Page 1


Advancing the Braford Breed 10 Sale

Selling 7 bulls and 15 heifers at the Advancing the Braford Breed 10 Sale. March 23, 2018 — Kinder, LA — 4 p.m.

121_Rainer7037

333_Rainer

BR 6064 Ms. 7098

Selling BR 6064 Ms 7098 at the International Sale in Houston. Born Feb. 6, 2017. RMR Top Hand 6064 daughter. March 2, 2018 — Houston, TX — 7 p.m.

124_Rainer7046

International Braford Sale P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334-738-2205

Bill Rainer Cattle Co. REGISTERED BRAFORD CATTLE

New Summerfield, Texas Cell: 903-780-6455 Texas Home: 903-683-1086

16 Braford Bulls Selling March 23 at the Advancing the Braford Breed

10 SALE

Kinder, Louisiana

LOT 138

HR Designer Boss 1232 BW -1.6

BWM -0.5

WW 15

YW 25

Milk -2

TM 6

Fat 0.030

REA 0.18

Marb 0.06

2949 State Road 70 West Okeechobee, Florida 34972 Jim W. Harvey — 863.697.6624 Ronnie Trythall — 863.697.2182

CALVING EASE DELUXE!


Vol. XXXIII, No. 1 2018

Spring-born Braford calves at Alleman Cattle Company in Rayne, LA

Feature Story 12 Time Passes by Amanda Lee

Other Features 6 An Exploration of Selection Tools by Courtney Wesner

March 2 UBB Board of Directors Meeting, Crowne Plaza, Houston, TX

In Each Issue

March 2

2 President’s Notes

UBB Annual Membership Meeting, Crowne

by Robert Mills

3 From the Director’s Desk by Hannah Wine

5380 Old Bullard Rd., Suite 600, Box 358 Tyler, TX 75703 904.563.1816 www.brafords.org • BrafordNews@brafords.org Like the United Braford Breeders on Facebook!

Events

4 Association News 18 Junior Focus 20 Show Results

Plaza, Houston, TX March 2 International Braford Sale, Houston, TX March 3 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo National Braford Show, Houston, TX March 8-9

UBB Registration Office As of Sept. 29, 2017 PO Box 1177 Kingsville, TX 78364 361.296.4415

World Braford Congress, Fort Worth, TX March 23 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale, LA

Braford News is the official publication of the United Braford Breeders (UBB). It is published four times a year and is supported by paid advertisements and subscriptions. Advertising and subscription information can be obtained from the UBB office. We appreciate your letters, comments and any editorial material you would like considered for publication.

March 31 Late Herd Inventory Deadline

Editor – Hannah Wine hwine@brafords.org Production Hereford Publications Inc./Creative Services Abigail L. Engel 11500 NW Ambassador Dr., Ste 410, Kansas City, MO 64153 816.842.3757 • 816.842.6931 fax aengel@hereford.org

Follow the United Braford Breeders!

Zoetis is corporate sponsor of United Braford Breeders.

Editor, Hannah Wine, hwine@brafords.org

Twitter: UnitedBrafordBreeder Instagram: unitedbrafordbreeders Facebook: United Braford Breeders

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

1


President’s Notes

UBB Board of Directors 2018 is here and things are becoming very busy in the Braford world. The new year brings many new and exciting things to our association. The new registration system is up and running. There are still a few bugs to work through, but everything seems to be progressing. The new office staff in Kingsville are becoming familiar the Braford system and members. Communications are also improving with the phone number changes. All of the new pieces will only improve from here as we all become more comfortable, day by day.

by Robert Mills

MAKE YOUR MARK IN THE SHOW RING AND RAISE GOOD ONES FOR YEARS TO COME! Be sure to check out lot 5 in the International Braford Sale

Brynlee’s selling one of her best! Lot 5 B/S SLOW RIDE 3017

Danny Boudreaux 337-905-2330 Cell 337-249-9066 3475 Grand Chenier Hwy. Grand Chenier, LA 70643 boudreauxandson@camtel.net

