Page 1

Explore

Huddersfield Uncover Huddersfield’s obvious – and not-soobvious – charms with this introductory guide. Discover the town’s top experiences and explore the nightlife, dining, shopping, sport and cultural scenes of this charming, vibrant destination.

Explore

Huddersfield

A Guide for Students

PRODUCED BY LONELY PLANET FOR


Explore Huddersfield – A Guide for Students Published November 2017 2nd edition Produced by Lonely Planet for the University of Huddersfield. All editorial views are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality. www.lonelyplanet.com Published by: Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd ABN 36 005 607 983 Lonely Planet offices: Australia The Maltstore Level 3, 551 Swanston Street, Carlton, VIC 3053 tel +61 3 8379 8000, fax +61 3 8379 8111 USA 230 Franklin Rd, Building 2B, Franklin TN 37064 tel +1 615 241 6737, toll free 800 275 8555 150 Linden St, Oakland, CA 94607 tel +1 510 250 6400, toll free 800 275 8555, fax +1 510 893 8572

Huddersfield is a bustling town with a rich architectural heritage, a vibrant student population and England’s stunning countryside right on its doorstep.

u

Co-Operative Clock Tower

UK 240 Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8NW tel +44 20 3771 5100, fax +44 20 3771 5101 India 302 DLF City Court, Sikanderpur | Gurgaon 122002 tel +91 124 423 1645 University of Huddersfield www.hud.ac.uk This book was commissioned in Lonely Planet’s Franklin office and produced by the following: Authors Fionn Davenport, Sally Schafer Sales Manager David Read Account Manager Lloyd Meeks Project Manager Jennifer Pentes Commissioning Editor Nicole Griffith Designer Kali Hudson Proofer Bella Li

Text © Lonely Planet Publications 2017; text on pages 6–9, 11, 19 supplied by the University of Huddersfield. Images Cover: Huddersfield Railway Station © Alastair Wallace / Shutterstock. Internal images: The images on the following pages were photographed by Chris Mellor ©: 1, 2–3. The images on pages 4, 8–12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 28, 30, 32 were supplied by the University of Huddersfield. The image on page 26 was licenced from Getty Images ©: Britain OnView. Printed in China. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, except brief extracts for the purpose of review, and no part of this publication may be sold or hired, without the written permission of the publisher. Lonely Planet and the Lonely Planet logo are trademarks of Lonely Planet and are registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Lonely Planet does not allow its name or logo to be appropriated by commercial establishments, such as retailers, restaurants or hotels. Please let us know of any misuses: lonelyplanet. com/ip. Although the authors and Lonely Planet have taken all reasonable care in preparing this book, we make no warranty about the accuracy or completeness of its content and, to the maximum extent, disclaim all liability arising from its use.


u

Greenhead Park


Contents This is Huddersfield

5

Highlights

12

Nightlife

14

Eating

16

Culture

20

Shopping

22

Sport

24

Excursions

26

Getting Around

30


u

Harold Wilson Statue and Huddersfield Railway Station


This is

Huddersfield Handsome Huddersfield has a rich architectural heritage, courtesy of a Victorian construction boom that built a town centre of neoclassical buildings out of local, honey-hued Yorkstone. Many of these now house the restaurants, bars and clubs that make Huddersfield such a vibrant town and a great place for a night out. The friendly atmosphere and multicultural makeup of the local community make Huddersfield the perfect spot to enjoy the celebrations of food, dance and music that keep things buzzing throughout the year. Its ideal location – on the doorstep of the Peak District and less than an hour’s ride from both Leeds and Manchester – makes for an easy getaway should you want to breathe the wild air of the moors or bask in the big city lights.

5


Huddersfield’s AwardWinning University At the heart of the local community, the University of Huddersfield is a growing centre of research and teaching excellence, pushing the boundaries of knowledge and receiving national recognition for it.

Global Teaching Excellence Award We’re proud to have been awarded the first Global Teaching Excellence Award (GTEA) by the Higher Education Academy, recognising our commitment to world-class teaching.

A Gold-Rated University Huddersfield is proud to have been recognised as a goldrated University by the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF), which aims to recognise and reward excellent learning and teaching.

