Page 1


RESOURCE PROJECTIONS TOTAL CARBON In-Use Total Carbon

..u

1,200 .................................. i................ ,..... .

0

:

C

800

400

2015

l

;

''

Ill

' '

In-Use Total�................................... Carbon witht..,Offset ............................... . ·................................... �...................................

..... '

'' 2050

2030 Year

ENERGY/WATER/WASTE In-Use Total Carbon

..u

1,200

0 Ill

� C

800

400

...........j...................................�..................................e,..................................:,,.................................

.

:i........................... .... ! ! . i . . .. .....+··""""'""""'""""'""' ''""""'""""'""""'""' ' ""

..................................i...................................

.

Ill

2015

t .

j

2030 Year

18

:

i................................... • .................................,4 ................................. .

t .

i

2050


3 PRECEDENTS


WASHINGTON, D.C. Sustainability D.C.

The United States Capitol Building with the Washington Monument in the background.1

26


The Path to Carbon Neutrality

City Population Est. 693,972 Residents (2017)

10 10

Demographics

8 8 2006 - 10.100

6 6

2009 - 8.425 2012 - 7.575

4 4

2032 - 3.788 2006 - 10.10 2050 - 0.000 2009 - 8.425 2012 - 7.575 2032 - 3.788 2050 - 0.000

2 2 0 0

2006

2006

2009

2009

2012

2012

...

...

2032

2032

...

2050

...

Female: 52.5% Male: 47.5% 5

2050

Washington, D.C. Current and Projected Carbon Emissions in Million Metric Tons CO2e.

2

Washington, D.C.’s Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE) conducted a Greenhouse Gas Inventory in both 2006 and 2012. The 2012 Inventory reported a 25% decrease in emissions from 2006 levels. The District aims to reduce emissions by 50% below 2006 levels by 2032, and has pledged to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

Walkability

African American: 47.7% White: 36.4% Hispanic: 10.9% Asian: 4.1% American Indian: 0.6% Pacific Islander: 0.2%

Economic Distribution

Natural Environment - Provide additional access to parks - Protect wetland acreage by 50% - Expand tree coverage by 40%

Built Environment

4

- Develop active, vibrant neighborhoods - Encourage green building design - Increase population by net of 250,000

3 1

5

2 6

7

Social Environment WARD 1 - $98,485 WARD 2 - $190,692

- Educate about sustainability in schools - Improve bicycle and pedestrian safety - Reduce obesity rate by 50%

8

WARD 3 - $257,386 WARD 4 - $116,668 VERY WALKABLE

WARD 5 - $78,559

WALKABLE

WARD 6 - $120,526

NOT VERY WALKABLE

WARD 7 - $54,667

UNWALKABLE

WARD 8 - $44,076

Pedestrian Friendliness Heat Map 3 Very Walkable Walkable Not Very Walkable Unwalkable

Average Household Income by Ward 4 Ward 1 - $98,485 Ward 2 - $190,692 Ward 3 - $257,386 Ward 4 - $116,669

Ward 5 - $78,559 Ward 6 - $120,526 Ward 7 - $54,667 Ward 8 - $44,076

Economic Environment - Triple number of small businesses - Increase number of available jobs - Decrease unemployment by 50% 6 27


COPENHAGEN CPH 2025 Climate Plan

Looking west over Copenhagen, Denmark with the city hall clock tower to the right.1

28


The Path to Carbon Neutrality

City Population Est. 775,033 Residents (2018)

CO2 emissions (1,000 tons)

2,500 Other sectors 2,000

Town gas and process heat consumption Individual heating

1.500 1.000

Electricity consumption

2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021 2023 2025

Traffic and other mobile sources

Copenhagen Current and Projected Carbon Emissions in Thousands Metric Tons CO2e. 2

CO2 emissions (1,000 tons)

New initiatives

800

Intelligent traffic systems and mobility Public transport

600

New fuels

- The city is full of mixed use buildings with bike and pedestrian friendly streets. Their focus is to improve quality of life which helps growth.

City of cyclists

200 0

Natural Environment

Built Environment

Energy savings Solar cells

400

Female: 53% Male: 47% 5

-Use only renewable energy by 2050 with half coming from wind.

Reductions

1,000

White: 94% Hispanic: 3% African American: 1%

District heating consumption

500

1,200

Demographics

Social Environment

City administration initiatives Separation of plastic from waste New renewable energy based cogeneration using biomass Wind turbines

CO2 reductions from Climate Plan

Bicycle Superhighway Map

3

Through biomass, wind, geothermal, and solar power, the city aims to cut two million tons of CO2 to 400,000 tons. The city plans to add more than 100 wind turbines before their deadline to provide more than 50% of the power demand. Less carbon-intensive ways of producing heat and electricity will cut emissions by 75%. Copenhagen already has the worlds largest heating and cooling network using waste heat from power plants and cool sea water.

- Copenhagen has a focus on quality of life and part of this is training employees on climate friendly conduct and teaching people how to be energy efficient.

Economic Environment - Copenhagen produces a lot of energy that gets sent out to the rest of Denmark. Other strong businesses are fishing, brewing, IT, and research. 6

More than a third of trips to school and work are done on bicycle on the city’s 250 miles of cycle tracks. The goal for 2025 is for 75% of trips to be made by bike, foot or public transit. Citizens are already passionate and excited to progress their low carbon drive, many switching away from cars and using bikes as their primary transportation. 4

29


AUSTIN, TX Social Environment

View From Colorado Rive to Downtown Austin, TX.1

30


2030 day

8 13.6

Sustainable Goals

City Population

Net-Zero Goal

947, 897 Residents (2016) 2015 3

13.6 13.6

2030 2

Demographics

8

2050 1

4.6 4.6 0 0

22

44

66

88

10 10

12 12

14 14

16

Amount of Greenhouse Gases (Million Metric Tons)

Austin, TX, Net-zero Goal. Current and Projected Carbon Emissions in Million Metric Tons CO2.2

By 2020, the city is goingt to achieving a 20% reduction in single passenger vehcle commuting, ustrial Processes: 6%Associated with Manufacturing and reaching carbon neutrality of city of Austin municipal operations. By 2025, the city is going thane Produced by Landfills: the trashdemand; we generate to sve 5% 900 megawattscaused of peakbyelectricity using solar and wind to provide 55% of the nsportation: such 36% as cars, buses, and trucks total energy generation mix. By 2040, it is going to maximize recycling and composting to keep ergy, Produced 53% admaterials Used: such aslandfi electricity 90% of out of lls.3 and natural gas

Landuse

White: Hispanic: Black: Asian: Two or more Races: American Indian: Other Race:

48.5% 34.8% 7.3% 6.9% 2.1 % 0.2% 0.2%

Female:

49.3%

Male:

50.7% 5

Natural Environment - Improve the management of water resources. - Develop green infrastructure to protect environmentally sensitive areas.

