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E IT IT09 KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE KENT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE END OF YEAR SHOW


Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.

were designed to a complex and demanding brief which required negotiating dramatic changes of level and the famous promenade view across the harbour.

Soren Kierkegaard

The body of work represented by the 2009 yearbook is powerful and wide ranging, and goes some way to describing the experience of this year’s graduating students. The bravest of these were prepared to experiment and take risks, and in so doing they challenged accepted conventions to provoke, to intrigue, to innovate. In all parts of the School our students are prepared to confront complacency, using the potency of design to enhance the quality of the lives of those touched by it.

We are still a relatively new entrant into architectural education: this is the fourth year in the life of Kent School of Architecture. Kent is our laboratory, and you will see creative reactions to projects very deliberately embedded in the region. Some of these are particularly close to home, exploring new possibilities for enclosures to house Music and Art presentations on the Canterbury Campus itself. Other M Arch projects included a Hydographic Map Institute, the Tate Art

Restoration Academy, English National Ballet HQ and a Spinal Injures Centre. A raft of idiosyncratic personal projects included explorations into spatio/ perspective inferences of Antonioni’s Blow Up, traditions of Chinese urbanism and a ‘live’ project for a sustainable olive estate in Corfu. BA Architecture students examined regeneration possibilities in the coastal town of Ramsgate. The ‘Urban’ design project involved the design of a new spa building on a prominent site on the West Cliff. Schemes

Our Interiors programmes have continued design research into the sensory, the tactile, the visionary and the experimental. Proposals for Exhibition and Dance included innovation in the use of colour, lighting and installation. Design for Performance and Theatre speculated on adaptation of the existing, anchoring projects in an established community. 2009 also saw the establishment of the Centre for Research in European Architecture, CREAte, which has seen staff and post-graduate students present work at conferences as well as producing an impressive range of papers, publications, book chapters and books.

KASA, our energetic student society and an integral part of the School’s external activities, invited a series of award winning architects to talk to staff and students at well attended and provocative events. We are all immensely proud of their efforts. Hard work, ingenuity and ability have been spiced with self-belief, and the result is this yearbook the most powerful portfolio of projects since the School began. In these problematic times for Architecture and Interiors, it will be difficult for students emerging into the damaged world of practice. We are confident that graduates from Kent School of Architecture are equipped with the skills which will enable them to thrive in such challenging times. Professor Don Gray Head of School

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M Arch Stage 5

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M Arch (Master of Architecture)

with RIBA Pt II exemption

The first year of the M Arch (Stage 4) provides an opportunity to survey the territory between the memories of undergraduate school, filtered through the experiences and orthodoxies imported with a return from architectural practice, and the challenges that lie ahead in the concluding graduating year (Stage 5).

Here the onus is placed on selfgenerated briefs and self-directed study; research by design. We advocate and encourage driven personal investigations into what constitutes architecture and where its boundaries lie.

This Year Stage 5 engaged with the capital and appropriated the site of the former Thames-side ‘Chambers Wharf’ in Bermondsey as a catalyst for their individual, studentdeveloped briefs for their Major Design Projects. These include: a UK Hydrographic Institute; Tate Art Restoration Academy; Tidal Thames River Centre; Performing Arts Centre; English National Ballet HQ; New Bermondsey Spa; New BFI/NFTS Campus; IOC HQ; and a Spinal Injures Rehabilitation Centre. These projects are supported by associated Design and Technology written reports.

Bluewater: a short documentary film about the effects of the shopping centre on the High Street; a international competition for a Pavilion in Austin TX; and a ‘live’ project for an ecological Olive Oil Estate in Corfu.

In the spring Stage 5 developed Independent Study Projects which are more personal investigations on Architecture and related issues. These included: Spatial representation and meaning in Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1966 film BlowUp; the objectification of the subconscious from Doodle to Jewellery; Rubbish and aspirational recycling; Time; Traditions of Chinese Urbanism; Modernism and Refugee in Athens;

M Arch Stage 5 students 2008/9: Ed Dunderdale, Nina Ivanova, Joel Jenkins, Neil King, Richard Kirby, Richard Lai, Lennie Montgomery, Tatiana Lampridi, Josh Neal, Dimitrios Tsarouchas, Loukia Ventoura

The M Arch ‘Class of 2009’ emerged through considerable and unwarranted adversity during their Stage 4 to become a strong, cohesive, and confident group of individuals and friends in their final year. We have been through a lot, and their loyalty is appreciated. They graduate into uncertain times but I believe their resilience and strength will serve them well. You can see these character traits in their work. I wish them well. Michael Richards Programme Director M Arch

M Arch Stage 5 tutors: Gerry Adler, Timothy Brittain-Catlin, Nick Brown, Gordana Fontana-Giusti, Michael Richards, Chris Seaber

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Edward Dunderdale

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The United Kingdom Hydrographic Archive has been formed using the tactility of physical models, through investigations of scale and form along the social and historic sinews of grid and pathway, creating a new post industrial ‘pier’ typology, allowing tidal flow to permeate through the site, inextricably linking programme and brief, form and site and irrigating a

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new urban habitat. 1 Major Design Project UKHO Aerial Model View 2 Design Project final Amnesty International Headquarters Exterior View

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3 Major Design Project Barrage Model View 4 Major Design Project UKHO Archive Logo


The Tate Conservation Centre has developed from the historical context of Sir Henry Tate donating works of art and founding the Tate museums. The building

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is framed with a Wall of Caramel representing the history of the client, and preservation of the Chambers Wall facade retaining the rich history of the site.

Nina Ivanova

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1 Design Project final Jewellery 2 Major Design Project Caramel experimentation 3 Major Design Project river facade collage 4 Major Design Project Section E

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Joel Jenkins 6 1

Tide is the ‘silent client’ in this major project, which transforms the riverfront site into an urban beach. A bold opening in the river wall invites the water into the Thames River Centre - a meander of buildings centred on art and leisure facilities. The tidal flow orchestrates use of space.

1 Design Project final Jewellery 2 Major Design Project Caramel experimentation

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Neil King

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3 “I don’t need to be the best, I just want to dance”. My MDP is a building for the performing arts & arts therapy. The vision is to provide a building which enhances the quality of the culture, economy, and education of the area. Although primarily an educational building, it is also for the surrounding community.

4 1 Major Design Project Bermondsey Wall 2 Major Design Project Thames Elevation 3 Major Design Project Ground floor plan 4 Major Design Project Studio entrance 5 Major Design Project Roof terraces

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Richard Kirby

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2 1ENB River View 2 Amnesty  Project Visualisation 3E  NB Entrance

Visiting the current English National Ballet headquarters, I realised the potential for its development. I set myself the task of generating a detailed feasibility study, hoping to provide a performance space for in-house productions; external spaces; an extensive creative suite; and to provide a welcoming public face for the ENB.

