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Building a Stronger North Carolina A Companion Guide to Community Conversations Happening Across North Carolina

Brought to you by:

United Way of North Carolina and the NC Budget & Tax Center A project of the NORTH CAROLINA JUSTICE CENTER


Building a Stronger North Carolina A Companion Guide to Community Conversations Happening Across North Carolina

Brought to you by:

United Way of North Carolina and the NC Budget & Tax Center A project of the NORTH CAROLINA JUSTICE CENTER


BUILDING A STRONGER NORTH CAROLINA

TABLE OF CONTENTS Fast Facts on North Carolina’s Economy

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Fast Facts on the New State Budget

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State Budget Decisions by Area

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Education Health & Human Services Justice & Public Safety

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Major Policy Changes

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Ten Ways to Get Engaged

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Resources

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Appendix: Selected Cuts in Detail

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Dear Friend, Every year, the NC Justice Center’s Budget and Tax Center and the United Way of North Carolina team up with local partners for our briefings on the legislative session. It is our favorite time of the year, when we have the opportunity to talk to people all over the state about the budget and policy changes passed during the legislative session and the effect they will have on North Carolinians. More importantly, we get to hear from you about the successes, needs and challenges you see in your communities. This Companion Guide provides you with data about North Carolina’s economy, state budget, and workforce that you can use in your own advocacy efforts or in conversations with friends and neighbors. We hope you find it helpful, and we would love to hear your feedback on the briefing and this guide. Thanks so much for adding your voice to ours as we seek to improve lives across North Carolina. Sincerely, Alexandra Forter Sirota Director, NC Budget and Tax Center alexandra@ncjustice.org Louisa Warren Policy Advocate, NC Justice Center louisa@ncjustice.org Jill Cox Government Relations and Communications Director, United Way of North Carolina JCox@unitedwaync.org

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Fast Facts on North Carolina’s Economy Ü North Carolina’s Jobs Deficit: 515,500 as of September 2011 From the start of the Great Recession in December 2007 until September 2011, North Carolina lost 308,600 jobs. During the same time, North Carolina’s working-age population grew by 206,900, leaving the state with a jobs deficit of 515,500.

Ü # of NC Counties that Lost Jobs Since the “Recovery” Began: 53 While the Great Recession left no community untouched, rural areas and small cities were particularly hard hit and continue to struggle. Many of these local economies were dependent on the very industries that suffered the most dramatic decreases in activity and employment during the downturn – manufacturing, construction, education, and the public sector.

Ü Unemployed Workers Out of Work for More than Six Months: 48.9% High unemployment in combination with slow to no job creation has meant many workers face long-term unemployment—that is, they have been without work for more than six months. Extended unemployment benefits have enabled many of these workers and their families to avoid homelessness and hunger.

Ü Working Families that are Low-income: 34% Even those lucky enough to be employed have trouble making ends meet because of the prevalence of low-wage work. In 2010, nearly 725,000 North Carolinians were engaged in low-wage work, earning on average just $9.87 an hour. The NC Budget and Tax Center’s Living Income Standard, a market-based measure of what it takes for a family to meet basic needs in North Carolina, finds that a family of one adult and two children needs an annual income of between $34,454 and $47,377, depending on where they live. That’s $16.56 to $22.77 an hour, 40 hours a week, 52 weeks a year.

Ü Fastest-growing Occupations Pay Low Wages: 14 out of 20 Of the twenty occupations projected to have the highest growth rates from 2010 to 2020, only six pay average wages that meet the current Living Income Standard, according to the NC Commission on Workforce Development. The remaining 14 pay less than a living wage. North Carolina’s workers produce, earn and spend in the state’s economy, and their wellbeing is criticalto a strong economic recovery. However, North Carolina policymakers often ignore the primary role workers play in a successful economy. More than 24 months after the official end of the Great Recession, North Carolina’s working families continue to struggle with a lack of job opportunities and staggering loss of earnings.

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A Companion Guide to Community Conversations

Source:

2011

American Community Survey, 2011. Note that data for only 39 of the state’s 100 counties was available at the time of publication.

