BOARD

22. METHANE FUELLED SPOTLIGHTS: LAMBDA OXYGEN SENSORY, CATALYTIC CONVERTER FOR CARBON MONOXIDE EMISSIONS 23. PRE-CAST CONCRETE FLOOR PANEL 24. ETFE CUSHION, 3 PANEL SYSTEM, FRITTED

INTERNAL CUSHIONS FOR VARIABLE SOLAR GAIN 25. GAS FEED 26. ETFE ROOF PANELS 27. HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEM 28. AIR OPERATED ETFE DOOR

29/30. SLURRY RUNNELS 31. EXISTING BARN FOUNDATION 32/33. EXISTING OAK FRAME W/ELM BOARDING 34. ASBESTOS DEBRIS TROUGH 35. METHANE EXTRACTION

36. PRE-CAST CONCRETE SUPPORT/DEFENCE 37/38. SEALED ETFE ENCLOSURE TO EXISTING ASBESTOS ROOF 39. VENTILATED RIDGE FILTER

SWIGSHOLE BUILDING SECTION AA, 1:50 DETAIL DESIGN TECH 5; UNIT 1 CHARLES HOPE

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KEY: 01. CATTLE ENTRANCE 02. AUDIENCE ENTRANCE 03. WALKWAY 04. POUND/WASH

05. PENS 06. REFUGE 07. METHANE HARVESTING TANK 08. SIGNAL TOWER 09. RACE

10. OWNER’S BAR 11. MAIN RING 12. AUCTIONEER’S PODIUM 13. LAIRAGE 14. YARD

15. AUDIENCE ENTRANCE/ BOOT ROOM/ CAMERA OBSCURA/ 16. FARMER’S ENTRANCE/ MARKET

17. MACHINERY/FEED STORE 18. GALLERY LEVEL 19. METHANE/HEAT RECOVERY

THE MENEPARISHE LIVESTOCK THEATRE EXPLODED ISOMETRIC, 1:100 A0 THE MEAN PARISH DESIGN 5B; UNIT 1 CHARLES HOPE

CHARLES HOPE, Stage 5 The Meneparishe Agricultural Theatre speculates on the diversification of farming practice. Early studies included the Yantlet Creek Cattle Observatory and deployment of a Camera Obscura. The project investigated the last Kentish cattle mart and proposed an alternative experiential typology in light of the discontinuation of EU farming subsidies in Britain. 23


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ANDREA KING, Stage 5 My project (Receptaculum Femina: The Spiritual Retreat for Female Pilgrims) was based on the site of a former priory in Church Street, Higham (1148 - 1521), bordering the Hoo Peninsula. The building was formed from manipulating the speculated plan of the priory. From this, the building itself became a journey for women embarking on a spiritual pilgrimage in order to relieve the stresses of modern life. 25


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JILL MURRAY, Stage 5 Shade House, located on the Hoo Peninsula, was built in the late 18th C. for smuggling contraband to London. Its only defences were the malarial marshes and its inland facing windows. The project aimed to convert the property into a gin house and distillery whilst maintaining the spirit of the smuggler. 27


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GEOFFREY POMEROY, Stage 5 The Brice Institute is a facility for the diagnosis, physiological and psychological treatment of Silicosis. The project is sited on the Higham Creek mud-flats, excavated in 1930 by Solomon J Brice’s team of ‘Muddies’, to extract silica for cement production. 29


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JADE SIMM, Stage 5 Re-purposing the discontinued Kingsnorth Power Station for the extraction of salt led to providing a spa on site to treat sufferers of psoriasis. Designed through collage, the focus relied on the decomposition of various materials reflecting the condition of the patient’s skin. 31


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BENJAMIN WOOD, Stage 5 My final design project has led me to explore the companionship of thoroughbred race horses and neglected donkeys. Observation and movement were key themes of my scheme and this was discovered by working through detailed sections of the building to highlight the hierarchical status of the animals. 33


MAHAM NEHA ANSARI, Stage 4 The observatory set out a programme in which the memory of a WWII Spitfire plane crash is observed when a canvas, bathed in a light sensitive solution is exposed to a ray of sunlight on the anniversary of the incident, and subsequently dried, folded and stored in a mausoleum. The excess solution would then be collected by skimmers used to control oil spills, and displayed in ‘vessels’ of memories. 34


KAYLEIGH BUTTIGIEG, Stage 4 This project interacts with its site through section by identifying the relationship between the landscape and the weather. It also explores the concepts of time, weathering and decay in proposing a hybrid research centre for archaeology and meteorology. Further, inspiration has been drawn from its location on the WWI explosives factory on Cliffe Marshes. 35


TESSA DODDS, Stage 4 The project is an equine assisted therapy centre, particularly using equine assisted therapy to help children with autism. The site is an existing ammunitions depot on Lodge Hill dating back to the First World War. The architecture is informed by 3 sets of criteria – the horse scale, the particular needs of autistic children and the existing architecture on the site. 36


NATALIE FRENCH, Stage 4 This scheme is centred around restoring the wildflower landscape of Egypt Bay, and the documenting and archiving of this landscape. Both bees and humans co-exist within a u-social community, where they document and archive the ecology through honey production and analogue film, respectively. The architectural vernacular is informed by the processes of both disciplines. 37


TIMOTHY LINCE, Stage 4 

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A cystic fibrosis treatment clinic specialises in salt inhalation within the Stoke Saltings on the south eastern coast of the Hoo Peninsula. Inspired by studies of capillary action and evaporation, the spatial design and pathways induce a varying respiratory rate within saline atmospheres to alleviate symptoms.


CHRISTOPHER LONGMAN, Stage 4 The Redemption is sited at the ruined kilns on Cliffe Creek, the project in the Hoo Peninsula drew from Cliffe’s cement history and the peninsula’s prison hulk past. The project proposed reviving a single kiln for the production of historic Portland cement, to be worked and occupied by former convicts seeking redemption upon their release. 39


ORHAN KEMAL UNLU, Stage 4 A research and psychotherapy facility on St Marys Hoo, of the Hoo Peninsula, that employs and specializes in the technology and practices of alchemy. Thematically linked to the vernacular typology of agricultural architecture. Exploring the concepts of time, transient space and repetition, and the design mechanics of observation, kinetics & motion and contested zones. 40


RAPHAEL HEATON-CATELIN, Stage 4

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UNIT 2 WALWORTH AND ELEPHANT DREAMS: IN-BETWEEN UTOPIAS

“Architects have always dreamed of building a better world, dreams that were realised on a gigantic new scale in the twentieth century, but since the 1970s this ambition has faded – so why did we stop thinking about tomorrow?” Douglas Murphy AR June 2016 The previous generation “baby boomers’” simple steps to social mobilisation have long gone. We face Brexit, ‘austerity Britain’, ‘generation rent’, mass migration, increased global insecurity, environmental destruction, erosion of the nuclear family and the social state and a burgeoning sense that the economics of capitalism will come to define the 21st century for our generation. Meanwhile the present ‘internet generation’ instantly connects people and communities globally, redefining the notion and role of public interaction, sphere and place. We ask: • • •

‘Is the future really just a ‘greenwash’ of entrenched capitalist ideals?’ ‘Did Utopia and idealism in architecture die with Modernism in the 1980s, or are social architectural visions still an important part of aspiration and mobilization?’ ‘Can architects play a key role in the process of making new places, or are they now subjugated to the role of drafters for the ambitions of economic policy?’

Unit 2 reflects upon the architect as a social visionary (top down), as well as an engaged citizen (bottom up). We explore the notion of utopian communities, the ideological strands that influence their creation and ask questions about what future communities may come to be. We define potential mechanisms for social mobility and demonstrate the aspirations of Gen. Z in built form. 42


Using a mix of housing we design for communities, specific to this age. Each design narrative is supported by a particular research question. The outcomes are speculative and ambitious, but not science-fiction based. Two sequential design projects are on display exploring ‘ideal’ mixeduse, sustainable communities including housing in the Elephant & Castle and in Walworth. We present a series of low and mid-rise, mixed-use community projects which include the invention of productive ‘ideal’ landscapes.

Unit 2 Leaders:

Diana Cochrane & Matthew Woodthorpe

Technical Tutors: Matthew Woodthorpe Visiting Tutors:

Sonya Flynn; Sophie Goldhill; Kevin Haley

Guest Critics: Luciano Cardellicchio; Adam Cole; Charles Drozynski; Mattia Gambardella; Michael Holms Coats; Vincent Nowak; Annarita Papeschi; Michael Richards; George Thomson; Lorenzo Vianello; Seamus Ward Collaborators: Vince Brown; Seamus Ward; Susan Vericat; Draper House and Robyn no1 the Elephant

Diana Cochrane Unit 2 Leader 43


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ROSHNI BAGGA, Stage 5 In a post-Brexit era, where mechanical and electrical trade are lost with the EU, this project investigates the proposal of an engineering apprenticeship campus to provide students who can’t afford university learn the trade skills to make a more substantial site. 45


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ANDREEA BARBU, Stage 5 Based on increasing house prices and large amounts of waste generated by UK households, The Freegan Village aims to establish a new community in Walworth Road where obsolete objects are constantly recycled with a focus on hand-crafting, skill and social exchanges, and the celebration of freegan culture. 47


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ESTHER BROWN, Stage 5 Social Hub Housing - a project inspired by my Grandad. A place where students and elderly come together providing care and communication whilst maintaining independence. There are also opportunities to learn new skills and hobbies in the workshops and allotments, once again providing key communication between both parties. 49


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DANIEL JACOBS, Stage 5 In the context of rising homelessness in London, this project visualises a new form of ‘Robin Hood-esque’ social housing funded by the political hacktivist group Anonymous. A secret headquarters is hidden within a scheme financed by stealing money from tax evading corporations and individuals. 51


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ALEX MARINESCU, Stage 5 Heterotopia, [Un]limited: A design scenario for a highdensity, low-rise, low-energy, built to rent heterotopian housing community that encourages social interaction and aids young individuals in establishing meaningful relationships with others whilst providing the option of seclusion. 53


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MEESHA PATEL, Stage 5 The ‘Hidden’ Artisan: Situated in Elephant and Castle lies an emergent micro-city that seeks to revive the Arts and Crafts trade. Designed with a complex urban arrangement, the city leads its visitor through an intuitive, intricate and intimate journey by the manipulation of scale, orientation and façade detail. 55


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ERNA RAHMAN, Stage 5 The FOMO Monastery: In order to accommodate the competitive nature of the fear of missing out generation (FOMO) 30 years in the future, The FOMO Monastery acts as a new form of housing development that operates on the residents’ social rankings. 57


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DAVID SKILLICORN, Stage 5 Air-rights/Reuse/Repair - An Urban Intensification: This proposal aims to identify a sensitive, sustainable solution to increasing housing density in cities. Air-rights of existing buildings are utilised to provide affordable housing for graduates. The additional community brings vibrancy to the locale, with many new skilled individuals able to inhabit areas that would have previously been too expensive. 59


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THOMAS TAYLOR, Stage 5 How can a radical new approach to local government re-engage those most at need, and provide housing in a future where the welfare state has been eroded beyond recognition? Building on the radical borough of Camden, Southwark is redrawn to serve the vulnerable. 61


AZAM ABDUL HALEEM, Stage 4 Architecture to Empower: This project is a modular system that encourages cooperation through shared space, forming an environment where people rent a single bedroom, share ideas and develop skills. The difference: it is for the purpose of creating an identity for otherwise disenfranchised individuals to make artefacts that speak to and engage with the historic industrial spirit of the site. 62


CIARA BOYLE, Stage 4 My project focuses on designing a living and learning environment that encourages children to be more creative. Interior and exterior spaces for different age groups concentrate on individual and group play whilst decreasing the use of technology like smart phones and computer games. 63


DAVID EDWARD, Stage 4 What would happen if YouTube created accommodation specifically designed for vloggers? The Elephant Creator Community provides aspiring online celebrities with overnight accommodation and worldclass facilities for film-making. The venue encourages collaboration between creators and has spaces where vloggers can interact with their fans. Digital technology and voyeurism are major themes. 64