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Richard Lai

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1 Final Rear Elevation 2 Final Front Elevation 3 Major Design Project Model 4 Major Design Project Model

3 Richard’s New Bermondsey Spa returns a Spa facility to Bermondsey in close proximity to a famous but unviable residential Spa from the Victorian era. The new Spa purifies its water through a celebrated distillation process, and subsequently uses it as grey water to irrigate a recreation of the famous Bermondsey Cherry Gardens.

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Tatiana Lampridi 10

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5 1M  ajor Design Project Bermondsey

Ready to disembark and start

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my professional career I can only

inside the Spa 3M  ajor Design Project view of the Ice Rink

recall my beloved Mies’ words: Architecture is a language with the discipline of a grammar. In

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ordinary life, one can use this

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language as prose; but if one is very good, one can be a poet.


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Joshua Neal

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My MDP is the creation of the British Film Institute (BFI) Cinematic Gateway in central London. The scheme comprises of a multiplex cinema, the BFI library and archive, the BFI HQ and a film school. My ISP is a short documentary which looks at Bluewater’s effect on the Medway Towns.

5 1 Major Design Project Cross Section 2 Major Design Project Cover Image 3 Major Design Across the Thames View 4 Major Design Project View of Student Accommodation 5 Major Design Project Ground Floor Plan


Dimitrios Tsarouchas

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An Olympian himself, Mr. T’s

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MDP proposes a relocation of the International Olympic Committee Headquarters to London. A clash fundamental geometry alludes to the competitive ideal. Mr.T’s ISP begins with an entry for a new art-exhibition pavilion prototype

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competition for the AIA in Austin TX. A collection of vitrines unite above/ below an undulating plane/canopy of masses in reference to the regional landscape and cloudscape, and the creative environment between.

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4 1 Major Design Project Urban Landscapes 3D Perspective 2 Major Design Project Urban Landscapes Front Elevation 3 Major Design Project Urban Landscapes 3D Aerial 4 Major Design Project Urban Landscapes Site Plan early 3D


Loukia Ventoura

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I believe that architecture is the greatest of all arts. By studying

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architecture your mind is opened up to many things offering

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a completely different way of understanding. Moreover

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architecture gives you the ability to create forms and spaces

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which can change the way we see our world far beyond the reach of our lifetimes. This always enchanted me.


BA (hons) ARCHITECTURE

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stage 3

Keith Bothwell

Students returning after the summer holiday refreshed their design skills with an intensive one-week exercise exploring the detailed architectural characteristics of an ideal room, before embarking in teams on a masterplan for the Creative Quarter in Folkestone. Local planners and architects contributed to a day-long charrette on site, which culminated in a public presentation from each team of their key ideas for the area.

The steeply sloping backland site presented many challenges which produced a wide variety of formal solutions to the brief for student housing – from liquorice allsort towers to a ground-hugging Italianate hill town. The major project Urban – for a spa based in Ramsgate – continued the theme of regeneration in local seaside towns. A highly unusual site abutting the urban edge combined cliff-face panoramic views with a sunken garden. Proposals were characterised by a concern for geometry and materiality – unsurprisingly considering the benchmark precedent of Peter Zumthor’s seminal Therme Vals building.


Matthew Armitt

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1 Urban Infinity Pool 2 Urban Circulation 3 Urban Jacuzzi Room 4 Urban Curtain Wall


Stephen Athanasiou

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1U  rban Project Masterplan Proposal 2 Urban  Project Perspective Image 3 Urban ProjectSpa Interior of Fire Bath 4U  rban Project Section Showing Natural Daylight


Ryan Bainbridge

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1 Modular External View 2 Urban Plan 3 Modular Design Development 4 Urban Sectional Perspective 5 Urban Spa Pool

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Claire Bennett

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6 1 Urban Basement Plan 2 Modular Section 3 Modular Exploded Axonometric 4 Urban Perspective 5 Urban Night View 6 Modular Perspective


Robert Burke

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1M  odular Masterplan 2 Urban Model 3 Urban Section 4 Urban Plans and Sections

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Holly Campbell

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1 Modular Masterplan 2 Modular Elevations 3 Form + Structure Site Analysis 4 Form + Structure Orthographics


Jamie Campbell

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2 1 Modular Model 2 Modular Sketch 3 Modular Model

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Vincenzo Castiglione

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1 Modular Perspectives 2 Urban Perspective 3 Urban Cutaway


Jonathan Cerowski

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Situations are waiting for buildings to make them happen.

4 1 Urban Model 2 Urban Computer Render 3 Urban External Photo Montage 4 Urban Sketch Photo Montage


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Syrmina Chondromatidou

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1 Urban Building Interior 2 Modular Masterplan Analysis 3 Urban Building Exterior 4 Modular Study Bedroom 5 Modular Section


Cindy Chow

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1 Modular Masterplan 2 Urban Section 3 Urban 3D Renders 4 Modular 3D Render


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Carly Crockett

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1 Urban Exploded Isometric 2 Urban Sections 3 Urban Masterplan 4 Modular Exploded Isometric 5 Modular Masterplan


Isabel Diez de Ulzurrun

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1 Modular Study Room 2 Urban Sections 3 Modular Perspective 4 Urban Ramsgate Spa

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Michael Dillon

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3 1 Modular Concept Model 2 Urban Exploded Section 3 Urban Long Section 4 Modular External View

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Scott Douch

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1 Interdisciplinary 3D Visualisation 2 Urban Section 3 Interdisciplinary Gallery Montage 4 Modular South East Elevation 5 Urban 3D Visualisation

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Sarah Elliott

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4 1 Interdisciplinary Photographic Light Study 2 Modular South Elevation 3 Landscape Perspective 4 Modular Masterplanning


Samuel Gardner

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5 4 1 Modular 3D Section 2 Urban Long Section 3 Modular Atrium From Above 4 Urban Hot Pool Room 5 Urban First Pool Room


Shane Gavin

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1 Modular Axonometric 2 Modular Ventilation Diagram 3 Modular Elevation 4 Modular Section

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Aaron Gibbard

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1 Modular Perspective Section Sketch 2 Urban Interior Render of Steam Rooms 3 Urban Long Section


Patrick Gough

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1 Urban Perspective Views 2 Urban Masterplan Section 3 Modular Design Concept