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Fast Facts on the New State Budget Ü North Carolina’s Budget Gap: $2.5 billion North Carolina faced an enormous budget shortfall this year due to the continued weak economy and collapsing revenue. Another contributing factor to the final budget gap was the decision to cut taxes. In combination these factors grew the budget gap for fiscal year 2011-12 to $2.5 billion, which the legislature closed primarily with spending cuts.

Ü Total Cuts Made to Close the Budget Gap: $1.7 billion Of the $1.7 billion in spending cuts in the state budget for fiscal year 2011-12, 27% came from public education, 26% came from health and human services, 21% came from the UNC system, and 10% came from justice and public safety.

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A Companion Guide to Community Conversations

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Ü Total Revenue Raised to Close the Budget Gap: $0 State legislative leaders chose to let expire the temporary tax package passed in 2009, which consisted of a 1-cent increase in the state sales tax, a 2-percent to 3-percent income tax surcharge on high-income households, and a 3-percent surcharge on corporate income taxes. The result was a loss in nearly $1.3 billion in revenue. In addition, policymakers created a new business-income tax exemption that will cost North Carolina more than $300 million in revenue each year, once it is fully implemented. Additionally, conforming to federal estate tax rules will cost the state $57 million in FY2011-12.

Ü Estimated Job Loss from the Final Budget: 29,782 Through industry-standard methods, the N.C. Budget and Tax Center conducted a whole budget analysis of the spending and tax cuts to estimate their impact on employment and the economy. The analysis finds the budget will result in nearly 30,000 jobs lost over the next two years. These jobs are in the public and private sectors. Budget cuts affect private businesses in two ways. First, businesses suffer because their customers—those laid-off public-sector workers—no longer have money to spend, and the high unemployment rate means many of these workers will struggle to find new jobs. Secondly, much of the money that state government pays for public services goes to private businesses; for example, money spent on Medicaid goes to doctors, hospitals, therapists and others.

Ü Impacts on North Carolinians: Long-Lasting In addition to the impact on employment levels, the state budget cuts mean many North Carolinians will face further hardship and challenges in accessing services. Already, there is evidence that the number of teachers has declined by more than 6,100 since 2008. Medicaid services that are critical to the well-being of children, people with disabilities and elderly residents are being considered for elimination. Early childhood and child care subsidy waiting lists remain long.

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During the Great Recession, demand for state services increased dramatically but state appropriations decreased. Here are some examples of how state budgets have fallen behind demand for access to education, health care and public safety.

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State Budget Decisions by Area Total Reduction to the Education Budget: $924 Million (or 8%) in FY2011-12, $926 Million in FY2012-13 Education is North Carolina’s economic engine. It was how we created and attracted businesses to North Carolina in the past, and it is how we will stay a global leader in the future. This year, state legislators voted to cut almost $1 billion per year from the total state education budget, which includes K-12 public schools, community colleges and public universities.

Cuts to Public Schools: $459 million in FY2011-12 Of the total cuts, there were $124 million in “unspecified” cut translates to 2,418 school employees who have lost their jobs in the 2011-12 school year, including more than 500 teachers and 1,200 teacher’s assistants. In the last four years, North Carolina schools have eliminated more than 17,000 education positions, filled and unfilled, because of budget cuts. These budget cuts are masked because they are referred to as “flexibility” cuts but they have very specific ramifications for North Carolina’s children and our labor force.

WHAT IT MEANS FOR STUDENTS IN NC’S PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

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More than 3,000 teachers and 2,000 teacher’s assistants will likely lose their jobs, leaving fewer educators to serve North Carolina’s growing student population.

Schools will have older textbooks, fewer supplies and dirtier classrooms due to large cuts in non-instructional support personnel and resources.

Funding for community-based dropout prevention efforts, like tutoring and after-school programs, will cease.