1st in England for Teaching In 2016, HEFCE compared the number of professionally qualified teaching staff in 130 universities across England. We led the field, with over 90% of our academics holding a teaching qualification.

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University of the Year The Times Higher Education named us as their University of the Year in November 2013. They liked our ‘bold, imaginative and innovative initiatives’.

Queen’s Award for Enterprise We’ve always supported the international student community. So we were very pleased to win the Queen’s Award for Enterprise: International Trade in 2013.

Queen’s Anniversary Prize The Queen’s Anniversary Prize is a big thing in UK Higher Education. We were delighted to earn one for our role in expanding global boundaries of new music.

Athena SWAN We’re serious about gender equality. We want an equal number of men and women on our science and engineering courses, for instance. Our commitment was recognised in 2015 with the Athena SWAN Bronze Award.

A Four-Star University QS Stars have given us four stars. That means we are ‘highly international, demonstrating excellence in both teaching and research with an excellent environment for students and staff’.

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University of Huddersfield at a Glance

22,315 students

57

43

73

27

% female

% male

% undergraduates

% postgraduates

110

overseas students from

student clubs and societies

120

countries

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Student satisfaction is

86.39

% which is higher than the national average.

1st

in England for professionally qualified teaching staff

100

% debt-free University

10

Top uni in England for work placement years in industry

ÂŁ100

Over million invested since 2010 in new buildings and facilities on campus

10

in Top England for international student growth


100

% of academic staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Academy

500

+

courses offered

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Award-Winning Careers Service

100

% of students undertake professional work experience

95.9

% go into work or further study within six months of graduating

70

% receive a professional qualification alongside their degree

Statistics sourced from Destination of Leavers Survey 2015/16, HEFCE 2016, HESA 15/16, Times Higher Education March 2017, NSS 2017.

Teaching Excellence


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Freshers’ Festival


‘Overall I love the friendliness of Huddersfield, the excellent facilities on offer and the University’s closeness to the town centre. You can also have a great social life without breaking the bank!’ Madeline Mapletoft, Music BMus(Hons)

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Huddersfield Carnival

Highlights HIGHLIGHTS t 12


u Nights Out

u Festivals

Huddersfield is the perfect size for a good night out. It’s big enough to support a wide array of bars, clubs and pubs, but small enough so that getting from one place to another is a cinch. The town also has serious form when it comes to good ales and craft beers, but if you prefer something a little more colourful and fruity, there are plenty of opportunities for drinks under disco lights too.

With an elaborate summer carnival and a winter festival of light, the town pulses throughout the year with a variety of fantastic events. Celebrations encompass everything from contemporary literature and local traditions to food and cutting-edge music.

u The Great Outdoors

From peaceful canalside walks and gentle climbs with rewarding views, to treks in the wild expanses of the Peak District or the challenging Pennines, Huddersfield and the surrounding area offer plenty of options for hiking, running, cycling and climbing in the beautiful English countryside.

u History and Heritage

A wander through Huddersfield’s streets reveals a glimpse of its fascinating history. Stunning nineteenthcentury edifices abound, and tracing this architectural trail is a great way to discover the town’s interesting past. u The Best of All Worlds

You couldn’t ask for a better location: on the northern edge of the beautiful Peak District and slap-bang between Manchester and Leeds. Whether you’re looking for big-city distractions or a scenic escape to the countryside, Huddersfield makes it easy to do both. w

HIGHLIGHTS t 13


Nightlife Huddersfield punches well above its weight when it comes to nightlife. The big student body means there are plenty of options for a night out, whether it’s a pint or two of locally brewed ale, tasty cocktails prepared by an expert mixologist, or clubs that buzz until the early light. Many of the bars in the town centre have DJs and live music, as well as decent menus of affordable bites. But the real beauty of this town is that if you rock up somewhere that doesn’t suit, you’re never more than a few steps away from a better option. NIGHTLIFE t 14


u Top Tipples Whether your choice is traditional ale or a fancy cocktail, Huddersfield has the tipple for you. The town takes great pride in its locally produced beers and ciders – you’ll find a fine selection of those in traditional bars like the King’s Head, which is part of the train station and has recently been restored to its 19th-century best. Also recently restored is The Zetland, Huddersfield’s original student bar. The Sportsman is a multiple winner of the CAMRA Pub of the Year award – besides local beers like Mallinsons it also serves a selection of world beers – while The Grove Inn has more than 200 brews for sale. More modern bars that serve good ales as well as a fine selection of cocktails include Zephyr and The Warehouse.