Dimitrios Gyftopoulos

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1 Modular Ground Floor Plan 2 Urban Section 3 Urban Turkish Baths 4 Modular Student Room 5 Urban Turkish Baths

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Nick Hayden

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1 Modular Contextual Integration 2 Urban Viewing Gallery 3 Modular Development 4 Urban Promenade Montage


Faris Kallala

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1 Modular Plan 2 Modular Sketches 3 Modular Sketch 4 Modular Masterplan Development

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Eleftherios Kanakaris

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4 1 Modular Student Housing 2 Urban Internal View 3 Urban Exploded View 4 Urban Internal Spaces


Jasonder Kitt

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1 Urban Elevation 2 Elevation Modular 3 Urban Section


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Stephen Larking

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1 Urban Kids Play in Stream Harbour Lights 2 Modular Room with a View Phase Three 3 Urban Section Harbour Lights 4 Modular Room with a View Phase Three 3 Urban Floor Plans


Scott Laws

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1 Urban Solar Panel Roof 2 Urban Construction Detail of Roof 3 Urban Day Interior 4 Urban Night Interior 5 Urban Outside of Building

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Jorge Leitao

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4 1 Urban Plan 2 Modular Section 3 Modular Masterplan 4 Modular Masterplan 5 Urban Section

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Sizzy Li

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3 1 Modular 2D Masterplan 2 Urban Elevation 3 Modular Exploded Isometric 4 Modular Photo Montage 5 Modular Site Models

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Joanne Macey

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1 Modular Perspectives 2 Urban Sections 3 Urban Interior 4 Urban Exterior

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Charlotte Marshall

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1 Urban Contextual Integration 2 Modular Contextual Integration 3 Urban Spa Floor Plan 4 Modular Exploded Components 5 Urban Section


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James Martin

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1 Urban Ramsgate Spa 2 Urban Public Events Space 3 Modular Axonometric Accommodation Folkestone 4 L andscape Long Section Arts Building

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Ines Martins

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2 1 Modular Study Room 2 Modular Construction Detail 3 Urban Interior Perspective 4 Urban Plan and Section

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Julian Mills

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4 1 Modular Montage 2 Modular Photomontage 3 Urban Long Render 4 Urban Greenpool


Marcus Mittee

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1 L andscape Interior View

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2 Landscape Section 3 L andscape Sketch View 4 Landscape Perspective 5 Landscape Structural Plan

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James Murray

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1 Modular Bottom Floor View 2 Urban Section A 3 Urban Exterior View 4 Urban Section B 5 Urban Sound Box


Laurence Murrin

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3 1 Urban Night Photocopy 2 Urban Environmental Section 3 Modular Perspective Section Render


Chobela Ndilila

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4 1 Modular Common Room 2 Modular Student Housing 3 Modular Site Plan 4 Modular Dining Area


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Jo San Ong

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1 Modular Sections 2 Modular Perspectives 3 Urban Axonometric 4 Urban Sections 5 Landscape Model


2 1 Modular Ground Floor Plan 2 Urban Outdoor Pool 3 Urban Night View 4 2Modular Sections

Theodora Papanastasiou

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Sofia Pertsemlodou

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1 Modular Student

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Accommodation Facade 2 Modular Site Plan 3 Modular Promenade View

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1 Urban Model 2 Modular Section

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John Porter

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Lakshmy Radhakrishnan

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3 1 Urban Exterior and Plan 2 Urban Interior Views 3 Modular Perspective 4 Urban Private Spa Interior

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William Rayner

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4 1 Modular Night Concept 2 Modular Exterior 3 Front Elevation 4 Urban Pool 5 Urban CafĂŠ Terrace

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Christian Ringer

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4 1P  ortmanteau External Render 2 Landscape Arts Building Exterior 3M  odular Bedroom Section 4F  orm + Structure Bridge Project Render 5 Sensibilia Night Shot Render

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Sean Rogan

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3 1 Urban Dip Pool 2 Urban Final Sections 3 Urban Footspa 4 Urban Steam Room

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Tomas Sharp

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3 1 Urban External Montage 2 Urban Interior Perspective 3 Urban Axonometric Together 4 Modular Section

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Oliver Sims

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1 Modular Perspective 2 Urban Sections 3 Urban Digital Tech 4 Modular Section 5 Modular Construction Process


Richard Stevens

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1 Modular East facing Section 2 Modular South Facing Elevation 3 Urban Perspective 4 Urban Perspective

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Matthew Stewart

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1 Modular Datum Mesh 2 Urban Main Pool 3 Urban Promenade Shards 4 Modular Turning Tower


Hannah Taylor

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1. Urban Promenade Montage 2. Urban Perspective 3. Urban Interior Concept 4. Urban Facade Perspective

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Rachel Thapa-Chhetri

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Zinc Membrane roof The dining hall is constructed of structural glazing with a zinc membrane roof. Technical performance: Mechanical flexibility, good aestheic appearance that marries well with timber. It has a long life span between 80 -100 years. Almost maintenace free. It is durable and builds up it’s own protective patinal layer over time and is able to self repair imperfections and scratches. Enviromental considerations: More than 90% of zinc used in the building industry is recycled. Less energy is required to process zinc than any other principal metal. It is safe to the environment as it does not produce impurities that could enter the atmosphere. It does not produce toxic fumes in case of fire.

Steel cross beam

3D Image showing construction of timber frame to chapel and steel columns and joists (exsisting) structure of black box theatre.

Brick structural wall

Timber Frame Construction Technical performance: Good strong structural material able to sustain roof loads. High thermal insulation Lighter foundations can be pre-fabricated faster to buid than brick and block.

Axonometric showing construction of Gallery area.

Enviromental Considerations: Wod is a sustainble building material which means it has a low impact on the enviroment. It is considered the most environmentally friendly commercial building material available. It is naturally renewable,limits the growth of lobal warming as trees absorb co2 and produce oxygen. It requires low energy to harvest,transport and mill.(timber waste is largely reused) It is recycleable. It is a non fossil fuel. Sustainable timber requires that the forests that source it are managed in line with environmental considerarations. A forest management certificate will certify this along with a wood production custody certificate that will help to guarantee that from forest to commercial production the materials satisfy the necessary requirements. The chapel and cloisters are to be constructed entirely of a timber frame. The area illustrated in the axonometric drawing is partially timber frame but incorporates several steel columns to act as a structural support to a cross beam that will support the higher roof level of the gallery building. It is also necessary to place a stuctural brick wall against the side of the black box theatre in order to recive the same roof load on the other side. Bricks from the demolished site where the chapel now exists can be recycled for this purpose.

