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During the summer of 2014, while visiting friends who were spending an entire year in Stuttgart, Germany studying architecture through a program provided by the University of Kansas and the Universität Stuttgart, I was directed into the architecture school’s library and towards a small, unassuming book. Within this book, as it was described to me, were the most outstanding projects completed by the school’s architecture students from the previous year. By flipping from page to page, studying each individual project, it became clear that the body of student work produced at this university was incredibly impressive and immensely diverse. To be recognized - as a great designer, a leader, an innovator - by having a project published in this student workbook would certainly be a point of pride. Upon my return and subsequent readjustment to life in the US, as the immaculate details of memories from Berlin, Munich, Zürich, and many other fantastic cities began to slowly fade, I could not seem to forget about that little book. My fellow classmates within the University of Kansas’ School of Architecture, Design, and Planning, were just as talented and innovative as those from Stuttgart - but there was no compendium of student work, collected from the almost 400 architecture students enrolled at KU, to point to that could prove this point. I felt that our students should absolutely have the chance to be recognized in front of their peers, the university community, and the profession for their outstanding work - 1465, although in its infancy, supplies this opportunity. Found for the first time within these pages, handpicked by individual professors from throughout the school, are the preeminent projects completed by architecture students within the School over the course of the last calendar year. The inaugural student staff of 1465 would like to thank Department Chair Paola Sanguinetti for providing the framework for this publication to become a reality for the benefit of our students.

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1465 - Volume I 8

A Tribute to Dean Gaunt

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Year One - M.Arch

15

Mckaughan-Caitlin

19

Larson-Chelsea, Campbell-Maggie

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Powell-Robbie

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Hut-Kaitlin

28

Year Two - M.Arch

31

Aung-Myat

37

Fitzgerlad-Caitlin

41

Crookham-Jonathan

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Newcome-Michelle

50

Year Three - M.Arch

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Yang-Yuejia

59

Weber-Nicholas

63

Witthaus-Patrick

67

Zielke-Zach

71

Prizzi-AJ

75

Dirt Works Studio

81

MoCOLAB

88

Year Four / Graduate Student Work - M.Arch

91

Cannon-Blaise

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Durรกn-Johann, Rule-Aaron, Smith-Katie

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Hodges-Brittany

105

Colbert-Nick, Begley-Pat

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A Tribute to Dean Gaunt At the end of this academic year, John Gaunt will have ended his twenty-one year tenure as Dean of the School and become a regular member of the faculty as Professor of Architecture. He came to KU in 1994 after the University conducted a national search following the retirement of the previous dean. John was the former CEO of Ellerbe Beckett, one of the leading architecture and design firms in the country and former head of their New York-based design division. He was selected, in part, for his design credentials and there is no question that the School’s nascent design capabilities and orientation fully emerged under his influence. He arrived when the tradition of an accomplished professional architect or designer as a dean was starting to disappear at universities and deans were coming more from the ranks of professional academic administration. Throughout his tenure he has had to explain and promote the concept of an aesthetic education and the nature of design instruction at a time when the University itself was undergoing a massive restructuring of its mission and operations under diminishing financial resources. As part of this restructuring, the School was increased in size with the addition of the Department of Design from the former School of Fine Arts. At the same time, many faculty members in architecture had started retirement and a new and different generation of architects began filling their ranks. As Dean of the School, John has remained a dignified beacon of stability amidst all these changes and during difficult economic conditions. His grace 8