Built Environment

CURRENT 13.7 MILLION METRIC TONS OF GREENHOUSE GASES ARE EMITTED COMMUNITYWIDE FROM Industrial Processes: Associated with Manufacturing 6%

Methane Produced by Landfills: caused by the trash we generate 5%

Energy, Produced ad Used: such as electricity and natural gas 53% Co lora do

Transportation: such as cars, buses, and trucks 36%

Riv er Co lora do

Riv er

- Improve public transportation network - New residential and commerical construction - Increase open space

Social Environment Major Road Minor Road Road High Way

- Imporve equity of education. - Grow and invest in creative culture - Encourage and support different creative art forms

Water Capitol Building Shop Open Space Downtown

Economic Environment - Support creative industry - Procide affordable transportation, work space, housing and healthcare6

The University of Texas Downtown Austin Street Pattern Map4

31


NEW YORK CITY PlaNYC, OneNYC, GreeNYC

Times Square in Manhattan1

32


The Path to Carbon Neutrality

City Population 8,550,405 Residents (2018)3

Citywide Annual GHG Emissions by Sector

Demographics 80% projected reduction by 2050 in accordance with 1.5°

Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (MtCO2e)

15% decrease from 2005 to 2016 60

50

40

30

20

10

Waste Transportation Stationary energy

African American: White: Hispanic: Asian: American Indian: Pacific Islander:

24.2% 42.7% 14.9% 13.3% 0.38% 0.04%

Female: Male:

52.3% 47.7%3

Total estimation 2005 2006 2007 2008

2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2050

NYC Current and Projected Carbon Emissions in Million Metric Tons CO2e.

NYC plans to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050 and support the critical goal of holding the increase in the global average temperature to below 2° Celsius above pre-industrial levels as set by the Paris Climate Agreement --- that means total carbon emissions go from 52.1 mil metric tons in 2016 to 10.42 mil in 2050.2

Neighborhoods

Air Quality Improvement

Natural Environment - Dense metropolis - History of excessive waste and pollutants - Water quality testing, Clean Air Program, storm water management, waste disposal

Built Environment THE BRONX

<5 TA

N

5 - 10

NH

AT

10 - 20

MA

> 20

QUEENS

Neighborhoods above city-wide PM2.5 attributable asthma rate

BROOKLYN

ST

E AT

N

ISL

AN

- High population density, residential - Mass transit is main mode of transport - Increase city capacity for 1M population growth

Social Environment - GreeNYC for social media involvement - Educational efforts for sustainability - Change the behavior and thinking of New Yorkers about waste

D

Economic Environment Distinct areas of NYC

Decrease (tons/year) in PM2.5 Emissions

- Lower the cost of living - Increase affordable housing - Financial services, health care, retail, manufacturing, and education as main industries

33


PORTLAND, OR Portland Comprehensive Plan

Maciek Lulko, Portland cityscape, Oregon. 2015.1

34


The Path to Carbon Neutrality 2015 Recorded CO2 Emissions

City Population Est. 632,187 Residents (2016)

2050 Projected CO2 Emissions Goods

Residential

Goods

Food Transportation Services

Services

Food

Conserved

Residential

Transportation 1,2 & 3 Carbon Emission Today + Tomorrow2

The new Comprehensive Plan is an example of community-driven change as it brings in thousands of citizens as contributors to not only keep up-to-date with the climatic issues the city will face but also the social issues that need attention. The plan plainly lists areas that will be gaining rejuvenation or better distribution of resources over time to support a growing economy.

Portland Map

African American: White: Hispanic: Asian: American Indian:

5.59% 71.7% 9.7% 7.88% 4.46%

Female: Male:

52.5% 47.5%4

Natural Environment - Expand greenways and habitat corridors to better connect people and wildlife in an effort to improve both realms.

Portland & Tucson

Built Environment

1. Both share the division of low and high income communities, and bear a responsibility to extend infrastructural plans to these underserved communities

- Prepare for potential disasters by making a carbon neutral, self-sustaining infrastructure

2. Impending global warming is a concern for both cities. There are shared responsibilities to develop independently powered strategies to keep citizens cool.

Zones in Portland Plan3 Environment: Urban Habitat Equity: Inclusion of Low-Income Communities Environment: Improve Greenbelt Employment: City Center Resilience: Potential Development

Demographics

3. Although Tucson is mostly dry, its summer monsoons are crucial. Portlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rainy winters also provide it with the necessity to develop an efficient stormwater management infrastructure.

Social Environment - Make complete neighborhoods in underserved communities by bringing necessary greenways and resources.

Economic Environment - Foster an employment growth, competitiveness and equitable prosperity by investing in its industrial districts.

35


CURITIBA, BRAZIL Curitiba Master Plan

The skyline of downtown Curitiba, the city has included a large amount of vegetation into the fabric of the city center.1

36


Curitiba Rapid Bus Transit Map

City Population Est. 1.752 Million Residents (2010) Road

Bus Routes

Downtown Circulator Express Line Feeder Tourism Regular Route Inter Neighborhood Direct Line

Demographics African American: 3% White: 79% Asian: 1% Multiracial: 17% Female: 52% Male: 48%

Natural Environment Bus Routes 2 Downtown Express Feeder Tourism Regular Neighborhood Direct

Curitiba BRT

200

million kg(s) of CO2

160

126

80 70 40

47

0 2014

Built Environment - Separate spaces for modes of transit - Decrease vehicle congestion to speed up travel time and reduce inefficiency

Carbon Reduction

120

- Lower vehicle emissions - Increase green space in order to increase carbon offset

2030

2050

Curitibaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bus Rapid Transit system utilizes separate lanes for bus travel that allows extensive bus routes to navigate the city, unhindered by other traffic. This allows the bus to function as a light-rail would in many ways, making it more accessible and appealing to the people of the city as well as tourists. The BRT system has been so successful for Curitiba that many of its residents do not own their own cars.