SAM FLEMING, Stage 4 My project is a mixed-use live/work housing scheme designed for makers to live amongst a community that sells handcrafted products to the public from their homes. Based in Elephant and Castle, the scheme also includes a supermarket, workshops and a market hall; with housing built around a ramped ‘high street’ and a series of ‘squares and courtyards’ allowing access to the makers’ homes. 65


MELISSA KENDALL, Stage 4 Elephant and Castle Shopping Centre is due for demolition, displacing a lot of Latin businesses. Latin Elephant is a mixed use development and a new hub for their community. It is the main destination for ‘Carnivale del Pueblo’. 66


CHEUK HEI LI, Stage 4 Global Neighbourhood - How to shape the building as a global culture community: How can we, as architects, design a platform for the new generations? Through creating opportunities for creative people to collaborate, allowing them to complete their aspirations. 67


CHARLOTTE MIDDLETON, Stage 4 This scheme addresses the shortage of housing in London by promoting a sustainable way of living through the development of adaptable and flexible living spaces. Overall dwelling sizes have been reduced, releasing the land for agriculture and hydroponic purposes to intensify the land and develop a community based upon eco-living. 68


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UNIT 3 THE THOUSAND DREAMS

Unit 3 continues to be interested in architecture’s ability to be complex and ambiguous, to be strange and to tell stories. We think architecture is first and foremost a cultural practice, capable of representing more than its own silent self. Like songs and monasteries, architecture can be a repository for the fragile stories and conditions that would otherwise be lost. This year we focused on London’s historic centre, the square mile originally bounded by medieval walls. Whilst there are many cities in the world, this is simply The City. Most European historic centres have become museum pieces for tourism or other designated uses, the architecture frozen in a committee-appointed time period. Not so the City. This is the centre of world capitalism, a position it has held almost unchecked for five hundred years. $3 trillion flows through it each day. The physical material of the City has needed to be fluid to facilitate this - under the banks lie pagan temples, Roman graves, and a hundred other things - all unsentimentally cannibalised and built-over, chopped and changed, to meet the pragmatic needs of commerce and the endless pursuit of profit. In the City it is conversely the immaterial - the conceptual, the imaginary, the psychological - that holds firm and endures. The laws, customs, rituals, governance, guilds, processions and street theatre; these arcane and opaque animating-forces provide the necessary permanence and continuity in the absence of enduring physicality. 70


The interplay between these two forces - the physical and the psychological - formed the basis of our early projects. Once sites were chosen we needed a methodology to help us understand this secretive and complex world if we are to build there in any meaningful way. So we visited another city with its origins as a Roman outpost - Vienna. Vienna has some similarities but one big difference - whether it is the unified architectural stageset of the Ringstrasse loudly “showing out” to the world Vienna’s ideas of itself, the Secessionists and their alternative early modernism that made room for representation and ornament, or Freud himself with his exploration of dreams and the subconscious (and the virtuoso surrealist artists he inspired) - Vienna is a city that likes to talk about difficult things and has developed the means to do so. Back in London, armed with techniques for understanding the City’s collective unconscious, interpreting it’s dreams and nightmares, understanding how these might find spatial expression and be formally rendered, we set about developing architectural propositions that might start to manifest all that was once hidden. Unit 3 Leaders: Adam Cole & George Thomson Technical Tutors: Adam Cole; Lawrence Friesen; Lorenzo Vianello Guest Critics:

Luciano Cardellicchio; Diana Cochrane; Charles Drozynski; Mattia Gambardella; Michael Holms Coats; Vincent Nowak; Annarita Papeschi; Michael Richards; George Thomson; Seamus Ward; Matthew Woodthorpe

Adam Cole Unit 3 Leader 71


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PAYAL GANDHI, Stage 5 Serious Fraud Office : Following the 2008 Financial Crash there were no successful convictions. This project proposes new courtrooms and headquarters for the Serious Fraud Office. The complex brief gives rise to an imposing architectural figure in the heart of the Financial District where justice can be done and - as importantly - be seen to be done. 73


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MATT HARRALL, Stage 5 Ministry of the Mithranartii : The current bastion of the Mithranartii leaches itself parasitically to the ruins of the Old Bailey, the centre of administrative power of the society who have secretly ruled London like a master puppeteer since 43AD. Concealed within its superstructure hides the secret of Entasis, the mystic architectural prophecy of the City. 75


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ROBERT JOYCE, Stage 5 Located adjacent to the Barbican, this experiential theatre hosts a performance of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde based on the 1887 stage adaptation by T. R. Sullivan. The transformation between dualities is a theme that manifests in this project to allow architectural infrastructure to become theatre. 77


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SEUN KESHIRO, Stage 5 Karl Marx predicted in the 19th century that Capitalism in London would be swallowed up by its internal contradictions and overthrown in ‘The dictatorship of the Proletariat’. However Marx’s predictions haven’t come to pass in London because whilst social inequality is pervasive in the City, the two parties have worked around that and Marx’s Circus is a poetic commentary on how they do so. 79


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CHARLES LEUNG, Stage 5 The Urban Retreat : A wellness retreat whose site straddles the boundaries of work and home; its form derived from fold mountains – nature’s answer to the clashing of two tectonic forces. Mental wellness through animal therapy occupy an essential role, in this cragged piece of ‘urban landscaping’ that is rooted in play and illusion. 81


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DAN MARPLE, Stage 5 By establishing an open public space in the heart of Smithfield Market, this project looks to celebrate the iconic London chicken shop as a recognised architectural typology. A chicken shop, abattoir, chicken sanctuary and public toilet were designed through speculative drawing that explored the project on different levels. 83


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PATRICK O’KEEFFE, Stage 5 The Asclepeion of Cymatic Trading: An incubation temple and open outcry trading floor designed around musically harmonic proportions and operating as a branch of the Bank of England. An ambient drone sound is created from the trading floor noise which, within the incubation temple, allows traders to predict market patterns through sound-induced dream states. 85


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ABBIE SOBIK, Stage 5 The Palace of Dreams: A Guild of Publication that promotes and preserves the creative craft of story telling as well as sustains handmade publishing in the digital era. It is a repository for London’s fragile stories and dreams providing an escape from the everyday but also a platform for the written word to influence the prophecy of the city. 87


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BRADLEY SOWTER, Stage 5 The project investigates the work/home life divide. Using ‘A Christmas Carol’ as a proxy to create an architectural film. The film sets manifest themselves within the City of London, becoming temporary and permanent structures. 89


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RICHARD WILLIAMS, Stage 5 The Macabre Museum of the Charterhouse’s aims to reveal the invisible. The architecture indeterminately rests upon the boundary between the historic square mile and wider London. Below a religious text archive, exhibition spaces are precariously hung - holding nine of the Charterhouses’ most priceless artefacts. 91


ALEXEI ADASCALITA, Stage 4 The main drive of the project was to provide an organic system defined by modular and kinetic technology. The immersive experience of Virtual Reality provided a more in-depth experience of the design, allowing the users to walk through and even interact with the proposed design and the existing architectural environment. 92


JOSEPH CROSSLAND, Stage 4 The London Sheep Market is the greatest place to be on Saturdays or Wednesday, I’m sure you all agree. Stop on by if you wish for a dinner or a treat, with vendors selling local goods, the flavours can’t be beat. You can also pursue clothing, Jewellery, bones and spikes or maybe slip into the black market, there will always be something you like. 93


ELVIRA SALYAHETDINOVA, Stage 4 “The Freedom to Play” is a thesis project that addresses the very sensitive issues of mental wellbeing amongst children of school age. It posits a series of experimental and symptom-specific interventions in London’s Barbican. The interventions can be assembled in order to create a highly interactive and playful school. 94


STEPHANIE ELWARD, Stage 4 The Folly of Our Pursuits Aboard the Train to Nowhere: Twenty-one meters below the surface of London, a magical miniature train runs back and forth betweeen Paddington and Whitechapel, carrying a secret world of hedonistic nonsense. This project explores ideas about Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Historicism and the architecture of pleasure. 95


TIRION ENGLISH, Stage 4 A space of sanctuary within London, the scheme aims to provide space for active grief and personal reflection. It aims to allow for each distinct experience of grief to take place within a shared environment, reflecting loss as both a personal and universal experience. 96


AMY HEWES, Stage 4 The Department for Independent Reconstruction accommodates the Home Office for the newly independent City of London. The process-driven design saw forms and volumes sliced, shifted, and rotated to create a building that reflects the rich history of the site as well as being an architectural diagram for the naturalisation process. 97


MANDALIKA ROBERTS, Stage 4 Inspired by the Mudlarks of the Thames and influenced by tidal cycles, this project centres around the narrative of ‘The Machine’, a sub-aquatic mechanism which excavates through the layers of submerged history. This hyper-engineered Machine attaches to the architecture of ‘The Dock’, an exhibition space that hosts and displays the dredged Thames treasures. 98


KEREM SIVRI, Stage 4 The Hive; a start-up business incubator in the heart of Bishopsgate, London. From the likes of Bishopsgate Circle, this proposal aims to reorganise a tight urban grain through the exploration of levels and layers. 99


UNIT 4 OUTLANDS | UNCHARTED TERRITORIES 1.0

Tourism is a major social phenomenon of modern society. Not only being related to sightseeing and entertainment organisation, contemporary tourism is also a major agent of economic development that today represents one of the largest economic industries. A large part of related research tends to capture the concept of ‘tourism’ as a broader sociocultural phenomenon. This can be connected directly with the significance of associated research in sociology and the most recent evolution of the concept has undergone fundamental change following new demand for alternative forms of entertainment. Unit 4’s agenda explores the potential of inhospitable places in offering new models of tourism and land inhabitation, while dealing with the related climatic, ecological and social issues. The Unit’s investigation searches for new paradigms of land transformation and alternative models of land use - exploring ideas of adaptability and transitional land occupation, as a response to hostile settings. Our students have designed interventions at the urban and meso-scale, initially considering the territories of these interventions through advanced data-mapping methodologies; linking online and on-site data retrieval for the creation of perceptual and notional maps. Safety, pollution and modes of transport were investigated through data-mining and advanced data visualization to create individual frameworks to explore the material together with the formal and technological implications of these unique novel forms of hospitality. Iceland: the land of fire and ice. From steam to liquid, from solid ice, to hot springs, fresh water, salt water, and geothermal water, have all shaped Iceland in a myriad of different states and forms. Iceland is a country of vast extremes. The northerly geography in the midst of the Atlantic 100


creates vulnerable conditions in environmental as well as socio-economic terms. Since the economic crash in 2008, the Icelandic landscape has become even more attractive to tourists with visiting numbers now rising to triple the local population. Unit 4 researches the potential for geothermal water to contribute to the new tourism offer, while exploring waterscapes for adventure and recreation. Through the introduction of a specific architectural brief, the students were invited to question the typology of investigation, the relation to the chosen context, and the adopted tectonics, before working on a final fully documented proposal. The relationship between nature and man, between landscape and art, between environment and design, and the ambition of forging new spatial practices, describes the Unit’s area of investigation. By implementing new ways of understanding the urban phenomenon with the use of Big Data analysis, the Unit aimed to explore novel forms of territorial studies and civic engagement. The ultimate outcome describes possible futures relationships between the built and natural environment, delivering alternative development scenarios for a novel touristic and hospitality experience. Unit 4 Leaders: Annarita Papeschi & Mattia Gambardella Technical Tutors: Vincent Nowak Guest Critics:

Luciano Cardellicchio; Diana Cochrane; Adam Cole; Charles Drozynski; Michael Holms Coats; Vincent Nowak; Michael Richards; George Thomson; Lorenzo Vianello; Seamus Ward; Matthew Woodthorpe

Annarita Papeschi Unit 4 Leader 101


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LEONARDO ALI, Stage 5 New District of Columbia Capitol: A building to integrate the public and the government for the prospective 51st state of the USA. This parametric and porous form is designed to welcome the people of Washington DC to discuss and celebrate the state’s policies and achievements, while removing the barrier between public and private. 103


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TOM CHAPPELS, Stage 5 Complex Corbelling: The Icelandic government exploit the ‘crisis’ of desertification to ensure the sustainability of its tourism sector. Not only will drones aid in the afforestation process, they also serve to build the entirety of a contour-generated, dry-stacked, corbelled masonry structure and the accompanying windbreak system to reverse the desertification process. 105


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ROBERTO FARATRO, Stage 5 Artefact: A self-designed, funded and realised portable reading space for children, studying if temporary architecture can act as a catalyst for urban change. Design: Icelandic Ornithology Institute; a building for tourists and natives for the study of birds, using environmental optimisation algorithms as the driving force. 107


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KENNETH MOLEKOA, Stage 5 In the fragile ecosystem we inhabit; we are witnessing a transformative climatic change. Iceland is undergoing a rapid economic, cultural and environmental change spurred by the agricultural and tourism industry. The proposed architecture is riding the wave of change to develop an sustainable economic that the country will capitalise on. 109


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JOSH MURPHY, Stage 5 The Open-data Chamber: Re-envisioning the government’s role within a representative democratic republic to create a newly conceived political framework, where open data informs architecture and public space to symbolize and engage the citizenry.