u Live Music Dedicated live-music venues with eclectic line-ups mean you’ll often find musicians and DJs popping up in pubs and bars around Huddersfield. Each year, the town hosts the Huddersfield

Contemporary Music Festival (hcmf.co.uk), the UK’s largest experimental music festival, showcasing the likes of pioneers Brian Eno and Steve Reich. Further afield, the Picturedrome (picturedrome.net) in nearby Holmfirth offers an accomplished live programme, while the town’s convenient location means it’s only a short train ride from the music and festival calendars of big cities like Leeds, Manchester and Sheffield. w

NIGHTLIFE t 15


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Huddersfield Food & Drink Festival

Eating Huddersfield’s broad selection of restaurants and cafes has something for virtually every palate. You can find curried goat and jerk chicken, tender Lebanese kebabs, Polish dumplings, skewer after skewer of succulent Brazilian meats, feisty Mexican and fiery Thai delicacies. Summer brings the Huddersfield Food & Drink Festival (huddersfieldfoodfest.com) to town, which is the ideal time to let your taste buds roam over some of the region’s best produce – the stallholders often add a creative Yorkshire slant to cuisines from all over the world. EATING t 16


For something a little more unusual, you can dine in the crypt of a church (St Peter's on Byram St), or feast on tapas in a traditional boozer. There are plenty of places to grab a quick bowl of noodles or a good-value burger, and you’ll find two-for-one and other great deals all over town. u Cafe Culture If you’re craving a caffeine hit, Huddersfield’s great independent coffee shops will hit the spot. Espresso Corner, The Little Kitchen, Queenie’s (next to the Lawrence Batley Theatre) and Epicure Bar & Kitchen are popular for their choice of coffees and expert baristas. They also serve snacks and more substantial meals. Friendly co�feevolution is a fine spot to linger in, especially if you bag one of the comfy leather chesterfields downstairs. Northern Tea House offers traditional teahouse fare – tasty cakes, sandwiches and teas – in a modern industrial setting.

u Ice Cream No trip to Huddersfield is complete without an ice cream from Dixons Milk Ices at Lockwood, which has been serving up delicious homemade sweet treats since 1961, all made with natural ingredients and milk from local farms. u Posh Nosh If you’re looking for something a little more upmarket without breaking the bank, Eric’s, northwest of the centre, serves an elegant version of classic English cuisine (with mostly local ingredients) courtesy of chef Eric Paxman, whose previous clients include Arnold Schwarzenegger. And if you’re looking for another staple of the British palate, Mumbai Spice is an awardwinning Indian restaurant. w

EATING t 17


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Student Food & Drink Favourites Northern Tea House serves fantastic speciality teas and great food, and has a hipster, gorgeous interior and friendly staff. – Molly Charnley, Drama BA(Hons) Some of my favourite spots for a Wednesday night out with flatmates or course mates are Rock Café, Tokyo and (at the end of the night) Camel Club. – Marthe Ney, Costume with Textiles BA(Hons) We often head over to Warehouse which is pretty much opposite the University campus. We’re able to grab a pint and a bite to eat whilst enjoying a game of pool and watching the football. – Frank Best, Sports Promotion and Marketing BA(Hons) Huddersfield has a great many places to hang out with friends and have a good night without breaking the bank. My favourite spot to meet with friends is Bar Maroc if we’re in the mood for a beer and good conversation. – Alexandra Coslet, Marketing BA(Hons)

