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computer science AND IT undergraduate study 2014 entry


Key information UCAS CODE

TYPICAL OFFER

MSci Computer Science

I402

AAA-ABB; IB: 36-32

MSci Computer Science and Mathematics

GG4D

A*AA-ABB; IB: 38-32

BSc Computer Science

I400

AAA-ABB; IB: 36-32

BSc Computer Science with Industrial Placement

I401

AAA-ABB; IB: 36-32

BSc Computer Science and Mathematics

GG41

A*AA-ABB; IB: 38-32

BSc Computer Science and Mathematics with Industrial Placement

GG4C

A*AA-ABB; IB: 38-32

BSc IT Management for Business

GN52

AAA-AAB; IB: 36-34

BSc IT Management for Business with Industrial Placement

GN5G

AAA-AAB; IB: 36-34

Flexible Combined Honours

Y004

A*AA-AAB; IB: 38-34

Flexible Combined Honours with Study or Work Abroad

Y006

A*AA-AAB; IB: 38-34

Flexible Combined Honours with UK Work Experience

Y007

A*AA-AAB; IB: 38-34

Single Honours

BA/BSc Flexible Combined Honours

For further details on all our entry requirements, please see our Computer Science pages at www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/degrees/computerscience Streatham Campus, Exeter

Website: www.exeter.ac.uk/computerscience Email: compsci@exeter.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)1392 724061

Exeter is one of the top universities in the country with a great reputation for Computer Science and the Business School. I love Exeter and through my programme I have had some great opportunities to make contact with employers and to attend networking and competition events. Lecturers are always willing to help and there is always support available. I hope to gain a place on a Graduate Scheme at a Times Top 100 company. Sarah Collins, BSc IT Management for Business undergraduate


Why study Computer Science and IT at Exeter? There has never been a greater need for experts in computer science. From the complex IT systems used in modern businesses to sophisticated online gaming experiences, computers are a familiar characteristic of the modern world. This makes for a fascinating range of careers that require the technical expertise of a computer scientist (someone who understands the science behind computer technology). As an Exeter Computer Science and IT graduate you may find yourself working with business IT systems, the web, mobile communications or games technology, or in the management and development of the safety-critical systems that control aeroplanes, trains and power stations. During your time with us you’ll develop your problem-solving skills, your technical competence and your ability to analyse and reflect on issues relating to computer technology. These are essential skills whether you wish to work for a leading computing company developing new technologies, enter the world of business and finance, or if you would like to use your degree in a different role where you can make the most of your abilities to analyse and solve problems. We maintain excellent teaching links with computer-related industries via businesslinked projects, including assessment and prizes awarded by IBM, whilst organisations such as The Met Office, NATS and Motorola also collaborate in research and student project work.

92% of Computer Science students in graduate level employment or further study within six months of graduatingp 87% for Overall Satisfaction in the National Student Survey (2012)t Four-year degrees with an industrial placement year available Optional summer industrial placement that contributes towards your degree ÂŁ3 million invested in new academic and student facilities In addition to our core Computer Science degree, we offer a wide choice of programmes, from our industry-inspired degree in IT Management for Business to our degrees with Mathematics, which have a more scientific focus. All our programmes include the opportunity to gain practical experience in industry, either through an 8-12 week summer placement or by taking a year in industry.

Destination of Leavers from Higher Educaton Survey (DLHE) of 2010/11 undergraduates percentage of Computer Science students who agreed they were satisfied

p 

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Degree programmes Our interdisciplinary programmes cover the full range of skills within computer science from programming, basic science, discrete mathematics and logic, through to the latest developments in knowledge representation, pattern recognition, artificial intelligence and evolutionary computing. We have a strong emphasis on the applications of computer science to solving practical scientific, technological and business problems. Teaching relates directly to our interdisciplinary research expertise and active research has the added benefit of bringing the most up-to-date ideas into your degree programme.

Single Honours

We explore the fundamental aspects of system design; software development and deployment; multimedia systems incorporating graphics, animation, video and audio; and the role of the internet. New programming techniques, including genetic algorithms and neural networks, are central to our teaching, as are revolutionary approaches to problem solving through DNA and GPU computing. These may provide future generations with computers that we would not even recognise from today’s technology.

The BSc programme is also available as a four-year variant including a year’s paid industrial placement in your third year, working on a substantial project and gaining first-hand experience of the practical application of computer science.

You will not only develop a technical knowledge of computing theory, software and hardware, but also enhance your ability to think clearly and logically and get to the heart of a complex problem. Because of this, our graduates are highly regarded by prospective employers.

How your degree is structured The University operates a credit system, with each year’s work comprising of modules worth 120 credits. Virtually all modules in Computer Science are 15 credits, so typically you would take eight modules in a year. In the first and second years of each programme there are a number of compulsory modules which provide a thorough grounding in essential core topics. Full programme structures and module details can be found towards the back of this brochure. For up-to-date details of all our programmes and modules, please check www.exeter.ac.uk/ computerscience

MSci/BSc Computer Science Our degrees in Computer Science will give you practical skills in the specification, design and implementation of computer systems as well as an understanding of the theory behind them. They also give you a perspective on developing fields such as machine learning, evolutionary computation, neural networks and enterprise and webbased computing, and expose you to a wide range of applications in science and industry, preparing you not just for today but also for tomorrow.