Social Environment - Creating opportunities for equal access to transportation - Introducing programs such as trading in trash for bus tickets

Economic Environment - Keep transit cheap for citizens as well as visiting tourists - Increase the usability of public transit

The projected decrease in carbon as the city switches to renewable energy vehicles 3

37


LAS VEGAS, NV Vision 2045

Las Vegas Strip depicting water use and nightlife. 1

38


ighways

The Path to Carbon Neutrality 35

City Population Est. 632,916 Residents (2016) 3

C02 Emissions per Year (mTons)

30

Demographics

25 20 15

Emissions by Scope

10

Scope 1 Scope 2 Scope 3

5 0

2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020

Las Vegas Current and Projected Carbon Emissions in Million Metric Tons CO2e. 2

Las Vegas is especially committed to reducing CO2 emissions. There are numerous strategies in places for doing so, but they largely revolve around constructing LEED-certified buildings, developing renewable energy sources, and strengthening and emphasizing public transit. 2

Infrastructure

Projected Development

African American: 11.1% White: 62.1% Hispanic: 31.5% Asian: 6.1% American Indian: 0.7% Pacific Islander: 0.6% Female: 50% Male: 50% 3

Natural Environment - Energy is primarily natural gas - Net zero water use by 2045 - 29% recycling efficiency 4

Built Environment - Largely focused on tourism and entertainment - Emphasis on motorized transportation: 74% of commuting area is for cars 4

Social Environment

Map of road waterways throughout Majorand Roads Minor RoadsLas Vegas Highways Minor Roads Major Roads Waterways

Waterways

Development in sf per category 4 Civic + Institutional - 10% (1,185,000sf ) Employment - 19% (2,131,000sf ) Commercial - 11% (1,249,000sf ) Residential - 60% (6,889,500sf )

- Gambling and entertainment have always led growth -Strong emphasis on history and the performing arts 4

Economic Environment - Primarily tourism, gambling, and conventions -Supported by restaurants and retail 4

39


LOS ANGELES, CA pLAn

Downtown Los Angeles with open space and street trees along its highway. 1

40


VANCOUVER, CANADA Renewable City Action Plan

Vancouver is the densest city in Canada but it is also considered as one of the most unaffordable cities. Smaller natural environments like parks counteracts the high rises for user comfort and human proportions.1 42


Parks and Public Transportation

City Population 631,486 Residents (2015)

Demographics

CBD (City Business District) Rapid Bus

46.2% 27.7% 6% 6% 1.6% 1% 11.5%

Male: Female:

49.21% 50.79%

Natural Environment

Diesel or Trolley Bus Skytrain

2

Parks

Potential Density Growth Potential Density Increase based on Population Densities and Proximity to Amenities

European Canadian: Chinese: Southeast Asian: Filipino: Latin America: Black: Other

0

500

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000 m

High - 99.33

Low - 36.33

-Temperate rain forest -Large swamp areas due to poor drainage -Recent changes include sea level rising, frequent heat waves and summer droughts

Built Environment -Most densely populated city in Canada -Focus on economic and social prosperity -Characterized as mixed-used development and high-rise residential

Social Environment -Average age of residents is 39.7 -Public safety with public injection -Help vulnerable and impoverished areas like Downtown East side

Economic Environment

The criteria for potential density was based on current populations and adjacencies to amenities like parks and public transportation.3

-Very unaffordable city -Center for forest products and mining -Port Metro Vancouver is largest and most diverse port in Canada

43


PHOENIX, AZ PlanPHX

Downtown Phoenix with the Superstition Mountains in the background.1

44


The Path to Carbon Neutrality

City Population 1.6 Million (2016)

1,000,000 AKEN: TION T IS SIONS NO AC 05 EM 20 E V O 14% AB

MT CO2e

900,000

Demographics

800,000 2005 BASELINE EMISSIONS: 696,709 MT

700,000

600,000

500,000

ORIGINAL GOAL : 5% BELOW 2005 EMIS SION

2012 EMISSIONS: 7.2% BELOW 2005 EMISSIONS 2015 EMISSIONS: 588,153 MT C02e 15% BELOW 2005 EMISSIONS

2010

2020

2015

S

2025

2030

YEAR

2

In 2015, the City of Phoenix (COP) produced a General Plan called PlanPHX which outlined the sustainable efforts Phoenix achieved from 2005-2015. In 2005, COP projected a 5% decrease from their 2005 baseline emissions. in 2015, they surpassed their goal by 15% and are making efforts to be carbon neutral by 2050.3

African American: White: Hispanic: Asian: Native American: Pacific Islander: Other:

6.6% 45.0% 41.3% 3.3% 1.7% 0.2% 0.1%

Male: Female:

49.8% 50.2%

Natural Environment -Provide a100 year supply of reliable clean drinking water through water conservation programs to over 1.6 million residents.

PreserveHistoricPHX Historic Districts of Downtown Phoenix

Built Environment -New Buildings will implement a “netpositive” energy strategy through adopting Green Building Codes and on-site renewable energy assemblies.

I-17

PHOENIX

Social Environment

PEORIA

GLENDALE

SCOTTSDALE

I-10 TEMPE PHOENIX HISTORIC

CHANDLER

DOWNTOWN I-10

North Central Corridor Medlock Place Historic District Windsor Square Historic District Pierson Place Historic District Saint Francis Neighborhood Melrose-Woodlea Historic District Yaple Park Historic District North Encanto - Flower Circle Campus Vista Historic District Midtown Neighborhood La Hacienda Historic District Country Club Manor Cherry Lynn Historic District Earll Place Historic District Magarita Place Historic District Del Norte Place Historic District Encanto Vista & Encanto Manor

-An investment in trees and urban forests to create better walkable streets and vibrant pedestrian places.

Willo Historic District Ashland Place Historic District East Alvarado Historic District Country Club Park Historic District Coronado Historic District Roosevelt Historic District East Evergreen Historic District Garfield Historic District Oakland & Woodland Phoenix Homesteads The Arcadia Neighborhood

Economic Environment

4

-The Phoenix economy is boosted by high technology manufacturing, bioscience research and advance business services.