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Cuts to Community Colleges: $118 million in FY2011-12 The budget increases tuition by $10.50 per credit hour in the first year and by $12.50 in the second. In addition, it cuts funding by 10.7% of the system’s current service level. Thousands of unemployed and underemployed workers have enrolled in community colleges in recent years to get the training and credentials they need for new jobs. But the new state budget cuts financial aid and forces colleges to reduce course offerings, making post-secondary education less accessible and less affordable. WHAT IT MEANS FOR STUDENTS IN NC’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES:

1000 faculty members are expected to lose their jobs resulting in reduced course offerings and decreased student support.

Reduced class offerings mean decreased access to courses necessary to complete degree programs and fewer people trained for 21st century jobs.

Fewer students will complete degree programs because of higher cost and limited financial aid.

Cuts to UNC System: $347 million in FY2011-12 This 12% cut has forced campuses to reduce course offerings, increase class sizes and provide fewer supports and academic resources for students. In addition, legislative leaders cut the UNC Need-based Financial Aid program by 22%, eliminating aid to an estimated 5,000 income-eligible students. The budget also limits financial aid to nine semesters, even though many students will now find it impossible to finish their degrees in only 4 ½ years due to fewer class sections and course offerings. WHAT IT MEANS FOR UNC:

Fewer students will be able to afford college due to large cuts in financial aid and increases in tuition.

Many UNC schools will have to eliminate entire departments, limiting academic opportunities for North Carolina’s next generation of workers.

Students will receive less support and attention, as 2,700 faculty members are expected to lose their jobs.

Cuts to Pre-kindergarten: $32 million The final budget changed the name of North Carolina’s nationally acclaimed More at Four program to NC Pre-kindergarten (NCPK). It also moved the program from the Department of Public Instruction to the Department of Health & Human Services, where it will become part of the Division of Child Development. The outcome of the cuts to NCPK are still pending in court. The Governor has submitted a plan to the legislature to provide a “sound basic education” for all at risk four-year-olds to comply with a ruling handed down by Superior Court Judge Howard Manning. The final effects of the changes to pre-kindergarten services remain unknown at this time.

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Total Reduction to the Health & Human Services Budget: $433 million (or 9%) in FY2011-12, $473 million in FY2012-13 The programs of the NC Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) touch the lives of virtually every North Carolinian, from birth to old age. DHHS makes sure mothers and babies have the nutrition they need to thrive, seniors have access to prescription drugs, children have health care and supports for their development and people with disabilities have the supports they need to contribute to our communities. This year, nearly $433 million was cut from the annual DHHS budget, which will have serious impacts on the health and well-being of children, seniors, and communities throughout North Carolina.

Cuts to the Division of Child Development: $61 million in FY2011-12 These cuts include a $37.6 million, or 20%, cut to Smart Start, North Carolina’s nationally recognized early childhood program. State legislators also cut child-care subsidy funds for low-income parents taking post-secondary courses by $7 million, and they eliminated child-care subsidy transportation funding. WHAT IT MEANS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:

Cuts to SmartStart will result in fewer Children under age 5 experiencing high-quality early childhood education, which is essential to preparing children to enter school ready to learn.

Parents will have a harder time staying in the workforce and supporting their families and local economies as early childhood slots and transportation funding are sharply reduced.

Decreased access to early childhood education opportunities will have ripple effects on local economies as child-care providers lose their jobs.

Cuts to Division of Medical Assistance (Medicaid): $356 million The budget included a 2% rate cut to Medicaid providers, with a few exceptions, which comes on top of a prior 9% cut for many providers. In addition, the General Assembly ordered DHHS to save $90 million this fiscal year through the expansion of Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC), the state’s Medicaid managed-care program. DHHS recently reported that they will not be able to implement $139 million, or 39% of these budget cuts within the year due to delays in gaining federal approval for changes to Medicaid, delays enrolling thousands of new patients in managed care, and several other factors. State health officials are still considering cuts to Medicaid’s “optional” services, such as dental treatment, hospice care, podiatry, hearing aids, and group homes for people with mental disabilities. Adult vision care has already been eliminated.