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KARISMA SHOKER, Stage 5 The Wellness Cloud: From a distance The Wellness Cloud blurs the boundary between building and landscape, maintaining the beauty of the natural land formations. At an inhabitable scale, the ‘cloud’ reads as an immersive experience weaving the user in and out of the landscape through the occupiable spaceframe, combining indoor and outdoor spaces. 113


ALEX BEAN, Stage 4 This project establishes a sustainable approach to radical tourism, identifying how people hike through the peninsula and how specific camp locations can allow hikers to explore its entirety. Using a generative system, a building typology was produced which can be deployed at each location, enclosing accommodation, supplies and education specific to each site. 114


OLIVER EBONG, Stage 4 The Honeycomb retreat: A Hotel and spa serving as a rest stop for tourists after a long day coming into the nature reserve to take in all its beauty without having totally left at the end of the day. The scheme borrows from the concept of Airbnb ‘shared’ living and the theme of integrated structure by generating clusters of hexagonal cells arranged along a deformed honeycomb grid. 115


FARAH EL-HAKIM, Stage 4 Digital growth created through packing logic prototype: This project identifies older relaxers as gap in the Icelandic tourism industry. Twitter mining identifies the programme and location. Depending on various growth parameters, the system can create structures transitioning between dense, load-bearing bundles to porous, glazed surfaces for light and ventilation. 116


GEORGE HUTCHINS, Stage 4 A main Basecamp will act as a central backpacking hub for the extreme tourism of Iceland, making Reykjanes a gateway to the rest of Iceland. A starting point for hikers, trekkers, mountain climbers and thrill seekers wishing to get the earth under their feet and become fully submerged in the natural beauty of Iceland. 117


BEN LANGAN, Stage 4 AquaCulture Iceland: The scheme uses data-mapping software QGIS to locate the optimum cultivation location for seaweed. A digital exploration of 3D L-systems was tested as an inspirational material logic, from which the architecture of the seaweed farm and exhibition space was created, to radicalise the picturesque waterfront. 118


ROBERT NORMAN, Stage 4 The organisation of my project is based upon a hierarchal system of routes, reflecting the paths of the nervous system, that connect the external to the internal. The form was generated as a result of these routes with vertical prominence given to the key spaces in the building. 119


JEREMY PATON, Stage 4 Processing Landscapes. My proposal consists of a dedicated northern lights viewing park, situated on the shore of lake Kleifarvatn in the Krýsuvík Geothermal Region, Iceland. The park includes a dedicated day & night visitor centre for tourists as well as more isolated accommodation units along the banks of the lake. 120


JESS RYDER, Stage 4 The scheme is an underwater diving hotel and training facility. Known as the land of fire and ice, the hot springs at the waterbed are the main attraction for divers and provide the ‘fire’ for the scheme whilst the form was inspired by ice; how it forms and what happens ice at the edge of a lake. 121


ARTEFACT RESEARCH-THROUGH-PRACTICE

Globally there is an increasing interest in the notion of research-through-practice in academia as a means of bridging the divide between theory and practice, and how one necessarily informs the other, in a virtuous circle. That being said, this year, just two students, from the cohort of 35, elected to follow the Artefact option, statistically 5% of the course. Perhaps this reflects strong interest in the academic writing of Dissertation, or perhaps it’s a symptom of the maturing MArch Unit system and an inference that parallel curriculum activities should be streamlined or subjugated to studio design? It might be true to say that Artefact can tend to be a magnet for obsession, and bucking the prevailing trend, this year’s two Artefactarians have produced two truly heroic and obsessive pieces of research-through-practice. Both of these seized the implicit invitation to confront architectural propositions at full, 1:1 scale, something rare in schools of architecture. In brief these were: ‘Wheel-estate’ (earlier working title to Jonathan Bush’s Free through Mobility) is a comprehensive investigation of mobile-living. The author put his money where his mouse is, for a fascinating journey into alternative residential strategies in the prevailing economics of tertiary education. Acquiring, deconstructing, conceiving, designing, making, and critically evaluating the occupancy, operation, and maintenance of a mobile home. This project bridged historical and contemporary mobile living, combining a range of references from John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley, to the Haynes Manual, it navigates across the territories of the psychology of the mind of the occupier, to the regulatory and statutory permissive, and not-so-permissive, frameworks which control how, where, and why we reside. ‘Reading Room’ a usefully reductive moniker for Roberto Faratro’s Temporary Architecture: Ephemeral Activation of Space, saw the 1:1 creation of a mobile reading room out of humble materials – softwood and cardboard, but with grand ambitions; to act as a catalyst in the debate about concerning statistics related to the adverse effects of information technology in the home, and the impacted development of reading-age in children. With some expert assistance the Reading Room was deployed into the heart of the city, gown to town, and became the site for parents to read to their children, and for their children to begin to illustrate this narrative. This artefact advocates for a renewed interest in reading to and with our children, as the beginning of enhancing reading standards, enquiry, literacy, academic attainment and life long learning. Advisors: Prof Gerry Adler, Michael Richards Michael Richards Module Convenor 122


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Fig. 1: Jonathan Bush ‘Wheel-estate’ Fig. 2: James Clarke, Buzzfeed Article 123


DISSERTATION ACADEMIC RESEARCH EXPLORATIONS

Dan Jacobs The Ruperra Paradox: A Neglected Castle with a Problematic Future As attitudes towards heritage have changed, reflected by an increase in the number of listed buildings in the UK, concerns have arisen regarding the extent of building underuse or neglect. This dissertation explores Ruperra Castle in Caerphilly, Wales, as a problematic building in the field of conservation, investigating why some listed buildings in the UK remain ‘at risk’ indefinitely whilst others are saved. Despite possessing great potential for restoration and creative re-use, Ruperra has been left to decline into an unstable ruin following fire damage over seventy years ago. Andrea King My dissertation was titled ‘Modernising our Past: Exploring the Issues of Energy Efficiency in Grade I Listed Churches’. Through conducting research focused around my case study of St. Anthony’s Church in Alkham, Kent, as well as working closely with Rev. Brian Williams, exchurchwarden Dr. Geoff Gaskill and present churchwarden of St. Anthony’s, Mr. Richard Tapsell, I endeavoured to find what issues a Grade I listed rural church faced when looking to improve its energy efficiency. Research took me into analysing the current building fabric and its faults, discussing the legislations that restrained listed churches owned by the Church of England and suggesting future improvements that a church which ran on limited funding could consider introducing.

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Jill Murray In 2007, political theorist Chantal Mouffe declared that her ‘radical and plural conception of democracy’ can only be realised by recognising the need for critical artistic practices to contribute a variety of agonistic interventions in a diverse collection of public spaces. Following a thorough investigation into Chantal Mouffe’s agonistic democratic theory, and a critical analysis of the current trends in public space design, the feasibility of designing public space specifically to allow for agonistic public displays was deliberated. A series of case studies, varying in scale and discipline, are analysed to realise key design features necessary to encourage these agonistic displays. Geoff Pomeroy A study into the future of self-build and custom-build in the UK. The dissertation begins with in depth analysis of the current political and economic climate, in regard to self and custom build, divided into sections of what, why and how. This provides a backdrop to the analysis of three case studies: Graven Hill, Trevenson Park and Hammill Brickworks. An analysis of these case studies is brought together in the concluding section, in which a theoretical optimum mix of the investigated studies will be suggested. This analysis will be in relation to the current economic climate, recently released policy, and the apparent government direction for the self-build and custom-build market.

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PEDAGOGY RADICAL EDUCATION Forming one of three optional modules taught in Autumn Term of stage 5, this module aims to provide students with a formal programme in the teaching of architectural design and communication. Through this module students develop a good understanding of the historic, theoretical and practical principles of architectural education and pedagogy, first through research in the field of higher education and second through practical experience within studio teaching in the undergraduate programme. The focus is on teaching and learning models that are specific to architecture, such as studio-based tutorials and design crits. In addition, students are encouraged to develop their personal design workshops, based on their research activities. The module is taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, group seminars and review sessions. Teaching and assessment of this module is divided into two components: 1) theory and history of architectural education 2) development of learning tools through research and teaching practice. Component I: Theory & History For the theory and history component students produce a research essay based on a topic in the field of architectural education. In these essays they explore a particular area or learning tool of architectural education in greater depth. Students can choose a topic in consultation with the module convenor and develop their research over the course of the term. Feedback is provided at two formative review sessions and during weekly tutorials. During the reviews students present their research and receive feedback from a panel of critics. In Autumn Term weekly lectures and a series of group tutorials will be provided, introducing students to (a) educational theory, history and models of architectural education (b) research methodologies in education and (c) practical pedagogical methods used in studio teaching. Component II: Learning Tools & Teaching Practice For the practical component students take on the role of Teaching Assistants in the first year undergraduate programme under the supervision of dedicated studio tutors and the module convenor. Students work closely with the studio tutors, but are also given enough independence to develop their own individual approach to teaching and to explore various alternative methods. In this context, students are encouraged to explore different learning tools and develop workshops and models for a radical approach to architectural education: from serious play, experiential workshops, applications of Augmented Reality, outward versus inward polarities in architectural approaches, the tutor-student interaction, a design studio space manifesto to hierarchical consideration in the design process. Carolina Vasilikou Module Convenor 126


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BA (HONS) BACHELOR OF ARTS WITH HONOURS RIBA PART 1

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Studying architecture is the most amazing adventure - from making simple shelters with limited materials, to the design of the most sophisticated and complex buildings which, in the best cases, delight both the senses and the intellects of those who use them. Our students are encouraged to explore the characteristics that distinguish architecture from mere building. How will their designs create spaces which make the practicalities of life easier and more pleasant, delight users, and raise the quality of people’s lives? They explore the work of architects who adopt a humanistic approach - architecture that embodies the eternal qualities of good design regardless of passing fashion or superficial styling. We welcomed Tim Ireland to the School in January, as Director of Digital Design, who is leading the ambition of KSA to be at the forefront of the creative use of digital technologies in design and fabrication. Our specialism and focus on fine art and hand-drawings, however, will continue. Specific prizes are awarded for the best stage 2 sketchbook, the best models, and the best integration of technology and design. A new prize this year - the Gravett Award - is given for the best representational drawings of existing buildings. As well as recognising and celebrating the highest achievements in these areas, the prizes help to motivate students to excel in these skills and abilities. The ethos of the BA Architecture course lies in its engagement with the region. Stage 1 began the year building their own shelters on campus - for overnight inhabitation! - and then designed beach huts in Ramsgate. Stage 2 explored the themes of food and cookery on the site of an old industrial tip. Stage 3 were engaged in two projects in Rochester, firstly the adaptation and extension of the Guildhall Museum, and then in spring term the design of a multi-purpose market hall. The success of our programme is, as ever, down to the many contributions from students, staff, tutors, critics and friends of the school, whose insights, ideas and inspiration bring vitality and diversity to the course - an experience for students that will shape their whole lives‌ Keith Bothwell Programme Director & Director of Education 129


