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Graphene @ Manchester

Portfolio of resources and activities A WORLD-LEADING INNOVATION ECO-SYSTEM AT THE HEART OF MANCHESTER, THE HOME OF GRAPHENE


Graphene @ Manchester

A guide to how The University of Manchester is exploiting the potential of graphene to transform technologies


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he University of Manchester is the home of graphene, a material that has captured the imagination of the world.

Graphene@Manchester is an on-going programme of activity to ensure that Manchester and the UK play a leading international role in developing the revolutionary potential of graphene. We are creating a critical mass of graphene expertise made up of scientists, manufacturers, engineers, innovators, investors and industrialists to build a thriving knowledge-based economy. At the heart of our vision are the National Graphene Institute and the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre, multi-million pound facilities with a commitment to fostering strong industry-academic collaborations. Graphene@Manchester is home to an unrivalled breadth of expertise across 30 academic groups. This expertise gives us the ability to take graphene applications from basic research to finished product.

Taking graphene from the lab to real-world solutions


Graphene @ Manchester

Structure Five key, integrated areas that work together to translate fundamental research into commercial applications

MARKETPLACE

INDUSTRIAL PARTNERS

Graphene NOWNANO CDT

National Graphene Institute

Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre

Centre for Doctoral Training

Academic led research in collaboration with industry

Industry led application development


All activities fully integrate with each other and can be accessed to best suit the needs of individual projects and partnerships. Graphene@Manchester is open to collaboration on activities ranging from fundamental research and innovation to IP, prototyping and product development.

UMIP

Graphene Enabled Systems

Intellectual Property commercialisation

Bridging the gap between industry and graphene’s remarkable properties


Graphene @ Manchester

Investment Graphene@Manchester includes a wide range of diciplines (from physics to materials science, chemistry to biomedicine) and benefits from a high level of investment across all areas of activity: research, infastructure, applications, people, and facilities.


KEY METRICS

300 OVER

£195m INVESTMENT IN GRAPHENE ACTIVITIES

16,000 SQUARE METRES OF STATE OF THE ART FACILITIES

PEOPLE WORKING ON GRAPHENE AND 2D MATERIALS

90 OVER

INDUSTRIAL PARTNERS TO DATE


Graphene @ Manchester

Capabilities

Composites One of the simplest and most effective ways of harnessing graphene’s potential is to combine it with existing materials so called composite materials. Potential applications include: graphene-enhanced composites for the construction, aerospace and transport sectors. Our composite laboratories allow for the development of injection moulding and composite processing as well as the processing of polymer based and metal matrix composites.

Membranes Graphene is capable of forming a perfect barrier when dealing with liquids and gasses. This makes it an ideal material for applications such as water filtration, gas separation and desalination. Potential applications include: water filtration, gas separation, desalination and food packaging. Our membrane facilities provide the ability to characterise membrane materials and allows for the scale up of graphene and hollow fibre membranes.


Formulations and Solutions Current ink formations are far from ideal, either containing toxic solvents or requiring time-consuming, expensive processing. Potential applications include: conductive inks for flexible electronics, antennae and wearables. Our facilities have the ability to produce formulations and solutions for printed electronics and textile applications as well as a printing suite, which provides ink-jet, screen and roll-to-roll printing capability.

Energy Graphene is an ideal material to use in energy and energy storage due to its remarkable conductivity, its high surface area and robust flexibility. Potential applications include: electric vehicles, lightweight batteries and supercapacitors that could fully charge devices in minutes. Our dry room facilities provide the capability to produce pouch and coin cells, supercapacitors and battery applications.

Characterisation There are many different ways to create or isolate graphene. Graphene can exist as tiny flakes, large sheets or in a solution, each form lends itself to unique applications. Our centralised facilities provide the ability to characterise physical, electrical, thermal and optical properties of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.


Graphene @ Manchester

Capabilities

Pilot production Our key objective is to take graphene from its fundamental science to develop future applications. Our pilot hall allows the production of bottom up and top down production of graphene and other 2D materials.

Collaborative space Graphene@Manchester is able to provide dedicated laboratory space for industry partners to tailor to their specific project as well as community laboratory spaces for short-term projects.

Prototyping The prototyping suite provides facilities to build initial prototypes for future applications, with 3D printing and computerised numerical control (CNC) milling machines.


Cleanrooms Our cleanrooms provide over 1500 square metres of ISO standard 5 and 6 processing areas. This facility enables greater reproducibility and yield on nano-fabricated devices for front end research. The cleanrooms provide the facilities to fabricate, measure and and characterise nano-devices.

Electromagnetic capability (EMC) 2D materials have the potential to create the next-generation of electronics: faster transistors; semiconductors; bendable phones and other electronics. Our EMC rooms provide the facilities to reduce electromagnetic frequencies for sensors and low noise electronics.

