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Spring 2019 | Issue 11 Research and Enterprise Newsletter

The India Centre for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development Deepening and diversifying UK–India relations FEATURE: The effect of diet and health in women during pregnancy in India

FEATURE: The importance and experience of fieldwork

FEATURE: The impacts of climate change on migration across deltas in Asia

FEATURE: The rise of social entrepreneurship and enterprise in India


Introduction

WELCOME TO RE:ACTION I am delighted to introduce this special issue of Re:action focussing on the world-leading research conducted at the University of Southampton that aims to address some of the key challenges faced by India today – ranging from the threat posed by climate change to the delta regions of South Asia that provide much of the food for the sub-continent of India, to addressing the needs and well-being of an older population in the context of rapid urbanisation and global migration.

This issue also celebrates the inception of the new University of Southampton INDIA CENTRE FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, which provides a platform for our research leaders to come together with policy makers and business and industry partners to deliver evidence-based solutions and unlock the opportunities for policy change, inclusive economic growth, technology and sustainable development for India. Over the next decade India will overtake China as the world’s most populous nation, home to one in five people. Its economy is booming but if India, and the world, are to reap the rewards of this then the growth must be sustainable – both in economic and environmental terms, benefiting all of society and lifting millions out of poverty. Working together, the India Centre aims to play a small role in supporting India to achieve its sustainable development goals, changing the world for the better. Please enjoy this issue of Re:action. As always, feedback and ideas for inclusion in future issues is very much appreciated. Best wishes, Professor Jane Falkingham, OBE, FAcSS, FRSA Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences

PLEASE SEND US YOUR FEEDBACK We are keen to receive your feedback about Re:action. If you have any ideas, comments or suggestions, please send them to reaction@southampton.ac.uk

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/ris

IN THIS ISSUE

FEATURE

Delving into Deltas Research into migration across deltas in India.

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Our commitment to be a truly global university The UK’s future in India is bright

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Deepening and diversifying UK–India relations

Population ageing in India

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Mapping India’s population at high resolution

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Bright sparks

Learning to be leaders

FEATURE

Winchester School of Art: The Power of Biennale WSA has established a sustained research relationship with the Kochi-Muziris Biennale.

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Diet for a lifetime

The importance of fieldwork

The University of Southampton’s research on maternal nutrition in India.

Teaching the teachers: the delivery of CPD courses in India

Researching resilience

The India Centre for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development.

FEATURE

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FEATURE

The importance and value of onthe-ground fieldwork should not be underestimated.

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Southampton alumnus, Aniket Singh, launches Internship Program for Indian Students

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Research award highlights 3


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/global-connections

International strategy

OUR COMMITMENT TO BE A TRULY GLOBAL UNIVERSITY Universities in the 21st Century are and will continue to be highly competitive global knowledge-based organisations. At the University of Southampton, internationalisation is one of the four principles that underpin our University’s decadal Simply Better Strategy (2016–2026). To deliver the University Strategy collegially and effectively, and to advance quality and sustainability, is our commitment to internationalise both our education provision and research portfolio, for the benefits of student experience, graduate outcomes and research excellence. Delivering excellence in education and research depends upon universities developing a global perspective and working collegially across disciplines. At the University of Southampton, we pride ourselves to be both truly global and at the forefront of interdisciplinary collaborations.

I see internationalisation at Southampton to be both inter-connected and distributed. It is early days, but we are at the stage of embedding internationalisation by institutional leadership, governance, faculty, students and all academic and professional services. In the coming months and years, we will confirm our commitment through deliberate actions and a structured approach. Internationalisation begins at home. By 2026, our international capability and capacity in people, systems, processes, platforms, programmes and services will be a cut above the rest. Internationalisation at home will enable us to remain relevant, excellent and competitive globally.

To realise our commitment, we have, in recent years, appointed four Pro Vice Chancellors from international engagement, international projects, ASEAN to interdisciplinary research. Every single School at the University has appointed a Director of Internationalisation and every Faculty has an Associate Dean International. The Office of the President and Vice-Chancellor takes the institutional leadership to embed internationalisation very seriously. Concrete actions taken include the creation of a Vice President International role within the University’s decadal Strategy. The University Executive Board Members are committed to ensuring the University is a truly global university and championing the four principles of collegiality, internationalisation, quality and sustainability.

In the 21st Century, no university can claim to be global without engaging with India. India has 17% of the world’s population and its population is on a growth trajectory. Southampton has welcomed scholars and students from India for decades. The launch of the India Centre is our first institutional endeavour to harness the knowledge base at Southampton in order to create meaningful and longstanding partnerships with our collaborators, both existing and new, in India. It is another exciting chapter of internationalisation and we are committed to making our students, staff, communities and partners proud. Winnie Eley Vice President International

“In the 21st Century, no university can claim to be global without engaging with India. India has 17% of the world’s population and its population is on a growth trajectory.” Winnie Eley Vice President International

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For further information, visit: www.orc.soton.ac.uk

Feature

THE UK’S FUTURE IN INDIA IS BRIGHT Sir David Payne talks about his close links with India and how the University of Southampton’s relationship with the country is a bright light for the future. schools, and a new educational infrastructure which is benefiting its vast youth population who have a huge thirst for learning. ‘On so many levels when it comes to research, technology and business India is now equal to, or better than, the UK, such that our relationship has blossomed into one of true reciprocity; there is much we can learn from each other at this stage and my experience is that both countries are very keen to do so. ‘India is emerging as a world leader on many frontiers, particularly in space technology, where work in the country has progressed to a point where we can feel comfortable sending our best talent to gain new access to technology and scientific data, otherwise not available to the UK.’

Sir David Payne, a leading Professor of photonics at the University of Southampton and Director of the Optoelectronics Research Centre and Zepler Institute, is a world class pioneer of technology. His work has dramatically impacted the advance of telecommunications and laser technology over the last forty years. During these four decades, Sir David has made numerous trips to India, building an invaluable network of friendships and working partnerships in photonics research and education. His contribution to the country was recently acknowledged when he was awarded two prestigious foreign fellowships – one from the Indian Academy of Engineering and one from the Indian National Science Academy (INSA) for his ‘pioneering contributions to the world of science and relationship with scientific activities in India’.

The President of INSA, Ajay Kumar Sood, acknowledged Sir David as a ‘person of distinction’ and looked forward to the fellowship ‘bringing a closer relationship of the scientific communities of both our countries.’ Re:action asked Sir David about the key to his success in India, and his thoughts on what the future holds for the special relationship he, and the University of Southampton, has with the country.

Sir David is currently working closely with the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, to form a formal relationship with the University of Southampton. ‘I have found IIT Madras to be a particularly outgoing and entrepreneurial university with distinct strengths in photonics and telecoms – much like Southampton. ‘I have high hopes for what 2019 will bring in terms of working with India. We are already discussing future collaborations, exchange of people, opening access to new technology and looking at common challenges such as manufacturing, healthcare and smart cities’, concludes Sir David.