ADAPT & EXTEND

Construction

1. Urban Interior Perspective Sketch 2. Adapt & Extend Construction Details


Jake Tharp

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In both of my major design projects this year I have enjoyed experimenting with the private and public realms. Modular Student Housing deals with the proximity of the public to the private rooms and courtyards, whereas the Ramsgate Spa Project

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has a much more subtle public intervention, followed by a revealing subterranean arrangement.

1 Urban Plan 2 Modular Section 3 Modular Section 4 Modular Site Section


Eleftheria Varda

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1 Urban Outdoor Pool 2 Urban Plan 3 Urban North West Facade 4 Modular Plan

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Dance presents a unique aspect of human experience, understanding and relationship to the environment. Its knowing, its communication and its activity are through the human body and the process of knowing oneself in this way. No other discipline offers this aspect of knowledge. Peter Brinson, 1993

BA (Hons) Interior Design

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Taseer Ahmad Programme Director

The question in the background here, the unasked philosophical question, is really this one; what is furniture for..? Mark Kingwell, 2002

In Interior Design the students have undertaken projects that stem from the premise that the human body and human movement are integral components for the production of space. Architecture and Interiors are spatialised by human movement and human perception. The graduates began this year projecting ahead and considering the dystopian futures of a Ballardian man-made environment: the physical and psychological effects of technological, social and ecological developments.

In ‘Event’ the students designed the movement and flow around exhibition space at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Some interestingly employed a chronological or narrative navigation sequence. In her project, Sarah Jane Pinheiro adopts an amalgam of ancient typology and a technique of locomotion without a goal. She offers a similar approach in her ‘Trails of Light’ interdisciplinary research study.

The ‘Major Work’ of the Interior Designers explores space for dance. It borrows from Laban Dance Theory where dance is seen as an integral part of the history of human movement, human culture and human communication. Dance practice itself and its learning and teaching are recognised as being concerned with the architecture of the mind and all kinds of knowing. Dance as a discipline contributes essentially to the nature of knowing which comes

from a study of values. Using this medium, the graduates explore the nature and practice of communication as exemplified by Katie Warren. Other projects on show employ a variety of forms and guises: education, entertainment, leisure, exercise, therapy etc, in order to offer a range of experience.


Louis Borhani

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1 Event Installation Perspective 2 Event Perspective 3 Major Work Inner Courtyard 4 Major Work Outdoor Courtyard

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Libra Jacobs

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1 Major Work View of Textured Wall 2 Event Exhibition in use 3 Major Work Cutaway Section 4 Major Work Perspective 5 Event View of Bourrellec Brothers Exhibitions 6 Interdisciplinary Walk through


Victoria Mallett

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4 1 Major Work Section 2 Major Work Tables 3 Major Work Sketch 4 Major Work Concept


Louise Perry

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1 Major Work Interior 2 Major Work Studios 3 Major Work Studio 4 Interdisciplinary Canterbury Cathedral 5 Major Work Sketch


Sarah-Jane Pinheiro

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1 Major Work Atrium Perspective 2 Major Work 3D Section 3 Evolution London Map 4 Evolution Library Perspective

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Katie Warren

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1 Major Work Concept Drawing of movement 2 Event Exhibition Bridge 3 Event Meshes of Exhibition


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BA (Hons) Interior Architecture

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Taseer Ahmad Programme Director

Bifel that in that sesoun on a day, In Southwerk at the Tabard as I lay, Redy to wenden on my pilgrimage To Caunterbury with ful devout corage…” The Canterbury Tales

The graduates of the Interior Architecture Programme have studied location as narrative. From the rich and edgy history of Southwark in London to the multi-layered variety of Canterbury the students have mapped the intricate urban terrain. They have differentiated between site defined as a building plot (location plan) in order to expand the notion of site as a field and territory of investigation. In so doing the students have addressed the demographics of the site in the broadest sense: the historical context and the physical and non-physical characteristics.

In the trilogy of projects for the year: ‘Speculate’, ‘Locate’ and ‘Symphony’ the Interior Architects have focused on communication, theatre and performance. ‘Theatrical performance is central to human culture. It takes many forms and – unlike painting, literary or musical composition, sculpture and architecture – it is inherently ephemeral, leaving only the memories that an audience takes away,

the memories of the actors and, in a rather mysterious way, the memories left within the theatre space itself.’ The projects of Giovanni Scialo, Sabrina Cliff and others exemplify how such spaces evoke the ephemera and memory of performance and of the past. They have sought out and revealed the hidden and that which has evaporated from the consciousness in order...

...to see things neglected by others Le Corbusier


Sabrina Cliff

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1 Speculate Isometric 2 Speculate Concept 3 Symphony Section 4 Symphony Concept 5 Symphony Montage

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Tarryn Rossouw

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1 Speculate Concept Elevation 2 Speculate Concept Montage 3 Speculate Concept Interior 4 Symphony Concept Sketch


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Giovanni Scialo

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1 Symphony Underground Space 2 Speculate Photomontage 3 Symphony Tensile structure with the Norman Castle 4 Symphony Tensile Main Auditorium 5 Symphony Plan showing lighting

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Lucie Titchmarsh

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4 1 Symphony Stour Street Elevation 2 Speculate Borough Baths Elevation 3 Symphony Layered Concept 4 Speculate Concept Model


Stephanie Yaacoubian

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3 1 Symphony Theatre Auditorium 2 Speculate Borough Market 3 Symphony Ground Floor Plan 4 Cutaway Perspective

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prizes 2009 RIBA - Canterbury Branch Pt. 1 (BA Hons) Prize TBC on 19th June

Stage 5 M Arch: Most Original Independent Study Project Josh Neal

RIBA - Canterbury Branch Pt. 2 (M.Arch) Prize TBC on 19th June

Stage 3 BA Architecture: Portfolio Prize Michael Dillon Stage 3 BA Interiors: Portfolio Prize Katie Warren

M.Arch Portfolio Prize Joel Jenkins M.Arch - Hays Prize for Written Work Neil King

Undergraduate Most Improved Student TBC on 19th June Undergraduate Best Written Work Jamie Campbell Head of School Prize TBC on 19th June


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1 Rob Elkins Music Gallery Music Box