A long-term comprehensive plan that provides a vision and structure to guide the Phoenix Historic Preservation Program to further historic preservation efforts for the updated Phoenix General Plan.5 45


SEATTLE, WA Climate Action Plan

Evening view of downtown Seattle showing a festival and downtown nightlife.1

46


Urban Growth Map Seattle,

Seattle Flood Map Washington Washington ClimateSeattle, Action Plan

City Population 3-6 feet

Climate Action Plan

6-9 feet 9-15 feet

Urban Center Urban Village Hub Residential Displacement Risk | Low Opportunity Very Good Transit

Est. 704,352 residents (2016)

Demographics African American: White: Hispanic: Asian: Other:

7.9% 69.5% 6.6% 13.8% 2.2%

Male: Female:

50% 50%

Potential Village Manufacturing Industrial Centers

1

1

Natural Environment 2

3

Seattle’s Climate Action Plan proposes a reduction in transportation CO2 emissions by 97% by 2050 by switching over to electric transportation and bringing in nature back into the city. Furthermore, integrating urban centers and villages will promote shorter travel distances for everyday activities such as grocery shopping, working, and entertainment.

Carbon Mitigation

e) GHG Emissions (Million Tonnes CO

Built Environment -Seattle is expected to grow by 100,000 over the next 20 years -Needs for new land use strategies that include shared transportation and higher density housing.

2030 TARGETS + PROJECTED REDUCTIONS FROM ACTIONS 3.2 3.0 2.8 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0

-Reduce overall waste emission while diverting 70% of waste to recycling and composting -Energy consumption reduced by 90% leading to a carbon neutral city

2008 Baseline

Social Environment 2008 Baseline

-Reduce dependence on built environment while preserving city’s character. -Reduce current issues regarding poverty, homelessness, and public health.

62% * 64% Reduction

2008 Baseline

Reduction

39% 39% Reduction Reduction 82% 79%

Reduction Reduction

2030 Target

97% Reduction

2030 2050 Projected Projected

PASSENGER VEHICLE EMISSIONS

82%

Reduction

91%

Reduction

2030 2030 2050 Target Projected Projected

2030 2030 2050 Target Projected Projected

BUILDING ENERGY EMISSIONS

COMBINED PASSENGER VEHICLE & BLDG ENERGY EMISSIONS

Economic Environment

Nightoftime view of Downtown Night time view Downtown Seattle

-Centralize jobs and homes in urban centers while focusing on public transportation and less on car focused movement. 4

47


4

3 2

Autonomous Drop-Off

Community Bulletin

Water Collection + Biowall

Solar Collection

1

2

3

4

173


1

3

1

Filtering Tank

2

4

Vertical Flow Wetlands

3

Open Aerobic Reactor

4

Tidal Wetland

205


LUMBIN

G

R

“Watch near the riverbanks for the Desert Tortoise, rarely seen in Tucson!

01 .

P L A U D

D RIVE

02 .

OR E T S E R

“Mostly sunny today. Solar collection should be at 92% efficiency.”

1 - Exercise

Physical activity along the riverbank promotes a healthy society

social benefits

1 - Community Living social benefits

A housing complex creates a network of similar individuals

2 - Energy Production

Photovoltaic cells capture energy and charge a microgrid battery

2 - Riparian Zone

Lush flora and fauna are supported by the river

3 - Historic Restoration

Constant river flow pays respect to Tucson’s original cause of settlement

3 - Water Collection

Rainwater is stored in a potable water cistern for later use 1 mi.

9 am

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF

sen

6 am

2 mi.

r io

citizen

12 pm 3m

i.


03. WA

TE R

B HU

. COOLING 04

P S OD

“This facility has recycled 4,372 gallons of water today. Thanks for your help!”

“High temperature notice: Avoid direct sun and stick to vegetated areas.“

1 - Utility Reuse social benefits

Blackwater is recycled into grey water at hubs throughout the city

1 - Social Gathering

Cool spots in the park promote visitor interaction

2 - Food Production

social benefits

Nutrient-rich blackwater supports fruit-bearing vegetation

3 - Pedestrian Safety

Thick vegetation creates a comfortable microclimate for pedestrians

2 - Heat Mitigation

Evaporative cooling prevents overheating

3 - Refuge

A safe place is easily accessible by emergency staff

3 pm 300

ft.

3/4

mi.

9 pm

6 pm MAP


6 SUBDISTRICTS 2050


MERCADO SUBDISTRICT 2050


MASTER PLAN MERCADO SUBDISTRICT The Mercado District serves as the end cap of Tucsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban center, transitioning from greater scale and density closer to downtown towards smaller scale and density further away from downtown. This creates a stratification from east to west, wherein the banks of the Santa Cruz River to the east are home to larger scale housing and businesses, as is the central area of the district. As you move further west, the area is characterized by medium density mixed use buildings before transitioning to a small scale residential neighborhood. The district is intersected perpendicularly by pedestrian only corridors that allow for separation from the northsouth roads that facilitate public transportation and autonomous vehicle traffic.

Downtown Tucson Sub-District Boundary Waterways Building footprint Energy-Water Hub Nexus Green Infrastructure Open Space Pedestrian Only Corridors Protected Bike and Pedestrian Path

212


213


2030

2015

PATTERNS + TRENDS Land Use 14%

35%

6%

21%

24%

1%

28%

8%

6%

3%

1%

2050

25%

1%

20%

6%

4%

2%

1%

67%

214


Resource Demand

45

100

30

50

15

2030

300

100

200

50

100

2050

2015

15

6

10

3

5

2030

2050

Million lbs

9

2015

2050

Waste Use by Year

Gallons per ft2

Million Gallons

Water Use by Year

2030

90

30

60

20

30

10

2015

2030

lbs per ft2

2015

150

kWh per ft2

150

Million kWh

Energy Use by Year

lbs CO2 per ft2

Million lbs CO2

Carbon Use by Year

2050

Key Carbon in Million lbs CO2

Carbon in lbs CO2 per ft2

Energy in Million kWh

Energy in kWh per ft2

Water in Million Gallons

Water in Gallons per ft2

Waste in Million lbs

Waste in lbs ft2

215


VISUALIZATIONS LOW DENSITY NEIGHBORHOOD

Equity Auxiliary homes will provide affordable housing options for diverse social and economic classes. Community gardens and open backyards will encourage a sense integration and cohesiveness within small scale neighborhoods.

Sustainability Smaller historic single family homes will be retrofitted with modern solar voltaics and rainwater collection systems. Grey water will be utilized for the growth of produce, which may also be sold at local farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets by the community.