The four-year MSci programme is a natural extension to the BSc Computer Science programme and offers an integrated masters qualification for students wishing to study Computer Science at a higher level. Year 1 This year gives you a solid foundation in computer science. It includes an introduction to procedural and objectoriented programming, system architectures, computing for the web, professional issues of computing, and explores some of the boundaries of scientific knowledge in the field. Modules on vectors and matrices, and probability and discrete mathematics provide the mathematical underpinning of later modules in computer science and artificial intelligence. Year 2 The second year includes exposure to rigorous software development and software engineering best practice, together with information systems. Research-led modules in machine learning and artificial intelligence, and applied computing across science and industry give the distinctive flavour of this degree. Options this year include modules in algorithms, graphics, networks and IT management. You can take our Commercial and Industrial Experience module as a summer work placement. The four-year BSc programme includes a year-long, paid placement with a relevant company during your third year, working on a substantial project and gaining first-hand experience of the practical application of computer science.

Year 3 (4 for year in industry) The project, in which you’ll develop a substantial software system for scientific and/or business use, forms the core of the final year and allows you to develop your skills and interests in computer science. The wide range of optional modules allows you to tailor your degree toward your specific interests. Students on the MSci may also take a term abroad in one of our international partner universities in their third year. Year 4 (MSci only) This year includes advanced masters level modules such as Machine Learning and Optimisation; Pattern Recognition; Intelligent Image Understanding; Commercial and Industrial Case Studies; HighPerformance Computing; and a significant individual supervised project, typically in the field of applied artificial intelligence.

MSci/BSc Computer Science and Mathematics Computer science and mathematics are beneficially intertwined, from the fundamentals of logic and computation embodied in the Turing machine and the mathematics of encryption used to secure transactions over the internet, to the use of computers in solving the equations governing climate change and the proof of theorems by computer algebra. Mathematics underpins computer science and computer science opens up new areas of mathematics. This synergistic interplay makes a degree in Computer Science and Mathematics a natural combination. These degree programmes equip you with the computational and mathematical tools to analyse problems and design and implement solutions. They are taught by both computer scientists and mathematicians, with compulsory modules covering the core elements of both subjects at degree level. Optional modules in the second and third year of the programmes allow you to tailor your degree towards specific areas in Computer Science and/or Mathematics. The BSc programme is also available as a four-year variant including a year’s paid industrial placement in your third year, working on a substantial project and gaining first-hand experience of the practical application of computer science and mathematics. The four-year MSci programme is a natural extension to the BSc Computer Science


and Mathematics programme and offers an integrated masters qualification for students wishing to combine these subjects at a higher level. Year 1 This year gives you a solid foundation in both computer science and mathematics and includes an introduction to procedural and object-oriented programming, system architectures, along with a module covering the social and economic impact of computing and the law regarding its use. Alongside these you will take modules including vectors and matrices, calculus and geometry, and probability and discrete mathematics. These modules support both the more advanced mathematics options available in later years and provide the mathematical underpinning of later modules in computer science and artificial intelligence. Year 2 The second year includes exposure to rigorous software development and software engineering best practice. You will also cover the development, use and properties of information systems and be exposed to some of the frontiers of computer science research. Additionally in mathematics you will cover analysis, vector calculus and differential equations, alongside a range of options. Year 3 You’ll undertake a project in which you’ll develop a substantial software system for scientific and/or business purposes and take a wide range of optional modules. This allows you to tailor your degree toward your specific interests. Example options include Commercial and Industrial Experience; Enterprise Computing; Nature Inspired Computation; and modules in Artificial Intelligence, alongside mathematics modules such as Coding Theory and Cryptography.

Year 4 (MSci only) This year includes advanced masters level modules in both disciplines such as Machine Learning and Optimisation; Pattern Recognition; Intelligent Image Understanding; Modelling of Weather and Climate; Dynamical Systems and Chaos; and a significant individual supervised project, typically in the field of applied artificial intelligence.

BSc IT Management for Business This degree programme offers an unrivalled platform to launch your career in business, whether you are looking for a high-flying and rewarding career in management consultancy or as an IT professional. A unique benefit of this degree is the extent of employer involvement, which keeps you up-to-date with topical issues facing the IT sector. For example, there is a regular series of ‘guru lectures’ provided by IT professionals in business throughout all years of the degree. The programme was developed in partnership with the e-skills council of the UK (www.e-skills.com) which aims to ensure that graduates acquire the right combination of business and IT technical skills that are vital to business. Employers in the e-skills UK Board guarantee to interview all ITMB students who meet their minimum criteria for interview. The programme combines management and business studies with computer science, providing training that will enable you to work at a management level within organisations where computer systems and IT are playing an ever-increasing role.