under pressure – his balanced view of architecture as an allencompassing field of art, science and practice – has enabled the program to weather changing demands placed on faculty and students that under different leadership might have resulted in chaos.\ Another difficulty which he faced was the longtime antipathy between design and research within both the profession and the academy – especially within a public research university like KU. The fact that the School now has a doctoral program in architecture is due in part to John’s diplomacy among the different orientations of the faculty and his legitimacy as a design professional in convincingly promoting the need for a research-based dimension to the School’s future. This also includes the Center for Design Research built on west campus by Studio 804 in 2010. At the same time, however, he successfully promoted the concept of a “Professor of Practice” for the School that grew out of his own professional experiences at Ellerbe Becket and the extended visits to Lawrence of Juhani Pallasmaa, Glen Murcutt and Peter Pran. By virtue of his longtime tenure as dean, it is perhaps easy to take for granted his accomplishments because some of them have been in place for quite a while. The design-build capabilities within the architecture department – and especially the successes of Studio 804, Studio 409, and the acquisition of the Design Build Lab in East Hills – required many years of administrative diplomacy between the School and the University during a time when such an activity was considered unusual, eccentric , even strange. Also, the achievement of differential tuition for the School made possible the development of digital capabilities and laboratories when the acquisition of even the smallest piece of equipment was a major struggle. And although study abroad already had a longtime history in the School, its expansion and development under John Gaunt has made it one of the marquee programs of the University. This is not surprising given his international experience at Ellerbe Beckett and his understanding of the emergence of global practice in the profession as a whole. His support of the faculty’s wish to make study abroad a universal requirement in architecture was unprecedented; and his continuing support of student scholarships for that purpose will be appreciated by graduates for a long time to come. Also during his tenure, the French Student Exchange and Paris Internship Programs initiated by Wojciech Lesnikowski were launched along with the School’s first ventures in Asia and Australia.

Several agendas were presented to him early on but which he embraced wholeheartedly. Participation in student organizations within the School had declined prior to his arrival, but he patiently cultivated and supported their rebirth over many years. The looming centennial of architectural education was given a trial run with his support of the 90th reunion and, eventually, the full-out celebration of the centennial in 2012, including the publication of Vitruvius on the Plains with his drawing of a Marvin Hall collage on the jacket cover and an amazing hallway-length mural by Tim Hossler, a design faculty member. One agenda item that he inherited occupied his deanship to this day and has become a major part of his legacy. When he interviewed for the position as dean, the faculty presented him with the need for a “commons” on the main floor of Marvin Hall. In fact, he was shown the portfolio of a student project for “hanging” an addition onto the back of the existing second floor jury room. Thus, a seed was planted that grew in John’s imagination over the years, eventually becoming The Forum – which today comprises an achievement far more extensive than any which was imagined in 1993. That it has come to fruition is largely through his own unique sense of design commitment, persistence and administrative diplomacy. It also demonstrates the power of the phrase “and he can draw!” John’s beautiful drawings have played a major role in supporting such projects as Vitruvius on the Plains, convincing the University of the idea for recycling the power plant that eventually became the Hall Center for the Humanities, and creating and funding The Forum at Marvin Hall. Throughout all this time, he has continued his own creative work in drawing and metal sculpture and regularly exhibits his work at both the University and in the town and region. Finally, each academic year he teaches an introductory lecture course in the fall and a freehand drawing class in the spring and lends his presence to various conferences, workshops and events hosted by the various departments. He thus serves as an inspiration and role-model for faculty and students as an administrator, an architect and a teacher – a fully engaged individual who is truly an outstanding educator. Stephen Grabow Professor of Architecture 9


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Mckaughan-Caitlin 1st Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor- John Trefry

From Caitlin: This is an instrument and its protective case that later inspired a music space to perform the instrument. I started with a physical collage of random objects that began to form an instrument like a wind chime, and designed the music space using the movement of the instrument. Throughout this whole process I learned a practical understanding of how to realistically construct an object, because when I started I quickly learned that the initial concept was not a concept that could be built. The most exciting part was actually using the models that I built, and understanding that I could make something that was both beautiful and well-made.