Furnace and Chemistry The furnace facility provides high quality CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition) growth and annealing capability. The high temperature room supplies many specialised gases for the growth activity in controlled environments. The chemistry facility provides a platform for graphene derivatives to be produced in controlled environments, for membranes, composites and nano-functional materials and processes across many applications.


Graphene @ Manchester

Success stories

Morgan Advanced Materials

Morgan Advanced Materials joined forces with The University of Manchester – where graphene was first isolated a decade ago – to explore the potential of the material, with a full-time team based at the National Graphene Institute (NGI). Morgan was one of the Institute’s first industrial partners. The project’s early work focused on scaling up Manchester’s patented technology to produce graphene. This process sees molecules driven between the layers of a graphite electrode to separate them. Advances in this area enabled greater flexibility of the process, controlling properties such as flake size and thickness while also allowing the inclusion of other attributes, via in-situ functionalisation, to meet precise specifications depending on exact application needs. Dr Mike Murray, Chief Technology Officer of Morgan Advanced Materials, commented: “With its unique combination of properties

- lightweight, chemical inertness, and large surface area- the potential industrial applications of graphene are enormous, but much depends on finding the most viable and cost-effective method of manufacture. “As a global leader in the development and practical application of proprietary materials, Morgan is ideally placed to lead this process in conjunction with the NGI. We have committed a full-time team to be based at the NGI and are delighted with the results to date, which indicate the very real possibility of manufacturing larger graphene layers, able to be adapted for a range of requirements.” James Baker, CEO Graphene@Manchester, added: “We are already seeing great results from this exciting partnership and collaboration between NGI and Morgan Advanced Materials. This demonstrates the benefits of co-locating industry engineering and academic research teams to accelerate the commercialisation of graphene material and its applications.”


inov-8 British sports brand inov-8 partnered with The University of Manchester to become the first-ever company to incorporate graphene into running and fitness shoes. Laboratory tests have shown that the rubber outsoles of these shoes, new to market in 2018, are stronger, more stretchy and more resistant to wear. Commenting on the collaboration and the patent-pending technology, inov-8 CEO Ian Bailey said: “Product innovation is the numberone priority for our brand. It’s the only way we can compete against the major sports brands. The pioneering collaboration between inov-8 and the The University of Manchester puts us – and Britain – at the forefront of a graphene sports footwear revolution. “And this is just the start, as the potential of graphene really is limitless. We are so excited to see where this journey will take us.”

Dr Aravind Vijayaraghavan, Reader in Nanomaterials at The University of Manchester, said: “When added to the rubber used in inov-8’s G-Series shoes, graphene imparts all its properties, including its strength. Our unique formulation makes these outsoles 50% stronger, 50% more stretchy and 50% more resistant to wear than the corresponding industry standard rubber without graphene.” “The graphene-enhanced rubber can flex and grip to all surfaces more effectively, without wearing down quickly, providing reliably strong, long-lasting grip. “This is a revolutionary consumer product that will have a huge impact on the sports footwear market.”


Graphene @ Manchester

Success stories

Richard Mille and McLaren F1 An ultralight high-performance mechanical watch made with graphene was developed and manufactured thanks to a unique collaboration. The University of Manchester collaborated with watchmaking brand Richard Mille and McLaren F1 to create world’s lightest mechanical chronograph by pairing leading graphene research with precision engineering. The RM 50-03 watch was made using a unique composite incorporating graphene to manufacture a strong but lightweight new case to house the delicate watch mechanism. The graphene composite known as Graph TPT™ weighs less than previous similar materials used in watchmaking. Overall the ultralight watch weighs just 40 grams and is extremely durable. Speaking about the

RM 50-03 watch Richard Mille said: “This was an opportunity for us to discover the applications of graphene and to apply it for the case of the watch, a world first premiere. The RM 50-03 represents a new approach to the challenges of lightness underlying our watchmaking philosophy.” James Baker, CEO Graphene@Manchester said: “This collaboration has brought together three leading organisations who strive for excellence and perfection in their fields. “The results from this project have shown exactly why graphene is perfect for delivering improvements where high-performance materials are necessary and is a key step forward into developing more widespread applications including automotive and aerospace.”