‘I have seen a vast amount of change in the years I’ve worked with colleagues and contacts in India. Not just in the country itself, and its development, but also in the approach and motivation behind the great working relationship we have with people there. ‘India has one of the fastest growing economies amongst developing nations, with world-renowned universities and engineering

Photonics 2018 Conference Chair Professor Anurag Sharma, Professor Chandrima Shaha, Vice-President INSA and Sir David Payne

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Feature

DEEPENING AND DIVERSIFYING UK—INDIA RELATIONS THE INDIA CENTRE FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

“Together, the UK and India are at the forefront of a global technology revolution. ” Amarjit Singh Special Advisor for India to the University of Southampton

The modern relationship between the UK and India is at a key juncture. Through the University of Southampton’s new India Centre for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development, the University will help deepen and diversify UK–India relations across a variety of industry sectors and spheres. It will contribute to developing and applying new technologies and solutions, fostering new cross border collaborations in health and scientific research, which will enhance our cities and improve the lives of our citizens. In my capacity as Special Advisor for India to the University of Southampton, it has been an honour and pleasure to work with the University’s leadership team, faculty colleagues and International Office to support the University with its India development and engagement strategy, drawing on my expertise, networks and knowledge of the country. Together, the UK and India are at the forefront of a global technology revolution. Growth will

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come from knowledge-intense industries and emerging sectors such as digital technology, life sciences and fintech. The Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has called the links between India and the UK a “living bridge” and rightly so. There are countless personal and professional ties between our two countries, including the estimated 1.5 million Indian Diaspora, active in all walks of life and who act as a cementing factor between our two great nations. As the world’s oldest and largest democracies, the UK and India share a natural fit for delivering real innovation, entrepreneurship, skills and teaching which will inspire the next generation of global leaders and help bring Southampton and India even closer together. Mr Amarjit Singh Special Advisor for India to University of Southampton, an alumnus of the University’s Law School and CEO of India Business Group, a leading advisory consultancy working in the UK, EU and India markets.


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/indiacentre

“I have been deeply impressed with University of Southampton’s multidisciplinary expertise, portfolio of world class research and industry partnerships.” Professor, The Lord Patel of Bradford obe

“I am passionate about promoting cross-border cooperation and collaboration between the UK and India, working with multiple stakeholders, with a view to addressing cross cutting global issues. I have for some time been working with several UK Higher Education institutions in facilitating global educational partnerships, by bringing together key education, industry and Government partners. I have been deeply impressed with University of Southampton’s multi-disciplinary expertise, portfolio of world class research and industry partnerships which are contributing to the betterment of society. In my capacity as an alumnus of the University and patron of the newly established India Centre for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development, I look forward to continue working with dedicated colleagues to enhance the University’s India engagement and wider global impact.” Professor, The Lord Patel of Bradford obe

“The spell and image of a University is felt when one sanguinely interacts with the members of various faculties and is in purposeful conversation with the students.” Dipak Misra Former Chief Justice of India

“The spell and image of a University is felt when one sanguinely interacts with the members of various faculties and is in purposeful conversation with the students. Both the aspects revolve around three concepts – knowledge, interest and enthusiasm. These facets, compositely put in the compartment of intellectual purity and aristocracy, are perceived in promptitude in Southampton University, for the warmth of discussion and width of participation have not only magnetic effect but also establish immediate chemistry. Such was my feeling when I visited the University in September 2018. My talk on ‘Emerging Jurisprudence of Constitutional Ethos and Constitutional Morality’, organised as part of the Southampton-India Distinguished Lecture Series and hosted by the Southampton Law School under the Faculty of Social Sciences, became vibrant not because of the attention I received but because of the discussion that followed. One could visualise the attentiveness of each member of audience and the inquisitive questions put on nuanced scores. The impression is unforgettable.” Dipak Misra Former Chief Justice of India 7


Feature

For the past 25 years Professor Caroline Fall has been working with doctors and researchers in Pune, Mumbai, Mysore, Delhi, Vellore and Hyderabad, studying mothers and children living in a variety of settings, from remote rural communities to some of the largest cities. With her Indian colleagues, she has set up long-term research studies in which the physique, diet and health of women during pregnancy have been recorded, and then the children followed up to monitor their growth, brain development, and early signs of heart disease and diabetes.

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For further information, visit: www.mrc.soton.ac.uk

DIET FOR A LIFETIME The University of Southampton’s research on maternal nutrition in India.

Did you know that your mother’s nutrition and health when you were a fetus growing in her womb influence your health throughout your life? Research in Southampton has linked poor nutrition during early development to important diseases in later life, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease and osteoporosis. To take type 2 diabetes as an example, a man or woman who had a low birth weight, or whose mother had diabetes in pregnancy, is at increased risk of developing the disease. This occurs because good nutrition is essential for the proper development of organs and tissue (such as the liver, pancreas and muscle) which control our metabolism, protect us from diabetes, and after developing in the fetus have to last us a lifetime. Professor Caroline Fall, at the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit has extended this research to India. For the past 25 years she has been working with doctors and researchers in Pune, Mumbai, Mysore, Delhi, Vellore and Hyderabad, studying mothers and children living in a variety of settings, from remote rural communities to some of the largest cities. With her Indian colleagues, she has set up long-term research studies in which the physique, diet and health of women during pregnancy have been recorded, and then the children followed up to monitor their growth, brain development, and early signs of heart disease

and diabetes. The research has shown clear links between poor maternal nutrition and health and all of these outcomes in the children as they mature into adults. Professor Fall is convinced that in order to prevent type 2 diabetes and heart disease, we should be doing as much to improve the diet and health of mothers preparing for pregnancy, in order to build healthier people in the next generation, as we do trying to persuade people in middle age to look after their health by losing weight, taking enough exercise and giving up smoking. She and her Indian colleagues are now taking this research forward by actively intervening to make the diet and health of young women as good as possible before they become pregnant, as well as during pregnancy, and then following up the newborns and children to prove that this intervention benefits their health. Obviously, this type of research takes many years to complete, but the results so far have already convinced the scientific community and health ministers around the world that the ‘first 1,000 days’ (from conception to the age of 2 years after birth) is a vitally important stage of our lives, and worthy of better investment. If our nutrition is not at its best during this time, a long shadow is cast upon our development and health, a situation which is eminently preventable through better care of young women and mothers. 9


Feature

DELVING INTO DELTAS Research into migration across deltas in India.