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Larson-Chelsea, Campbell-Maggie 1st Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Anne Patterson

From Chelsea and Maggie: This is an addition that engages Murphy Hall’s existing stair tower on KU campus that includes additional practice space, as well as a preperformance auditorium. We began the project by interviewing music students and studying views from the existing tower to understand how to best design a functional space. The project was a challenge because we learned for the first time how hard it can be to create a practical space that is still beautiful. In the end, we learned that working in a group can lead to a better outcome than working alone, and that two radically different ideas can come together to create something than imagined alone.

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Powell-Robbie 1st Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Anne Patterson

From Robbie: This project was a study of diagramming and modeling a human action. It involved a motion and a fixed object, or “datum�, and the way that we interacted with this datum. I began by taking a video of myself swiping my ID and then opening the door to my dorm, and then took specific frames from this video to study and begin to diagram. This endeavor really made me begin to think about the ways our surroundings influence the actions we perform. Before this project, I never really thought about how architecture would interact with the humans that inhabit it. However, I now always analyze the human scale of the buildings I am both designing and personally experiencing.

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Hut-Kaitlin 1st Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Anne Patterson

From Kaitlin: The Light Box project’s main objective was to create a space inside your light box that emphasized characteristics of a previous project we had done. The light box was intended to display a holistic, aesthetically pleasing abstract object that had a strong relationship with bouncing light. The beginning of this project was based on a similar theme involved in the series of projects we had worked on all semester. With mine specifically, I had continued to incorporate a bowtie or hourglass shape or volume within all of my projects. With this idea in mind, we built the light box by using pieces of cardboard as templates to a repeating or moving motion cut out from the center, which would suggest the beginnings of a space starting to be created on the inside. As the project moved along, the space changed and we added other pieces to emphasize repetition, allow movement, and create less of a box and more of a volume.

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Aung-Myat 2nd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Matt Kleinmann

From Myat: The prompt for this project was to design a community center that incorporates a demokitchen and film studio to promote both a healthy lifestyle and creativity within the community. In the beginning it was very important to me to research and understand the community we were designing for, and specifically studying and analyzing the site and surroundings. The most important element of the project for me was to integrate public spaces around the building to ease the boundary between the pedestrians and the building. The largest and most rewarding challenge throughout the semester was the importance of the community involvement throughout the design process.

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Setback

Transition between pavement and building

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Public Space Urban Farming

Daylighting

Oriented to maximize daylight into public spaces

Public Space

Outdoor seating


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Fitzgerald-Caitlin 2nd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Alex Ogata

From Caitlin: This semester we were challenged with designing an entrance for the Kansas City Convention Center, uniting three buildings to create an awe-inspiring promenade to the center, as well as facilitating a meeting location for groups. I gained much of the inspiration from studying the Tokyo International Forum, modifying the curved curtain wall that this building features. Learning how to realistically support this structure was one of the biggest challenges of this project, and I was able to learn a lot of technical experience from spending time designing the composition of the curtain wall.

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ATRIUM A ATRIUM A AT IU UM U M

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ATRIUM

Crookham-Jonathan 2nd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Alex Ogata

From Jon: This project was an entrance to unify the various components of the Kansas City Convention Center, using primarily steel and glass. I began the design process by making many iterations of how steel pieces fit with glass to create a whole, drawing a lot of inspiration from the Lambert Galleria in Toronto. What was most rewarding from this project was learning how to use software as a tool to create a complex form, and make that form a reality.

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Newcome-Michelle 2nd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Alex Ogata

From Michelle: For this project we were prompted to design an entrance to the Kansas City Convention Center. My goal was to create a lighthouse that draws the attention of the person experiencing the entrance to the convention center in a way that doesn’t overpower the aesthetic of the existing and surrounding buildings. This project was a first for me in that I was able to fully develop the interior experience, not just the general form of the building from an exterior standpoint.

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Nolan Movie Series

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Yang-Yuejia 3rd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Kapila Silva

From Yuejia: This project is the Cinematic Art Museum in the Dallas, Texas arts district. I drew inspiration from a movie projector, taking the circular geometry of a projector and applying it to the gallery, and the wrap-around movie strip as the circulation around the building. The challenge to this project was how to play with the organization and schematic design of the program, and how to make the building aesthetically beautiful and functionally operable. I’m most proud of the back-story of this design, and how I tried to create a building that became an art piece itself to represent the importance of the cinematic experience.