216


VISUALIZATIONS MEDIUM DENSITY NEIGHBORHOOD

Accessibility The integration of protected bicycle lanes and autonomous vehicle hubs will encourage residents to visit urban centers by providing easy access to a variety of places to work, eat, and shop. Walkability and pedestrian friendliness will increase through the reduction of motorized vehicle traffic.

Prosperity The growth of small local businesses will be encouraged and incentivized along mixed-use economic corridors such as Cushing St. to create successfully commercial, but not large corporate driven, urban centers. Offices and apartments will be located on upper levels.

218


VISUALIZATIONS HIGH DENSITY NEIGHBORHOOD

Identity The intersection of Congress St. and Avenida del Convento serves as the gateway to the Mercado District, where the Mercado San Agustin is displayed front and center. Surrounding buildings will follow the Mercado San Agustinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead in being home to a variety of uses.

Adaptability Density around the Mercado San Agustin will be increased, including the expansion of services and amenities, to create a neighborhood with easy access to daily activities and a sense of community and social well-being.

220


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

A - Protected Bike Path B - Alley Market Bike lanes are protected by either bollards or landscape buffers.

Flexible vendor spaces are used for local markets.

C - Mixed-Use

D - Solar Panels

Integrated residential and commercial uses increase accessibility to services.

Solar voltaics on roofs produce local clean electricity.

222

E - Courtyard

F - Water Cistern

Buildings are arranged to enclose public spaces for gathering.

Rooftop water collection directs water to storage tanks.


Multi-Modal Intersection Pedestrian ways, bike paths, and streetcar tracks intersect to provide many means of transportation.

223


CONGRESS SUBDISTRICT 2050


MASTER PLAN CONGRESS The Congress district of Downtown Tucson serves as the birth place of Tucsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown. Locations such as The Congress Hotel, Fox Theatre, and the Rialto Theatre, brought people from across the nation into Tucson causing a chain reaction that led to present day downtown. With that being said, we honored the history present in the congress subdistrict by preserving historic facades and keeping the human scale along the street as undisturbed as possible. This is accomplished through increased density that is offset from the street and buffered with the typical two story street-front building typology. Restoring Congress Street to a pedestrian only corridor will bring the subdistrict into a more walkable era of downtowns. Downtown Tucson Sub-District Boundary Waterways Building footprint Energy-Water Hub Nexus Green Infrastructure Open Space Pedestrian Only Corridors Protected Bike and Pedestrian Path

244


245


2015

PATTERNS + TRENDS Land Use 3%

19%

29%

9%

10%

24%

2030

6%

8%

22%

25%

13%

6%

17%

2050

9%

11%

26%

23%

19%

5%

9%

7%

246


Resource Demand

30

600

20

300

10

2030

900

300

600

150

300

2050

2015

450

6

300

3

150

2030

2050

Million lbs

9

2015

2050

Waste Use by Year

Gallons per ft2

Million Gallons

Water Use by Year

2030

150

300

100

200

50

100

2015

2030

lbs per ft2

2015

450

kWh per ft2

900

Million kWh

Energy Use by Year

lbs CO2 per ft2

Million lbs CO2

Carbon Use by Year

2050

Key Carbon in Million lbs CO2

Carbon in lbs CO2 per ft2

Energy in Million kWh

Energy in kWh per ft2

Water in Million Gallons

Water in Gallons per ft2

Waste in Million lbs

Waste in lbs ft2

247


VISUALIZATIONS Rialto Block

Identity Throughout the time-line of Tucson, the Rialto block has served as the nexus of activity of downtown. By preserving the structural integrity, scale, and historical character, the Rialto block will maintain itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural significance while incorporating technological advances.

Prosperity With historical preservation and adaptive re-use, the Rialto block will continue to thrive and provide space for local businesses, large scale economies, entertainment, and cuisine.

248


VISUALIZATIONS Shade Structure

Sustainability The framing of the shade structure will carry renewable energy sources that will power the urban block. In addition, it will shade the historic buildings that are being adaptively reused.

Accessibility The pedestrian corridor running through the main access of the congress subdistrict acts as an accessible route connecting neighboring districts.

250


VISUALIZATIONS Urban Park

Adaptability Green infrastructure within the urban core of downtown will promote the usage of sustainable practices through a delineation of hard materials that will otherwise contribute to heat island leading the downtown area into a more adaptable environment in the future.

Equity Public open space becomes a necessity that will need to be incorporated into the urban fabric of downtown Tucson as density increases. The adjacency to large and small scale economies will promote a diverse demographic in a public space.

252


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

A - Green Economy

B - Mixed Use Hotel

Adaptively reusing parking structures to provide local agriculture and local economy.

Large scale economy providing office, retail, and residential spaces within the same footprint.

C - Cultural Alley

D - Shade Canopy

Linking the historic and modern components of Tucson with a dynamic space.

Historic preservation that also allows for solar harvesting.

254

E - Road Infiltration

F - Rooftop Garden

Roadway that filters storm-water through semi permeable surfaces.

Residential Tower with rooftop garden for local produce.


Congress Street Share Congress Street is closed to vehicular traffic providing a pedestrian and bicycle friendly transport through the heart of the congress district.

255


7 CITATIONS


CITATIONS WASHINGTON, DC

AUSTIN, TX

1. Robledo, E. (2016, December 30). United States Capitol (Photograph). 2. Department of Energy & Environment. (2016, December 21). Greenhouse Gas Inventories. Retrieved from https://doee.dc.gov/ service/greenhouse-gas-inventories 3. Gray, V. C. (2013, February 20). Sustainable D.C. (Office of the Mayor, District of Columbia). Retrieved from http://www. sustainabledc.org/ 4. Ibid. 5. United States Census Bureau. (2017, July 1). Quick Facts: District of Columbia. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/ DC 6. Sustainable D.C.