Pier Luigi Del Renzio

2 Rob Elkins Marlowe Foyer Concept

1 Marlowe Foyer

4 Marlowe Foyer Concept

2 Music Gallery Theatre

5 Marlowe Foyer Microclimate sketch

Michael Richards Programme Director M Arch In the autumn, Campus analysed almost 60 exemplar campus Welcome to the Campus! buildings, from the This year Stage 4 initiated spiritual home of the a series of collaborative purpose-built university projects with the campus, the United University, and looked at States. Music Box, a the phenomenon of the parallel exercise to purpose-built university record a live music campus. recital, as a non-audio analogue, touched on the themes of Iannis Xenakis and concluded with the design for the eponymous ‘music box’. In Composition, students then developed designs for a ‘Music Gallery’, a facility for the University’s Music Programme, art

M Arch Stage 4

M Arch Stage 4

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3 Music Gallery Sketches

collection, and new home for the British Cartoon Archive. Designed in response to a university brief and budget, to RIBA stage D, and critiqued by professional consultants, the energy and ideas generated in this project anticipated the announcement this summer of a new ColyerFergusson Building on campus to house a new Centre for Music Performance.

collaboration with the Department of Anthropology. An intense 1-week Marlowe ‘charrette’ responded to an invitation to engagement with the University’s ‘Creative Campus’ initiative, and allowed participating students to elect to follow either of two subsequent Urban Landscape pathways, Creative Campus and Market Town.

Urban Landscapes in the spring took the form of an interdisciplinary

Creative Campus pathway expanded upon the Marlowe charrette

with campus-wide design investigations. A measure of the success of this pathway is that a collaborative practice of KSA tutors, (MELD) and student(s) from the pathway have been formally commissioned by the University to implement many of these design proposals, the first of which, the School of Architecture/ Anthropology Foyer, is scheduled for completion this autumn!

M Arch Stage 4 students 2008/9: Dapo Adedumni, Andreas Andreau, Anna Carter, Pier Del Renzio, Emiline Delefortrie, Rob Elkins, Shaun Kam, George Kontalonis, Jason Lai, Kate Maclean, Ryan Manton, Anna Mutile, Stelios Moschopoulos, Yusuke Nishimura, Heather Pavitt, Maxim Taylor, Sara Tilley, Stefan Vara, Konstantinos Ventouras. M Arch Stage 4 design tutors: Nick Brown, Michael Richards


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M Arch Stage 4

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1 Heather Pavitt Marlowe Foyer Bench Analysis 2 Ryan Manton Market Park View 3 Shawn Kam Gallery Precedent Studies 4 Shawn Kam Gallery Music Box 5 Shawn Kam Gallery Auditorium

Food formed the other preoccupation of Stage 4 this year! In the autumn, following Carolyn Steel’s lecture Sitopia, as part of the KSA CREAte series; Stage 4 visited the urban market halls of Barcelona in preparation for the Market Town pathway this spring. Taking their point of departure from Steel’s recent book ‘Hungry City’, students formed groups to champion three major food-groups and researched and analysed the history and prevailing conditions of related food cycles. They then undertook an urban master plan, leading to more specific building proposals for an urban market, food hotel, culinary school,

and associated housing on the site of Rosemary Lane car park and the adjacent former Tannery in Canterbury. The work was critiqued by a panel including Carolyn Steel, and formed the subject of recent student-initiated exhibition called Market Town at Canterbury Castle.

1 Music Gallery Crit 2 Stefan Vara Marlowe Foyer Perspective 3 Stefan Vara Music Gallery Model 4 Group project Market Town Time Study Sketch 5 Kate Maclean Market Town Perspective 6 Group project Market Town Dinner in Carpark


Timothy Brittain-Catlin

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BA Architecture stage 2

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Architecture students broaden their horizons in their second year and engage with complex and demanding sites. The first design project of the year is entitled ‘Adapt and Extend’, and requires them to design alterations and additions to an existing building with a demanding brief. This year we tackled Pierremont Hall, designed as a mansion at the end of the eighteenth century by S.P. Cockerell for a site in the centre of Broadstairs but now council offices: students remodelled the house and grounds for use as a residential college. The second project, ‘Landscape’, requires thinking on a large scale; a building is designed as a component

of an overall landscape scheme, with emphasis on sustainable construction and long-term thinking. For this project students designed a winery on a rural site at Harbledown, west of Canterbury. Longfield Academy KSA is committed to building strong links to schools in the region. In the Autumn term of 2008 a group of our second-year students designed extensions to the existing campus at the newly created Longfield Academy in West Kent. Academy pupils acted as clients for the designs and participated in the process. In February 2009 they visited us in Canterbury for a day of celebration, watching presentations and making models. Both projects were accompanied by exercises in technological, constructional and environmental design.


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1 Group Project Form & Structure Bridge Design

1 Emma Craig Adapt and Extend Library Perspective

2 Ben Gregory Climate Solar Shading Study

2 Marianna Pereyra Pedrido Landscape Site Plan

3 David Jarrad ACM Construction Detail

3 Ehren Trebiatowski ACM Construction Detail

4 Christopher Ayling ACM Artificial Light Study

4 Marianna Pereyra Pedrido Landscape Plans

5 Derin Kinacigil Adapt & Extend Visualisation

5 Matthew Donald ACM Artificial Light Study

6 Derin Kinacigil Adapt & Extend Library Perspective

6 Peter Evans ACM Artificial Light Study


BA Interior Design BA Interior Architecture

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stage 2

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BA Interior Design BA Interior Architecture

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1 Emily Thompson Sketch Book 2 Kayley Barnes The Suspension of Disbelief Perspectives

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The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use the words.

The projects in the Stage 2 Interiors Courses emphasise the multi and interdisciplinary nature of the subject. They reflect contemporary perceptions and the convergence of parallel fields such as art, fashion, film, dance, exhibition design, architecture and interiors. The work exhibited is

7 exploratory and experimental employing installation, sculpture, stage and set design. The embracing of a design and disciplinary commonality gives rise to the transfer and crossfertilisation of traditional and new technologies in interiors, furniture and product design. The students display a sense for the materiality

3 Kayley Barnes

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The Suspension of Disbelief Design Concept

of interior space with an emphasis on ‘making’. They demonstrate a concern with the ‘little things’ and the ‘big things’; the private and the public; the detailed and the general.