STAGE 3 SITE LOC. CHLOE STREET TARBATT

Tutors Dr Gerald Adler, Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin, Dr Luciano Cardellicchio, Keith Bothwell, Andy de Carteret, Howard Griffin, Dr Manolo Guerci, Chris Gardner, Professor Don Gray, Dr David Haney, Rebecca Hobbs, Dr Nikolaos Karydis, Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou, Hilary Nixon, Michael Richards, Dr Giridharan Renganathan, Henry Sparks, Jef Smith, Chloe Street Tarbatt, Fiona Raley, Carolina Vasilikou, Ashvin de Vos, Dr Richard Watkins, Peter Wislocki Our design modules this academic year have been actively building on our evolving agenda to use ‘live projects’ as an educational tool, making closer links between the school’s activities and local industry / society. The ‘live project’ (a design brief that is developed in liaison with a real client, based in real time on a current development scenario) can effectively provide “a pedagogic means to extend the institutional confines of the design studio” , developing mutually beneficial relationships with local clients and stakeholder groups, engendering poetic design responses underpinned by robust pragmatism and social awareness. The projects were both based in Rochester, a Kent cathedral town of significant historical interest. The first project ‘Adapt and Extend’ (convenor Chloe Street Tarbatt) was based at the Guildhall Museum, located within a medley of Grade 1 listed structures at the end of Rochester High Street in serious need of rejuvenation. http://www.liveprojectsnetwork.org “Live Projects Network,” accessed 22nd July 2016 130


We worked closely with the museum who provided a detailed brief focusing on an interweaving of old and new structures, demanding awareness of the conservation status of the historic buildings on the site while encouraging students to consider ways a contemporary addition might fuse gracefully with a complex historical setting. In contrast to the intricate existing conditions of the Guildhall Museum, the setting for the second design project, ‘Urban’ (convenor Jef Smith), offered students an open site immediately outside the medieval city wall on which to explore ideas of progressive transformation through ‘hybrid urbanism’. Their design proposals were to contain a mix of uses based on the individual student’s holistic understanding of place and its future potential, particularly in relation to the high speed rail link to London and the substantial adjacent urban development underway; ‘Rochester Riverside’. This year, we are also delighted that our new Deputy Vice Chancellor for Education (April McMahon) is funding a touring public exhibition of our Rochester-based student design work, to take place in July 2017. The exhibition will tour between five venues across Kent showcasing the best of our student projects, serving to increase an awareness and impact of our activities at KSA within and beyond the confines of the university, sparking curiosity and debate with the general public. Our Stage 3 students also partake in three academic modules. The Dissertation module (convenor Keith Bothwell) allows students to select a subject of their choice, on the basis of which they are assigned a personal tutor. Subjects range in scope dramatically from the historical to contemporary, from critiques of gothic architecture through to the impact of neuroscience on the design of urban environments. The Modernisms module (convenor Gerald Adler) provides a lecture series based on 20th-century architecture and design, followed by production of a reflective essay on a self-selected theme. The Architectural Practice module (convenor Peter Wislocki) is taught in parallel with the ‘Urban’ module, and requires students to produce a report based on their final design projects, taking on a role as an ‘architectural practitioner’ for the purposes of this professional practice assignment. Chloe Street Tarbatt Stage 3 Coordinator 131


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ISABEL ADAMS, Stage 3 I adore food, so I have made it the subject of my studies over the last year. Firstly, through my dissertation and then manifesting it within my urban project to improve the mental, social and economic wellbeing of the Medway area. By creating a place for ex-cons of HMP Rochester they can learn the culinary trade whilst being offered a safe place to stay. 133


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BILAL AHMAD, Stage 3 Our surroundings impact us on a personal scale; influencing our actions and emotions. I aim to challenge general perceptions of space, altering moods and experiences through my designs. Careful analysis of human interaction on site, alongside advancing technology, forms the basis for better integrated design. 135


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SUDE AKDENIZ, Stage 3 In my projects, I aimed to create social spaces that will not only give new opportunities for people but also will bring the community together.

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JEREMY ALI, Stage 3 The design intervention is based around the enhancing of visitor flow throughout the building and paying special attention to the improvement of exhibitions.The Scheme is centred on the proposed solution of diversifying the economic demographic of Rochester in Kent by using key industrial buildings found in the locality for inspiration. 139


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MARIAN ALKALI, Stage 3 The projects carried out in Rochester’s City Centre have allowed me to develop my interest in designing buildings as an experience through materiality, special arrangement and façade structure. With Kent’s rich historical background, contextual cues were drawn to form concepts as the basis of the design woven into the heart of Rochester. 141


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JOSH ANDERSON, Stage 3 I sought to introduce a scheme that was capable of integrating a traditional ‘live-work’ program into a new tectonic typology, one that was able to subside the repetitive tendency of relating to the normative context and bring around an architectural embodiment of social progression within an area such as Rochester. 143


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DANIEL ATKINSON, Stage 3 Buildings are first and foremost designed for the people that inhabit them. They should therefore aim to enhance and captivate the messy and unpredictable nature of human life. My Urban proposal ‘Canvas’ provides Rochester with a flexible and adaptable scheme, promoting the arts, whilst combining vernacular and industrial context in contemporary form. 145


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MEERA BADRAN, Stage 3 With the reuse of the historical characteristics of Rochester, such as re-establishing markets and reclaiming industrial works, my proposals aim to unite the Medway towns and blend the social classes together. This is done by creating a place for all to come together and mingle through education, entertainment and fun! 147


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MAIMUNA BALA SHEHU, Stage 3 This is a sample of my work from Stage 2 and 3. I aimed to create interesting and vibrant buildings that would enhance the character of the historic city of Rochester and the market town of Faversham. 149


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MARGHERITA BASTIANELLI, Stage 3 My proposal is to treat mental health problems with different kinds of ‘natural’ therapies, such as swimming, yoga and cookery classes. In fact, people with common mental health problems often do not need medications to feel better, they just need to get back on track on a healthy lifestyle. 151


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AMY BETTINSON, Stage 3

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ALEXANDRA BIRD, Stage 3 A collection of work from each year, including the Barcelona Pavilion and Life Drawing in first year, Collective Dwelling in second year and the Urban project in third year. 155


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CHELSEA BLAND, Stage 3 The main focus for the first project (Adapt and Extend) was centred around framing the existing buildings, adapting showcases and exhibiting the variety of buildings on the site. Urban was focussed on creating spaces. The project included a variety of courtyards and pathways aimed at enhancing the delicate urban fabric of Rochester’s high street. 157


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JULITA BORYS, Stage 3 Integrating the historical elements and the literature culture of Rochester, my design creates a community centre and attractive public spaces through a functional and flexible layout.The Urban project is a conceptual beehive emphasizing community, connectivity and productivity through focus on theatre, visibility, and open space. 159


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SAMUEL BUSH, Stage 3 The following drawings illustrate my proposal for a popup, mixed-use development in Rochester constructed out of recycled shipping containers. The aim of my design was to propose a sustainable scheme made from reusable components that could be easily erected, dismantled and relocated. 161


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JACK BUNKER , Stage 3 I have enjoyed making physical models throughout the design process, as it helps me to visualize my design and creating a detailed final model. My Urban design is for fine art; the purpose is to help bring the community together with their love of creativity. 163


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YIWEN CAO, Stage 3 I love drawing historic architecture because of its beautiful details and decorations. My Urban project is a Centre for Creative Arts. It is a gift to students who study arts in Medway to encourage them to continue their passion. 165


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MYLES CHAPMAN, Stage 3 OK-OK-O is a ‘Campus for Creatives’, for designers and start-ups. The intention is to create an alternative work environment, who’s architectural forms and spaces provoke the users into questioning norms in business and design.The project Adapt and Extend reestablishes the guildhall as a cultural centre. The forms and materials create a juxtaposition between the guildhall. 167


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STEPHANIE DAVIES, Stage 3 I have created functional, adaptable spaces to inspire and meet the needs of people, encouraging a sense of community whilst respecting the natural environment. The Reform Workshop aims to provide all the essential skills to help finding employment and integrate students into the community through public interaction, exhibitions and shared event spaces. 169


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KENNETH ELLIOT, Stage 3 The main ideas behind this hybrid scheme was to form multiple layers of relationships between people and the older historical parts of Rochester, focusing on the idea of the pace taken throughout the town, be it walking or cycling. Focused mainly on the cyclist, an elevated velodrome appears in the scheme which can be accessed by cycling through the building itself. 171


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TILISHA FRANKLIN, Stage 3 This scheme was developed to promote a knowledge based economy for the Rochester area by introducing an innovation and education hub. The configuration of spaces was informed by four sectors: inspire, learn, create and present, and establishing the facilities required for users to prosper. 173


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JOY GEORGI, Stage 3 WAYV urban development is designed for the brain by decreasing the intergenerational gap. WAYV adapts to a technology focused future, whilst encouraging feelings and creativity. The artefact experiments with material driven design, where architecture has a symbiotic relationship with humans. Bio-integrated design goes beyond biomimicry dissolving boundaries between the living and non-living. 175


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MARK GODFREY, Stage 3 My design is based around the idea of sports, and introduces a new sports orientated complex into the heart of Rochester’s town centre, combining a sports centre containing a sports hall and rooftop football pitch, with a public market and workspaces tailored to sports related businesses. 177


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JAMES HATTON, Stage 3 This project embarks on a way to use the social reforms that Charles Dickens fought so hard to achieve to improve the town of Rochester. The concept behind the building then, is so the people who experience and inhabit the building to continue the legacy of Charles Dickens’ stories. 181


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DENIS HERBERG, Stage 3 My Urban project has tried to enhance the provided space by leaving the ground floor open for the public, while the large exo-skeletal steel structure aims to create a monument, reminding commuters and visitors of Rochester’s rich industrial heritage. 183


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HENRIK HOLTE, Stage 3 The task was to design a major mixed-use development in the centre of Rochester. The specific function(s) of the development were to chosen by me. After analysing the site, Rochester, its people, and today’s society, I decided to design an AI and Robotic Academy. 185


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SAHAR IBRAHIM, Stage 3 Architecture should portray a conversation between a building and its context. I referred to Rochester’s rich historical background, through old precedents for spatial differentiation and reinventing the urban footprint and embracing deep-rooted crafts, to enrich the city’s culture and economy. 187


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HANIYA KARIM, Stage 3 The Landscape and Architecture project explores the human senses and how we perceive space with them. The Urban proposal focuses on the indeterminacy of an evolving multi-functional structure consisting of live and work spaces sitting above a market space. 189


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ADRIAN KEHRLI, Stage 3 “The Library is a sphere whose exact centre is any hexagon and whose circumference is unattainable.” The Library of Babel - Jorge Luis Borges 191


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JEMMA LAIRD, Stage 3 The concept behind the horticultural scheme seeks to create a journey through the urban forest, tying together the use of the building as a horticultural hub and the aesthetics and atmosphere of new green spaces created for a growing community. 195


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HIU YAN LEE, Stage 3 The first project is Adapt and Extend, the concept of the extension is bringing visitor from the present to the past by a top down approach. The second project is Urban, creating an art and craft market providing a stronger connection between Rochester and Riverside. The art market stall can extend out to the central route, making Rochester a lively place. 197


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RHIAN LLOYD, Stage 3 The idea behind this design was a ‘folded’ High street, expanding on what Rochester already had to offer and creating spaces for the creative industries that needed it. The main design idea for the extension of the guildhall was to create a large open exhibition space to the rear of the building, covered by an elaborate geometric gold roof. 199


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YIN KIU LOONG, Stage 3 The ‘Food Hub’ overcomes the historical dichotomy between urban consumption and rural production of food by reimagining a new physical connection between people and the produce they consume by re-introducing the intimate relationship with food by producing accessible fresh food on the High Street. 201


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JILLIAN MASKELL, Stage 3 I used blocks to form the building into a ‘stepping-up’ shape, allowing views out across Rochester, and light into the building. At ground level is a market/multi-functional space and as the building moves up through the levels, there are work and living spaces. 203


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MEESAM MIRZA, Stage 3 The strong industrial aesthetics of the project references Rochester rich industrial heritage through form, structure and materials. The project aims at enhancing the culture and economy of Rochester by providing craft workshops for the local community and introduce more creative industries within Medway. 205


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MOHADESEH MOEIN SHIRAZI, Stage 3 The Rochester Reclaim Centre is an urban project in which the process of upcycling is introduced and taught to the community. Second-hand items and scraps are collected, stored, and given a new life through various design workshops, and finally sold or exhibited in the mixed-use market space. 207


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NOR FARAH AIN MUHAMAD HER, Stage 3 “Stay true to yourself, yet always open to learn. Work hard and never give up in what you do even when others tell you cant. These may sound cliché but they are real tool to stay focused and make you more determined”.