1. Rabe, S. (2010, December 12). Austin, TX: View of Austin from the South Side of the River (Photograph). 2. Department of Sustainability (2015, June 10). Net-zero: Austin Community Climate Plan. Retrieved from http://austintexas. gov/sites/default/files/files/Sustainability/FINAL_-_OOS_ AustinClimatePlan_061015.pdf 3. Department of Sustainability (2017, January 27). Austin Community Climate Plan. Retrieved from https://austintexas.gov/ sites/default/files/files/Sustainability/Climate/ACCP_summary_ final_012717.pdf 4. Department of Sustainability (2015, June 10) 5. City-data. (2016, March 11). Races in Austin, TX. Retrived from http://www.city-data.com/city/Austin-Texas.html 6. Department of Sustainability (2015, June 10)

COPENHAGEN, DK NEW YORK CITY, NY 1. Peter, J. (2014, August 2). Copenhagen (Photograph). 2. Baykal, A., & Jensen, F. (2012, September). CPH 2025: Climate Plan. (Office of the Mayor, Copenhagen). Retrieved from kk.sites. itera.dk/apps/kk_pub2/pdf/983_jkP0ekKMyD.pdf 3. Cycling Embassy of Denmark. (2011, February 2). Cycle Super Highways in the Greater Copenhagen Area. Retrieved from http:// www.cycling-embassy.dk/2011/02/02/super-cycle-highways-ingreater-copenhagen-area-2/ 4. Gerdes, J. (2013, April 11). Copenhagen’s Ambitious Push to be Carbon Neutral by 2025. Retrieved from https://e360.yale.edu/ features/copenhagens_ambitious_push_to_be_carbon_neutral_ by_2025 5. Larsen, D. (2018, January). Population in Denmark. Retrieved from https://www.dst.dk/en/Statistik/emner/befolkning-og-valg/ befolkning-og-befolkningsfremskrivning/folketal 6. Copenhagen’s Ambitious Push to be Carbon Neutral by 2025.

260

1. http://euromentravel.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ manhattan-times-square.jpg 2. De Blasio, Bill. New York City’s Roadmap to 80x50. PDF. New York: 80x50, September 2017. 3. “New York City Population 2018.” New York City Population 2018 (Demographics, Maps, Graphs), World Population Review,20 Oct. 2017, worldpopulationreview.com/us-cities/newyorkcity-population/. PORTLAND, OR 1. 4th Year Option Design Studio. (2017, May). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict. Retrieved from https://issuu.com/ universityofarizonaschoolofarchitec/docs/451a_fixed_book_ final__spreads 2. Maciek Lulko, Portland cityscape, Oregon. 2015. Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/lulek/23865613266/ 3. Portland Water Bureau. (2014, 2015). Carbon Footprint Report. Retrieved March 14, 2018, from https://www.portlandoregon. gov/water/article/579534


4. City of Portland, Oregon. (2016, December). 2035 Comprehensive Plan. Retrieved March 14, 2018, from https:// www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/2035-comp-plan.pdf 5. Portland, OR. (n.d.). Retrieved March 14, 2018, from https:// datausa.io/profile/geo/portland-or/

2. pLAn, Sustainability City. “Sustainable City pLAn 2nd Annual Report.” Los Angeles Sustainable City pLAn. March 02, 2017. Accessed January 24, 2018. http://plan.lamayor.org/. 3. “Census profile: Los Angeles, CA.” Census Reporter. Accessed January 24, 2018. https://censusreporter.org/ profiles/16000US0644000-los-angeles-ca/.

CURITIBA, BR VANCOUVER, BC 1. Curitiba - Urban Agriculture in Curitiba [Photograph found in C40 Cities]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.c40.org/ awards/2016-awards/profiles/109 2. Broadus , V. (2010, June 10). Keepin’ Up with Curitiba. Retrieved March 12, 2018, from http://thecityfix.com/blog/keepin-upwithcuritiba/ 3. Economist Intelligence Unit. “Latin American Green City Index.” Www.siemens.com. https://www.siemens.com/global/en/home. html.

1. Retrieved from http://www.nordostpassage.at/wp-content/ uploads/2017/11/kanada_9.jpg 2. Retrieved from http://ibis.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geob479/ classof08/vandensify/maps/mini-1ad-proxparks.jpg and http:// ibis.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geob479/classof08/vandensify/maps/ mini-1c-transitcbd.jpg 3. Retrieved from http://ibis.geog.ubc.ca/courses/geob479/ classof08/vandensify/maps/mini-3b-mceammpoprla.jpg

LAS VEGAS, NV

PHOENIX, AZ

1. “Las Vegas Night View.” Allen McGregor. May 5, 2011. Accessed 12 March 2018. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ allenmcgregor/5698174038/ 2. Stephen, H., & Hoyuela-Alcaraz, E. (2014). Clark County Regional Emissions Inventory (Rep.). Las Vegas, NV: Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition. 3. Las Vegas Population 2018. (n.d.). Accessed January 24, 2018, from http://worldpopulationreview.com/us-cities/las-vegaspopulation/ 4. Vision 2045: Downtown Las Vegas Masterplan. (2016). Las Vegas, NV: City of Las Vegas.

1. Sunshine Experts. The Neighborhood of Phoenix. Website designed by Portis, James. http://www.sunshineexperts/phoenixarizona/. Accessed February 2018 2. 2015 City of Phoenix Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions Summary Report. :Measuring Emissions: Where are we Headed?”. July 2016. Prepared by the ASU Walton Sustainability Solutions Initiatives. Page 5. 3. City of Phoenix Sustainability Report 2015-16. Office of Sustainability. phoenix.gov/sustainability. 4. Residential Districts: Phoenix Historic Property Register. Prepared by the City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Office. June 2007. PDF Map accessed at https://www.phoenix.gov/pdd/historic/ historicmaps/historic-preservation-residential-districts. 5. 8.(5.) City of Phoenix Historic Preservation Office. Residential Districts - Phoenix Historic Property Register. PDF Map provided by City of Phoenix Preservation Office. June 2007

LOS ANGELES, CA 1. “Los Angeles skyline and San Gabriel mountains.” Navid Serrano. December 10, 2007. Accessed March 12, 2018. https://upload. wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/57/LA_Skyline_ Mountains2.jpg