4 Laura van Beek Design Jour 5 Mariam Iqbal Ceiling Study Laura van Beek 6 Design Consideration & Conjecture Body Movement 7 The Suspension of Disbelief Site

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Photomontage 8 Design Consideration & Detail Concept Model 9 The Suspension of Disbelief Maquettes


BA Interior Design BA Interior Architecture

BA Interior Design BA Interior Architecture

stage 2

stage 2

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1 Sara Shihabi Development & Detail Interior Sketches 2 Rebecca Lilley The Suspension of Disbelief Interior 3 Rebecca Lilley The Suspension of Disbelief Interior 4 Matt Constantinou Paradox &

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Symbiosis Releif Section

Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away

5 Sara Shihabi Sketch Book 6 Sara Shihabi Concept Models 7 Sara Shihabi Development & Detail Study Models

Philip K. Dick

8 Sara Shihabi Concept Drawings

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stage 1 combined year

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With an ever more capable and demanding cohort of students in Stage 1 as a result of three successful years of the Kent School of Architecture and the raising of the UCAS tariff points this year, the Architecture, Interior Architecture and Interior Design programmes have witnessed a change in gear in the work produced. This shift has come about not only as a result of the particular students but also the further integrated demands of the Technology and Environmental, and the History and Theory Modules within the Design programme. Add to this the opening up of the applied Communication course and the resulting work takes on a new seriousness. Habitat 2, a small occasional residence for an individual with an obsession, sited within the derelict garages adjacent to the School started

the years design work. This was then polarised with the annual Field Study Programme held in Barcelona where Sensibilia 2, a small pavilion, in the Pl. De Vicenc Martorell, El Ravel, for the display of a specific collection of drawings, photographs and writing generated by the individual student during the course of the week’s visit. The student being the client, designer and the curator for this Module. House and Housing, the first History and Theory Module of the year addressed both the implicit issues in the Modules name but also the ability to model, at a uniform scale, examples of seminal houses of the Twentieth Century. Through Enlighten the students were introduced to a range of issues surrounding the technical realisations of their design proposals. Navigation 2 started the Spring Term when a new entry route into the first floor of a reconfigured Marlowe building was the problem

to be addressed. The Technical and Environmental aspects of the problem were supported by the Enclose Module which also equipped the students with the wherewithal to confront the physical manifestation of the final design Module of the year, Portmanteau 2, a Champagne and oyster bar situated a one of three sites adjacent to the sea front in Whitstable. Western Architecture the second History and Theory Module of the year completed the octet of Modules in Stage 1 and gave the students a broad understanding to the development of Architecture and Interior space in Europe over the past two thousand years. We believe in the ethos of education and not indoctrination and wish to understand the choices that students in Stage 1 make through robust testing of their ideas through whatever methods they deem

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appropriate – we wish to understand the choices that they make even if we do not necessarily agree with them! I would like to thank all the teaching staff who have contributed to the work produced this year with special reference to the design studio staff, Chris Gardner, Janice Shales, Nick Hobbs, Rebecca Hobbs and Jef Smith and the invaluable input from the teaching assistants from Stage 4 and 5.

Chris Seaber Stage 1 Programme Director


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11 1 Alfonso Saco Navigation Scale Model 2 Alfonso Saco Photomontage 3 Aneesah Satinya Portmanteau Elevation 4 Azmah Arzmi Memory Box 5

Azmah Arzmi Habitat Scale Model

6 Bruce Buckland-Wilson Navigation Scale Model 7 Emma Clinton Sensibilia Section 8 Laura Buckingham Habitat Scale Model 9 Laura Buckingham Habitat Sketch 10 Rosie Seaman Portmanteau Design Development 11 Seb Willett Sensibilia Perspective


Research

Beatriz Colomina

Peter Carl

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Marks & Barfields Kew Garden. Engineering by Jane Wernick

The KSA Research The KSA Research has continued its development. The research active staff members have been busy this year. They have taken part in publishing essays and articles, presenting papers at conferences, submitting bids for major grants in UK and Europe. One major European application within the Interreg scheme has been submitted and two small grant proposals have been destined to AHRC.

The Centre for Research in European Architecture (CREAte) has been dynamic in organising evening lectures and seminars. The guest speakers have included: Carolyn Steel, Peter Carl, Beatriz Colomina, Juliet Odgers, Pierre d’Avoine, Jane Wernick and Avi Friedman The productive involvement with the Architecture Humanities Research Association AHRA continues with members of staff taking part in research

events and conferences. The preparations are on the way for hosting the AHRA 2010 Annual Conference on the subject of ‘Scale’ at the University of Kent. The relations with the local and regional stakeholders such as SEEDA, Kent County Council, Margate and Canterbury City Council have developed in coordinating the demands of the region with the research programme of the School.

The MPhil/PhD Programme in Architecture has sustained its role in developing research. The programme runs weekly research seminars designed especially for PhD students. Current PhD candidates include: Anja Karina Nydal, Grant Mitchell, Lindy Weston, Keth Bothwell and Gian Luca Amadei. Post-doctoral research fellow this year has been Beria Bayizitlioglu.

The new MA in Urban Design has been validated and it is due to commence in the autumn 2009. Professor Gordana Fontana-Guisti


Research 104

PhD Students 2008-09 Gian Luca Amadei: Contemporary Cemeteries and Their Role in Urban Regeneration Keith Bothwell: Architecture for the Passively Tempered Environment Anja Karina Nydal: The Role of Aesthetics, Geometry and Imagination in Mountaineering and Architecture Grant Mitchell: Architectural Therapeutics Lindy Weston: Architecture and the Sacred Post Doctoral Research Fellow 2008-09 Beria Bayizitlioglu: Accordia, Cambridge: Post-occupancy- Research and Assessment

The architecture of the passively tempered environment There is little to be gained in addressing climate change if we build so-called ‘carbonneutral’ buildings which use wind or solar power, if these technologies can be abandoned and substituted with carbon-fuelled energy systems. When designing lowcarbon buildings we should firstly maximise the passive control of internal temperatures, and only secondly use renewable energy to meet any shortfall. I will be examining a group of buildings which employ these strategies – daylighting, natural ventilation, passive solar heating and cooling – measuring temperatures, recording energy consumption and evaluating human comfort. Keith Bothwell

Imagining Geometry: On Imagining Geometry in 16th Century Stereotomy and its Relationship to Mountaineering Focusing on the production and cutting of stones by the sixteenth century stonecutters, this chapter deals with questions around the mental processes that made the cutting of stones possible. Through reading texts by Philibert De L’Orme and Palladio – both architects who were sons of stonemasons - this will introduce the first linking between architecture and mountaineering. A study of their mental processes will be compared with that of rock climbers and mountaineers in the twentyfirst century, who display an outstanding ability to

remember and imagine the shape of the rock on which they have climbed. Neither attempting to bridge the centuries dividing these practices, nor attempting to write two parallel histories, it will be shown how both had a remarkably similar ability to imagine the three dimensional object: stone. I endeavour to illustrate that although the ability to imagine and remember complex geometrical shapes gradually disappeared from the discipline of architecture after the sixteenth century, we have today a stone master in the ‘architect-climber’ with these extraordinary abilities. Thus, this chapter which I am currently working on will also underline the method for the whole project: that a spatial practice in one century can function as a ‘code’ towards understanding a similar spatial practice, both oriented around the same object: stone, but set several centuries apart. Anja-Karina Nydal

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Communications

Kate Maclean Stage 4 Architecture Computer Rendering

Howard Griffin Head of Computing and Communication

Brian Wood and Dele Ojo offering advice

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Janice Shales in tutorial Robert Burke Stage 3 Architecture Interdisciplinary Project

Communication is an integral part of the architectural and interiors industries. As such, the Kent School of Architecture continues to place a priority on providing the necessary teaching to equip students with the skills needed to effectively communicate ideas and designs. This year has seen a surge in

the variety and breadth of communication skills across the school. This is particularly true of the darkroom and photographic facilities that we have, that were put to good use by Stage 3 students as part of their Interdisciplinary Option studies.