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For further information, visit: generic.wordpress.soton.ac.uk/deccma

The DEltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration & Adaptation (DECCMA) project has been a five-year programme analysing the impacts of climate change and other environmental drivers on migration across contrasting deltas in Africa and Asia. This extensive £8.2 million, 24 institution project has undertaken research into deltas that is vital since they are home to 500 million people worldwide and represent a climate change “hotspot” – a place where high exposure to climate stresses coincides with high levels of vulnerability. The large and mega-deltas of India and Bangladesh are of particular interest as the populations that rely on them for livelihoods are threatened by sea-level rise and subsidence, increased storminess and salt levels in the soil. Other drivers include upstream catchment changes and land use change to destructive shrimp farming and depletion of fish stocks, making deltas very dynamic settings. The DECCMA consortium was led by Professor Robert Nicholls, Professor of Coastal Engineering within Engineering and Physical Sciences. Professor Nicholls’ research concerns long-term coastal engineering and management, especially the issues of coastal impacts and adaptation to climate change, with an emphasis on sea-level rise. He was supported by Professor Craig Hutton, Professor of Sustainability Science within Geography and Environmental Science. Professor Hutton’s research focus lies at the intersection between the environment and social implications of environmental/climate change and management for sustainable development. Professor Nicholls explains what the research has shown and how it will help plan for the

future, ‘Deltas are often seen as potential sources of huge numbers of environmental refugees due to sea-level rise. Our research shows that whilst it is certainly the case that climate change will generate displaced persons, large migration flows occurring today are mainly due to a variety of economic factors and rural to urban migration – hence climate change will exacerbate existing migration flows rather than create new ones. The scope for adaptation to preserve these food basket areas is also large and will require strategic and innovative action’. The project has included a number of research methods, such as risk and vulnerability mapping, policy analysis, economic modelling, socio-ecological scenario development and household surveys. These surveys investigated adaptation strategies and migration behaviour across the deltas through surveys of women and men in over 5000 households in areas ranging from low to high exposure to natural hazards. This survey was followed by another of more than 2500 individual migrants in receiving areas in cities in or near the deltas. The consortium was funded by the International Development Research Centre, Canada, and the Department for International Development, UK, and mainly involved partners from India, Bangladesh, Ghana and the UK. The group’s research covered climate and environmental change, migration and adaptation in three delta systems: the transboundary Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna megadelta (comprising the Indian Bengal delta, as well as the part in Bangladesh), the Mahanadi in India, and the Volta in Ghana. In 2019 the results of the project will be published in a book titled “Deltas in the Anthropocene”.

“Our research shows that whilst it is certainly the case that climate change will generate displaced persons, large migration flows occurring today are mainly due to a variety of economic factors and rural to urban migration.” Professor Robert Nicholls Professor of Coastal Engineering

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/ageingcentre

Feature

POPULATION AGEING IN INDIA Today, globally, there are just under one billion people aged 60 and over. Of these, around 120 million live in India and a further 225 million live in China, with the two countries alone accounting for over a third of all older people alive today. Furthermore, the population of older people is set to increase rapidly over the next decade and by 2030 it is estimated that there will be around 190 million people aged 60 and over living in India and 362 million in China, with some regions at risk of ‘growing old before they grow rich’, as the expansion of the older population precedes advances in economic and social development. Therefore, understanding the challenges and opportunities of an ageing population in the two most populous countries of the world is of key significance for policymakers, practitioners and planners alike. The Centre for Research on Ageing (CRA) at the University of Southampton is playing an active part in contributing to the evidence base through partnerships with leading centres of excellence in India and China. Staff in CRA and Social Sciences collaborated with colleagues from the Population Research Centre at the Institute of Social and Economic Change, Bangalore; the Centre for Development Studies, Trivandrum, India; and the Population Research Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands to establish the AgeGlobe Network. This interdisciplinary international network was funded in 2012 by ESRC, Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Indian Council for Social Science Research.

of migration, traditional systems of family support are coming under pressure. The CRA, led by Professor Maria Evandrou from the University of Southampton, was successful in being awarded funding in 2016 under the UKRI Global Challenges Research Fund to extend its previous research, bringing in new partners in India, China and Africa to establish the Global Ageing and Long-term Care Network (GALNet).

care, took place in Hyderabad, hosted by the Tata Institute for Social Sciences; whilst the third workshop, focusing on policy choices, was organised by the Institute of Gerontology at Renmin University in Beijing.

GALNet has held three workshops with the first, hosted by the Africa Population & Health Research Centre, Nairobi, focusing on understanding realities of, and need for, longterm care. The second workshop, focusing on examining alternative models of long-term

Through these workshops, GALNet has facilitated the sharing of insights into the factors underpinning the need for, and presenting the realities of, long-term care and how these might vary across different social groups. It has also provided valuable opportunities to discuss alternative models for long-term care from different sources and the balance between unpaid care provided by family members, and formal support provided by the state or Non-Governmental Organisations or purchased through the private sector.

Globally, there are just under

By 2030 it is estimated that there will be

people aged 60 and over.

people aged 60 and over living in India

A particular focus of the Network has been on understanding the experience of ageing and the exchange of care in the context of global migration, investigating the well-being of individuals ‘left behind’, with research examining the extent of intergenerational exchanges and the spread of health vulnerabilities between family generations, particularly in co-residential households. Globally, the family remains the key source of support for social care in later life. However, with increasing numbers of women particularly, in paid jobs and higher levels

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one billion

190 million


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/geography

Feature

RESEARCHING RESILIENCE ‘We have been able to develop a novel method to estimate village level crop production using satellite data, a method which can be translated to many parts of the world with small holder farming practices to provide systematic information on high resolution crop yield.’

Professor Jadu Dash and Professor Emma Tompkins, in the school of Geography and Environmental Science, have for the past four years been leading a unique research project to identify what environmental, socio-economic and institutional factors, and the interaction of these factors, build or obstruct the climate and disaster resilience of rice cropping and rice farmers in coastal Odisha, Eastern India. Named PREFUS – Pathways of Resilience to Future Storms – the project is funded by the Leverhulme Trust and covered two particular districts in the state of Odisha: Kendrapara and Jagatsingpur. Professor Dash explains the importance of the research, ‘One of the key achievements from this project is that we demonstrated methods to combine satellite remote sensing data and socio-economic data to understand the resilience of the coastal communities in Odisha to natural disaster. This means the policymakers have clear information on the effectiveness of specific policies at a village scale and how future changes in climate and livelihood practices will affect regional vulnerability.

Odisha made for an interesting case study for the Asia-Pacific region, as it has developed a progressive, decentralised disaster management infrastructure over the past decade under the guidance of Odisha State Disaster Management Authority (OSDMA). Policies established have focused on creating a dense coverage of cyclone shelters in vulnerable regions and developing local level community response plans to any disaster. The success of this effort was illustrated in October 2018 when the response at all levels was so effective to cyclone Titli, it kept the number of deaths to less than 10 compared to more than 10,000 lives in the 1999 cyclone. A coordinated and effective institutional response to short term disaster recovery was identified as a positive development in the state; however, the project found that a long term strategy to make the community more resilient against future cyclone is still lacking.