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u

Lawrence Batley Theatre

Culture Huddersfield’s cultural heritage hits you as soon as you step off the train onto the platform of the Grade I-listed railway station, built in 1850 and described by John Betjeman as the most splendid in all of England. The splendour of Victorian Huddersfield radiates outward from St George’s Square, with the town’s collection of honey-coloured Yorkstone buildings complemented by more recent constructions, such as the colourful wrought-iron Open Market and the art deco Library & Art Gallery, where you can also pick up information on historical walking trails. CULTURE t 20


u On Stage The Lawrence Batley Theatre (thelbt.co.uk), originally built as a chapel in 1819, stages an exciting range of theatre, live music, contemporary dance and comedy; and the nearby Town Hall (kirklees.gov.uk/townhalls) has a diverse line-up of comedy, music and cabaret. u Festivals Bookworms will want to venture out for performances and talks at the stimulating Huddersfield Literature Festival (litfest. org.uk), while music lovers can enjoy new and experimental sounds at the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival. In May, the Holme Valley hosts the Holmfirth Film Festival (holmfirthfilmfestival.co.uk), with films and documentaries from all over the world screened in a variety of indoor and outdoor locations;

it follows the Holmfirth Festival of Folk (holmfirthfestivaloffolk. co.uk), which takes place the weekend before and sees the local bars put on gigs as well as plenty of on-street entertainment. October brings the Marsden Jazz Festival (marsdenjazzfestival.com), which has a pretty broad remit, so as well as traditional jazz you’ll also hear folk, blues and electronic. In July, tens of thousands come from all over the country for the two-day African-Caribbean Huddersfield Carnival (huddersfieldcarnival. co.uk). u Yorkshire Sculpture Park Set in the grounds of 18th-century Bretton Hall, the Yorkshire Sculpture Park (ysp.co.uk) is a 200-hectare, open-air collection of sculptures by local and international artists, including Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth and Eduardo Paolozzi. w

CULTURE t 21


u

Byram Arcade

Shopping SHOPPING t 22


Huddersfield’s shopping options range from the functional to the frivolous. The town centre has a broad selection of high-street names and independent shops, while tucked-away arcades are home to smaller boutiques and speciality stores – the Victorian Byram Arcade has three floors of vintage goods and craft stores to peruse. The gleaming Kingsgate Shopping Centre has more high-street brands, including Topshop, H&M, Office and Stormfront – a licensed Apple Store reseller. u Vinyl Tap This excellent independent record store (vinyltap.co.uk), right opposite the railway station, has an impressive selection of new and second-hand vinyl and CDs across all genres. New releases appear upstairs every couple of days, and you could spend hours downstairs rifling through the used collection, which starts from just £1. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, check their collection online or ask the friendly and knowledgeable staff.

u Local Markets The Victorian arches of the Open Market are the perfect place to pick up your weekly veggies and bargain homewares, and on Tuesdays and Saturdays become a snooper’s paradise, where you can root out some great-value vintage goods. The second Sunday of the month also sees the Upmarket come to town, with stalls brimming with locally produced fashion, crafts, food and drink. w

SHOPPING t 23


u

John Smith’s Stadium

Sport Huddersfield has impeccable sporting credentials. Rugby League was born here in 1895, and the Super League’s Huddersfield Giants have a huge and passionate local fanbase. In football, Huddersfield Town was promoted to the Premier League in 2017, where they will challenge for a long-awaited title last won in 1926! Both teams play at the John SPORT t 24


Smith’s Stadium (johnsmithsstadium.com), for those hoping to attend a match. For something a little more active, the town’s superb hiking, cycling and climbing opportunities are hard to beat. Or if you just fancy a stroll or a game of frisbee, well-kept Greenhead Park is a peaceful place to hang out in the sun. u Countryside Cycling The Trans Pennine cycleway passes through the countryside near Huddersfield, making this a prime starting line for cyclists. In 2014, stage two of the Tour de France zipped through the town, and there are plenty of cycling routes to follow in these esteemed tracks, as well as more leisurely jaunts – a good option is the Holme Valley, which boasts a 39km circular route that takes you from Berry Brow railway station through Holmfirth. u Castle Hill That tower that keeps catching your eye as you stroll around town is closer than you think. An easy and attractive 45-minute walk from the centre will reward with fantastic

views out to the hills beyond. The bluster up here is perfect for flying a kite; on calmer days just hang out, relax and enjoy the view. u Peak District Sitting tantalisingly close to the Peak District, Huddersfield gives you ample opportunities to hike some of the best trails in the UK. You can pick up the long-distance Pennine Way at Standedge, near Marsden, and walk the 13 miles to Crowden. From here, the route goes across the High Peak to Edale, the official end (or beginning) of the route. w