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WHAT IT MEANS FOR MEDICAID RECIPIENTS AND HEALTH-CARE PROVIDERS:

Patients’ access to quality medical care will decrease as providers struggle to deliver services at the lower reimbursement rates. Fewer providers will accept Medicaid patients.

Medicaid recipients may have to go without essential health-care services like dental treatment and artificial limbs, and people with mental disabilities will face a critical lack of services.

MEDICAID OPTIONAL SERVICES TARGETED FOR POTENTIAL ELIMINATION

North Carolina will lose approximately $513 million in federal matching funds, limiting quality and accessibility of health care in North Carolina. Additionally, health-care workers will lose their jobs resulting in a drop in economic activity.

Cuts to Mental Health: $58 million The final budget makes several significant cuts to North Carolina’s mentalhealth system, which is already under federal investigation. This includes a one-time, $45 million cut to state-funded Mental Health Community Services that will decrease both the quality and accessibility of services available to people with mental-health disabilities. In addition, it will force some of these patients into more expensive institutions, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act’s community integration mandate.

Elimination of CARELINE: $380,000 Budget cuts also eliminated the CARELINE, which was a toll-free number that residents could call to help them navigate the network of human services in North Carolina. Before it was shut down, the Careline received 300,000 calls per year from parents and caregivers looking to access health services. Private agencies offer another alternative. The United Way, for instance, offers NC 2-1-1, a three digit phone number that connects families to community health and human service resources 24 hours a day, every day in all languages.

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BUILDING A STRONGER NORTH CAROLINA

Total Reduction to the Justice and Public Safety Budget: $166 million (or 7%) in FY2011-12, $159 million in FY2012-13* North Carolina strives to offer safe communities where at-risk children and adults, including ex-offenders, have an opportunity to lead productive lives. This year, more than $150 million annually was cut from the Justice and Public Safety budget, which includes the state court system, Corrections, Juvenile Justice, and other statewide public safety initiatives.

Cuts to Juvenile Justice: $16 million in FY2011-12 In the final budget, legislators consolidated the Division of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Department of Corrections, and the Department of Crime Control and Public Safety into a new Department of Public Safety. They closed two Youth Development Centers and eliminated 39 court counselor and 8 chief court counselor positions. WHAT IT MEANS FOR JUVENILES IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM:

Youth are more likely to recidivate without adequate counseling and education opoortunities leading to higher crime rates.

Additional Justice and Public Safety Cuts Funding was eliminated for the Women at Risk substance abuse treatment program, the Summit House residential facility for female prisoners and their children, and the Harriet’s House residential facility for former female inmate re-entering their communities. Funding was also eliminated for Drug Treatment Court, Sentencing Services, and all nonprofit mediation centers operated via the Dispute Resolution program. The final budget also cuts $12.7 million in funding for the Office of Indigent Defense Services, and it leaves unpaid an estimated $13 million in fees owed to private attorneys who represented indigent clients on the state’s behalf. WHAT IT MEANS FOR PEOPLE STRUGGLING WITH DRUG ABUSE AND THOSE WHO CAN’T AFFORD ATTORNEYS:

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More people convicted of minor, non-violent offenses will end up in prison and without treatment for chronic problems.

Recidivism will increase as ex-offenders struggle to adjust to re-entering society without the guidance and assistance once provided by Sentencing Services, a program that’s been proven effective.

Fewer attorneys will be willing to serve indigent clients, possibly resulting in ineffective representation for low-income people charged with crimes.


A Companion Guide to Community Conversations

2011

Innocent people will likely go to prison, and many guilty verdicts could be overturned due to a lack of adequate representation.

*

The budget-cut amounts for Justice and Public Safety do not take into account the transfer of the Highway Patrol from the Highway Fund to the General Fund under the Crime Control and Public Safety budget.)

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BUILDING A STRONGER NORTH CAROLINA

Major Policy Changes from the 2011 Session Legislative policy changes at the state level are made typically through two vehicles: 1) bills that pass both the House and Senate and become law, and 2) “special provisions” in the state budget. The special provisions document contains hundreds of pages of directions on how state and federal funds should be spent, and it may include significant policy changes. Below is a summary of major policy changes made through legislation and the budget special provisions in the 2011 legislative session.