Professor Dash explains, ‘In particular we highlighted that agricultural development policy seeking to make rice farming more resilient to climate hazards should identify and tackle contextual factors that maintain vulnerable. However, Odisha also demonstrates the need for a fully holistic, locally sensitive approach to disaster risk reduction to be adopted. ‘Disaster management should recognise that development will be difficult unless livelihoods are resilient to natural hazards, and disaster vulnerability will not be reduced unless livelihoods enable people to step out of poverty.’

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Feature

For further information, visit: www.worldpop.org.uk

MAPPING INDIA’S POPULATION AT HIGH RESOLUTION Producing data on population numbers, particularly for small areas, is vital for supporting reliable decision making, producing accurate health metrics and delivering fair resource allocation, among many other uses. WorldPop, in the school of Geography and Environmental Science, is a research group lead by Professor Andy Tatem, which focusses on the integration of census, satellite, survey and mobile phone data to produce detailed maps of population distributions, demographics and dynamics.

vaccine is needed and what it will cost. The mapping of changing population distributions over time has been used to measure precisely how much extra demand there will be for services such as healthcare in urban areas, and how numbers of people at risk of malaria has changed, resulting in changing amounts of drugs and bednets required. The World Bank has also utilised the data to develop urban planning strategies and the World Health Organisation has used it for constructing health metrics.

These maps which show the characteristics of populations, such as age and gender structures to numbers of births and pregnancies, are extremely useful for planning and implementing programmes to help key vulnerable groups and keeping a track of progress towards development goals. In India, WorldPop have worked with national census, survey and satellite datasets, integrating them to map out population numbers and age/gender breakdowns for each year from 2000 to 2020, for each 100x100m grid square in the country. This is very detailed information, never produced before. In addition, the integration of data on fertility, stillbirths and abortions has enabled mapping of births and pregnancy estimates for each 1x1km grid square, and the mapping of characteristics such as poverty and vaccination coverage at similar scales. Through mapping factors such as settlement patterns, land use, landscape and infrastructure from satellite imagery through time, the WorldPop researchers have been able to take 2001 and 2011 India census data counts and map out population distributions through time and space at very detailed small areas. The datasets are freely available to download from the WorldPop website and are widely used by a range of governments and other organisations. For instance, the population maps have been used by governments to assess how many children are in each area, and therefore how much

The datasets are freely available to download from the WorldPop website and are widely used by a range of governments and other organisations.

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/silab

Feature

BRIGHT SPARKS The University of Southampton has deep links with India in the field of social entrepreneurship, dating back to 2014 when the first Spark India programme launched in Ahmedabad. Since then, our collaborative links across the country have expanded and diversified, reflecting both the growing popularity of social entrepreneurship to our students, and its exponential growth in India itself – particularly in higher education. Spark India The Spark India fellowship ran from 2014–2017, attracting huge interest across the University, with an average of ten applicants per place. The programme took students to different cities across India to work with social purpose organisations on real business challenges, such as crowdfunding campaigns, technology roll-outs, and programme evaluations. Over the four years of the programme, students worked with a range of organisations including Aakar Innovations on improving access to sanitary healthcare, SafeCity on using data to fight sexual violence, and Sampurn(e)arth to decentralise waste management. Our Spark India fellows commonly describe the experience as transformational, and many have attributed their future career successes as PhD researchers, engineers, civil servants and social entrepreneurs to the skills and experience gained on the programme. UK-India Social Innovation Challenge In 2017 and 2018, in partnership with the Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship at IIT Madras, the British

Council and the Confederation of Indian Industry, we have run the annual UK-India Social Innovation Challenge (UKISIC). The competition crowdsources solutions to social or environmental challenges from all higher education institutions in the UK and India. In 2017 the theme was clean water and sanitation, and in 2018 it was waste management. Social Entrepreneurship Capacity Building The Social Impact Lab has also won a UK-India Education and Research Initiative (UKIERI) grant to build capacity in the delivery of social entrepreneurship in the Indian states of Tamil Nadu and Kerala, and we hope to have enabled 20 colleges to build their social enterprise programmes by 2021. Through a British Council education grant, we also founded the UK-India Social Entrepreneurship Education Network which launched with an inaugural conference in Chennai in 2016, with over 250 delegates in attendance.

Our collaborative links across the country have expanded and diversified, reflecting both the growing popularity of social entrepreneurship to our students, and its exponential growth in India itself.

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/demography

Feature

THE IMPORTANCE OF The importance and value of on-the-ground fieldwork should not be underestimated. We look at two different trips and the enormous benefits derived for both Southampton students and partnering organisations. ‘On a particularly warm afternoon of the trip, we headed towards the entrance of campus, where groups of students were stood together. Here we managed to find our first interview candidate, as he showed us to a nearby bench. After a fair bit of fiddling with the dictaphone we finally got the show on the road. He was a very driven and enthusiastic student, and the interview was smooth for the most part. However, I may have accidentally piped up a couple of times to ask the interviewee some additional questions, which I shouldn’t have done because I was supposed to be the silent observer and it can confuse things within the interview process if the observer also asks questions. I simply couldn’t help myself! But alas, it is all part of the learning experience!’

In early 2018, the 2nd year BSc Population and Geography students from the Department of Social Statistics and Demography travelled to Kerala for their Applied Population Research Methods field trip. Collaborating with the University of Kerala in Thiruvananthapuram and working with the Department of Demography, the 18-strong cohort worked with Indian students and staff to gain on-the-ground experience of how demographic research is done in a real-world field context. Dr Claire Bailey, Senior Teaching Fellow and Head of Teaching Programmes in Social Statistics and Demography, organised the trip, ‘This fieldwork takes all the theoretical knowledge of research methods gained in the classroom and looks at how that knowledge is applied in the field.’ ‘Our students undertook primary data collection for a qualitative project whilst in India called ‘The Educational Trajectories and Aspirations of Students at the University of Kerala’. In addition they learned about the collection of quantitative survey data by looking at a project by the Population 16

Research Centre with funding from the Kerala Department of Social welfare entitled ‘Aging and its Implications in Kerala’. One of the students, Alice Meen, talked us through the quantitative project, ‘We visited two field sites which were used when conducting a survey about ageing in Kerala. We visited these sites in order to gain an understanding of how the surveys were carried out and also, to see what the places looked like. One site was rural and the other urban; we were surprised to find that the rural site in Trivandrum didn’t match our idea of a rural setting from the UK as the area was quite developed and on the edge of the city.’ ‘When visiting the rural setting, we were invited into one of the respondents’ house, where we were able to discuss in detail the methodology of the study and also ask the respondent questions to gain their views on the survey data collection.’ Undertaking qualitative interview was certainly an experience for the Southampton students, as Sunniva Anderson explains, ‘We undertook interviews with people in-field as it is a valuable process for collecting data that can be observed and is rich in detail and description.’