We utilise the research and teaching expertise within both the department of Computer Science and the University’s Business School to provide both vocationally relevant training and research-led academic education. You will be able to apply IT to business situations, evaluate technical knowledge and confidently take on project and team management in IT-related business scenarios. You will learn the skills to interpret and communicate complicated technical ideas to those with less technical knowledge. Year 1 The first year provides you with grounding in the fundamentals of information technology/computing and related business concepts, including introducing procedural and object oriented programming, system architectures, management theory, computer law, and business information systems. Year 2 The second year includes exposure to rigorous software development and software engineering best practice alongside information system implementation and IT management. Organisational behaviour theories are introduced, along with marketing principles, resource management and optional business modules. Year 3 (4 for year in industry) Half of the final year is constructed of optional modules, allowing you to focus on the specific areas of IT/computing and business, which most interest you and meet your employment goals. Additionally you will undertake a significant business-focused project, and take modules in Enterprise Computing, and Management of Information Systems.

The IT Management for Business degree offers high calibre, highly motivated students an unrivalled platform to launch their business careers in the IT departments of any large company, irrespective of industry. Unilever, like all companies nowadays, depends upon its IT organisation to consistently give it a competitive edge and the qualities inherent in ITMB will give graduates the perfect opportunity to contribute and progress rapidly in this highly visible and challenging environment. Helen J Toogood, VP IT Academy, Unilever Global IT


Learning and teaching Industrial Placements The four-year versions of the BSc degrees include a paid placement in business or industry for the duration of your third year, working on a substantial project. The placement gives you the opportunity to put into practice some of the things you will have learned in the first two years and to enter your final year with the insights from your practical experience in the field. Your year long placement will give you a proven employment track record and additional confidence when searching for your first graduate position – both should help to make you highly attractive to employers and the placement companies often offer employment after graduation. As part of the three-year BSc and fouryear MSci degrees, you can choose to take an optional Commercial and Industrial Experience module during the vacation before the third year (subject to availability). This very rewarding opportunity allows you to gain paid work experience while earning credits towards your degree programme. Following the placement you can report on your experience which, alongside a report from the employer, enables you to count your experience as a third-year optional module. We have excellent links with employers and can provide assistance in finding suitable employment.

Flexible Combined Honours This innovative Combined Honours scheme enables you to combine modules from a number of different fields of study not otherwise available through an existing Combined Honours programme. You can combine Computer Science with up to two other subjects from an extensive list. Throughout your degree you will be given regular support to help you choose the most appropriate pathway for you. Further information and the full list of available subjects can be found at www.exeter.ac.uk/fch

We encourage a supportive environment where students and staff work together in an informal and friendly atmosphere. The department has a student-focused approach to teaching, whereby all members of staff deal with questions on an individual basis. We operate an open door policy, so it is easy to consult individual members of staff or to fix appointments with them via email. As a friendly group of staff, you will get to know us well during your time here. Alongside your academic studies you will develop personal skills, gaining expertise in communications, team working and project management, and the ability to debate and reflect on the effects of new developments on society and individual lifestyles. The aim is to teach a science-rich syllabus that you will find intellectually challenging, rewarding and exciting, encompassing a balance of theory and practical application. We make use of a variety of teaching styles, including lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Most modules involve two or three lectures per week, so you would typically have about 10 lectures each week. In addition, workshops and tutorials support and develop what you’ve learnt in lectures and enable you to discuss the lecture material and coursework in more detail. You’ll have over 15 hours of direct contact time per week with your tutors and you will be expected to supplement your lectures with independent study. You should expect your total workload to average about 40 hours per week during term time. Working through examples, solving problems and developing programming skills are a vital part of learning computer science, so coursework forms a component of all modules. All modules have a reading list consisting of chapters from textbooks and research articles from journals.

We’re actively engaged in introducing new methods of learning and teaching, including increasing use of interactive computer-based approaches to learning through our virtual learning environment, where the details of all modules are stored in an easily navigable website. You can access detailed information about modules and learning outcomes and interact through activities such as the discussion forums.

Research-led teaching We believe every student benefits from being part of a culture that is inspired by research and being taught by experts – you will discuss the very latest ideas in seminars and tutorials and become actively involved in research yourself. All our academic staff are engaged in internationally recognised scientific research across a wide range of topics: artificial intelligence and information engineering; problem-specific tailoring and hybridisation; generic parameterisation issues and multiobjective optimisation; machine learning; genetic algorithms; statistical analysis of gene expression; knowledge representation; advanced technologies for data mining; pattern recognition; statistical modelling; software engineering; safety-critical software design; neural networks; and hydroinformatics. You can find out much more about our research on our website at www.exeter.ac.uk/ computerscience


Facilities

Assessment

We have benefited from a ÂŁ3 million investment in academic and social facilities including completely refitted lecture theatres and teaching spaces, a major expansion and upgrading of our undergraduate computer facilities and social space.

Modules are assessed by a combination of continuous assessment through small practical exercises, project work, essay writing, presentations and exam.

We have a range of purpose-built computer rooms and lecture facilities fitted with the latest audio-visual equipment. There is an ongoing programme of investment in new computers and software. The computers used for undergraduate teaching include a range of machines running either Windows or Linux. On these computers you can access specialist software, work on program development using Java and Python, undertake multimedia work or simply access the network for email or internet browsing. There are also other more specialised computing facilities within the department, such as clusters that support high performance computer intensive research. The department and IT Services provide a Helpdesk facility and a laptop surgery to help you with any difficulties and provide access to manuals and technical publications. Remote access to computing laboratories is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and most University accommodation has broadband access from your room. We also have wireless access throughout the building.