Early Childhood Education—Smart Start The special provisions in the state budget contain a number of items that limit Smart Start’s programming, effectiveness, and reach of services. Major ones (from Section 10.5) include the following: •

Limits on Smart Start’s administrative costs to no more than 8% of state funds for local partnerships

Salary caps for employees of NC Partnership for Children and local partnerships

A requirement that all partnerships match 13% of state funding with private funds

Early Childhood Education—More at Four In addition, the budget special provisions mandate the transfer of More at Four from the Department of Public Instruction to the Department of Health & Human Services’ Division of Child Development. The budget renames the program “NC Pre-K” and makes several significant changes to how it is operated and funded. (Since the budget passed, there has been a legal battle that may shift some of these requirements.) Major changes to More at Four/NC Pre-K (from Section 10.7) include the following: •

A cap on the percentage of low-risk children served by More at Four at 20% (previously, there was no limit), fundamentally changing the program’s focus

A directive that only three-, four-, and five-star facilities receive child-care subsidy funds

The implementation of a co-payment for More at Four that is aligned with the child-care subsidy co-payment

Finally, Section 10.1 limits parents enrolled in post-secondary education to a maximum of 20 months of subsidized child-care services. This will impact scores of parents working to qualify for new employment opportunities by beefing up their education and training.

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K-12 Education Notable new laws that impact K-12 education include the following: TAX CREDITS FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES (House Bill 344 / S.L. 2011-395) allows parents of children with qualifying disabilities who were enrolled in a public school but now attend private schools or are homeschooled to claim a nonrefundable tax credit worth up to $6,000 per year for K-12 education expenses. The law also establishes a separate fund for Special Education and Related Services to be funded at a level of $2,000 per tax credit claimed. HIGH SCHOOL TO WORK PARTNERSHIP (House Bill 769 / S.L. 2011-91) requires local boards of education to create policies that will encourage high-school-to-work partnerships. NO CAP ON NUMBER OF CHARTER SCHOOLS (Senate Bill 8 / S.L. 2011-164) – eliminates the cap of 100 charter schools. AMEND LAW RE: SCHOOL DISCIPLINE (House Bill 736 / S.L. 2011-282) revises and updates the school discipline law to codify case law and acknowledge changes in law. It eliminates mandatory long-term suspensions for everything except firearms violation, which is in federal law. The law also requires discipline notices to parents be written in a foreign language if the parents speak that language, including the provision of resources to provide the notice in another language. DROPOUT RECOVERY PILOT PROGRAM (House Bill 822 / S.L. 2011-259) creates a pilot program in four jurisdictions, including New Hanover County that will contract with nonprofit or for-profit corporations to develop educational programs for people who have dropped out of school. MODIFY LAW RE: CORPORAL PUNISHMENT (Senate Bill 498 / S.L. 2011-270) lets parents sign a document to opt their children out of corporal punishment.

Post-secondary Education There are two significant special provisions pertaining to post-secondary education. •

Section 9.11(a) limits a student’s receipt of the UNC Need-based Grant to 9 semesters (or its equivalent if enrolled part-time).However, many students will be unable to complete their degree programs in that time because of reduced course offerings due to budget cuts. This special provision also directs the General Assembly’s Fiscal Research Division, the NC Community College System and UNC’s General Administration to study the impact of need-based grants on college completion.

Section 8.5(a) allows a local community college to use up to 20% of its state Literacy Funds to provide employability skills, job-specific occupational and technical skills, and developmental education instruction to students enrolled in a high-school equivalency or diploma program. The college may waive tuition and registration fees associated with this instruction.

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Notable policy bills that passed are as follows: ELIMINATE MEANS TEST FROM 529 DEDUCTION (Senate Bill 247 / S.L. 2011-106) eliminates the income threshold, which was implemented in 2010, that allowed only households earning less than $100,000 to take tax deductions for 529 college savings plan contributions. NO ADULT LEFT BEHIND (Senate Bill 166 / S.L. 2011-327) establishes a No Adult Left Behind initiative that will provide funds and outline state workforce development goals with an eye to increasing post-secondary completion among North Carolina's working population. COMM. COLLEGES/OPT OUT OF FED'L LOAN (House Bills 58, 15, 134 and 541) comprised of a set of local bills that allow 26 community colleges to opt out of the federal student loan program.