‘Our second interviewee didn’t speak very good English and his friend sat in on the interview to help translate. This is not proper interview etiquette, as he was an unofficial translator. So this was another learning point, but we took this all in our stride and decided to try again the following day.’ For our final interview, we found a candidate who spoke very good English and was quite enthusiastic to take part. Luckily this interview process was much smoother, with less background noise, no unofficial translator and no interruptions to the interview. So although we had a rocky start, I am ultimately grateful for those experiences because I learnt from them and am now hopefully a more proficient interviewer. It was a pleasure to be able to work with the students from the University of Kerala, as they were extremely patient and friendly.’ Dr Bailey summed up the experience by saying ‘This trip provided a valuable insight for students into how research is actually carried out and created for them a tangible link between undergraduate teaching and learning and academic research. In addition the students benefited greatly from getting to experience a new culture and networking and making friends with their counterparts at the University of Kerala.’


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/geography

Feature

FIELDWORK A recent project which partnered University of Southampton students with students from Jadavpur University in Kolkata, demonstrates the significant benefits of fieldwork for both research and student training. Four University of Southampton students were connected with students from Jadavpur University through EU-India networking project CASCO (Climate Adaptation and Services Community), as part of the DEltas, vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration & Adaptation (DECCMA) project (see pages 10 and 11). The aim of the collaboration was to enable the Southampton students to collect data for their dissertations as part of an MSc in Sustainability, and for Indian students to see different methods and approaches to data collection. DECCMA’s main Indian partner, Dr Tuhin Ghosh, facilitated the collaboration. Conducting fieldwork enables students to see applications of theory they have learned in the classroom, and is considered a high point of the postgraduate experience. Lindsay Roberts, an MSc student at UoS, whose dissertation looked at the role of migration on women said, ‘The opportunity to pursue my dissertation and undertake research in the Indian Bengal Delta was one of the highlights of my university experience. From the unique setting of the Sundarbans’ villages to the key insights on out-migration and women I found from my research, I feel incredibly lucky for this experience for developing and applying my knowledge surrounding climate change adaptation.’ Martin Watts from UoS, whose research looked at agricultural adaptation added, ‘It was an insightful cross-cultural experience into farmers’ adaptive behaviours. I realised the importance of collective action for sustainable and resilient farming practices.’ As well as being useful for the visiting British students, student counterparts from Jadavpur University also found the experience valuable. As Purna Baduri explained, ‘Most of our background is in quantitative data collection

and analysis. Here I have learned a lot about qualitative data and the value that it can add to studies relating to population.’ The whole team agreed that the opportunity to share perspectives on adaptation and migration in the Indian Bengal delta called into question some of their previously unquestioned assumptions. This experience was made possible by the dedication of the DECCMA India team, who ‘Provided endless support throughout the fieldwork process to ensure individual research goals were met. Sumana Banerjee was at the centre of organising the fieldwork, ensuring

every aspect of the trip was well planned, and Dr Tuhin Ghosh provided valuable information on the Sundarbans and it was great to discuss my research with him.’ said Rosalyn Lloyd Haynes (UoS MSc student). The University of Southampton students were funded by DECCMA and the CASCO project, funded by the European Union delegation to India. Authored by Dr Emma Tompkins, Professor within Geography and Environmental Science, and Katharine Vincent from Kulima Integrated Development Solutions, one of the DECCMA consortium. 17


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/education

Feature

TEACHING THE TEACHERS: THE DELIVERY OF CPD COURSES IN INDIA

When the Association of Private Schools in Assam, India, invited the School of Education at the University of Southampton to deliver a bespoke Continuing Professional Development (CPD) course for up to 40 of their educational staff, Phil Green, Principal Teaching Fellow in the School of Education jumped at the chance. The headteacher of the Modern English School in Guwahati, Mrs Jonali Das, who hosted the course, had completed her MSc in Education with the School of Education a few years earlier and had first-hand experience of the excellent track record it has in delivering cutting edge professional development courses to teachers and school leaders. Assam is a region in the far North East of India with a population of 30 million. Its school system is a mix of government and private schools: across Assam approximately 70% of children attend free government schools, and the other 30% attend a fee paying private school. Two days of CPD is mandatory for Assam teachers at private schools, so the need and desire for courses like the one run by the University of Southampton is high.

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Mr Green explains the course concept, ‘We began with a week-long ‘Principles of Teaching and Learning’ course. This naturally seemed to evolve over a number of weeks to become a teaching and leadership course as more and more senior teachers and school leaders became interested in what we were offering.

70%

Across Assam approximately 70% of children attend free government schools.

‘The course was attended by 30 to 40 delegates each day dependent on their availability. And from information we gathered we were able to identify half of the delegates as classroom teachers and the other half as primarily in a school leadership role of some sort’, explains Mr Green. The success of the Assam CPD programme was due in no small part to the structure

adopted for the week; the emphasis of work and input shifted from instructors to students during days four and five of the programme so that the delegates could enjoy and appreciate being highly involved through sharing innovative practice ideas and engaging in small group themed discussions.

30%

Across Assam approximately 30% of children attend fee paying private schools.

Mr Green is already planning for the next programme to be delivered in India, ‘The course was deemed a resounding success with very positive qualitative and quantitative comments from delegates. Our Southampton staff that delivered it also found the cultural experience of visiting India really fulfilling, along with the professional challenge.’


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/education

Feature

LEARNING TO BE LEADERS

The Chandra Southampton Next Generation Leadership Programme arose from a series of meetings between Amreesh Chandra, Executive Principal, St. Paul’s school, Gorakhpur, India, and representatives from the University of Southampton. With a key focus on education and fostering sustainable change, the intention of this partnership was for Southampton Education School (SEds) second and third year BSc Education, BSc Education/Psychology and PGCE students to contribute to a leadership project at St. Paul’s and develop their leadership skills. The Chandra family offered the opportunity for a select number of students from SEds to travel to St. Paul’s for three weeks. After a competitive process, five students departed to India accompanied by Julie Reynolds, Senior Teaching Fellow. The leadership project the students were given on their arrival in Gorakhpur was based around raising menstrual awareness through education in India, currently a topic of social taboo. Their job was to propose a guideline for schools in India to consider.

Julie was on hand to support the students through this challenging project: ‘Our time in Gorakhpur was inspiring but intense – the students worked all day in the classroom and we were often guests at a family house in the evening. We were also able to travel beyond the school gates to explore the local area and experience the colour, the chaos and the cows.’ Whilst at the school, the students undertook a combination of teaching and observing, attended seminars regarding leadership and contributed to presentations on Autism and Special Educational Needs.