261


CITATIONS SEATTLE, WA 1. Retrieved from http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-K0Ds5AfjUfM/ VW9ZwRVAMLI/AAAAAAAAAD4/3biKSxmCMOg/ s1600/2962220455_f1411f7ebb_o.jpg 2. Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development. (1994). Comprehensive Plan. Retrieved from http://www.seattle.gov/ opcd/ongoing-initiatives/comprehensive-plan 3. Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development. (1994). Comprehensive Plan. Retrieved from http://www.seattle.gov/ opcd/ongoing-initiatives/comprehensive-plan 4. Seattle Office of Sustainability & Environment. (2013, June). Climate Action Plan. Retrieved from http://www.seattle.gov/ environment/climate-change/climate-planning/climate-actionplan QUESTION 1 1. 4th Year Option Design Studio. (2017, May). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict. Retrieved from https://issuu.com/ universityofarizonaschoolofarchitec/docs/451a_fixed_book_ final__spreads 2. Labriola, N. (2013, January 13). Cheyney House (Photograph). 3. Presidio San Agustin del Tucson Museum. (2014, July 5). Tucson’s Presidio District. Retrieved from https://tucsonpresidio.com/ About (2014, July 5). Tucson’s Presidio District. Retrieved from https://tucsonpresidio.com/About 4. Wuelpern, T. (2014, July 2). The Mercado District (Photograph). 5. Moule, E., & Polyzoides, S. (2012, May 16). Mercado District, Rio Nuevo. Retrieved from https://www.mparchitects.com/site/ projects/mercado-district-rio-nuevo 6. Cyprus Civil Development. (2015, July 3). One East Tucson (Photograph). 7. Presidio Tucson. (2015, May 28). One East Tucson. Retrieved from https://www.oneeasttucson.com 8. 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict. 9. Tovar, K. (2015, July 24). Mercado San Agustin (Photograph). 10. Mercado District, Rio Nuevo.

262

11. Yetman, Emily. (2015, September 15). Tucson Convention Center (Photograph). 12. O’Brien, W. P., Ph.D. (2015, May). Strategies for Stewardship: The Tucson Convention Center (TCC) Landscape. Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/sites/default/files/projects/PLN%20 564%20Eckbo%20Landscape%20Final_6_3_2015.pdf 13. Hannley, P. (2014, February 18), Ronstadt Transit Center (Photograph). 14. Sun Tran. (2007, January 27). History: About the Sun Tran. Retrieved from http://www.suntran.com/about_history.php 15. City of Tucson. (2017, November 2). Comprehensive Residential Rehabilitation Programs. Retrieved from https://www.tucsonaz. gov/hcd/comprehensive-residential-rehabilitation-programs 16. City of Tucson Department of Transportation. (2017, February 22). Bicycle Boulevard Master Plan. Retrieved from http://www. cgne-tucson.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Tucson-BicycleBoulevard-Master-Plan-February-2017.pdf 17. City of Tucson. (2013, November 13). Plan Tucson: City of Tucson General & Sustainability Plan 2013. Retrieved from https://www.tucsonaz.gov/pdsd/plan-tucson QUESTION 2 1. College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture. (2017, May).2050 Tucson Eco District (4th Year Option Design Studio). Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/sites/default/ files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20FINAL_%20reduced.pdf 2. Ibid. 3. Southern Arizona Guide (2018). Southern Arizona Transportation Museum (Photograph). Retrieved from https://southernarizonaguide.com/southern-arizonatransportationmuseum/ 4. Southern Arizona Transportation Museum (2014). At the Depot. Retrieved from http://tucsonhistoricdepot.org/?page_id=16. 5. Frank, B. (2016, August 22). The Historic Rialto Theatre on Congress (Photograph). Retrieved from http://santafetravelers. com/our-travels/things-to-do-in-tucson/ 6. The Rialto Theatre (2015). Rialto: A History. Retrieved from https://www.rialtotheatre.com/history/


7. Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block(Photograph). 8. Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block. Mission History. Retrieved from https://tucsonmuseumofart.org/mission-history/ 9. City of Tucson (2013, November 13). Plan Tucson. Retrived from https://www.tucsonaz.gov/pdsd/plan-tucson. 10. 4th Year Option Design Studio. 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict. Tucson, AZ: UA College of Architecture, Planning,and Landscape Architecture, 2017. 11. Bouley, R. (n.d.). El Rio Community Health Center Exterior [Photograph found in Tucson]. Retrieved from https:// mylocalnews.us/arizona/wp-content/uploads/sites/50/2017/09/ ElRioExterior081314.jpg (Originally photographed 2017,September) 12. Bouley, R. (2016, December 10). El Rio Begins Construction on New Cherrybell Community Health Center. Retrieved February13, 2018, from https://mylocalnews.us/ arizona/2016/12/el-riobegins-construction-on-new-cherrybellcommunity-health-center/ 13. http://www.esbdesignbuild.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/ pima-county-WIC-landscape-1024x768.jpg 14. Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program. (n.d.). Retrieved February 13, 2018, from https://webcms.pima.gov/health/ preventive_health/women_infants_and_child_program/ 15. Valencia, C. (n.d.). Lohse Family YMCA [Photograph found in Tucson]. Retrieved from http://s3.amazonaws. com/media.azw/28018_n4816ymcacarmenvalenciargbp.jpg (Originallyphotographed 2016, April 9) 16. Medina, A. (n.d.). Lohse Family YMCA, YMCA of Southern Arizona. Retrieved February 13, 2018, from https://tucsonymca. org/location/lohse-family-ymca/

QUESTION 3 1.

2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8. 9.

College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture4th ear Option Design Studio. (2017). 2050 Downtown TucsonEcoDistrict. Retrieved February 2018, from http://capla. arizona.edu/sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20 FINAL_%20reduced.pdf Hooves & Rails [Photograph found in Tucson]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://parentseyes.arizona.edu/hooves/preface.html The Ronstadt Transit Center. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www. doney.net/aroundaz/celebrity/ronstadt_linda.htm Bell, J. (n.d.). Tucson, Arizona: Old Pueblo Trolley [Photograph found in Tucson]. Retrieved from http://www.jtbell.net/transit/ Tucson/OPT/ (Originally photographed 2006, July 8) College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture 4th ear Option Design Studio. (2017). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict. Retrieved February 2018, from http://capla.arizona. edu/sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20 FINAL_%20reduced.pdf Moroder, Matthew (October 2012) Retrived from: https:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Navajo_Generating_Station_ from_the_south.JPG Ideler, Matthew (n.d.) Retrieved from: http://www.powermag. com/springerville-generating-station-earns-prbcug-2014-honors/ Tucson Electric Power (n.d.) Retrieved from: https://techparks. arizona.edu/advancing-potential-solar-power Mathers Museum of World Cultures ( July 21, 2012) Arizona, US. Hopi Tewa Pot. Retrieved from:https://www.flickr.com/ photos/mathers_museum/15738594221/in/photolist-pYLpJMaU1Mj8-cXvxVf-cZhNXq-d5x2rW-cYkApf-d6JCH7-d7MQVUd6JCqucZhNCN-d8n1Lh-cWorjq-cWoqZh-cZhMAL-d5x35daSyP3rcZhN4u-cYkAVw-d7MQKs-cYBJcS-cYkAG1-4ddAKw51SyGqaSyPjD-d6Tf2q-d6JC9d-d3YxXA-d3YxEJ-d5x2mmd4Giisd5x2Kb-d4Gi69-d5x3c1-cYBK8L-d7MQtG-cYBJSmcXvy79-cXvxJC-d8n13Y-d6bnid-aE6TVz-d3YxNQ-7adt9g4YKEYc-HxcyEx-aE6TFD-d6T7cY-cqU8Bm-6nn4Ko-7djCa6