Haydale Haydale Graphene Industries, the group focused on enabling technology for the commercialisation of graphene and other nanomaterials based in Loughborough, work closely with the NGI. The partnership leverages each party’s particular expertise in order to seek opportunities to develop and commercialise graphene products and applications. This has seen the NGI utilising the Haydale patented process incorporated in its R&D plasma reactor for research into the functionalisation of graphene and other nanomaterials, led by Professor Ian Kinloch and Professor Robert Young. This has allowed the identification of nanomaterials to enhance performance in composites, sensors, printable inks, super capacitators, rubbers and elastomers. Working in collaboration has created opportunities and funding in the aerospace and automotive markets. Already this co-

operation has seen the development of components for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) demonstrator which has been flown at Farnborough Air Show. The demonstrator is creating interest interest amongst a number of aerospace companies and is a great example of academia and industry working together to create the supply-chain necessary for entry into such a market. Haydale CEO Ray Gibbs said: “Haydale are delighted to be collaborating with the National Graphene Institute and the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre in Manchester which is known as the home of graphene. The NGI has a worldwide profile, which attracts significant industrial interest from across the globe. This collaboration is a further step in our aim at making the UK the centre of excellence for graphene by retaining UK knowledge on graphene as we work towards commercialisation.�


Graphene @ Manchester

Working with us Our world-class expertise and facilities can help businesses develop next generation applications

TO DATE WE HAVE WORKED WITH OVER 90 INDUSTRIAL PARTNERS

BUILDING STRONG RELATIONSHIPS WITH INDUSTRY IS A KEY PART OF REALISING GRAPHENE’S POTENTIAL


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e are keen to partner with companies to make graphene products a reality. Relationships and collaborations with industry are central to Graphene@ Manchester. Some of the world’s biggest and most influential companies are currently working with us on graphene applications. There are many ways you can engage with us and access our expertise, experience and facilities. Our approach is extremely flexible and collaborative. Strong industry/academic partnerships are essential if graphene’s potential is to be translated into real-world solutions. Our innovative Engagement Framework has been developed to best suit bespoke project and partnerships for everyone from multinationals, to SMEs and entrepreneurs with ideas for new products and processes. Options within the Framework include: Industry/research partnerships Project and knowledge transfer partnerships Consultancy and training Tier 1 and Tier 2 partnerships

If you wish to learn more about how you can work with us visit: graphene.manchester.ac.uk


Graphene @ Manchester

National Graphene Institute Outstanding facilities that allow industrial partners and world-class academics to work side by side

1500 SQUARE METRES OF ISO 5 AND 6 CLEANROOM SPACE THE LARGEST ACADEMIC SPACE OF ITS KIND DEDICATED TO GRAPHENE AND 2D MATERIALS RESEARCH

7,825 SQUARE METRE FACILITY: HOME TO STATE-OF-THE-ART CLEANROOMS PLUS LASER, OPTICAL, METROLOGY AND CHEMICAL LABS


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he National Graphene Institute (NGI) is the national centre for graphene research in the UK. Its unrivalled range of facilities allow world-leading academics and their industrial partners to work side-by-side on new and pioneering applications. Industry has a vital role to play in how the world’s first 2D material will be utilised. Research is nothing without development. The NGI adopts a flexible approach to working with companies to encourage collaboration, engagement and fresh thinking. National Graphene Institute collaborative projects include:

Demonstrations of new concepts, applications and fundamental studies

Demonstrating graphene’s potential by producing new concept products and processes

Development of low-cost scalable manufacturing methods for high-quality graphene

Process stabilisation, achieving reproducible quality, high manufacturing yields Graphene standardisation, quality control and health and safety

“The National Graphene Institute is fundamentally important to continue the world-class graphene research started in Manchester. Our researchers and scientists are able to collaborate with colleagues from other universities and from some of the world’s leading companies, which can only serve to enchance scientific research” Sir Kostya Novoselov, Nobel laureate


Graphene @ Manchester

Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre The University’s second pioneering graphene facility

A £60M DEVELOPMENT TO ACCELERATE THE TRANSITION OF GRAPHENE FROM LAB TO MARKETPLACE A KEY COMPONENT OF THE UNIVERSITY’S STRATEGY FOR GRAPHENE@MANCHESER


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he Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) complements the National Graphene Institute’s research focus by concentrating on multi-faceted industry-led application development. The Centre’s key areas of activity will be pilot production, characterisation and material development. Work will be undertaken in partnership with academics and will fill a critical gap in the graphene and 2D materials eco-system. The GEIC’s areas of application development include: Composites Energy Solution formulations and coatings Electronics Membranes Characterisation

This centre’s aim is to accelerate the commercialisation process to real-world applications


UMIP’s role is to bring the University’s ground-breaking innovations into the commercial world. The University of Manchester Intellectual Property (UMIP) is a division of The University of Manchester I3 Ltd (UMI3), the University’s agent for intellectual property commercialisation. UMI3 is wholly owned by the University which has over a 30-year history of IP commercialisation. As a result of the world-leading research at our university, there is potential for numerous innovative processes, materials and products in the 2D materials research field to be invented in our labs across campus. Our job at UMIP is to turn these innovations into a commercial reality through patenting and assisting in the commercial development of these technologies.