“Our time in Gorakhpur was inspiring but intense – the students worked all day in the classroom and we were often guests at a family house in the evening.” Julie Reynolds Senior Teaching Fellow

Commenting on the success of the Programme, Julie said, ‘Student evaluations suggest that this experience had a very positive impact on them, both in terms of their teaching but also on their aspirations to be leaders. As one student concluded: ‘There is something marvellous about this journey that we have just been through, and I am forever grateful to have had this opportunity.’ Planning for the 2019 trip is underway.

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/wsa

WINCHESTER SCHOOL OF ART: THE POWER OF BIENNALE A Biennale is any event that happens every two years. It is a term commonly used within the art world to describe large-scale international contemporary art exhibitions. Winchester School of Art (WSA), has established a sustained Indian research relationship with the Kochi-Muziris Biennale (KMB), launched in 2012 in Fort Kochi, Kerala. The KMB is seen as one of the newest and most influential global art biennales. Professor Ed D’Souza, Head of WSA, is leading the charge when it comes to the University’s involvement in the KMB. His key early critical writing in the Journal of Cultural Politics on the ‘Biennale effect’ explains the KMB against India’s recent history of radical political modernization post-independence and through the states attempts to establish itself in terms of internationalism and contemporaneity via the arts. This journal article is the seventh most downloaded article from Cultural Politics over the last two years demonstrating the level of global interest in this art event. The KMB commissioned Professor D’Souza as an artist for the second edition in January 2015 where he built a life-sized sculpture of a Hindustan Ambassador car, End of Empire, built and shown on the streets of Fort Kochi which became a video installation at Tate Modern as part of a WSA week of events, Building an Art Biennale in April 2018. End of Empire has now been recommissioned as a major project for the forthcoming Oslo Biennial launching in May 2019 where it will be reimagined as ‘Migrant Car’. The sculpture will journey around Oslo acting as a catalyst for other collaborations with local artists and curators over a three-month period to give new meanings to the locality by revealing stories of migration in the city at a time of political tensions. The sculpture will also give an opportunity for a dialogue in the city questioning assumptions of how public artworks and audiences might engage in public space through a large-scale event such as a Biennial. Much of Professor D’Souza’s internationally published work, exhibitions and contributions as a speaker have centred around economic, political and social change concentrating on identity, location and context especially in relation to India and its global diaspora. He has been regularly featured and interviewed in the Indian press and profiled about both his design/art practice and as an expert in relation to India, creativity and UK art and design education. He has also won awards and received nominations for his India related work. 21


Alumni

For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/alumni-supporters

SOUTHAMPTON ALUMNUS, ANIKET SINGH, LAUNCHES INTERNSHIP PROGRAM FOR INDIAN STUDENTS ‘Not only was my work in ECS fascinating, living in Southampton and attending the University which has such a multi-cultural campus taught me that there is so much to explore in life. There are so many different people to meet, countries to travel and vistas to see. It triggered in me a wanderlust that still persists; a summer in England had been a dream for me since my childhood and to fulfil it was a true life goal.’ ‘I got multiple offers from Universities in Europe to set up the Program, however I chose Southampton not only because it was the most highly ranked among these universities but also because Professor Al-Hashimi was so helpful and accommodating of the idea.’ explains Aniket. ‘The Program is a progression of a series of books I have authored on domestic and international study themed ‘Intern Abroad This Summer’. Ever since my books came out, I have been delighted by the response students have shown.

University of Southampton Alumnus, Aniket Singh, now works for the world renowned technology giant Apple in Cupertino, California. And as a result of the career defining internship he undertook here at Southampton in 2004, Aniket is offering Indian students the chance to follow in his footsteps in the School of Electronics and Computer Science (ECS) through a new international internship program. Aniket’s ‘Intern Abroad Program’ will fund three-month internships in ECS for four promising students from Indian universities. Students selected in the new program will join ECS in summer 2019 and gain first-hand experience of the School’s high quality academic research. The program is designed to allow students to get the same positive experience that Aniket had here at Southampton and he hopes it will shape their perspective in their formative years. ‘I interned with ECS during my own studies at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Madras, India’, explains Aniket. ‘I worked very closely with Professor Bashir Al-Hashimi, who let me work on a truly challenging project around Switched Capacitor Circuits. That project sparked a curiosity in me that continues to this day.

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‘Most students today are unaware that they can find an awesome internship around the world, and even if they do know, they often don’t bother applying, believing the field to be too crowded. Their years as a student are the most critical of their life – building blocks to a great future. I believe simply focusing their student years working on getting good grades is only seeing half the picture. Internships, volunteering and practical experiences are what set students apart from the crowd, much more than just good grades.’ The new ECS internships expand Aniket’s international program, which already links Indian students in engineering, management, sciences and humanities subjects with top colleges in England, India, Singapore and Switzerland. For more information please visit www.aniketsingh.com

“I got multiple offers from Universities in Europe to set up the Program, however I chose Southampton not only because it was the most highly ranked among these universities but also because Professor Al-Hashimi was so helpful and accommodating of the idea.” Aniket Singh


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/research

RESEARCH AWARD HIGHLIGHTS FACULTY OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES

FACULTY OF MEDICINE

Prof Laura Jeanice Brooks; School of Humanities Songs of Home: Musical Soundscapes of Australia and Britain, 1788–1860 AHRC; £70,762 over 12 months

Prof Keith Godfrey; Human Development and Health Sarcopenia Project II (MEMOSA Validation Study) Nestec Ltd; £173,426 over 7 months

Dr Lucy Blue; School of Humanities MarEAMENA: The endangered maritime archaeology and cultural heritage of the Middle East and North Africa Arcadia Charitable Trust; £2,000,000 over 60 months Dr William Davies; School of Humanities Defining cultural boundaries in the European Upper PALAEOlithic: Archaeology and Rock arT in EASTern Europe(PALAEOARTEAST) Newton International Fellowship for Dr Aitor Ruiz-Redondo. British Academy; £99,000 over 24 months Prof David Brown; School of Humanities Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship: ‘The aristocratic tradition at its best’? Shaftesbury, philanthropy and reform Leverhulme Trust; £137,099 over 36 months Prof Alistair Pike; School of Humanities Counter Culture: investigating Neolithic social diversity AHRC; £44,037 over 24 months