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CONNOR NELLIST, Stage 3 The purpose of the project was to design live-work units in Rochester, Kent. The main driver for my scheme was Rochester’s lack of employment, the intentions of the cooking school was to target people from troubled backgrounds and to give them an opportunity of employment and learning new skills. 213


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DERRICK ODAFI, Stage 3 The Design Modules for stage 3 were Adapt and extend and Urbanism. With these two projects, I aimed to create buildings that would be recognised immediately in Rochester and beyond, bringing excitement and activity to the city. I believe the designs reflect my bold character and creativity. 215


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LOUISE OGODO-AVBARA, Stage 3 This a sample of my work completed in Stage 3. In each module, I aimed to create a unique shape which would enhance people’s experiences in the different spaces.

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NICOLE OKUBAJO, Stage 3 An existing car park in Rochester’s High Street, was to be converted to a multi-use development site. Spencelayh Place, proposes a modern, modest addition to Rochester, consisting of food and craft markets, a community centre, ampitheatre and live/work units. This scheme seeks to highlight Rochester and bring it’s community together. 219


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MOHAMMAD ZIYAAD OOZEER, Stage 3 Artistic Urban Regeneration: The Rochester Centre of Arts provides co-living, co-working, exhibition areas, community spaces and public gardens where the people will live, work, play and be creative with the help of lively entertainments provided by local artists. 221


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ELIF OZTIMUR, Stage 3 Urban: Cultural and educational hub for people who are not working and have a dependent child to take care of. A cultural centre which would revive Rochester’s festival atmosphere not just for couple of days but every day while educating the people. 223


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MARKOS PAPADAKIS, Stage 3 This project is based on the idea of healthy mind in a healthy body. The building is designed in a courtyard layout and includes: a market space, cafe, restaurant, and gym facilities. Being a vehicle free zone, it is essentially an urban oasis that turns its back to the city noise and pollution and leads the people of Rochester towards healthier living. 225


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CHANDNI PATEL, Stage 3 Linking to its historic Arts and Craft industries, the Rochester Design and Craft centre thrives in teaching the once forgotten crafts, and boosting its local economy. The centre would provide a place in which those could learn a new craft to start and sell their own products, as well as providing an exhibition space for those working within. 227


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MEGHA PAUDYAL, Stage 3 My final projects at the school truly allowed me to delve into design with an experimental and playful approach. Rochester Institute of Music looks to integrate its various musical societies into the vibrant heart of the city, whilst the extension of the Guildhall Museum celebrates the city’s rich industrial past. 229


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ANDZELA PETREIKYTE, Stage 3 Based on the consideration of Rochester’s future riverside development and high density of the high street, my concept uses the site as a base to bridge these parts together by creating a communal space for aspiring artists and the public. Inspired by Tunbridge Well’s Pantiles, my scheme is formed around a courtyard space which inhabits various facilities for Rochester’s community. 231


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RYAN POINTER, Stage 3 The concept for this scheme was to emulate qualities from the historic castle in Rochester and recreate the idea of a King living atop his castle. The rampart style facades and grass ramps create a very defensive aesthetic for the ground floor and protect the residential housing on top which sits on the sites centre. 233


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REUBEN POWELL , Stage 3. My final design was essentially an industrial scale development in a domestic context. To adapt to the requirements of the building and remain respectful, the proposal continues recognisable forms and rhythms on a larger scale. The design is made of three pitched roofs, all different sizes and all entertaining different functions. 235


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OTTAVIA PROFUMO, Stage 3. My mixed-use Urban development used ‘knowledge’, and activities dedicated to its assimilation, to help people gather in community areas inside and outside a transparent and efficient CLT and Glulam building. The Guildhall Museum is improved by a fragmented and dynamic glazed Extension that integrates better connections to the multiple levels. 237


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EDWARD ROBERTS, Stage 3 With Great Britain’s exit from the European Union offering a unique opportunity to alter the enviromental policy of the nation. The METC will be a new typeology blending large community spaces with research facilities. Working as part of a greater masterplan that aims to reduce the contribution to air pollution. 239


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ARAN SALEM, Stage 3 ‘The resistant virtues of the structure that we seek depend on their form; it is through their form that they are stable, not because of an awkward accumulation of material. There is nothing more noble and elegant from an intellectual viewpoint than this: to resist through form’. (Eladio Dieste, 1996) 241


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KAJA SANDURA , Stage 3 The scheme includes work and live-work units suspended over a book market, bound together by the canopy inspired by origami which in the same time references Rochester’s roofscape. The project creates a relationship between the exposed existing building and the extension creating a unique atmosphere in the most important spaces and provides the museum with a cafÊ. 243


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RESHMA SANTHOSH, Stage 3

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CURTIS SCUFFINS, Stage 3 Urban ‘Prioritise’ A mixed-use development consisting of housing, work and public spaces. Situated along Rochester high-street the design adopts a familiar yet modern twist upon Rochester’s vernacular. Adapt and extend: The proposal consists of a modular copper clad tower overlooking the town of Rochester and its assets. 247


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YAGMUR SIL, Stage 3 Studying Architecture at KSA has been an intense yet rewarding experience in the past three years of my life. A time that I will look back on fondly with optimism thanks to all staff and students. Looking forward to embark into the new unknown. Best of luck for all the graduates! 249


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JOSHUA SO, Stage 3

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OLUWASEYI SOBOGUN, Stage 3 The Jazz Project: Mixed Use Development in Rochester, Kent The scheme picked up on the rich creative culture in Rochester and looked to develop it further. Aimed at Jazz Musicians and Students and following the energy of New Orleans, the scheme created a new, vibrant hub for the community of Rochester after hours. 253


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OLUWAGBEMISOLA SOFOWORA, Stage 3 I designed the mixed use scheme for the Rochester and West Kent Art Society who plan to expand into Dance, Drama and other performing arts. It was inspired by Kent’s rich creative culture. The proposal should encourage people engage in a variety of activities, perform, learn, read and showcase talents.

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BILLY SWINDELL, Stage 3 Both schemes were worked through a sequence of conceptual models in order to produce spatially complex and sophisticated design strategies. My Adapt and Extend proposal focussed on producing a dramatic and bold sense of new into old. A concept of live-work units plugging into a 3D frame, Urban was inspired by the visionary raised cities of Yona Friedman. 257


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NATASHA TEN, Stage 3 My proposal for the Urban development encourages community activities and strives to solve the problem of the social and economic discrepancy faced in Rochester. My Adapt and Extend proposal stems from the contrast of rigidity and fluidity, creating distinct spaces, both public to private. 259


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ALANA TIDD, Stage 3 The design strategy for this Market Hall in Rochester is energised by identifying transport vectors and potential activity dynamics. The plan enables interconnection and is formed around the function of a market, whilst additionally creating a social hub that nourishes the community and the economic success of the building. 261


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AUBIN TORCK, Stage 3 Pod. Park creates two different worlds on one plot - the Park and the Market. The elevated park brings greenery and air into the dense old town of Rochester. It covers a sunken Multi-functional Rail system while the new Guildhall Museum is an open-plan stand alone extension with a roof top theatre. 263


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YASEMIN TOYGAR, Stage 3 Adapt and Extend: The building has three main functions, with the extension connecting the two buildings together. Urban: The scheme aims to create a medieval-like village with narrow streets opening to larger spaces. The site contains five different huts, including a market, auditorium and shops. 265


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CATHERIN VAN DORSSEN, Stage 3 Enhancing the existing spires of the Rochester skyline became the concept behind my Adapt and Extend project. The rising of the block form reflects the increasing image of a spinning zoetrope. My Urban project ‘The Wallpaper Printing Refugee’, explores the reintroduction of the printing skills of refugees to Rochester. 267


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VENTSISLAV VIDELOV, Stage 3. Both projects, the Rest Art Urban development and the Adapt and Extend of the Guildhall Museum in Rochester, are defined by bold, but clever geometry. The former aims to reinvent the identity of Rochester through introducing a new volume on the skyline, while the latter tries to perform a rather subtle change. 269


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PETE WALLINGTON, Stage 3 Large scale mixed use development in Rochester with the aim of providing low cost office space for start-up businesses. Taking and innovative approach on the working lifestyle with emphasis on the development of a strong urban community with high levels of integration in and around the South East. 271


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BEN WARNER, Stage 3 My design proposal for the “Urban� module represents a culmination of the skills I have developed over the duration of my degree. My methods range from the more traditional draughtsmanship/craftsmanship of my concept drawings/models to the CAD models/renders created using BIM software at the very cutting edge of the profession. 273


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MICHELLE WINKLER, Stage 3 A Sculptured Urbanism proposes to revitalise the Rochester community and encourage creativity through its sculptural form and exterior ramps which integrate into the surroundings. Adapt & Extend incorporates the concept of transparency by manipulating glass and timber. 275


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TOBY YIU, Stage 3

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PUI LAM YUEN, Stage 3 The Urban project is a farmer’s market with climbing wall and residential space. There’s a landscape garden and an amphitheatre surrounded by the market. The dwelling project in Faversham is comprised of 3 types of dwelling, a café, gym and market space. 279


STAGE 2 DEAL & FAVERSHAM, KENT REBECCA HOBBS

Architecture and Landscape – Autumn Term The first design module in the second year offers students the opportunity to explore the relationship between interior and exterior spaces, the threshold between architecture and landscape and a new proposed landscape. This year, the old spoil heap from Betteshanger Colliery near Deal, was chosen as the site for analysis and intervention. Now known as Betteshanger Country Park and the last colliery to close in Kent, the existing site rises 10 metres above the adjacent sea level giving an extraordinary views to the channel and Ramsgate to the east. The site offers a steep wooded edge to the north overlooking a small lake. To the south, the landscape comprises a plateau planted with silver birches and where a variety of grasses grow to form a varied recreational site for cyclists, naturalists and birdwatchers. The brief offered students a challenge to design a cookery school and a restaurant together with an associated landscape. The concept of creating both recreational and a working landscape for growing food offers the opportunity to explore a variety of different conditions to be enjoyed by visitors and students of the cookery school. A kitchen garden, a microclimate, a journey through zones of soft and hard landscaping for visitors of all ages were key considerations. It is a challenging brief and a field of design that many students haven’t considered but one that will inevitably have an impact on future projects. Studies of historical and contemporary landscapes were made through the lecture series to provide a rich context for the module. Throughout the design process, environmental issues were also tackled to ensure that the proposed building responded to and made the most of its environment. Sustainability were also key considerations in the buildings’ design. 280


Collective Dwelling – Spring Term The site for Collective dwelling was again located along the Creek at Faversham following last year’s engaging responses. Its rich maritime and industrial history provides students with the opportunity to revive the Creek edge and design unique multiple dwellings for a cross section of the community. A Charrette was held at Faversham’s Alexander Centre using the Faversham Creek Neighbourhood Plan as a guide. The document identifies a number of key sites located along the Creek for housing. Students were initially asked to work in teams to design a masterplan for the whole of the Creek edge. Research into the history of Faversham, its infrastructure, amenities and community offers a fascinating context to respond to. Form and Structure comprised the design for a clear span roof and supports covering an area of 400 square metres.Intricate, complex and imaginative models have been made giving form to a variety of concepts and structural solutions. The cultural context modules, Renaissance to Neo-Classicism and the autumn and 19th Century Architecture in the spring, gives a solid background for contemporary investigations and research with particular application to Collective dwelling. As students leave stage II and begin the journey into stage III, the dissertation title, topic is chosen and the first of tutorials and lectures is timetabled. The timing of it ensures that that students have the body of the work completed before the final project, Urban, is underway in the spring of 2018. Stage II Tutors: Dr. David Haney, Dr. Timothy Brittain-Catlin, Dr. Manolo Guerci, Rebecca Hobbs, David Moore, Giovanna Piga, Mike Richards, Carolina Vasilikou, Keith Bothwell, Patrick Crouch, Ashvin de Vos, Chris Gardner, Yorgos Loizos, James Shaw, Dr Luciano Cardellicchio, Giacomo Chiarani, Lorenzo Vianello Rebecca Hobbs Stage 2 Coordinator 281