Michael Boudreaux Cell 337-303-4167 162 Eugene Rd. Lake Charles, LA 70607 mlbbrafords@yahoo.com

2 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

Houston events are in their final planning stages and shaping up to be exciting for our members and international guest that will be in attendance. The 2018 World Braford Congress will be held here in the United States. We would like to extend a very heartfelt welcome to all of the attendees. Their first impression of the UBB and USA will be in Houston during our activities at the National Show. From there, tours with many stops have been planned and scheduled to see a variety of agriculture ventures. The culmination and 2018 World Braford Congress will be held at River Ranch in the historic downtown Fort Worth Stockyards area. Several leading industry speakers representing several countries are on tap to discuss topics that are relevant to the beef industry today. Again on behave of the entire UBB membership, I would like to say “Welcome” and we hope your stay here will be one that you will remember for a lifetime. Safe travels and we will see everyone in Houston Robert Mills

President - Robert Mills 15535 C.R. 1123 Athens, TX 75751 Office: 903.489.0837 Home: 903.489.0869 Mobile: 903.676.8930 Email: robert@rockcrestranch.com Vice President - Bill Rainer P.O. Box 243 Union Springs, AL 36089 Alabama: 334.738.2205 Texas: 800.729.7790 FAX: 903.683.9830 Mobile: 903.780.6455 Email: granjan.jr@gmail.com Secretary - Scott McCullough 3226 C.R. 3115 Greenville, TX 75402 Mobile: 903.274.7799 Email: wmscottmcc@hotmail.com Treasurer - Larry Stanberry LS Brafords 996 VZ C.R. 1805 Grand Saline, TX 75140 Home: 903.962.7219 Mobile: 214.924.9202 Email: lstanberry@earthlink.net Region 1 Director - Will Moncrief Running M Ranch 10006 Journeys End Tallahassee, FL 32312-3710 Office: 850.385.4489 Mobile: 850.566.6070 Email: w69cracker@hotmail.com Region 1 Director - Zach Adams Adams Ranch Inc. 25501 Orange Ave. Fort Pierce, FL 34945 Mobile: 772.215.6268 Email: ZachAdamsRanch@gmail.com Region 2 Director - Chris Herpin Herpin Cattle Company 20102 Herpin Circle Kaplan, LA 70548 Mobile: 337.652.8125 Fax: 337.643.3382 Email: aherpin@sfbcic.com Region 2 Director - Heather Green 3313 Trailer Town Rd. Jennings, LA 70546 Mobile: 337.540.1748 Email: gran3290@aol.com Region 2 Director - Corey Doucet 120 Tans Road Lake Charles, LA 70607 Home: 337.598.5190 Mobile: 337.802.5528 Email: coreydoucet@camtel.net Region 4 Director - Paul Harris Greenview Farms 334 K-Ville Rd. Screven, GA 31560 Mobile: 912.294.2472 Fax: 912.586.6991 Email: Greenviewpaul@yahoo.com Region 4 Director - Jim Smith JS Land & Cattle Co. P.O. Box 487 Magnolia, MS 39652 Home: 601.783.7045 Mobile: 601.551.7045 FAX: 601.276.7675 Email: jimsmith@agup.co


From the Director’s Desk

W

Welcome by Hannah Wine UBB Executive Director

elcome to all of our international guests attending the 2018 Braford World Congress! The opportunity to host Braford enthusiasts from other countries comes to us here to the United States at a wonderful time. The breed is advancing faster than ever and the quality of the Braford cattle produced on U.S. ranch soil is higher than it has ever been, both from a genotypic and phenotypic standpoint. That’s a testament to our breeders’ strong focus on making better, more efficient, and more profitable beef cattle that not only fit our US market but have an international acceptability to them as well. Know that it is a great pleasure to showcase the American way of raising Braford cattle, the environment, food, cultural traditions, and let’s not forget a chance to show you around a good old fashioned stock show. Rest assured that there is no better place to explore U.S. beef production than right here in Texas. Texas is, undoubtedly, American cattle country in all of its glory. It leads the United States in cattle production with 12.3 million head, nearly double that to Nebraska in second with 6.5 million head.