Prof Hazel Inskip; Human Development and Health Cohort and LOngitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources grant – CLOSER ESRC; £15,220 over 24 months Prof Alexander Mirnezami; Surgical Oncology; Cancer Sciences Investigating the clinical utility of SurgiMend Bovine Acellular Dermal Matrix in complex abdominopelvic reconstruction Integra LifeSciences Services; £90,557 over 24 months Prof Isabel Temple; Human Development and Health Child Growth Foundation – Use of genomic medicine to discover causes of Silver-Russell syndrome and related growth disorders (August 2018). Child Growth Foundation; £85,000 over 24 months Prof Roxana-Octavia Carare; Clinical and Experimental Sciences LOX as therapeutic target to improve IPAD – May 18 Royal Society; £12,000 over 24 months Prof Delphine Boche; Clinical and Experimental Sciences Tissue-infiltrating lymphocytes characterisation in glioblastoma – (March 18) Pathological Society of Great Britain & Ireland; £2,000 over 12 months Prof Jane Lucas; Clinical and Experimental Sciences Lucas – AAIR – A feasibility study into the use of novel MRI techniques for paediatric lung disease – Jul 18 AAIR Charity; £9,800 over 12 months Prof James Nicoll; Clinical and Experimental Sciences Nicoll – BRAIN UK extension 2018 (516922103) Brain Tumour Research; £40,000 over 12 months Prof Michael Moore; Primary Care and Population Sciences Moore/Santer/Willcox/Hu – SPCR – Community pharmacists’ perception of using herbal medicine in acute infections: qualitative study (September 2018) National Institute of Health Research; £26,141 over 11 months Dr Beth Stuart; Primary Care and Population Sciences Stuart – NIHR SPCR – Acne Network Meta-analysis (September 2018) National Institute of Health Research; £31,629 over 10 months

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Research award highlights Prof Michael Grocott; Clinical and Experimental Sciences NIHR HTA (via UHS) – Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for reducing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC): a sham-controlled randomised controlled trial (June 2017) National Institute of Health Research; £24,358 over 42 months

FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND LIFE SCIENCES

Dr Miriam Santer; Primary Care and Population Sciences NIHR HTA (via Nottingham) – What is the clinical and costeffectiveness of using a goal-directed allopurinol-based treat-to-target protocol in people with recurrent gout? (November 2017) National Institute of Health Research; £194,656 over 80 months

Prof Stephen Darby; School of Geography & Environmental Science NERC/Newton Fund HydroMeteorological Hazards Natural Environment Research Council; £324,013 over 30 months

Dr Sean Lim; Cancer Sciences Investigation of the efficacy of INCB05982 alone and in combination with anti-CD20 and anti-CD27 Incyte Corporation; £33,874 over 12 months Prof Ramsey Cutress; Cancer Sciences WCRF – Influence of body composition in chemotherapy toxicity in women with early stage breast cancer World Cancer Research Fund; £294,221 over 36 months Dr Nicholas Fuggle; Human Development and Health Does epigenetic age acceleratino predict 10-year musculoskeletal outcomes The Dunhill Medical Trust; £194,950 over 36 months Dr Xiao-Yang (Mio) Hu; Primary Care and Population Sciences Herbal Medicine in Acute Cough National Institute of Health Research; £84,375 over 15 months

Prof Stephen Roberts; School of Ocean and Earth Science Investigating the geochemical and physical response to fluid rock reaction beneath an active hydrothermal system in an arc environment Natural Environment Research Council; £38,012 over 10 months

Prof Lucy Yardley; School of Psychology HEE/NIHR Clinical Doctoral Research Fellowship National Institute of Health Research; £13,749 over 36 months Prof Lucy Yardley; School of Psychology NIHR PGfAR Reduce Intervention Study Part 2 National Institute of Health Research; £151,616 over 72 months Prof Gail Taylor; School of Biological Sciences and University of California, Davis And ECR Dr Rob Holland, School of Biological Sciences Supergen Bioenergy Hub EPSRC; £38,429 over 48 months Prof Christopher Moore; School of Ocean and Earth Science Atlantic BiogeoChemical fluxes (ABC) 2 Natural Environment Research Council; £16,999 over 36 months Dr Tracy Long-Sutehall; School of Health Sciences Eye Donation from Palliative and Hospice care contexts: investigating Potential, Practice, Prefereces and Perceptions (EDiPPP) National Institute of Health Research; £720,498.07 over 36 months Dr Clive Trueman; School of Ocean and Earth Science Combining Geochemical and Molecular Methods for Catch Location Verification and Traceability Marine Stewardship Council; £50,186 over 12 months Prof Wendy Adams; School of Psychology EPSRC ROSSINI: Reconstructing 3D Structure from Single Images: a Perceptual Reconstruction Approach EPSRC; £349,736 over 36 months Dr Ivan Haigh; School of Ocean and Earth Science SCOPAC Storm Analysis and Digitisation SCOPAC; £9,500 over 4 months Dr Ivan Haigh; School of Ocean and Earth Science SCOPAC Storm Analysis and Digitisation Supplement SCOPAC; £5,000 over 16 months Dr Ivan Haigh; School of Ocean and Earth Science Comp-Flood: Compound flooding in coastal Viet Nam Natural Environment Research Council; £350,472 over 36 months Prof Joerg Wiedenmann and Dr. Cecilia D’Angelo; School of Ocean and Earth Science Artificial Light Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems (ALICE) Natural Environment Research Council; £195,190 over 48 months

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For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/research

Prof Rachael James; School of Ocean and Earth Science ULTRA – Ultramafic-hosted mineral Resource Assessment Natural Environment Research Council; £445,643 over 48 months Prof Martin Solan; School of Ocean and Earth Science ONR Funding Office of Naval Research (USA); £231,624 over 36 months Prof Martin Solan and Dr. Jasmin Godbold; School of Ocean and Earth Science Current and Future Effects of Microplastics on Marine Shelf Ecosystems (MINIMISE) Natural Environment Research Council; £134,083 over 36 months Dr Katherine Bradbury and Rosie Essery; School of Psychology EPRSRC/UCL Get A Move On – Development & Validation of an Intensity & Domain Specific Online Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Adults EPSRC; £50,000 over 6 months Dr Ivo Tews; School of Biological Sciences CCP4: Advanced integrated approaches to macromolecular structure determination BBSRC; £33,156 over 60 months

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES Prof Michael Surridge; School of Electronics and Computer Science Data-protection toolkit reducing risks in hospitals and care centers European Commission; £493,276 over 36 months Prof Robert Eason; Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics Optically controlled fluid flow in paper-based medical diagnostic devices EPSRC; £467,977 over 30 months Prof Daniel Hewak; Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics Smart and Flexible Energy Supply Platform for Wearable Electronics European Commission; £176,000 over 36 months Prof Stephen Beeby; School of Electronics and Computer Science H2020 – Wearable multiplexed biomedical electrodes (WEARPLEX) – S Beeby European Commission; £508,653 over 36 months

Dr Ruth Bartlett; School of Health Sciences Walking Assessments: Adapting the practice of telehealth care workers Alzheimers Society; £2,438 over 3 months

Prof Stephen Beeby; School of Electronics and Computer Science Functional electronic textiles for light emitting and colour changing applications EPSRC; £833,072 over 36 months