You must pass your first year assessment in order to progress to the second year, but the results do not count towards your degree classification. For three-year programmes, the assessments in the second and third years contribute to your final degree classification. For four-year programmes the assessments in the second, third and fourth years all contribute to your final degree classification.

Academic support Each degree has a Programme Coordinator who monitors your progress, advises you on choice of pathways and generally ensures that the programme runs smoothly. You will also have a personal tutor who will provide help and advice where necessary, convey exam results, give general support and write employment references after you have graduated. During the first year, each tutor holds fortnightly group meetings that provide the opportunity to discuss computing-related topics which go beyond the confines of the formal syllabus. These also provide the time to air general issues and concerns related to the degree. You are also expected to have individual meetings with your tutor once a term and can request additional meetings to discuss issues of concern if required. We provide academic skills development sessions in your first two years that include an induction week in the first year and a series of employability training sessions throughout your degree. You will also undertake personal development planning and annual self-appraisal with your personal tutor.


Careers A degree from Exeter is highly valued by employers. Management and personal skills are built into our programmes and our students take advantage of the wide range of extra curricular and personal development opportunities offered by the University, from study abroad (for certain programmes) to volunteering and playing an active role in student societies. Our Employability Officer is active in developing aspects of our programmes and services that improve the employability of our students. We also have a dedicated Careers Consultant who provides specific services such as careers workshops tailored to careers in computer science and support in matters such as applications and job interview skills. The Career Zone runs several careers fairs throughout the year and these have been particularly successful in putting major UK employers in touch with Exeter students. Relevant employers visit the

department from the first year to meet and hold mock interviews with students, with the aim of helping them to develop their career ideas at an early enough stage to help with module choices and placement decisions. Career opportunities for computer scientists are many and varied, and graduates can be found working in the private and public sector in areas such as software engineering, health, communications, education, life sciences, physical sciences, finance and manufacturing. Computer scientists from Exeter have a reputation as being articulate, numerate problem solvers, who typically claim great job satisfaction, a good salary and a huge range of career possibilities. Exeter has an excellent reputation with graduate recruiters and a strong employment record. Major employers target Exeter graduates irrespective of their degree subject. We offer a very wide range of opportunities

Examples of the destinations of our recent graduates: Occupations

Web Developer // Software Developer // Software Engineer // Associate Consultant // Business Analyst // IT Consultant // Cyber Scientist // Finance Advisor // Support Manager for IT // Network Engineer // Web Support Analyst

for students to obtain work experience and develop the skills employers are looking for. Many students from the department take part in the Exeter Award and the Exeter Leaders Award. These schemes encourage you to participate in employability related workshops, skills events, volunteering and employment which will contribute to your career decision-making skills and success in the employment market. We also have opportunities for further study and there is a fast track application process for Exeter students to our Masters programmes. For further information about what the Employability Service offers at Exeter visit www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/ employability

Employers

Apple // Microsoft // DSTL // FDM Group // John Lewis Partnership // Met Office // IBM // BskyB // Proctor and Gamble A number of our Computer Science graduates choose to go on to further study. Many choose to stay on at Exeter continue their studies with us whilst others go further afield. A variety of subjects are studied from Masters level and PhDs in Computer Science and associated topics through to professional qualifications such as teaching.

Entry requirements and applying You can find a summary of our typical entry requirements on the inside front cover of this brochure. The full and most up-to-date information about Computer Science is on the undergraduate website at www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/degrees/ computerscience and we strongly advise that you check this before attending an open day or making your application. Some programmes at the University require prior study of specific subjects and may also have minimum grade requirements at GCSE or equivalent, particularly in English Language and/or Mathematics.

We make every effort to ensure that the entry requirements are as up-to-date as possible in our printed literature. However, since this is printed well in advance of the start of the admissions cycle, in some cases our entry requirements and offers will change. If you are an international student you should consult our general and subjectspecific entry requirements information for A levels and the International Baccalaureate, but the University also recognises a wide range of international qualifications. You

can find further information about academic and English language entry requirements at www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/ international For information on the application, decision, offer and confirmation process, please visit www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/ applications


Module details

KEY C = Core O=O ptional

For up-to-date details of all our programmes and modules, please check www.exeter.ac.uk/computerscience

C

Advanced Calculus O

Business and Management Modules Calculus and Geometry Computers and the Internet

C

Data Structures and Algorithms

C

Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

C

Frontiers of Computer Science

C C C C

Vectors and Matrices

C

O

O

C

O

O

O

Computer Languages and Representations

O

C

Database Theory and Design

C

C

Differential Equations

C

Information Technology Management and Professional Skills

C

O

C C O

Numerics and Optimisation C

Organisational Behaviour and HRM Programming for the web

O

O C

Principles of Marketing C

C C

Mathematics Modules

C

MSci/BSc Computer Science and Mathematics

Applied Computing Artificial Intelligence and Applications Communications and Networking Technologies