Health & Human Services Notable special provisions affecting Health & Human Services (other than early childhood education, which is addressed above) include the following:

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Section 10.16 directs DHHS to eliminate up to 250 full-time-equivalent positions that have been continuously vacant since July 1, 2010.

Section 10.18 reduces funds allocated to non-profit organizations by $5 million.

Section 10.19 bars the use of state or DHHS funds for Planned Parenthood contracts.

Section 10.26 directs DHHS to work with the Department of Correction to use DOC funds to purchase pharmaceuticals for the treatment of inmates with HIV/AIDS.

Section 10.31.(d)(2) authorizes the Secretary of DHHS to change or eliminate certain Medicaid optional services if budget savings are not realized.

Section 10.36.(a) requires DHHS to implement a cost-sharing requirement for families of children with incomes above Medicaid limits to pay for CAPMR/DD and CAP-C programs. Currently the state provides these services at no charge. The fees would be established based on a sliding scale. This change is subject to federal approval.

Section 10.37.(a) outlines significant changes to Personal Care Services programs (PCS). New programs prioritize in-home care for children and adults.

Section 10.41(a) requires that changes to NC Health Choice be preapproved. It also limits dental services provided under Health Choice.


A Companion Guide to Community Conversations

2011

Justice & Public Safety The budget’s special provisions merged the Department of Correction, the Department of Crime Control and Public Safety, and the Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention into a single department: the Department of Public Safety. The change (Sec. 19.1) could have ramifications for how juvenile justice services are managed in the state. Other notable changes in this area through legislative bills are as follows: JUSTICE REINVESTMENT ACT (House Bill 642 / S.L. 2011-192) is the result of work by the Council of State Governments’ Justice Reinvestment Project, which identified savings in NC’s criminal justice/corrections system. It increases supervision after a prisoner is released to 12 months, limits jail time for probation violations to 90 days, creates a Community Corrections Advisory Board, places more people with misdemeanor convictions in jail rather than prison, and adds additional funding to substance abuse services. ANNEXATION REFORM ACT OF 2011 (House Bill 845 / S.L. 2011-396) makes major changes to NC’s annexation laws, including reducing the barriers to voluntary annexation for low-wealth and excluded communities. EXPUNGE NONVIOLENT OFFENSE BY MINOR (Senate Bill 397 / S.L. 2011-278) allows individuals convicted of a non-violent crime when under age of 18 to have the criminal conviction expunged if certain conditions are met.

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Ten Ways to Get Engaged Advocacy is the process of exercising our individual or collective power to influence policy and policymakers. To create lasting changes, people can use their voices in a multitude of ways, some of which are straightforward while others require more effort. Today you learned about budgetary, economic and programmatic issues that are impacting communities across North Carolina. We hope you will feel compelled to act on something you learned. Please consider taking one of these steps in the next week. Become a reliable source of information. Get educated about the issues you care about. Learn about the legislative process and how policymakers’ work impacts your issues. Find out who is supporting or opposing your position and why. Call your elected official to bring attention to your issue or concern. Before you call, consider what you would like to convey and how you can express it concisely. Expect to talk to a staff member, but don’t worry – this does not limit the effectiveness of your call. Get to know the staff members of your elected officials. They serve as advisors to the policymakers and can highlight your concern and the need for change. Visit your local policymaker. Be sure to schedule an appointment first. Establish your talking points ahead of time, and be sure that you are respectful in all that you say and do. Write a personal letter or e-mail to your policymaker. Be sure to be specific about your concern and include a statistic or two about your issue, if possible. Never use a threatening tone. If sending a letter to a U.S. senator or representative, do not use regular mail; use a fax number or email address. Invite your local elected official to an event at your facility. Give them a tour of your facility to help them understand the impact their decisions have on the work you do and those you serve. Write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper. While every letter may not be published, editors pay attention to well-written letters. This is especially true when there are many letters written on the same topic. In turn, published letters do influence elected officials. Join forces with others. Add your voice to an existing coalition or gather people or groups that share your views to create a coalition. There is power in numbers. Host a community event. Provide education and opportunities for action in order to engage others in the issue you care about. Always say thank you. Acknowledging a policymaker’s efforts is a critical step in creating a lasting relationship.