Prof Andrew Tatem; School of Geography & Environmental Science Tatem, Benjamin Foundation. Mapping school attendance at high resolution in low/middle income countries; £43,852 over 12 months

Prof Robert Wood; School of Engineering Early detection of contact distress for Enhanced performance monitoring and predictive inspection of machines EPSRC; £1,059,539 over 42 months

Prof Andrew Tatem; School of Geography & Environmental Science Mapping seasonal denominator dynamics in low and middle income settings Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; £836,816 over 24 months

Prof Sonia Heaven; School of Engineering Environmental Biotechnology Network BBSRC; £1,229,579 over 60 months

Dr Robert Ewing; School of Biological Sciences New therapeutic strategies for brain tumours: mechanistic analysis of Zika-driven medulloblastoma oncolysis MRC; £151,654 over 24 months Dr Rosalind Coggon; School of Ocean and Earth Science ‘Quantifying variations in hydrothermal contributions to the oceans: Scaling from drill core observations to global models’ Royal Society; £64,551 over 30 months Dr Mark Chapman; School of Biological Sciences Improving the identification of genomic variants in crops and its application to alleviate food insecurity Royal Society International Fellowship; £2,601 over 3 months Dr Bjorn Robroek; School of Biological Sciences RECOUP-Moor: Restoring Ecosystem Carbon Uptake of a Post-fire Moorland Natural Environment Research Council; £52,391 over 12 months

Prof Anna Barney; ISVR; School of Engineering Listening Across Disciplines II AHRC; £34,292 over 36 months Prof Simon Coles; School of Chemistry National Research Facility: UK Physical Sciences Data Science Service EPSRC; £2,197,153 over 60 months Dr Corin Gawith and Dr Matt Himsworth; Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics Pioneer Gravity: Industry Strategy Challenge Fund Commercialising Quantum Technologies 2018 EPSRC; £430,310 over 29 months Prof Bruno Linclau; School of Chemistry Chemoenzymatic synthesis with fluorinated sugar phosphates BBSRC; £11,351 over 1 month Prof Michael Boniface; School of Electronics and Computer Science Zero Defect Manufacturing Platform European Commission; £422,250 over 36 months 25


Research award highlights Prof Christian Knigge; School of Physics and Astronomy Interacting binaries as radio and optical transients Royal Society; £102,001 over 36 months Dr. Irene Zanette; School of Physics and Astronomy Advanced X-ray Imaging for 3D Virtual Histology with a Liquid-MetalJet Source Royal Society; £199,515 over 30 months

Dr Thomas Blumensath; ISVR Machine Learning Methods for Tomographic Image Reconstruction from limited data UK-France PhD programme; £130,730 over 48 months Dr Joseph Banks; School of Engineering English Institute of Sport Research Framework Agreement. EIS Performance Innovation; £200,897 over 24 months

Prof David Simpson; School of Engineering Improving specificity, sensitivity and test time for objective Auditory Evoked Response detection – Chesnaye/Simpson The Oticon Foundation; £189,683 over 24 months

Dr Zhan Shu; School of Engineering Co-Design of Communication and Control for Secure Cyber-Physical Systems Royal Society; £3,000 over 1 month

Prof Stefano Moretti; School of Physics and Astronomy DIVA – Prof. Khalil Science And Technology Facilities Council; £5,000 over 2 months

Prof Ole Thomsen; School of Engineering Certification for Design – Reshaping the Testing Pyramid EPSRC; £2,998,763 over 60 months

Prof Robert Nicholls; School of Engineering Enabling near-term results for climate adaptation in Africa and Asia beyond CARIAA International Development Research Centre (IDRC); £26,410 over 3 months

Dr Stefano Modafferi; School of Electronics and Computer Science European connected Factory Platform for Agile Manufacturing European Commission; £514,856 over 36 months

Dr Stuart Boden; School of Electronics and Computer Science Supergen Solar Network+ EPSRC; £8,290 over 48 months

Prof Mark Sullivan; School of Physics and Astronomy STFC opportunities call – Portsmouth lead Science And Technology Facilities Council; £34,728 over 6 months

Dr Senthil Ganapathy; Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics Fabrication of tantala waveguides for on-chip nanoscopy University of Tromso; £16,873 over 18 months

Prof Elena Simperl; School of Electronics and Computer Science Data Market Services European Commission; £313,319 over 36 months

Prof Jonathan Preston; School of Engineering TRANSPORT TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH INNOVATION FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (T-TRIID) Department for International Development; £29,974 over 6 months Dr Jonathon Hare; School of Electronics and Computer Science TranscribeAI: Artificial Intelligence-Driven Information Extraction from Documents Innovate UK; £190,310 over 21 months Dr Tristan Rees-White; School of Engineering Direct Measurement of Landfill Emissions using the Tracer Gas Dispersion Method Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; £88,128 over 6 months Dr Sasan Mahmoodi; School of Electronics and Computer Science Gait Analysis Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL); £249,272 over 12 months Prof Stephen Daley; Head of Signal Processing and Control Group, ISVR BAE – EPSRC Prosperity Partnership – Intelligent Structures for Low Noise Environments BAE/EPSRC; £2,425,685 to UoS over 60 months

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Dr Simone De Liberato; School of Physics and Astronomy Mid-infrared polaritonic emitters Royal Society; £197,419 over 30 months Dr Alexantrou Serb; Zepler Institute for Photonics and Nanoelectronics Use of Novel Computational Hardware in Safety-Related Systems Defence Science & Technology Laboratory (DSTL); £57,757 over 7 months Dr Diego Altamirano; School of Physics and Astronomy NICER observations of accreting objects Royal Society; £199,499 over 29 months Dr Andrew O’Bannon; School of Physics and Astronomy Strange Transport at Strong Coupling from Boundaries and Defects Royal Society; £154,259 over 24 months Dr Matthias Baud; School of Chemistry Small molecule stabilisers/activators of p53 mutants Royal Society; £7,200 over 24 months


For further information, visit: www.southampton.ac.uk/research

FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES Prof Chris Potts; School of Mathematical Sciences Dr Antonio Martinez Sykora; Business School KTP with Lucketts: Coach and Driver Scheduling Innovate UK; £137,324 over 30 months Lucketts; £67,637 over 30 months Prof Kostas Skenderis; School of Mathematical Sciences Withers RS URF EA – Holographic CFTs on curved spacetimes Royal Society; £113,406 over 18 months Dr Michaela Brockmann; Southampton Education School Brockmann Gatsby – On-the-job training of apprenticeships in England The Gatsby Charitable Foundation; £36,895 over 8 months Dr Michael Hatcher; School of Economic, Social and Political Sciences Endogenous extrapolation: Implications for boom-bust cycles and macroeconomic policy ESRC; £85,958 over 24 months

This list encompasses a selection of awards logged with University of Southampton Finance from October to December 2018 that are not considered commercially sensitive.

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