C

Theory and Practice of Management

O

Business and Management Modules

C C

C

C

C

Programming for Business Social and Professional Issues of the Information Age

C

Algorithms that Changed the World

C

C

Introduction to Business Information Systems

Programming for Science

C

Module Name

MSci/BSc Computer Science

C

Accounting

Object-Oriented Programming

MSci/BSc Computer Science and Mathematics

BSc IT Management for Business

MSci/ BSc Computer Science

Module Name

BSc IT Management for Business

Year 2 Modules

Year 1 Modules

Software Development

C

C

C

Software Engineering

C

C

C

Statistics

O

Statistical Modelling

O

Systems, Series and Transforms

O


KEY C = Core O=O ptional

O O

Module Name

MSci Computer Science and Mathematics

O

Advanced Statistical Modelling Bioinformatics and Systems Biology

MSci/BSc Computer Science and Mathematics

BSc IT Management for Business

MSci/BSc Computer Science

Module Name

MSci Computer Science

Year 4 Modules

Year 3 (Year 4 for Industrial Placement students)

Commercial and Industrial Case Studies

O

O

Computation and Numerical Analysis

O

Dynamical Systems and Chaos

O

Commercial and Industrial Experience

O

O

Dynamics and Evolution of Biological Systems

O

Computability and Complexity

O

O

High-Performance Computing

O

O

Computer Graphics

O

Intelligent Image Understanding

O

O

Business and Management modules

O

Crisis, Change and Creativity in Organisations Enterprise Computing

O

C

O

O

Ethics and Organisation

O

Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics Machine Learning and Optimisation

O

O

Mathematical Analysis of Biological Systems

O

Fluid Dynamics

O

Mathematics Modules

O

Graphs, Networks and Algorithms

O

Modelling the Weather and Climate

O

High Performance Computing

O

O

Nature Inspired Computation

O

Individual Literature Review and Project

C

C

Ontology for Information Systems

O

O

Pattern Recognition

O

O

Research Methodology

O

O

Research Project

C

C

ITMB Individual Project Learning from Data

O

O C

Management of Information Systems

O

Mathematical Biology and Ecology Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

O

Nature Inspired Computation

O

Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

O

O O

Partial Differential Equations Services Marketing

O

Statistical Inference

O

Stochastic Processes

O

Strategic Management

O

The Climate System

C O


Computer Science modules Please note that availability of all modules is subject to timetabling constraints and that not all modules are available every year. For a full list and details of the individual modules, including Business and Mathematics optional modules, please check the undergraduate section of our website at www.exeter.ac.uk/computerscience

Year 1 Computers and the Internet

Computers and the internet are now an integral part of everyday business and social life. This module will equip you with the foundational skills and knowledge necessary to understand and work with computers and networking technologies. This includes the ability to use an extensive range of hardware and software for industrial and business applications as well as the ability to analyse, design and develop web-based applications from informal specifications.

Object-Oriented Programming

This module introduces you to the objectoriented programming paradigm, now widely used throughout industry and science. Using the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and the Java programming language, the module introduces you to object-oriented problem-solving methods and provides object-oriented techniques for the analysis, design and implementation of solutions.

Programming for Business

Without the ability to program, IT solutions would be limited to connecting different existing software packages. Developing the ability to program allows you to produce entirely new solutions (and indeed modifications of existing ones). This module introduces you to the procedural programming paradigm, develops your skills of analysis and problem solving, and concludes with a team-based business-oriented software development project.

Programming for Science

Being able to program well is essential to computer science. This module introduces you to the procedural programming paradigm, and develops your problem-solving and analytical skills. It introduces you to the algorithmic formulation of solutions to problems, and will expose you to some of the scientific applications of programming.

Degree specific and optional modules: Accounting

Provides you with a broad understanding of the fundamentals of recording transactions, the content of financial reports, the scope of financial reporting in the UK and the basics of the interpretation of published accounting information.

Advanced Calculus

This module will introduce you to advanced methods of Calculus, building on knowledge acquired to develop further key ideas and skills that will form necessary background for later study. The main emphasis of the module will be on practical methods and problem solving; however, all results will be stated formally and each sub-topic will be reviewed from a mathematically rigorous standpoint.

Calculus and Geometry

You will develop knowledge and skills in two and three dimensional analytic geometry and differential calculus. From this you will be able to quickly and accurately perform calculus on simple functions using a variety of standard techniques. It will also teach you how to reason using abstract ideas, formulate and solve problems and communicate reasoning and solutions effectively in writing and as with the other modules, it will develop your self management and time-management skills and broaden your use of learning resources including the use of IT.

Data Structures and Algorithms

This module introduces you to the fundamental role played by data structures and algorithms in Computer Science and introduces a systematic framework for the description and manipulation of data structures. This will pave the way for a systematic study of algorithms, the abstract procedures that may be implemented in concrete form within computer programs. In particular, you will be introduced to the study of computational complexity, which provides measures of the efficiency of algorithms (in terms of memory utilisation and running time) and can also characterise the complexity of problems in terms of the optimum efficiency of algorithms for solving them.

Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

This module provides you with the basic concepts and tools developed in discrete mathematics disciplines but needed for the study of computer science. As such, it forms an essential part of a rounded education of a computer scientist or computer expert whose work includes computerbased data manipulations.