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Resources Who represents me? Find out who your state legislators are by visiting the NC General Assembly website. Simply enter your county, zip code or district and the names of your legislators will pop up. http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/GIS/Representation/Representation.html Find out who your U.S. House and Senators are by visiting the following websites: Representatives: http://www.house.gov/ Senators : http://www.senate.gov/ How can I learn more about my community? Learn more about your county by visiting the National Association of Counties http://www.naco.org/counties/counties/state.cfm?state=nc Learn more about your city by visiting the National League of Cities www.nlc.org Learn more about the latest census data for NC or your community by visiting http://www.linc.state.nc.us/ You can access all of these links and a host of resources from the United Way of North Carolina website at www.unitedwaync.org listed under both advocacy and system support research. How can I find help in my local community? Ever wondered who to call for help? It’s a great question considering North Carolina has more than 20,000 nonprofits providing every form of service. Spearheaded by United Way of North Carolina, NC 2-1-1 is an easy to remember, three-digit telephone number that connects people to critical health and human service programs. Today, NC 2-1-1 reaches 80% of NC residents. United Way of North Carolina is actively working to expand 2-1-1 services statewide. Both the nc211.org website and the 2-1-1 number are available in multiple languages. Services include housing, food, medicine, transportation, support groups, money management, legal assistance, counseling, health care, recreation, donations and much more. Simply dial 2-1-1 on your phone to get connected. For community planners, 2-1-1 can also provide an analysis of local needs vs. available services to help determine gaps in services and to direct local investment where they are needed most. How can I learn more about policy issues? Visit www.ncjustice.org to sign up for regular email alerts and publications about policy issues you care about. The N.C. Budget and Tax Center produces timely, credible analysis on budget, tax and economy issues. Follow us on Twitter at @ncbudgetandtax. Get involved in Together NC, a coalition of over 130 advocacy groups, service providers and professional associations working to maintain and expand public investments in education, health, and infrastructure by taking a balanced approach to our state budget, one that includes not only careful spending cuts but also new revenues. Find out more at www.togethernc.org, or follow us on Twitter at @togethernc. Follow United Way’s advocacy work at www.unitedwaync.org/advocacy.

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Opportunity and Prosperity for All

NC Justice Center

North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

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P.O. Box 28068

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Raleigh, NC

BTC Reports

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org

Appendix 1: Selected Cuts in Detail


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

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P.O. Box 28068

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Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

l

P.O. Box 28068

l

Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

l

P.O. Box 28068

l

Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

l

P.O. Box 28068

l

Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

l

www.ncjustice.org


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

l

P.O. Box 28068

l

Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org


North Carolina Budget & Tax Center

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P.O. Box 28068

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Raleigh, NC

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27611-8068

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www.ncjustice.org


U N I T E D WAY O F N O RT H CA R O L I NA 875 Walnut Street • Suite 150-B • Cary, NC 27511 919/834-5200 voice • www.unitedwaync.org • info@unitedwaync.org

N O RT H CA R O L I NA J U S T I C E C E N T E R Opportunity and Prosperity for All 224 S. Dawson Street • P.O. Box 28068 • Raleigh, NC 27611 919/856-2570 voice • 919/856-2175 fax • www.ncjustice.org • contact@ncjustice.org

© COPYRIGHT 2011 NO PORTION OF THIS DOCUMENT MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION.

Building a Stronger North Carolina  

This Companion Guide, created by the NC Budget and Tax Center and United Way of NC, provides you with data about North Carolina’s economy, s...

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