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Lift

Linear Direction

Linear Direction

Gallery Administration

Education

Service Entrance Lobby/Public

Secondary Entrance

Main Entrance

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Rain Water Attenuation Water tanks and buffers allow storm water to safely flow away

Shallow Green Roof

-Oxigen Production -Air Pollustion Removal -Reduce Street Level Particulates -Temperature Reduction -Water Filtration

Natural Ventilation

Smart Glass Facade

-Block direct light in when exterior light is intensive -Introduce indirect light in when exterior light is gentle -Solar panel in between to convert DC to AC -LED light in to lighten the glass at night

Water Heater

Warm interior space

Invertor

converts electricity DC to AC

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Weber-Nicholas 3rd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Nilou Vakil

From Nick: The prompt for this project was a Museum for the work of Donald Judd and other temporary exhibits from other artists, with the inspiration for the building design evolving from pieces of Judd’s furniture that I connected with. The design morphed into a study of materials, and how materials join one another and express themselves, which is what I found interesting in Judd’s furniture design. Throughout the semester I was challenged by thinking of the building as as whole, including systems integration, and what goes into the design of making a functioning museum space that keeps its housed artwork well-preserved and well-displayed.

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1

3 PANE SLOPED ROOF GLAZING CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE BEAM 2 PANE INSULATED GLASS GRAVEL DRAINAGE BED

Level 3 35' - 0"

ROOF DRAIN

ROOF MEMBRANE 4 STONE WOOL INSULATION

6.5 RIGID INSULATION SLOPED TO CENTER DRAIN

2X8 STEEL STUD HEADER

LEVEL TWO WALKWAY

U CHANNEL

.75 GYPSUM BOARD

6 STEEL FRAMING STUD

Level 2/Gallery 17' - 0"

EXTERIOR ALUMINUM WALL PANEL .75 SHEATHING

EPOXY FLOOR COAT 8 PRECAST, PRESTRESSED CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE BEAM 4 RIGID INSULATION STEEL ANGLE 8 STEEL STUD

STEEL Z CHANNEL

CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE COLUMN

3 PANEINSULATED GLASS

LIBRARY

10 PRE-CAST, PRE-STRESSED CONCRETE SLAB 12 CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

4 SLAB ON GRADE SIDEWALK

Level 1 0' - 0"

BACKFILL 6 CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB 4 RIGID INSULATION

PARKING GRAVEL DRAINAGE BED CONCRETE FOOTING VAPOR BARRIER 8 PERFORATED DRAIN PIPE

Parking Level -12' - 0"

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Witthaus-Patrick 3rd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Nilou Vakil

From Patrick: This semester began with studying the work of Donald Judd in order to prepare to design a museum of his work in the Crossroads District in Kansas City. I was inspired by the systematic geometric approach he used in many of his works, and used a similar system of extraction and void in order to define the spaces within the museum. It was very important to me to make this building a cultural center within the Crossroads that gave back to the community, so the inclusion of walkable, park-like green roofs nearly doubled the amount of green space found within the district. The largest lesson learned throughout this project was exploring the relationship between formal construction techniques and sustainable system implementation to make this project a truly holistic design that fits my own beliefs about what architecture should be.

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Level 7

28’-0”

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22’-0”

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-10’-0”

Level 1

-25’-0”

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Zielke-Zach 3rd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Kapila Silva

From Zach: This project stemmed from an abstract feeling of the site, located in the Dallas Arts District. We were given two sites to choose from, and both felt very disconnected from the Arts District because of the large residential tower in the middle of the district. The design started between two buildings with a bridge spanning both sites, and later morphed into the building becoming the bridge. This project was a technical challenge for me. Although the design was first a conceptual project it also had to work and function as a building and also justify combining both sites, as the prompt was to just transform one of the two we studied. I aimed to design a building that functioned well as a museum, but also intervened into the city landscape.