263


CITATIONS QUESTION 4 1. “Santa Cruz River Sahuarita Arizona 2014”. Wikimedia Commons. March 2, 2014. Accessed March 12, 2018. https:// upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/ff/Santa_ Cruz_River_Sahuarita_Arizona_2014.jpg/640px-Santa_Cruz_ River_Sahuarita_Arizona_2014.jpg 2. History of Water Management in Arizona. (2014, March 27). Accessed January 24, 2018, from http://www.azwater.gov/azdwr/ watermanagement/History/History_of_Water_Management_in_ Arizona7.htm 3. “Map of Colorado River Basin Watershed.” Karl Musser. August 3, 2005. Accessed March 12, 2018. https://upload.wikimedia.org/ wikipedia/commons/f/f6/Colorado_watershed.png 4. “El Presidio Park, near Pima County Courthouse, Tucson, Arizona.” Ken Lund. April 11, 2009. Accessed March 12, 2018. https://www.flickr.com/photos/kenlund/3442823621 5. City of Tucson. (n.d.). Xeriscape Landscaping and Screening Regulations - Ordinance 7522. Retrieved January 24, 2018, from https://www.tucsonaz.gov/water/ord-7522 6. “Veinte De Agosto Park.” Visit Tucson. Accessed March 12, 2018. https://www.visittucson.org/business/veinte-de-agostopark?clientid=23121. 7. Reynaert, E. (2018, February 28). Veinte De Agosto Park [Photograph]. 8. “Tucson Convention Center.” Tucson Convention Center | The Cultural Landscape Foundation. Accessed March 12, 2018. https://tclf.org/landscapes/tucson-convention-center. 9. Reynaert, E. (2018, February 28). Tucson Convention Center Plaza [Photograph]. 10. About. (n.d.). Accessed March 12, 2018, from http:// mercadosanagustin.com/about/ 11. Reynaert, E. (2018, February 28). Mercado San Agustin [Photograph]. 12. College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture pg. 63(May 2017). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict (4th Year Option Design Studio). Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/ sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20FINAL_%20

264

reduced.pdf 13. U. (n.d.). CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator(pp. 1-34, Rep.). U.S. Forest Service. doi:https://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/capandtrade/ protocols/forest%20old/ctcc.pdf 14. The University of Arizona Campus Arboretum Tree Benefits Assessment(pp. 1-9, Rep.). (2012). Tucson, AZ: The University of Arizona Campus Arboretum. doi:https://arboretum.arizona. edu/sites/arboretum.arizona.edu/files/2012%20Campus%20 Arboretum%20Tree%20Benefits%20Assessment%20Web_1.pdf QUESTION 5 1. College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture pg. 123(2017, May). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict (4th Year Option Design Studio). Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/ sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20FINAL_%20 reduced.pdf 2. AC Hotel. Tucson, Arizona. Retrieved from https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/e3kJDP180DGJ2sxmDqLshNCuhL7SJSo-hL35qwBZQeBpA4zTDOE nWWbBGXwOf VwNOCE4aew=s132 3. Tucson Electric Power (TEP). Tucson, Arizona. Retrieved from https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ jdZCFkE1c0IDlCWcyPQlf WH_lHAM6Sq-kpA7XYKv2ngND AM2PnZsh5Np0A6twiN5Ewbu=s121 4. National Bank of America. Tucson, Arizona. Retrieved from https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/mg_bocJWohvsEzQH-eGH mzMxrDFAeKBikTTFwzYfEc5OS8PDxp1psGzUEav4zzVdJg PS_g=s152 5. College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture pg. 103 (2017, May). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict (4th Year Option Design Studio). Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/ sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20FINAL_%20 reduced.pdf 6. Hotel Congress. Something Blue Photography. Accessed February 2018. http://www.somethingbluephotography.net/ 7. Parmenter, Kai. Rialto Theater. October 2015. Accessed February 2018. https://www.downtowntucson.org/2015/10/century-


making-brief-history-tucsons-historic-rialto-theatre/ 8. Motorrad-67. Pima_County_Courthouse.jpg. 2008. Accessed February 2018. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pima_ County_Courthouse.jpg 9. College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture pg. 63(2017, May). 2050 Downtown Tucson EcoDistrict (4th Year Option Design Studio). Retrieved from http://capla.arizona.edu/ sites/default/files/faculty_papers/451A_BOOK%20FINAL_%20 reduced.pdf 10. Southern Pacific Depot, Tucson, Arizona early 1900s. Retrieved from http://www.familyoldphotos.com/image/view/1423/_ original 11. History of Hotel Congress. Retrieved from http://hotelcongress. com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/congress_1909.jpg 12. History of Hotel Congress. Rialto Theatre. Retrieved from http:// hotelcongress.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/congress_1909. jpg

265


266


University of Arizona College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Architecture 451A Spring 2018 Design Studio Professor: Courtney Crosson Graphics Team: Daniel Badillo Jeremy Goodman Nan Liang Eric Reynaert Evan Robledo Data Team: Madison Neperud Jason Sciarrotta Ben Stewart Model Team: Tycien Chaney Zach Peters Thomas Yazzie

267


Daniel Badillo Tycien Chaney Courtney Crosson Jeremy Goodman Nan Liang Madison Neperud Zach Peters Eric Reynaert Evan Robledo Jason Sciarrotta Ben Stewart Thomas Yazzie

Tucson2050  

What will our city look like in the year 2050? This book offers a vision for Downtown Tucson as a growing, thriving, livable community in 2...

Tucson2050  

What will our city look like in the year 2050? This book offers a vision for Downtown Tucson as a growing, thriving, livable community in 2...

Advertisement