As expected, the computing facilities continue to be used extensively with diversity, using the spectrum of programs available. 3D Rendering skills were enhanced with the modification to the Advanced Computer Modelling module in Stage 2, which focused on the enhancement of modelling,

materiality and lighting skills. Film and animation continues to be strong this year with a number of students using this medium to explore and explain their designs. My thanks must go out to both Brian Wood and Dele Ojo who have continued to keep these facilities running, no matter what.


Sarah-Jane Pinheiro Stage 3 Interdisciplinary Photographic Study Kevin Smith and Enzo Labrosciano

Sarah Elliot Stage 3 Architecture Light Studies

Stage 1 Life Drawing Class

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Michael Dillon Stage 3 Architecture Interdisciplinary Project

Mariam Iqbal Stage 2

Shawn Kam Stage 4 Architecture Music Box

Lawrence Murrin Stage 3 Architecture Urban Model

Sarah Smith Stage 1 Life Drawing The model making workshop is increasingly an integral part of the Kent School of Architecture. The precision of the Laser cutting machines coupled with the more organic methods, such as resin injection and vacuum

forming have seen some of the best models that have been produced in the school. The workshop has been instrumental in assisting students throughout the school, but particularly Stage 3 Interdisciplinary students, helping them to produce life size bodies, sublime eggs and abstracted candles. Thanks must go to Kevin Smith and Enzo Labrosciano for all the help and assistance, often beyond the call of duty, they provide.

Drawing skills continued to be the primary focus for Stage 1 students this year, with classes in orthographic drawing, observational drawing and life drawing. This grounding in core drawing skills will reap benefits as the students progress through the school adapting these skills for use with new technologies. Thank you to Janice Shales, who has been instrumental in putting these classes together.


Bricks and Sticks Event

Bricks and Sticks Sequence

Emmanuel Verkinderen Lecture

Keith Bothwell Head of Technology & Environment

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As in previous years, KSA students developed a variety of imaginative approaches to their designs in meeting the ever more urgent challenge of global warming. Students are encouraged to firstly reduce energy demand by adopting passive environmental control strategies – in preference to the clichéd approach of ‘eco-bling’ (the overrated technologies of PV panels, wind turbines and heat pumps, which have a questionable net effect on carbon emissions). Stage one students start by exploring various qualities of natural light and its potential to create mood and to raise

Technology & Environment the human spirit. Selected design projects are given physical structure and construction detail right from the beginning of the programme. In stages two and three, qualitative concerns are supplemented by the quantitative analysis of energy, light, sunlight and human comfort. In this way students learn how to take advantage of free sources of energy as well as how to protect against uncomfortable fluctuations in the climate. Study visits to London to examine novel structures provided the foundations

111 Peter Evans Adapt & Extend Section

for students to develop structural bricks-on-sticks models, which are tested to destruction. The Form and Structure module culminated with a bridge design for the River Soar, based on a competition brief. Technology and Environment is both integrated into design projects and disaggregated at varying stages across the degree programmes. There are sound educational reasons to focus on a specific aspect of architectural design when first venturing into a topic area – such as making models in stage one to explore the relationship of form and light – but later,

Paper Day event with Mark Bolitho students need to juggle and meld a wide range of skills during the complex, iterative and integrating design process. M Arch students undertake research into innovative building technologies – in preparation for private practice where design decisions need to be backed up by the clear and rational comparative analysis of alternative products.

Vincenzo Castiglione Urban Structural Cutaway


Kelsey Tomlinson House & Housing Model of Rooftecture S House

Cultural Context

manifestoes and theories. In their final undergraduate year, architecture students prepare an ‘apologia’ in the form of an analytical, historical essay that accompanies and explains their design approaches, as well as writing a dissertation. At KSA we value very highly the way in which theory and practice run side by side, believing that the newly qualified architect who is comfortable with architectural history is better placed to respond with facility and experience to the challenges of modern professional life.

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Sam Alexandre House & Housing Gehry House Timothy Brittain-Catlin

During their first year all our students are introduced to the leading domestic architecture of the last hundred years, and they combine historical study with model-making and analysis. They are later introduced to Western architecture through landmark buildings presented in their historical, social and aesthetic context. Students begin their second year with a look at key chapters in architectural

history from the end of the eighteenth century up to the 1950s. These are linked to the ‘Adapt and Extend’ design module which challenges them to engage with historic or existing buildings. A series of lectures then looks at international and historical landscape design from across the world, accompanying the ‘Landscape’ design module. At the same time, interior design and interior architecture students examine current ideas,

“I was introduced to the work of Carlo Scarpa by a tutor during my first year at university and have had a keen interest ever since. Scarpa’s work is much admired both by students and architects, and is known for its craft intensive, decorative nature, although it is dialogue he created when intervening with historic buildings that interests me most. Scarpa believed in clarity and honesty, with all new work created in the language of the present day, Of all Scarpa’s projects, the Castelvecchio in Verona is widely regarded as his masterpiece and is cemented in the architectural canon of historic building interventions. I wanted to analyse this building in particular to ascertain if some of the principles he employed there can be found in modern adaptations. This dissertation is the culmination of my curiosity of how Scarpa’s influence has been felt in my home city of London. In the investigation and writing of this essay, I visited the Castelvecchio Museum as well as selected building conversions in London.”