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Prizzi-A.J. 3rd Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Shannon Criss

From AJ: This project is an exploration of emulating an urban environment in a sprawled area. We were prompted with creating a community center in Kansas City, Kansas that absorbed its surroundings in terms of site and people around the neighborhood. I created first a complete street concept for the surrounding neighborhood that trickled into informing the shape and function of the building itself. I chose to develop a complete street site because it had been a successful formula in so many urban revival projects to date. From this project I was challenged to not be set on one initial idea but to work through creating iterations of one design, weighing the pros and cons of that design, and finally the decision process to choosing which design was most successful.

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Dirt Works Studio 3rd Year, Design/Build Faculty Advisor - Chad Kraus Sustainability, particularly in disciplines such as architecture, is our preeminent calling. In the face of staggering figures, our responsibility to address global concerns is no longer a question. Today, sustainability in architecture has become increasingly synonymous with technology-driven building techniques. Even now, shifts based in building information modeling and integrated project delivery promise to deliver better performing buildings with ‘smart’ skins, responsive systems, and complex new building assemblies. While these advances are commendable, we often fail to see that which lies directly before us. In the words of philosopher Martin Heidegger, “the answer we are looking for lies at hand; so near that we all too easily overlook it. For the way to what is near is always the longest and thus hardest for us humans.” Earthen architecture is inherently sustainable. Yet in many industrialized nations, building with soil has become marginal – largely due to a shroud of mystery concealing the process of transforming the soil. This is particularly true in the American Midwest. Unfortunately, restricted use comes at a time when earthen architecture is needed most – to lighten our carbon footprint while rooting us to our unique place in the world. The primary obstacles preventing wider acceptance of earth architecture are primarily a lack of public awareness and professional education. The Dirt Works Studio, in the School of Architecture, Design, and Planning at the University of Kansas, aims to educate architecture students in the design and construction of publicly accessible earthen structures for all to experience.

Students: - Vincent Graceffa - Connor Crist - Chandler Hanna - Micheal DeFries - Areil Piersen - Andrew Kloppenburg - Micheal LaVanier - Matthew Everest - James DeFries - Brittany Hodges - Shira Kohn - Nicholas Colbert - Erin McFarland - McKenzie Liebl - Jared Pechauer - Chloe Lockman - Ragan Allen - Corey Boucher

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MoCOLAB - Design/Build 3rd Year, Design/Build Faculty Advisor - Nils Gore The KU Mobile Collaboratory (MoCOLAB) is a re-purposed 1972 31’ Airstream Land Yacht that was conceived and designed to be KU’s community classroom on wheels. It was born out of recognition that there are many faculty and staff on campus whose work is firmly embedded in community issues, from design and urban planning, to public administration, to public health and clinical child psychology. Furthermore, that work needs close cooperation and reciprocal collaboration with community partners in its place of consideration. MoCOLAB is essentially a room on wheels that can be used for a variety of purposes. It could be a science lab, a dining room, an elementary classroom, a conference space, and art gallery. It is designed with a high degree of flexibility through the use of movable carts and seating, as well as foldable work surfaces. It has electronic presentation resources (audio/video) both inside and outside, and heating and cooling for use year-round. The back-end has been converted into a hatchback for accessibility via a sliding ramp.