Frontiers of Computer Science

This module provides you with an exciting and diverse overview of current research in Computer Science. Computers are now able to learn for themselves, find solutions to difficult problems in science and provide ever more human-like opponents in games. This module covers a diverse set of topics from research in computer science, delivered by staff according to their individual research areas. Lecturers introduce research themes and provide directions for further reading after which you’ll have the opportunity to select an area of particular interest to study in more detail.

Artificial Intelligence and Applications

Artificial Intelligence is the science of getting computers to do things which, when done by humans, involve the exercise of intelligence. Machine Learning is an important sub-area of Artificial Intelligence, in which mechanisms are developed which enable machines to learn from experience just as humans do; it is a key focus of Computer Science research at Exeter. This module will provide you with a broad overview of both Artificial Intelligence in general and Machine Learning in particular, as well as a more detailed understanding, both practical and theoretical, of selected topics within these areas.

Introduction to Business Information Systems

Explores the impact and use of computer-based technology in and outside the workplace. Decision making and the distribution of responsibility are both areas in which technology has changed the nature of work and this module is designed to provide you with enhanced insight into the modern business computing environment and to appreciate the relationship between technology and business strategy.

Communication and Networking Technologies

Provides an in-depth introduction to the fundamental principles underlying modern communication and network technologies and their applications. The emphasis is on the protocols involved and how they work together.

Database Theory and Design

Databases are an integral component of all industrial and commercial information systems. This module equips you with the theoretical and hands-on practical knowledge needed to design, develop and manage database systems using modern database management systems. By the end of this module, you will be adept at designing, developing and managing database systems and their associated forms-based applications using a selected commercial database management system.

Differential Equations

This course will enable you to demonstrate an understanding of, and competence in, a range of analytical tools for posing and solving differential equations, specifically as applied to engineering situations. You will learn the basic principles of differential equations, and will apply that knowledge to some every day phenomena, as well as be introduced to calculation methods and computer models for general applications.

Information Technology Management and Professional Skills

A series of lectures will be given by leading industry professionals, giving you an overview of the current IT market. You will also examine the necessary personal skills and best practice relating to project management in this module.

Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management

During this module you will explore organisational behaviour and human resource management, including ways of analysing organisations, relevant management approaches and techniques and the means to evaluate and assess them.

Principles of Marketing

This module introduces the key principles and concepts used by marketers and gives an opportunity to apply them in practical contexts. This marketing perspective will focus on an in-depth understanding of consumer motivations and desires which will be analysed with concepts from psychology, sociology and anthropology.

Programming for the Web

The web is a ubiquitous part of modern-day life and a web presence is vital for almost every individual and business. This module will introduce you to upto-date web technologies and you will learn about the programming techniques required to develop usable, high-performance, robust web applications. In addition to covering the technical side of web development, Programming for the Web will cover some of the usability, design and architectural concepts that make web development different from programming for a single operating system.

Social and Professional Issues of the Information Age

This module will introduce you to the law regulating the use of computers; encourage your awareness and critical thinking regarding the social impact of information technology and AI; and help you relate professional IT/computing societies’ codes of conduct to ethical theory.

Theory and Practice of Management

During this module you will examine the historical development of organisation theory and discuss organisational structure and design as well as the culture and the competitive environment of the organisation. You will also explore the principles and practices of modern management, the changing role of management and managerial skills and competencies.

Vectors and Matrices

This module provides a basic introduction to complex numbers and a foundation in the concepts of vectors and matrices, together with some applications both to geometry and to the solution of systems of linear equations.

Year 2 Algorithms that Changed the World

Applied Computing

Algorithms are precisely defined procedures designed to solve computational tasks: they are the life-blood of computing. This module is designed to highlight the importance of algorithms in Computer Science, providing you with an understanding of what algorithms are, how they can be specified and evaluated, and what they can be used for. These general ideas will be illustrated throughout by means of an in-depth study of a range of example algorithms which have played an important part in the development of Computer Science and underpin current computing practice. It is difficult to conceive of any area of science, industry and business that has not been impacted upon by computers and the technologies and techniques developed by computer scientists. This module will expose you to many disparate areas of applied computing, with lectures delivered by academics from across the University in the sciences, social sciences and the humanities, alongside speakers from business. These lectures will discuss how computers are important in the presenter’s specific field, and what computer science problems needed confronting to solve particular important problems they have faced.


Software Development

This module extends your skills in object-oriented programming and introduces you to various software development methodologies and tools used in industry, including testing frameworks, version control and automated builds.

Software Engineering

The science and art of building large and complex software systems is developed in this module. Methods, relying on formal and informal techniques, for the specification, design and implementation of interactive computer systems are explored and extensive practical experience is gained though a group project.

Ethics and Organisation

Explores some of the ethical and human rights issues confronting contemporary organisations. Managers are increasingly expected to make decisions which minimise the negative and maximise the positive social and environmental effects of their activities. However, it can be difficult to determine what action to take. The main ethical perspectives are considered and a variety of issues that currently challenge organisations are explored.

Fluid Dynamics

The aims are to provide a further understanding of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics associated with flow of incompressible (constant density) fluids with both viscosity and inertia. You will learn to translate a physical problem into an appropriate mathematical system. This module is mainly concerned with the flow of viscous fluids and can be regarded as a continuation of the second year module Hydrodynamics on inviscid fluids.