UMIP continues strategic development of this IP portfolio and is leveraging these IP assets to drive commercialisation activities that include licensing, industrial partnerships, and spin-out businesses. Currently, UMIP activities are focused around the development of platform spin-outs for certain applications and the licensing of other technologies to companies where this is more appropriate. We are always interested to hear from academic inventors, potential licensees and partners, and interested investors. Please contact us at graphene@umip.com

DESALINATION

ANTICORROSION

NANO-FILTRATION

LIGHTWEIGHT COMPOSITES

MEMBRANES

COATINGS

COMPOSITES

THERMOELECTRIC COMPOSITES

ANTI-FRICTION

PRODUCTION OF 2D MATERIALS

2D INKS

SENSORS

HUMIDITY SENSORS

LOGIC MEMORY DEVICES

WEARABLE ELECTRONICS

ELECTRONICS

PRESSURE SENSORS

ELECTROWETTING SCREENS

FLEXIBLE ELECTRONICS

There are numerous routes that we commercialise our research, and many ways to work with us: LICENSING

Individual licenses for single technologies Multiple license programs e.g. graphene and 2D material production methods

PARTNERING

Some of our most exciting technologies are at an early stage By working together, we can bring these technologies to market more effectively

SPIN-OUT INVESTMENT

Some of our technologies are highly suited to spin out We are looking for investors to enable us to become market leaders of the future


Graphene Enabled Systems is a wholly owned subsidiary of The University of Manchester. Its mission is to create commercially successful spin–outs or joint-venture businesses using graphene and other 2D or nano materials.

Current projects include:

Graphene Enabled identifies markets and applications in which these new materials can enhance product performance and create competitive advantage and, having identified an opportunity capable of generating a spinout or joint-venture with an industrial partner, develops robust business plans and building high-quality product demonstrators.

Graphene Enabled works with sources of investment capital to provide seed funding. The University has also created an investment facility specifically for early stage 2D materials businesses which licence its IP.

www.graphene-enabled.com

Atomic Mechanics Ltd, a new business developing and manufacturing human machine interfaces and sensors Grafine Ltd, a graphene enhanced elastomers technology and process development business Graphene Water Technologies Ltd, a water desalination business which uses a graphene enhanced membrane. GrapheX, a project to design and manufacture energy X ray tubes with low power consumption Laser Graphene Ltd – A business planning to develop and manufacture equipment to direct write conductive graphene circuits onto low temperature materials Collaboration with Rotite Technologies Ltd to lighten and strengthen their patented industrial fastening technology A project to inkjet print graphene materials directly onto textiles The development of a range of new hybrid graphene composites


Graphene @ Manchester Graphene NOWNANO CDT

Graphene NOWNANO Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) is a four-year doctoral training programme leading to the award of a PhD in Nanoscience. Our aim is to train the next generation of scientists who will be able to realise the huge potential of graphene and related 2D materials, driving innovation in the UK, Europe and beyond.

Graphene NOWNANO provides a wide-ranging interdisciplinary PhD programme that teaches students to think and work across traditional discipline boundaries. The close involvement of the medical/life sciences with the physical sciences is an essential feature of the CDT that has been developed from the framework of its predecessor, the North West Nanoscience Doctoral Training Centre (NOWNANO) in partnership with Lancaster University.

www.graphene-nownano.manchester.ac.uk


Graphene City®

Graphene City® is an ambitious vision from The University of Manchester aiming to create a thriving knowledge-based economy around Manchester’s revolutionary 2D material - graphene.

Infrastructure

More than 300 people working on graphene and related 2D materials.

£61m National Graphene Institute (NGI).

£60m Graphene Engineering Innovation Institute (GEIC).

Graphene NOWNANO Centre for Doctoral Training.

£235m Sir Henry Royce Institute for Materials Research and Innovation.

Critical mass We believe graphene’s vast potential will only be realised by creating a critical mass of scientists, manufacturers, engineers, innovators and industrialists. The innovation ecosystem has at its core the National Graphene Institute and the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre. Here we can take a graphene application from fundamental research to finished product.

Manchester was the world’s first modern industrial city, now we want to establish a Graphene City®.

“Graphene City will be a district built around the people who will form the world’s first labour market highly skilled in 2D materials. Large firms will want to locate where they can access skills and world-class collaborators. Start-up companies and SMEs will face lower risks when they know they can recruit the people they need. ” Luke Georghiou, Deputy President and Deputy Vice-Chancellor, The University of Manchester


Graphene @ Manchester


Graphene @ Manchester

The University of Manchester Oxford Road Manchester M13 9PL United Kingdom www.manchester.ac.uk Royal Charter RC000797

National Graphene Institute Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre UMIP Graphene Enabled Systems Graphene NOWNANO CDT www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk graphene@manchester.ac.uk Twitter @UoMGraphene Facebook: /UoMGraphene Youtube: /homeofgraphene

University graphene brochure  

Portfolio of resources and activities

University graphene brochure  

Portfolio of resources and activities