Fig. 1: Collective Dwelling: CHEAH ZHI BIN Fig. 2-4: Architecture and Landscape Fig. 5-7: Collective Dwelling

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Fig. 1: Architecture and Landscape: SHEFIELD NG Fig. 2: Architecture and Landscape: ANDY CAWS Fig. 3: Architecture and Landscape: DUNCAN KEELING

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Fig. 1: Collective Dwelling: ANDRA - LILIANA OPREA Fig. 2: Collective Dwelling: CHEAH ZHI BIN Fig. 3: Collective Dwelling: PEREIRA CARLOS

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Fig. 1: Collective Dwelling: SHEFIELD NG Fig. 2-3: Architecture and Landscape: TZE CHUN ANDY CHIU Fig. 4-6: Architecture and Landscape: ANDRA - LILIANA OPREA

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STAGE 1 RAMSGATE & BARCELONA CHRIS GARDNER BA stage 1- 2017 The theme for the autumn term is Shelter. Before attending KSA, students were asked to identify and record three shelters local to their home town. With an international cohort, this can provide a wide variety of examples for discussion and helps as an introduction of the student to their fellow students. AR 323 Folio In this module the students are taught technically to draw, orthographically, perspective, sketching and life drawing. In the spring term they are introduced to computer aided drawing. AR 318 Form Finding Students design a temporary shelter, using only cardboard, bamboo, string and plastic. In groups of three, they then developed one of their designs, physically make the shelter and then spent the night in it on Campus. Assignment 2 was set on the Kent coast in Ramsgate. The students first created a small masterplan for 18 beach huts then designed one of the beach huts in detail. AR 325 Light and Structure For structures, students design and construct a bridging structure spanning a gap of 450mm, using swab sticks and cotton thread, that can support a brick. For light students first model a space suitable to exhibit a chosen piece of art. Having drawn an imaginary view of their art piece illuminated in the space, students then form various openings and reflectors in the modelled space to try to achieve a similar lighting effect. 286


Study trip This year’s study trip was to Barcelona, to study over 2000 years of built history and contemporary architecture and view work by some of the greatest artists of the 20th century. The site for the spring term design module was also located in Barcelona adjacent to the marina on the Moll de la Fusta, students also undertook site investigation during the trip. AR 319 Building Design & AR 320 Building Construction For design, the students are asked to design a small art gallery and studio for a famous Barcelona artist. A small studio for the owner must also be included as should a small cafÊ with terrace. For construction students produce a detailed section showing the principal details of their building, together with an isometric showing only the structure of their design. AR 322 Modern HouseThis is the History and Theory module for the autumn term and studies seminal houses of the 20th century. AR 324 Ancient and medieval Architecture is the history and theory module for the spring term and studies in some depth the architecture of the period. Other Initatives: A drop-in clinic, was devised as part of the EDI initiative, and has proved to be very successful offering both design and pastoral support. In conclusion, I would like to thank all members of staff and the MArch Architectural Pedagogy assistants who have contributed to this year’s success. Chris Gardner Stage 1 Coordinator 287


Fig. 1: Form Finding: BEN CHILD Fig. 2: Building Design: VINH PHUC NGUYEN

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Fig. 1: Building Design: KYLE MCGUINESS Fig. 2: Building Design: VINH PHUC NGUYEN Fig. 3: Light and Structure: EDOARDO AVELLINO

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Fig. 1-2: Form Finding: EDOARDO AVELLINO Fig. 3: Building Design: VINH PHUC NGUYEN

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Fig. 1: Form Finding: MO TOBUTT Fig. 2: Building Design: VINH PHUC NGUYEN Fig. 3: Building Design: SHU KAI KWOK

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POSTGRADUATE MA ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN MSC ARCHITECTURE & CONSERVATION MSC ARCH. & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS MA ARCHITECTURAL VISUALISATION PHD IN ARCHITECTURE

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MA ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN PROGRAMME DIRECTOR: PROFESSOR GERALD ADLER

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This year the MA in Architecture and Urban Design split more or less 50/50 into a Canterbury and a Paris cohort. All students followed the identical programme in the autumn term, taking the module in Research Methods and Analysis as well as the Urban Landscape design module focussing on the intriguing coastal area around the power station at Dungeness, Kent. In spring term, all students took the new Theory and History of Urban Design module (the impactful THUD). The students who stayed for the term in France additionally took one of the modules offered by the Paris School of Arts and Culture, while the Canterbury students took the new Urban Design project. Their site was ‌in Paris!...and they were tasked with revealing a tributary of the Seine, the Bièvre, with a series of connected personal projects that opened up the old course of the river from the south of the city to where it disgorges into the Seine beneath Austerlitz station. We began the spring term with a three-day (and very cold!) field trip. Teachers on the programme were Timothy Brittain-Catlin, John Letherland, Alan Powers and myself. We are grateful to Richard Portchmouth and Steve Smith for acting as external critics at reviews. Professor Gerald Adler Programme Director

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Fig. 1: Grupal Fig. 2: Win Nee Leaw

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MSC ARCH. & CONSERVATION PROGRAMME DIRECTOR: DR NIKOLAOS KARYDIS

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Based in the historic town of Canterbury, this programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning cathedral itself provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site. Ideal for those with an interest in architectural heritage, the course represents a gateway to a career in demanding professional fields such as conservation and heritage management. As the future leaders in these fields, the course’s graduates are expected to play a central role in disciplines that lie at the centre of current economic, environmental and social agendas. The varied curriculum of the course reflects the multi-disciplinary nature of conservation. Students gain a critical understanding of historic buildings through an introduction to conservation philosophy and policies. This is followed by the study of practical survey and preservation techniques. Case studies and workshops, carried out in collaboration with Canterbury Cathedral introduce the students to the properties of historic building materials and the techniques employed in the repair of historic buildings. Towards the end of the programme, our students undertake a conservation project in which they design an intervention at an existing historic site. This year, the students worked on the restoration of the Infirmary of Canterbury Cathedral. This involved the study of the history of this outstanding building, and the survey of its remains, which are currently in an advanced state of decay. These preliminary studies formed the basis for the elaboration of new conservation plans and the design of restoration proposals that promise to save this seminal building and infuse new life into it. Having completed this project, the students started work on their dissertations, a module that enables them to study an aspect of the conservation cycle of their choice. Dr Nikolaos Karydis Programme Director

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Fig. 1: Infirmary of Canterbury Cathedral Fig. 2: Structural Survey - E. Boutsikas F. Witwit Fig. 3: Structural Survey b - E. Boutsikas F. Witwit

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MSC ARCH. & SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS PROGRAMME DIRECTOR: PROFESSOR MARIALENA NIKOLOPOULOU Our Master’s programme has successfully reached its fifth year, promoting a cross-disciplinary approach to research in the field of sustainability in the built environment, bridging the traditional boundaries between the arts and the sciences, research and practice. The course content ranges from the development of the design skills and the technical and scientific understanding required to develop sustainable solutions for new and existing buildings, the analysis of historic buildings and past environment technologies, to a critical exploration of the historical and cultural context of sustainability and environmental design. Over the last year, we have had a range of activities from external presentations, study visits to fascinating experiments and new collaborations. In January, Dr Richard Watkins along with a group of MSc students (see photo) conducted an experiment to visualise air flow around the Nave of Canterbury Cathedral, using helium-filled balloons. While aiming to understand the different circulation paths of air in the Cathedral, the Director of Stained Glass of the Cathedral, who came to observe the experiment, called it “a wonderful combination of science and unexpected poetry in motion”.

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This was the precursor to the students selecting their own building to evaluate thermal comfort conditions and energy performance. The case studies monitored and modelled through dynamic thermal simulations included various university buildings of different functions, from workshops to restaurants, as well as newly built flats and houses and a restaurant situated in a historic building at the center of town. The design project once again consisted of a mixed-use development located in the Creek area of Faversham, the subject of a draft development plan. Last summer marked the beginning of new initiatives with the Chartered Institute for Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Heritage Group, under the leadership of Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt. In July, the MSc cohort presented their projects to the CIBSE Heritage Group, which was followed up by an article co-authored with Maria Köhler’s, one of the students, on her research on the historic environmental system of the Royal Albert Hall. These successful developments led to our close collaboration with the CIBSE Heritage Group and a pilot programme for post-graduate research. The initiative will involve workshops which will bring together the students, members of the Heritage Group and members other Special Interest group within CIBSE. The aim is to jointly explore how research into historic environmental technology could yield a better understanding of historic building and how this understanding can feed into practice. The collaboration, which is unique in the country, will significantly enhance the students’ experience. Prof. Marialena Nikolopoulou Programme Director

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Fig. 1: Sustainable Design Project in the Creek area of Faversham, by Gulia Sponza

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Fig. 2: Sustainable Design Project in the Creek area of Faversham, by Gulia Sponza Fig. 3: Sustainable Design Project in the Creek area of Faversham, by Kyveli Filippidou

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MA ARCH. VISUALISATION PROGRAMME DIRECTOR: HOWARD GRIFFIN 2016-17 has been the most ‘international’ #MAArchVis year since its creation 7 years ago. With a cohort of students from 8 different countries from 4 continents, and the introduction of an inaugural international field study tour, the sense of internationalisation purveyed throughout. Collaboration has also been a key factor of the experience of this year. Students arriving to the school in September were immediately tasked with collaborating with ThinkNation, an organisation that “brings young people, creatives and thought leaders together to tackle how big issues and technology impacts on our everyday life and futures.” The event in December is a fast-paced, live conference with many speakers discussing topics, such as hacking, artificial intelligence, women in tech, and more. #MAArchVis students were tasked with creating animated project on mapped visualisations that would illustrate the topics being discussed. Introducing students to projection mapping is a key component of the course, helping students to understand the transformative nature of the work, moving from 3D to 2D and then to 3D once more. This collaborative project with external organisation creating content for a public audience is the first taste of the ‘real’ work that students continue to produce on the course. This work continues with the Virtual Cities module, and the creation of digital representations of historic buildings and monuments. Working with English Heritage, students have this year continued the development 306


of St. Augustine’s Abbey, a now ruined abbey and monastery in Canterbury, which forms an integral part of the city’s World Heritage status. The project gave students an insight into the creation of digital models ready for exploration through virtual reality. The work that the students have produced will be displayed through VR units at the site of the abbey later in the summer. The field study tour to Lyon, France in December was a particular highlight for the year. Coinciding with the Fêtes des Lumières, an annual light festival attracting millions of visitors to the city, the tour enabled students to practice their photographic skills, as well as witness the array of large-scaled projection displays – an important reference for their own projection work. Lyon, a city packed with architectural diversity, provided ample opportunity for students to capture different form and space, at different times, under different lighting conditions. This photographic exhibition, as well as the rest of this year’s work can be seen in the end of year show. However, for the #MAArchVis students, this is not the end of the year. Over the next 3 months the group is engaged with their Independent Research Project, with some electing to undertake a work placement, while others opt to produce a portfolio of work. This year, students have secured work placements at Miller Hare, AVR London and Glass Canvas, giving them valuable industrial experience. 2016-17 MAAVers are: Michael Krinou, Grace Yin Ping Lung, Alex Michalakis, Nidaa Ramadan, Tom Readman, Varit Santipongchai, Grace Timmeny and Uma Shanmugasundaram.