High Performance Computing

Systems with a massive number of processors in close proximity to each other are generally called ‘supercomputers’. These types of system, alongside more spatially distributed machines perform a considerable proportion of commercial and scientific data processing. This module will introduce you to some of the common architectures and languages used in this domain.

Individual Literature Review and Project

This module builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in your first and second years. You will develop your skills in researching a topic and writing a theoretical paper or scholarly review in preparation for your individual project. The module encourages you to explore your topic further, demonstrating both an understanding of the research background as well as current and future developments.

IT Management for Business Individual Project

Through this project you will consolidate the knowledge, understanding, techniques and methods you have acquired by applying them to the production of a software system for business using an appropriate method for project development. It is expected that the project will be undertaken in association with an external employer.

Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (KR) is a fundamental requirement for the application of Artificial Intelligence to real-world problems. This module provides an introduction to the logical and philosophical principles providing a formal basis for KR, and illustrates the application of those principles to a representative range of subject areas within Artificial Intelligence.

Learning from Data

To create artificially intelligent machines or software, they must be able to assimilate data from their environment and make decisions based upon it. This module equips you with the fundamentals of statistical learning in a computer science context. It will provide a thorough grounding in the theory and application of machine learning and statistical techniques for classification, regression and unsupervised methods.

Management of Information Systems

The aim of this module is to provide you with a critical understanding of the main managerial challenges organisations face when implementing information systems solutions. This module provides you with both an understanding and knowledge of the main aspects related to the Management of Information Systems (MIS) that are vital for their professional success.

Year 3 Modules (Year 4 for Industrial Placement students) Advanced Statistical Modelling

Bioinformatics and Systems Biology

This module will describe the underlying theory and provide a general introduction to the application of the commonly used generalised linear statistical models in practical settings. Software currently in use will be discussed and used in the lab so that you will develop an understanding of the key role of the generalised linear model in data analysis. Biology has undergone a data explosion in recent years due to the development of a variety of highthroughput measurement technologies. This module will provide you with the computational techniques necessary to understand and analyse this biological data, one of the most important applications of computer science methods today. The module will be taught by researchers in the field and so will include a significant element of research-led teaching in the use of computation to better understand biological data.

Commercial and Industrial Experience

This module provides practical work experience in a business or commercial setting that is of direct relevance to your degree programme. Individual placements are subject to availability and to approval by the relevant Programme Coordinator.

Computability and Complexity

Although it is commonly believed that computers can be programmed to solve any computational problem, it has been known for many years that all computing devices have built-in limitations: there are computational problems which cannot be solved, even in principle, and amongst the problems which can be solved there are some whose inherent computational complexity means that they can never be solved quickly enough to be solvable in practice. This module explores the concepts which underpin the mathematical theory of computation and shows how they can be used to demonstrate these results.

Computer Graphics

During this module you will study advanced algorithms, techniques for rendering graphics and methods for scientific visualisation and image processing.

Crisis, Change and Creativity in Organisations

Examines how organisations cope with crises and manage profound change. The complex cultural, political and ethical issues faced by change agents is examined in detail. Consideration is given to how managers can be better prepared for the unpredictability, unintended outcomes and possible harmful consequences of change.

Enterprise Computing

Introduces the techniques used to implement large-scale distributed information systems. You will consider important inter-operability issues for business to business (B2B) communications including Service Oriented Architecture and the semantic web.


Mathematical Biology and Ecology

This course shows how mathematics may be usefully employed in the biosciences to assess population and demographic phenomena. Software will enable you to build and analyse models using real-world examples from nature. This has theoretical and practical applications in biological, biomedical and biotechnology research. No prior courses in biology or in second year Applied Mathematics are necessary.

Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing

Computers and computing devices are rapidly becoming ubiquitous and we are in the transition of one model of computing to another, with the demise of general purpose fixed devices, and the emergence of a new generation of personal, mobile ‘consumption devices’ – everyone has their own digital hub. This module will prepare you for working with and creating applications for these architectures and devices. We will look at the architectures inherent in the ‘always on’ nature of these devices and gain hands-on experience of development on current devices.

Nature Inspired Computation

Year 4 Commercial and Industrial Case Studies

Nature has developed many systems that are highly adept at solving the many problems associated with survival in a complex and changing world. Researchers in computing have tried to harness these capabilities through nature-inspired computing. This module introduces the main nature-inspired algorithms and techniques which are now commonly researched and applied. The development and management of large-scale computer systems is a difficult and often high profile undertaking. This module will provide you with a thorough understanding of the technical and management implications of implementing large-scale IT systems. Example systems will be presented through traditional and guest lectures and through student presentations; these presentations will also allow you to develop your independent research skills. You will also undertake a substantial team project as part of this module to provide the necessary management and team working skills.

Computation and Numerical Analysis

This module will introduce the popular computer package Matlab and other relevant software. Topics from linear algebra, differential equations, statistical modelling, optimisation and dynamical systems will be used to demonstrate the versatility and capabilities of such packages in the application of modern numerical modelling techniques.

Dynamical Systems and Chaos

Provides you with a good understanding of asymptotic behaviour of nonlinear dynamics and exposes you to qualitative and quantitative methods for dynamical systems, including nonlinear ordinary differential equations, maps and chaos.