Students: - Adeola Adewale - Allison Bergmann - Laura Nelson - Xun Sun - Jessica Luber - Brianna Sorensen - Dominic Sosinski - Patrick Henke - Alexandra Dakas - Doug Dawson - Johann Duran - Kayleen Lindstrom - Austin Griffis - Riley Uecker - Erin Hoffman - Elisa Rombold - Steven Reyes - Rachel Wotawa - Aaron Rule

The Airstream was completely gutted, down to the aluminum framing and skin, then outfitted with a curved, vacuum laminated, Baltic birch wooden paneling system. All new electrical, heating and cooling was installed. The custom carts and seating were designed, fabricated and installed by the students. http://kumocolab.org/

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Cannon-Blaise 4th Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Kapila Silva

From Blaise: The prompt for this project was to create a cultural center for the Haskell University Campus, including in the program a museum and gathering spaces for students on campus. I began the project with site analysis, finding inspiration from architecture firms like BIG, Bernard Schumi and Shigeru Ban, and translating this inspiration into a building footprint that responded to the site. I first thought of the building in massing layers that translated into the different levels of the final building, that served as a contextual response to the site and the city (level one responded to the campus, level two to the city of Lawrence, Kansas, and level three to the cosmos, relating to the importance the cosmos holds in Native American culture).

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Box Office

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Durรกn-Johann, Rule-Aaron Smith-Katie ,

4th Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Stephen Grabow

From Johann, Aaron, and Katie: In redesigning the Chicago Lyric Opera, we quickly discovered that the design is greatly dependent on the site context of Wolf Point on the Chicago River. Our design intent was to create a transparency in the building that emphasizes the views of the city down the river. We believe that the act of attending an opera should be extremely experiential. Therefore, we made it a focal point of our design by creating a grand, lively atmosphere from the arrival point and the main lobby to the sky bar and auditorium. The form of the opera house stemmed from program adjacencies in order to create a building that would function well for both the public in the front of house and the performers and staff backstage.

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Music Shop

Art Shop

Coffee Shop

Stage Door

Ballet Lounge

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Inst. Office

6 Storage

Shop Office

Inst. Office

Loading Dock

Super Lounge

Scene Shop

Rear Stage

Sing. Assem.

7 Ballet Office

Account. Office

Elec. Repair Crew Lounge Costume Shop

Costume Storage

Chorus Assem.

Mech. I Prop Shop VIP Parking

8 Right Stage

Ballet Studio Mech. II

Main Stage

Left Stage

Storage

Lower Stage

Stage Manager

9 Orchestra Pit

Boutique

Cloak Room

House Mgr.

Rehearsal Room I

Parking Garage Stor.

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Practice

Practice

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Practice

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Restaurant/ Bar

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Hodges-Brittany 4th Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Chad Kraus

From Brittany: This project challenged me above other studio projects to thoroughly explore the experience of a building, and how it can relate to more than just architecture or a building, but people and the use of the building itself. The prompt of the Timber Tower was to design a residential tower mixed with a specialty luthier music studio and shop. I began the project by exploring the influence mass timber could have over the human experience of the building-for example, in the luthier studio I wanted to create a dynamic relationship between the consumer and the art of making stringed instruments, and did so by studying the craft of wood itself and applying it to both the construction of the mass timber and the experience of creating a wooden instrument.

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Colbert-Nick, Begley-Pat 4th Year, M.Arch Faculty Advisor - Stephen Grabow

From Nick + Patrick: The inception of this design came from a programmatic point of view. An opera house is a very specific and complex building program, so we first studied precedents, specifically the KKL Luzern, to gain an understanding of how we could best design a building that would function not only as an opera house, but also as a symbol of the resurgence of the Chicago Opera to a point of prominence. Designing a 100,000 square foot building in a single semester was quite the task for 2 people, but we used our team dynamic really well. Getting down to details was important for us.

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P E O P L E O F 1 4 6 5 Witthaus-Patrick

Sloan-Kevin

Editor in Chief

Graphic Designer

3rd year M.arch

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3rd year M.arch


Dewitt-Alexandra 3rd year M.arch

Photographer

Chamberlain-Jordan 4th year M.arch

Content Director

Zilke-Zach

3rd year M.Arch

Graphic Designer

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1465 Volume One  

A Year in Review 2015

1465 Volume One  

A Year in Review 2015