Howard Griffin Programme Director

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Fig. 1: Students practicing their photographic techniques Fig. 2: Readman. Space Fig. 3: Umadevi. What is

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Fig. 4: St Aug Int Nave Fig. 5: Michael. What Will Be Fig. 6: Ramadan. What was Fig. 7: Santipongchai. What has never been Fig. 8: Michalakis. Facade

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PHD IN ARCHITECTURE DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES: DR MANOLO GUERCI The Kent School of Architecture has a vibrant and diverse community of about twenty PhD students, which plays an important role in its research life. The students are members of one of our two research centres, and actively participate in the school’s life. Some are involved in teaching; others with special occasions and events including the organisation of the school’s biannual conferences. Our students are offered a variety of specialist workshops to develop their skills, complete their research with in-depth knowledge of their respective fields, and have developed a reputation for delivering conference papers. This often begins within the seminar series organised by the school, where the students are given an opportunity to present their work informally, whilst receiving peer review from their own environment. Equally, they also work with the research centres to deliver thematic events and talks. The School has a wide range of expertise, from the history and theories of both polite and vernacular buildings and landscapes from across the centuries, through planning and design in the twentieth century, as well as thermal and environmental comfort, urban environments and housing sustainability. To this expertise the school has recently added digital architecture, with a dedicated member of staff. New research students will broadly work within these fields, will become active in our own professional and academic networks, and will join their supervisors at international conferences and in the national amenity societies in which they are themselves 310


involved. Indeed, all PhD students are invited to attend the annual conferences organised by the research centres, which are often major international events. This year we are delighted to congratulate Alison Charles on the recent completion of her thesis on ‘Deciphering the “Dutch House”, and look forward to congratulate a handful of other students, due to submit soon. The year has been great in terms of scholarship awards, three in total: in addition to our Vice Chancellor Scholarship, two of our candidates were in fact successful in obtaining a prestigious CHASE Scholarship. The Vice Chancellor Scholarship was awarded to Haval Abdulkareem, who will be researching sustainable housing design in hot and dry climates under the supervision of Dr Henrik Shoenefeldt. The CHASE scholarships went to to Giacomo Damiani and Iliona Khalili, who will be working on ‘The philosophical paradigm in Renaissance Architecture: the case of the “De divina proportione” by Luca Pacioli’, and ‘The Role of Poetics in the Formation of Public Space in Post-Migrant Cities’, respectively, both under the supervision of Professor Gordana Fontana-Giusti. PhD applications from all over the world have also increased, attesting to the school’s growing reputation as a leading research centre. In effect, the school has also received requests for PhD by publication, and Davina Jackson has been admitted as a candidate under the supervision of Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin. Her research focusses on South Pacific modern architecture and design.

Dr Manolo Guerci Director of Graduate Studies

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Fig. 1: Bahar Badiee - Inspired by the absence of literature with regard to coloured glass panels and Orsi windows, as architectural, climatic and aesthetic elements of traditional Iranian design.

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Fig. 2-4: Bahar Badiee - The main objective of this research was to investigate Orsi integrated dwellings and windowmorphology in order to recognize whether or not incentives, such as environmental changes, advancements of building technology, availability of crafting materials, cultural influences and artistic aspirations, motivated the evolvement of traditional and uniform Persian windows into enlarged and detailed Orsi windows from the Safavid era forward.

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INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

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FIELD TRIPS BERLIN FIELD TRIP NOVEMBER 2016

BA Stage Two and Three students visited Berlin for an ever-popular visit to this intriguing city. It offers a comprehensive insight into the development of the nineteenth and twentieth-century city, one in which the urban design of the city as a whole is to the forefront. We stayed in a cheap and cheerful student hotel in Kreuzberg, a pleasant walk away from the hill of the same name from the summit of which we had a vantage point over the entire city. This was also our first encounter with the work of the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel, with his monument to the Prussian victory over Napoleon’s forces, in Viktoria Park. We were to see much more of Schinkel’s work in reshaping the Prussian capital over the next few days. Students who had the stamina managed to keep up with the intensive walking tours led by the tutors (I was assisted by Keith Bothwell, Patrick Crouch and Rebecca Hobbs) as we crossed the city from west to east and north to south. We took in a cross-section of exemplary housing projects including Bruno Taut’s Horseshoe Settlement from the 1920s, the 1950s West Berlin Hansaviertel (with contributions from Walter Gropius and Oscar Niemeyer, amongst many others), to equivalent projects in the east (the former Stalinallee) which made us nostalgic for Moscow. We paid special attention to West Berlin’s IBA projects from the 1980s, and were especially moved by David Chipperfield’s masterly conservation of August Stüler’s ruined Neues Museum and by the nearby reworking of Schinkel’s Guard House on Unter den Linden to form Germany’s First World War memorial in 1930. Berlin’s tribulations since the Nazi era were brought home most poignantly in the small but highly-charged ‘earth church’ in the Bernauer Strasse, designed by Sassenroth and Reitermann. Over the course of an intensive five days we were all acutely aware of the vicissitudes of history, but also of man’s ability to come to terms with the past and to make constructive and intelligent responses that look towards the future. My own favourite memory of the trip was of the return journey. As our EasyJet approached Gatwick, on the evening of the fifth of November, the students burst into ‘Happy Birthday to You’ as I was presented with a group birthday card of drawings of Berlin from the group. Thank you, Patrick, for masterminding this, and for not trying to set off any fireworks on board.

Professor Gerry Adler 316


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Fig. 1: Emil Fahrenkamp, Shell-Haus, 1932 Fig. 2: Wilhelm Riehmer & Otto Mrosk, Entrance to Riehmers Hofgarten, 1892 Fig. 3: Temporary full size hoarding masking the reconstruction of Schinkel’s Bauakademie, 1832-36 Fig. 4: Otto Schmalz, Law Courts, 1896-1904

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VENICE BIENNALE STEWARDSHIP FELLOWSHIP BRITISH PAVILLION

In October 2016, Louise Cook, was awarded the Venice Stewardship Fellowship. The programme, launched by the British Council, is a unique opportunity for outstanding students to spend a month in Venice during the Architecture Biennale. As part of the programme, stewards divide their time between running the British Pavilion exhibition and independent research projects. These individual research projects are guided by the focus of the Biennale, which in 2016 was the ‘Home Economics’ theme. The students’ work contributes to a cumulative piece of research, which is made publicly available and contributes to current debates around architecture. Louise’s primary research investigation looked beyond the tourism industry in Venice and toward the quality of housing provided for local residents, with particular focus on 20th Century housing. The city is saturated by the leisure industry and with a rise in hostels, hotels, boarding houses and serviced apartments, Venetians are usually forced to reside on the smaller surrounding islands. Louise’s research was presented as a series of three photographic case studies; Sacca Fisola, 1960-80, Ex-Saffa Housing in Cannaregio, 1981-85 and the Housing at Mazzorbo, 1979. These final prints were produced through dark room techniques to add age, grain and atmosphere to their aesthetic. Her images present a feeling of nostalgia and honesty, disparate from the romanticised postcard pictures of the city.

Louise Grace Cook Stage 5: Unit 1 318


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Fig. 1: Lived here for years Fig. 2: Graffiti Fig. 3: The Group 319


TESSENOW SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIPS

The Heinrich Tessenow Society was founded on the great German architect’s death in 1950 by his largely north German and Berlin pupils and assistants, in order to further his ethos of simplicity and rigour in architecture. Over the years the membership has gradually been replaced by scholars, architects and members of the public with a keen interest in his work. I am the only active British member of the society, having joined during my PhD studies on Tessenow, and I serve on the Prize committee which every year honours an architect, historian or theorist with the Gold Medal. For the last few years the society has awarded scholarships to KSA students to attend its annual meeting and prize-giving, and this year Larissa Braga (Stage Two) and Michael Hall (PhD) accompanied me to Frankfurt am Main for the ceremony, society meeting, and trips around Frankfurt. Larissa and Michael presented aspects of their work relevant to the Society; Larissa introduced her dissertation topic on the Garden City and its future (Tessenow was one of the chief designers of Hellerau Garden City, Dresden, Germany’s greatest example of the quintessential English [sub]urban typology), while Michael discussed his study of the changing status of the country house in postwar British heritage circles. We began the events at Frankfurt’s Deutsches Architektur Museum, a fitting venue as it has at its heart a full-size abstraction of a house with strong echoes of Tessenow’s timeless and proto-typical house-form. This year’s prize-winner was the Italian critic and theoretician Vittorio Magnago Lampugnani, professor at ETH Zurich. He is a prolific writer on architectural matters, and I would like to mention his Die Modernität des Dauerhaften (The Modernity of Durability) as being particularly inspiring. In this book he writes against fashionable ‘form for form’s sake’, and argues for the enduring architectural and urban qualities of building and environments that last, as opposed to the recourse to the virtual and the throw-away qualities of the ephemeral that are so ubiquitous today. In Frankfurt we visited a number of the Siedlungen (housing estates) that made the city a beacon of modernist design in the 1920s, in addition to significant expressionist buildings by Hans Poelzig and Peter Behrens for the chemical concerns IG Farben and Hoechst, while out of town we saw villas by Behrens and Richard Neutra.

Professor Gerry Adler 320


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Fig. 1: Martin Weber, Holy Cross Church, Bornheim, Frankfurt am Main (1928-29) Fig. 2: Peter Behrens, Technical Administration Building, Hoechst, Frankfurt am Main (1920-24) 321


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RESEARCH & COMMUNITY

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CASE THE CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE AND SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS This has been another landmark year for CASE with new exciting projects and collaborations, as well as a range of talks and lectures. Our Open Lecture Series, commenced with Marylis Ramos, the Director of Sustainability and Research at PRP Architects on “Future Cities: resilience, zero carbon, and wellbeing”, while Professor Maria Kolokotroni from Brunel University discussed the “Urban Heat Island: its impact on energy demand by buildings”. We concluded with Chris Twinn, principal of TwinnSustainabilityInnovation after 28 years with Arup as a director and Arup Fellow, discussing the topical “Where is Sustainability going next?” Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt’s AHRC project “Restoring the Palace of Westminster’s nineteenth century ventilation system - Between Sustainability and Heritage” has been progressing exceedingly well with Henrik being fully embedded with the Restoration and Renewal Programme to lead the study of the original Victorian ventilation system and how it can be reutilised in the context of the forthcoming refurbishment. Recently, he has been invited to work with Patrick Duerden from Donald Insall on the Conservation Management Plan for the Palace of Westminster and the historic ventilation is to be embedded with preservation and re-use to be made a requirement. Dr Richard Watkins, focusing on air movement in large spaces, developed a system using helium-filled balloons to conduct air flow experiments and track air flow around the Nave of Canterbury Cathedral. (see image) Other international collaborations include Dr Giridharan Renganathan’s work on “Thermal Comfort in Tsunami Housing Developments in Southern Coast of Sri Lanka” funded by the University of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka, and Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou’s WIMEK Visiting fellowship at Wageningen University, The Netherlands, to focus on the role of thermal perception in outdoor thermal comfort. The year also saw some important external recognitions. Giridharan Renganathan won the 2016 Carter Bronze medal for most highly rated paper relating to application and development for his paper published in CIBSE’s technical journal Building Services Engineering Research & Technology, while Marialena Nikolopoulou was invited by the Estonian Research Council as part of an international committee of experts to evaluate research and development in Estonia. And before the academic year ended we got the opportunity to celebrate winning KSA’s largest ever research project. The three-year £904,000 EPSRC-funded project “Urban albedo computation in high latitude locations: an experimental approach” was awarded to Marialena Nikolopoulou, Giridharan Renganathan and Richard Watkins in collaboration with Brunel and 324


Loughborough Universities. The project, which will commence in August, aims to investigate experimentally the impact of urban fabric on urban albedo and develop an empirical model to predict changes in urban albedo in relation to changes in urban fabric and solar altitude. Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou Director of CASE Prof. Marialena Nikolopoulou Keith Bothwell Dr Giridharan Renganathan Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt Dr Richard Watkins

PhD Students: Michael Adaji, Bahar Badiee, Christina Chatzipoulka, Giacomo Chiarani, Victoria Gana, Soha Hirbod, Angeliki Sivitanidou, Leonidas Tsichritzis

Partners: Adaptation and Resilience in the Context of Change network Canterbury Cathedral CIBSE CIBSE Heritage Group CIBSE Resilient Cities Group Deadalus Kent County Council Lee Evans architects London Climate Change Programme RIBA Thanet District Council

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Research Associate: Dr Carolina Vasilikou

Fig. 1: Prof. Maria Kolokotroni from Brunel University discussing “Urban Heat Island: its impact on energy demand by buildings� Fig. 2: Dr Richard Watkins: Helium-filled balloons tracking air flow around the Nave of Canterbury Cathedral (https://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/whats-on/news/2017/01/19/a-grand-adventure-in-the-nave/