High-Performance Computing

The drive for faster and more powerful computers, allowing us to deal with the wealth and frequency of data that modern business and science needs processing, has lead to the development of massively parallel systems. A number of issues arise when performing high-performance computing, which will be covered in this module, alongside the programming and development paradigms suited to the domain.

Intelligent Image Understanding

Introduces computer understanding of digital images of real objects. The module describes various image processing methods that allow computers to select and recognise particular objects, segment them into regions of interest, extract suitable features, and enable an efficient classification of the considered objects.

Machine Learning and Optimisation

This module provides a grounding in the theoretical and practical aspects of machine learning and optimisation as well as examining some of the philosophical and historical foundations of machine learning, including the limitations of what may be learned.

Ontology for Information Systems

This module provides an understanding of key ontological concepts, introduces specific formal tools for handling these concepts, examines a number of particular ontologies that have been especially influential in the field, and explores some specific application areas for ontological theory.

Pattern Recognition

This module provides a thorough grounding in the theory and application of pattern recognition, classification, categorisation and concept acquisition. Neural networks and graphical models are flexible tools for modelling data which can be employed, in a principled statistical way, in pattern recognition schemes.

Research Methodology

This module introduces you to undertaking independent but supervised research at postgraduate level. Good investigative research is a difficult skill involving the framing of research goals and investigative plans as well as critical evaluation of previously published results. This module explicitly addresses research planning and critical assessment in the context of your own research project.

Research Project

This module aims to introduce the student to substantial research projects, particularly in the field of applied artificial intelligence, and it aims to put into practice the knowledge acquired from the taught elements of the programme. It aims to give the student experience of many aspects of research work including planning, experimentation and analysis, interpretation of results and presentation.


Academic excellence • The University of Exeter has been named as The Sunday Times University of the Year and is also ranked 7th in the UK in its University Guide 2013 • We are also in the top one per cent of universities in the world, and a regular fixture in the top 10 league tables in The Guardian and The Times • University of Exeter students are among the most satisfied in the UK: we are ranked 6th in the UK in the National Student Survey 2012 amongst traditional universities and 3rd for the quality of our teaching • O ur teaching is inspired by our research, nearly 90 per cent of which was ranked as internationally recognised by the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise • We attract the best qualified students in the country; we’re in the top 10 for the number of students graduating with a first or 2:1 and for entry standards (students achieving AAB at A level and above)

A vibrant community • Our students are the most engaged in the country, smashing participation records in student elections for the last two years running

• The Students’ Guild offers an unrivalled selection of societies, from sport to culture to community volunteering groups – 8,000 students take part in 165 societies • We are a top 10 UK university for sport and provide excellent facilities and support whether you want to compete at the highest level or just for fun • We work with our students to continually improve the education on offer, via initiatives which put students at the heart of our decision making process • We’re a truly international community, with students from over 130 countries and staff of 50 different nationalities

Ambition for the future • We equip you with the skills employers need via business placements, study abroad schemes, volunteering opportunities, careers advice from successful alumni and much more • Despite tough economic times, we’ve improved our employment record yearon-year: more than 90 per cent of students get a job or further study place within six months of graduating • We’ve invested over £350 million in our three campuses, from new accommodation and research labs to state-of-the-art lecture theatres and library spaces

Explore the possibilities Open Days Come and visit our beautiful campuses. We hold Open Days twice a year in June and September. Campus Tours We run Campus Tours at the Streatham Campus each weekday during term time. You’ll be shown round by a current student, who’ll give you a first-hand account of what it’s like to live and study at Exeter. For full details and to book your place, contact us on: Website: www.exeter.ac.uk/opendays Phone: +44 (0)1392 724043 Email: visitus@exeter.ac.uk Offer-Holder Visit Days Once you receive confirmation of an offer we’ll contact you with an invitation to visit us on an Offer-Holder Visit Day, which will give you the chance to find out more about your programme and department and decide whether to accept our offer. While this opportunity to visit includes a campus tour and formal introduction to the department, much emphasis is placed on a more informal period for questions and answers. A number of our current students also take part on these days, leading tours and giving you the opportunity to ask them what studying at Exeter is really like! Offer-Holder Visit Days take place during the period January to April.

The best things about my course and the University are the contacts with industry, both local and international, the scenery and beaches in the surrounding countryside and the security of living in a safe city such as Exeter. The lecturers are so down to earth and the course has given me a range of very transferable skills, useful contacts with industry and the knowledge to run an online business. When I graduate I plan to work for a software company abroad. James Alvarez-Buylla, Computer Science undergraduate


www.exeter.ac.uk/computerscience This document forms part of the University’s Undergraduate Prospectus. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in the Prospectus is correct at the time of going to print. The University will endeavour to deliver programmes and other services in accordance with the descriptions provided on the website and in this prospectus. The University reserves the right to make variations to programme content, entry requirements and methods of delivery and to discontinue, merge or combine programmes, both before and after a student’s admission to the University. Full terms and conditions can be found at www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/applications/disclaimer Find us on Facebook and Twitter: www.facebook.com/exeteruni www.twitter.com/uniofexeter

2013CAMS022


Computer Science brochure 2014  

Computer Science undergraduate subject brochure 2014

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