SPORT t 25


u

Victoria Quarter

Excursion:

Leeds A wealth of nightlife and cultural attractions have made Leeds one of northern England’s most dynamic cities, while its shopping has earned it the nickname ‘Knightsbridge of the North’ – and it’s all just a 20-minute train ride from Huddersfield. The city’s club scene is legendary, while its ever-evolving food scene makes this one of Yorkshire’s gourmet hotspots. EXCURSIONS t 26


Leeds’ best-known museum is the Royal Armouries (royalarmouries. org), the UK’s national museum of arms and armour. If it sounds a bit macho, the selection of exhibits – from jousting to elephant armour – will reveal a fascinating museum. The city’s collection of shopping arcades is among the most beautiful in England. The best known are the mosaic-paved, stained-glass-roofed Victorian arcades of Victoria Quarter (victorialeeds.co.uk), but they’ve been dwarfed by more recent openings like the huge Trinity Leeds (trinityleeds.com), where you’ll also find a pop-up food court, and the futuristic Victoria Gate, which opened in 2016. If you’re looking for designer boutiques and fashion markets, be sure to check out the historic Corn Exchange (leedscornexchange.co.uk), originally built in 1865.

A playground of pubs, clubs and venues, Leeds city centre makes for a full-on night out. Look out for the ever-changing street food and check out the bars on Call Lane and around. Live-music hotspots include City Varieties (the world’s longest-running music hall), the Brudenell Social Club (a lively venue hosting an eclectic mix of gigs), The Warehouse and, for the big acts, the Leeds Arena. There’s always something innovative going on at The Belgrave Music Hall & Canteen (belgravemusichall. com) from themed quizzes, films and comedy, to live hip hop, folk and blues. If you want to dance to top-class DJs, check out Mission, Wire or HiFi Club, which focuses more on Motown and dancefloor jazz. With trains running back to Huddersfield through the night, there’s a slight chance you’ll make it home before dawn. w

EXCURSIONS t 27


Excursion:

The Colne Valley EXCURSIONS t 28


When the constant tease of the surrounding hills gets the better of you, jump on the train and head for Marsden, a cute village banked on all sides by gorgeous rolling hills. Visitors will immediately catch a yeasty whiff of the Riverhead Brewery Tap (theriverheadmarsden.co.uk), an excellent place to sample awardwinning cask ales. Crumbals on the Corner serves a mean piece of cake and quality coffee. Marsden is a great starting point for getting out onto the moors, on one of numerous circular trails that can be easily conquered in a day (route maps are available from the library). From here, it’s also just a 15-minute walk to Standedge, where it’s possible to take a boat into the longest canal tunnel in Britain (3.25 miles).

The most satisfying way to get back into town is to follow the canal path that meanders a tranquil 7.5 miles downhill, all the way to Huddersfield. The route snakes along the valley, boasting numerous locks and beautiful canal architecture. En route, Slaithwaite offers more options for pausing for a pint, and right on the canal is the handmade bakery (thehandmadebakery.coop) where superb breads, cakes and other treats are conjured up behind the counter. It’s possible to catch a train back from Slaithwaite, but continue on the path through Linthwaite and Milnsbridge and you can walk right back onto the University’s campus from the water’s edge. w

EXCURSIONS t 29


Getting Around GETTING AROUND t 30


Huddersfield is compact enough that you can make almost all of your journeys on foot. Although there are some hills to tackle, the town is also a straightforward and scenic place to get around by bike. u Bus Buses (wymetro.com) serve the outlying villages that surround Huddersfield, leaving the bus station or nearby Market Street and running every 15 minutes to once hourly, depending on the destination. Buses also run up to Castle Hill, the John Smith’s Stadium and out to Holmfirth. u Train Convenient local trains run to Colne Valley (Slaithwaite, Marsden) and Holme Valley (Honley, Brockholes) destinations. Huddersfield also has excellent rail links to Leeds, York, Sheffield, Manchester, Manchester Airport,