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Jamie Campbell, Stage 3 Architecture


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With almost 100% participation, Stage 1 visited Barcelona in Week 4 of the academic year. It is always a nightmare to organise a venture such as this so early in the year but the gains far out-weight the pain. The Architectural and Interior experiential benefits at the broadest level of such a visit are without question but perhaps in parallel with this is the social interaction and bonding it promotes amongst a new cohort of students, the majority of which are experiencing for the first time ‘education away from home’

Field trip to Paris I visited Barcelona in October 2008 on the Stage 1 field trip as a member of the department’s administrative staff and therefore without the intrinsic interest in architecture that would be expected of a student or academic in the subject. From start to finish though the visit was entirely illuminating: it is a luxury to see a city accompanied by the commentary of some of our academics who have themselves been exploring it for 28 years. You got a sense of how continuously changing it is, yet with a respected and preserved architectural history, whilst previously the only architect I had heard of in its context from newspaper articles was Gaudi. The week itself was also a cornerstone in the early development of interaction and friendship between our students and our students and staff.

A group of predominantly stage two students spent four days in Paris in October accompanied by Keith Bothwell, Gordana Fontana-Giusti and French host Claire Lozier. Our short field trip packed in a veritable history of Parisian architecture through the centuries, from the delightful Places des Vosges to the disappointing Quay Branly Museum.

Ben Martin. Administrative Staff member Kent School of Architecture

Berlin Field Trip Autumn Term 2008

I should like to thank all the staff involved in the Programme that once again contributed to its success. Chris Seaber Stage 1 Programme Director

By special permission of the owner, a rare visit to Chareau’s Maison de Verre was arranged for one group while another toured Le Corbusier’s rue Nungesser et Coli apartment. Our visit culminated in a tour of the iconic Villa Savoye en route back to Canterbury

Study Tours

Study Tours

Barcelona October 2008

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The Berlin field trip this year proved so popular that we needn’t two aircraft to transport us all! We stayed out East – one group next to a former StaSi building, the other in cool Prenzlauer Berg. We took in all the usual sights, but it is worth mentioning the excellent Wall Museum on Bernauer Strasse, which brought home the reality of the Cold War on the divided city of Berlin. Postwar architecture in West Berlin received particular scrutiny, including a visit to the Hansaviertel housing of the late 1950s, and Egon Eiermann’s Memorial Church. The early part of the twentieth century was not forgotten, though – Otto Schmalz’s great law courts building in the Littenstrasse amazed us all with its great neo-Baroque entrance hall and staircases.


KASA President: Rob Elkins (Stage 4 Architecture) Lecture Chair: Jorge Leitao (Stage 3 Architecture) Treasurer: Charlotte Marshall (Stage 3 Architecture) Social Secretary: Hannah Taylor (Stage 3 Architecture) Merchandise: Lucie Titchmarsh (Stage 3 Interior Architecture) Special Operations Officer: Anna Becheru (Stage 2 Architecture) Lecture Assistant: Deniz Kayimbasioglu (Stage 2 Architecture) Staff/School Liason: Mike Richards

This has been a great year for KASA the fantastic team of volunteers have driven forward a number of new initiatives including the annual KASA pavilion competition, a new and enlivened social calendar aimed at encouraging cross divisional and inter year alliances, an ever expanding merchandising range, a coffee shop, and a multi disciplinary photography competition, whilst continuing the traditional spring lecture series in style with lectures from Sarah Wigglesworth, Annalie Riches, Bryan Avery, Peter Clegg, and Graham Stirk. A huge thank you to all of the team and everyone else that helped with the logistics of the lectures and the socials. Special thanks to Pier Luigi Del Renzio (Ex-President), Ryan Manton, and Sarah Smith (Assistant Social). Finally, a massive thank you to our generous sponsors: RIBA South East, Lee Evans Architects, HMY, CTM, and Clague Architects.

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Good luck in the next year from all of KASA Rob Elkins KASA President

Sarah Wigglesworth Architects

KASA Pavillion 117

KASA tower The KASA tower takes a new approach to the term ‘pavilion’. The tower form is a strong symbolic response to the ergonomic factors required in the brief, taking a scaffold frame to create a strong, flexible and cheap structure to the pavilion. The scaffold stair ascends to multiple viewing platforms where a full panoramic of the surrounding countryside is available.


Collaborations 118

Contributors to the school: Adam Smith: Orange St Music Andy Dyson: Cantillion Andy Henderson Carolyn Steel David Johnson Dylan Haughton Fiona Raley Graham and Sue Mitchell Graham and Julia Bailey Haworth Tomkins Architects Henry Sparks Ian Bride Igor Gottschalk Jef Smith Joe Burns, Paul Eldred, Richard Francis: Gardiner and Theobald LLP Jonathon Friday Karen Banks Kathryn Siveyer Katie Miller: Canterbury City Council Keith Mander Louisa Sharpless: Young Vic Theatre Lucy O’Reilly

Matthew Poxon: Royal National Theatre MELD Architecture Miles Berkley Mo Woonyin Wong Nick Brown Nick Dermott: Conservation Architect, Thanet District Council Nick Hobbs Paul Davies Peter Carless: St. Martins Property Peter Clegg Peter Czarnomski Pierre and Pereen d’Avoine Rebecca Hobbs Roger Turner Roy Dexter: Town Clerk, Broadstairs and St Peter’s Town Council Simon Westerman Stefan Colley: Orange St Music Steve Bowkett Sue Wanless Thomas Wensing Tim Carlyle

Thank you... Kent School of Architecture could not operate to such levels of success without the dedication of staff who excel in all parts of the School. These individuals go far beyond what is required to produce an exceptional experience for our students, and my sincere thanks is due to each and every one of them Professor Don Gray Head of School

Academic Staff Dr. Gerry Adler Taseer Ahmad Keith Bothwell Dr. Timothy Brittain-Catlin Professor Gordana Fontana-Giusti Chris Gardner Howard Griffin Alan Latham Mike Richards Chris Seaber Computer Technicians Brian Wood Dele Ojo Workshop Staff Kevin Smith Enzo Labrosciano Janice Shales Administrative Staff Jeanne Straight Ben Martin Claire Woodhall

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Photography by Howard Griffin


Contents 1

Introduction

2

M Arch

14

BA Architecture

71

BA Interior Design

78

BA Interior Architecture

85

Prizes

86

M Arch stage 4

90

BA Architecture stage 2

94

BA Interior/Interior Architecture stage 2

94

BA Architecture & Interiors stage 1

102

Research

106

Communications

110

Technology & Environment

110

Cultural Context

112

Study Tours

116

KASA

118

Collaborations

119

Staff Credits

Kent School of Architecture Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR website: www.kent.ac.uk/architecture contact: +44(0)1227 824689 Designed by QCreative Ltd +44 (0)1233 629275

ISBN: 978-0-9558802-3-0

9 780955 880230


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