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CREAte THE CENTRE FOR RESEARCH IN EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURE CREAte is the Kent School of Architecture humanities based research centre. We are committed to the cultivation of humanistic values and ethical responsibility, through the exploration of cultural and social contexts within constantly evolving European and national identities. Based in the Faculty of Humanities at Kent, our Centre collaborates with other faculty centres and colleagues, widening the scope of our investigations into problems effecting architectural culture, such as ecological changes, demographic shifts, and historiographic debates. Much of our work focusses on heritage issues, including not only the conservation of physical material, but also the constant re-evaluation of cultural significance through interpretation and physical adaptation. CREAte members engage in wide ranging activities, serving as journal editors, members of trans-European architectural societies, and professional consultants nationally and locally in Kent. Our PhD students play a central role in our centre through regular staff-student seminars. This past year we invited a range of speakers who approach architectural research from strikingly different perspectives. Landscape architect and theorist Tim Waterman began the lecture series with an analysis of the use of landscape in James Bond films, and how this could be seen as a particular representation of British identity, and anxiety. Alan Powers discussed the politics and personalities behind the design and realisation of the Sainsbury Wing of the National Gallery, in the context of his work on Post Modernism in England. Joanna Conterio spoke to a seminar group of CREAte staff and PhD students on health, soil, and modernist sanatoria in Soviet-era Sochi. Shiqiao Li and Esther Lorenz addressed urban issues in Kowloon from a theoretical standpoint. Finally, Iain Jackson presented the work of architects Maxwell Fry and Jane Drew in the context of mid-twentieth century post-colonial cultural and climatic environments. The highlight of the CREAte calendar this year was the book launch held in April at the Pugin’s House, the Grange, in Ramsgate, in celebration of the publication of Gothic Revival Worldwide: A. W. N. Pugin’s Global Influence. This important work was edited by our member Timothy Brittain-Catlin, along with Jan De Maeyer of Leuven, and Martin Brassani of McGill. The event was well attended by Pugin Society members and the interested public, with Lady Alexandra Wedgwood as guest of honour, herself a noted Pugin scholar. Gothic Revival Worldwide is the first truly international survey of the topic, and undoubtedly will become a standard work. Dr David Haney Director of CREAte Research Centre 326


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KASA KENT ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ASSOCIATION

The Kent Architectural Student Association (KASA) is a student run body which has grown alongside the school since its inaugural year in 2005. This year KASA has developed its 2008 rebranding strategy to establish a unified sense of identity across the Kent School of Architecture. We chose to release new designs at the End of Year Show to share this with both former and prospective students thus engaging with the wider community and embracing this year’s themes for the show. The Autumn term welcomed new and returning students by inviting guest speaker Simon Allford (AHMM Architects) to open the KASA 2016-17 lecture series. Other speakers this year included Factory Fifteen and Waugh Thistleton Architects and the Surveyor of the Fabric of Canterbury Cathedral. The lecture series provided an extracurricular platform for students to gain valuable insight into a broader range of architectural topics and contemporary issues. As students settled into their respective courses throughout the year, KASA hosted a series of social events which run alongside the lecture series. Highlights included quiz events, garden games and film & popcorn nights which aimed to encourage student integration within the school. The KASA Summer Ball concluded the social programme allowing the students an opportunity to celebrate the completion of an academic year at KSA with the rest of the school and staff to whom they were grateful. This year’s catalogue design competition saw an impressive number of entries from students in all KSA programmes. Stage 5 student Thomas Chappels was awarded the prize for his design which celebrates the show’s theme of time. KASA also believe that the animated design visually encapsulates the school’s enthusiasm to learn and use new technology in architecture. The End of Year Show has been the result a fantastic team effort and on behalf of KASA, we would like to thank all those involved. Finance Officer: Tim Lince Lecture Team: Lucia Lanzalaco & Joshua Anderson Events & Media Team: Ciara Boyle, Melissa Kendall, Marian Alkali, Akmaral Khassen, Orhan Unlu Support Team: Rares Tugui, Ghaith Maraqa, Calum Snape, Kelly Wong, Sahar Ibrahim, Kauser Basheer Kayleigh Buttigieg & Mandy Roberts KASA Presidents 2016-17 328


FILM AND POPCORN N I G H T TUESDAY 28 MARCH MLT1

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POPCORN & DRINKS FROM 5:30PM KASA INVITES YOU TO THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF A SHORT DESIGN FLIM TRILOGY - ABOUT TYPOGRAPHY AND GRAPHIC DESIGN

6PM SCREENING: 80 MINS RUNNING TIME

MARLOWE LECTURE THEATRE 1 17:30 DRINKS 18:00 LECTURE

KASA is delighted to announce an upcoming lecture by Jonathan Deeming – WITH THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS: Surveyor of the Fabric of Canterbury Cathedral. Jonathan is a Partner for architectural practice Purcell and has achieved qualification as an Architect Accredited in Building Conservation. Jonathan’s role as Surveyor to the Fabric is wide ranging and complex; he is responsible for preparing a survey of the Cathedral every five years, assessing the state of repair of the structure and making recommendations about the priority for repairs to the building. The lecture will discuss the recently completed, in progress and future work planned for Canterbury Cathedral. .

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STUDENT SUCCESS EQUALITY, DIVERSITY & INCLUSIVITY

This summer sees the culmination of the Student Success (EDI) Project at Kent School of Architecture. KSA was one of the first pilot schools for the Student Success Project in September 2014. As part of the initiative, we have provided extra support and opportunities for all undergraduate students. To celebrate the start of the final year of the project, we arranged a fun-filled week and welcome pack for our new Stage 1 students which included a copy of the ‘A is for Architecture’ book written and illustrated by Jasmine Davey (Former Stage 5 MArch student) and James Shaw (current PhD student). ‘Drop In Fridays’ for stage 1 & 2 were repeated this year owing to the success and popularity of the sessions led by AAL Henry Sparks with the assistance of 5th year MArch student Louise Cook, and then 4th year MArch student Kerem Sivri, continuing with Monday Twilight sessions in 2015/16 for stages 2 &3 led by AAL David Moore with the assistance of 5th Year MArch student Jonathan Bush. It is hoped that the ‘Drop in’ sessions will become an ongoing part of KSA culture. The outreach programme is now in its 4th year. With the support of the Partnership Development Office, we offered a series of workshops at Canterbury High School and St Anselm’s Roman Catholic School. At Canterbury High, the design brief challenged students to design a habitable bridge for Faversham Creek. At St Anslem’s, Students were asked to design a dwelling made out of three shipping containers. The whole initiative was led by a fantastic group of both 3rd and 4th year student ambassadors. Teams went into each school for 6 sessions supporting and encouraging school students to come up with ideas which were developed into models. The workshops culminated in an exhibition and a workshop at KSA. Kent School of Architecture is hosting the 4th Summer School in July which offers Partner School students a glimpse of life on campus. The School provides a journey through the design process from a site visit, mini lectures, sketching, orthographic drawing and model making. The brief is to design a dwelling and workspace to form a village which provides the highlight of the event. Rebecca Hobbs EDI and Outreach Project Lead 330


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Fig. 1: A habitable bridge for Faversham Creek, Canterbury High School Fig.2: Shipping Container Dwelling, St Anslem’s School 331


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ACADEMIC STAFF Professor Don Gray; Head of School Professor Gerald Adler; Deputy Head of School, GTA Academic Contact, Programme Director: MA Architecture & Urban Design Keith Bothwell; Programme Director: BA (Hons) Architecture, Director of Education, Senior Lecturer Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin; Reader in Architecture Dr Luciano Cardellicchio; Lecturer, KASA Liaison, Library Liason, BA Technology Coordinator, Chief Examiner Professor Gordana Fontana-Giusti; Humanities Associate Dean (Graduate Studies), Professor of Architecture and Urban Regeneration Chris Gardner; Stage One Coordinator, Lecturer Howard Griffin; Programme Director: MA Architectural Visualisation, Lecturer Dr Manolo Guerci; Director of Graduate Studies, Senior Lecturer Dr David Haney; Director of CREAte Research Centre, Senior Lecturer Rebecca Hobbs; EDI and Outreach Project Lead, Equal Opportunities Representative, Lecturer and Design Tutor, Stage Two Coordinator Dr Tim Ireland; Director of Digital Architecture, Senior Lecturer Dr Nikolaos Karydis; Programme Director: MSc Architectural Conservation, Chair of Humanities Faculty Ethics Committee, Lecturer 332

Professor Marialena Nikolopolou; Director of Research, Director of CASE Research Centre, Programme Director: MSc Sustainable Architecture & Environment, Professor of Sustainable Architecture Dr Giridharan Renganathan; Lecturer Michael Richards; Programme Director: MArch, MArch Unit Leader & Design Tutor, Senior Lecturer Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt; Lecturer of Sustainable Architecture Jef Smith; Lecturer Chloe Street Tarbatt; Stage 3 Coordinator, Lecturer, e-Learning Champion Dr Richard Watkins; Lecturer, Senior Tutor

ASSOCIATE & ASSISTANT LECTURERS Felicity Atekpe; Design Tutor Bahar Badiee; Design Tutor Samuel Causer; Design Tutor Faye Chantler; Design Tutor Christina Chatzipoulka; Graduate Teaching Assistant Giacomo Chiarani; Design Tutor Diana Cochrane; MArch Unit Leader & Design Tutor Adam Cole; MArch Unit Leader & Design Tutor Patrick Crouch; Design Tutor Jasmine Davey; Design Tutor


Andrew de Carteret; Design Tutor Ashvin de Vos; Design Tutor Charles Drozynski; Design Tutor Tim Fox Godden; Design Tutor Mattia Gambardella; Design Tutor Ben Godber; Technology & Environment Tutor

Matthew Woodthorpe; Associate Lecturer

PROFESSIONAL ADMINISTRATION Stuart Flower; Finance Officer Annabel Long; Administration Assistant

Kevin Haley; Design Tutor

Sharmini Mahendrasingam; Recruitment Communications & Outreach Coordinator, Student Success (EDI) Project Officer

Michael Holmes Coats; Design Tutor

Ben Martin; Student Experience Manager

John Letherland; Design Tutor

Ellie Mascall; Recruitment, Admissions and Marketing Manager

Georgios Loizos; Design Tutor Michael Luszczak; Design Tutor

Claire Perera; Postgraduate Coordinator

Martin McKay; Design Tutor

Jeanne Straight; School Administration Manager

David Moore; Design Tutor

Rebecca Wilkinson; Administration Assistant

Hilary Nixon; Design Tutor Annarita Papeschi; MArch Unit Leader and Design Tutor Giovanni Piga; Design Tutor Alan Powers; Design Tutor Fiona Raley; Design Tutor Chris Seaber; Design Tutor Henry Sparks; Design Tutor George Thomson; Design Tutor

TECHNICAL TEAM Colin Cresser; Workshop Technician Neil Evans; Studio Technician Christopher Jones; I.T. Technician Kevin Smith; Workshop Manager Julien Soosaipillai; 3D CAD Technician Brian Wood; Technical Resources Manager

Carolina Vasilikou; Design Tutor Peter Wislocki; Design Tutor 333


CREDITS

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CATALOGUE TEAM Charles Hope

EXHIBITION COORDINATORS

Kayleigh Buttigieg

Charles Hope

Mandy Roberts

Kayleigh Buttigieg

Thomas Chappels; Catalogue Design Competition Winner Tirion English Matthew Harrall Rob Joyce Andrea King Jade Simm Abbie Sobik Brad Sowter

Mandy Roberts

ALUMNI & COMMUNITY HUB Patrick O’Keeffe Benjamin Wood Esther Brown

SIGNAGE & MEDIA

Orhan Unlu

Louise Cook

Benjamin Wood

Jade Simm Orhan Unlu

M.ARCH UNIT COORDINATORS Jill Murray; Unit 1

BA (HONS) EXHIBITION COORDINATORS

David Skillicorn; Unit 2

Kayleigh Buttigieg

Matthew Harrall; Unit 3

Mandy Roberts

Josh Murphy; Unit 4

Jeremy Paton 335


KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Marlowe Building Canterbury Kent CT2 7NR +44 01227 824689 www.kent.ac.uk/architecture architecture@kent.ac.uk

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Kent School of Architecture - End of Year Show Catalogue 2017  

Kent School of Architecture - End of Year Show Catalogue 2017  

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