Liverpool, York, Durham and Newcastle. Fast trains run to Leeds in 20 minutes, with up to five an hour during the day. It takes about 35 minutes to get from Huddersfield to Manchester Piccadilly and trains run every 20 minutes or so throughout the day. Frequent travellers should pick up an MCard (m-card.co.uk), on which you can load bus and train season tickets for a week or a month. Fulltime students and anyone aged under 26 are eligible for unlimited travel within West Yorkshire for £22.60 a week or £85.60 a month, at the time of writing. Term-time tickets are also available. w

GETTING AROUND t 31


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Explore Huddersfield – A Guide for Students Published November 2017 2nd edition Produced by Lonely Planet for the University of Huddersfield. All editorial views are those of Lonely Planet alone and reflect our policy of editorial independence and impartiality. www.lonelyplanet.com Published by: Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd ABN 36 005 607 983 Lonely Planet offices: Australia The Maltstore Level 3, 551 Swanston Street, Carlton, VIC 3053 tel +61 3 8379 8000, fax +61 3 8379 8111 USA 230 Franklin Rd, Building 2B, Franklin TN 37064 tel +1 615 241 6737, toll free 800 275 8555 150 Linden St, Oakland, CA 94607 tel +1 510 250 6400, toll free 800 275 8555, fax +1 510 893 8572

Huddersfield is a bustling town with a rich architectural heritage, a vibrant student population and England’s stunning countryside right on its doorstep.

u

Co-Operative Clock Tower

UK 240 Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8NW tel +44 20 3771 5100, fax +44 20 3771 5101 India 302 DLF City Court, Sikanderpur | Gurgaon 122002 tel +91 124 423 1645 University of Huddersfield www.hud.ac.uk This book was commissioned in Lonely Planet’s Franklin office and produced by the following: Authors Fionn Davenport, Sally Schafer Sales Manager David Read Account Manager Lloyd Meeks Project Manager Jennifer Pentes Commissioning Editor Nicole Griffith Designer Kali Hudson Proofer Bella Li

Text © Lonely Planet Publications 2017; text on pages 6–9, 11, 19 supplied by the University of Huddersfield. Images Cover: Huddersfield Railway Station © Alastair Wallace / Shutterstock. Internal images: The images on the following pages were photographed by Chris Mellor ©: 1, 2–3. The images on pages 4, 8–12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 28, 30, 32 were supplied by the University of Huddersfield. The image on page 26 was licenced from Getty Images ©: Britain OnView. Printed in China. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, except brief extracts for the purpose of review, and no part of this publication may be sold or hired, without the written permission of the publisher. Lonely Planet and the Lonely Planet logo are trademarks of Lonely Planet and are registered in the US Patent and Trademark Office and in other countries. Other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Lonely Planet does not allow its name or logo to be appropriated by commercial establishments, such as retailers, restaurants or hotels. Please let us know of any misuses: lonelyplanet. com/ip. Although the authors and Lonely Planet have taken all reasonable care in preparing this book, we make no warranty about the accuracy or completeness of its content and, to the maximum extent, disclaim all liability arising from its use.


Explore

Huddersfield Uncover Huddersfield’s obvious – and not-soobvious – charms with this introductory guide. Discover the town’s top experiences and explore the nightlife, dining, shopping, sport and cultural scenes of this charming, vibrant destination.

Explore

Huddersfield

A Guide for Students

PRODUCED BY LONELY PLANET FOR

Lonely Planet Guide Explore Huddersfield  

Lonely Planet Guide - Explore Huddersfield. Huddersfield is a bustling town with a rich architectural heritage.

Lonely Planet Guide Explore Huddersfield  

Lonely Planet Guide - Explore Huddersfield. Huddersfield is a bustling town with a rich architectural heritage.