Here are some numbers to help paint a clearer picture of U.S. Cattle Production: Top 5 states that raise cattle and calves as of Jan. 1, 2017:

Texas — 12.3 million Nebraska — 6.45 million Kansas — 6.4 million California — 5.15 million Oklahoma — 5 million

Top 5 states for cattle in feedlots with capacity more than 1,000 head as of Jan. 1, 2017:

Texas — 2.42 million Nebraska — 2.37 million Kansas — 2.17 million Colorado — .900 million Iowa — .600 million Average age of a principle beef cattle rancher is 58.32 913,246 total cattle & calf operations 727,906 are beef farms and ranches

91% are family-owned or individually-operated 11% are operated by women 26,586 are engaged in cattle feedlot production 80% are family owned or individually operated 5% are operated by women The numbers show a lot. But what they don’t show is that ranching in the United States is a way of life. It is a culture of its own and we appreciate the opportunity to get to share that culture and way of life with you. We believe that you will find that the Braford cow of the U.S. is a maternal machine, with all of the adaptability and built in profitability that you have surely come to know through your own experience with the breed. We look forward to the networking and knowledge sharing opportunity that we have been presented with through this wonderful event. On behalf of the United Braford Breeders, welcome to all of our Congress guests!

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

3


Association News 2018 Houston Livestock Show and UBB Annual Membership Meeting 2018 UBB membership meeting slated for Friday, March 2, at 2 p.m. at the NRG Center on the grounds of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo. 2018 Houston Braford Events Schedule Thursday, March 1, 2018 7 a.m.: Cattle move-in Starts 3 p.m.: must be in place at Airport Blvd 5 p.m.: must be checked in at the Superintendent’s Office Friday, March 2, 2018 2 p.m.: UBB Annual Membership Meeting, NRG Center, 2nd Floor Room 603 7 p.m.: Braford Sale, East Arena Saturday, March 3, 2018 8 a.m.: Braford F1 Female Show followed by the National Braford Show

L AL

AMERICAN

o

JU

NA

, AR

se d r o f a r Bn the State Lin A

March 2 UBB Board of Directors Meeting, Crowne Plaza, Houston, TX March 2 UBB Annual Membership Meeting, Crowne Plaza, Houston, TX March 2 International Braford Sale, Houston, TX March 3 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo National Braford Show, Houston, TX March 8-9 World Braford Congress, Fort Worth, TX March 22 Advancing the Braford Breed Sale, Kinder, LA March 31 Late Herd Inventory Deadline June 1 NJBA All American Entry Deadline

LY AR 5-7 • TE X

K

Upcoming Events:

9300 Main St, Houston, TX 77025 (832) 371-9300 Group Rate: $195/night Group Name: United Braford Breeders

JB A

United Braford Breeders is holding the International Braford Sale on Friday, March 2, 2018 at 7 p.m. in the East Arena. Join us for good food, great fun, and even better Braford genetics!

2 018 N

International Sale of Sales | March 2, 2018

Sunday, March 4, 2018 12 p.m.: Release Braford Cattle ​ NEW Headquarters Hotel: Holiday Inn Express New hotel built in 2017 and located just one mile from the barn!

2018 NJBA All American Slated for July 5-7 UBB Board of Directors Elections The following directors were elected to serve the United Braford Breeders membership for a three-year term. Region 1, Florida: Will Moncrief Region 2, Louisiana: Bryan Alleman Region 3, Texas: Robert Mills Region 4, All Other States Region: Toni Meacham, Washington 4 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

The Hyman family will be hosting the 2018 All American Braford Show July 5-7 in Texarkana, AR. The All American is much, much more than just a Braford and F1 cattle show. The event is jam packed with all sorts of contests like showmanship, judging, sales talk, quiz bowl and much more. Weaver Livestock and Leather will be providing a free educational session for all exhibitors. Make plans to join us and look for schedule and hotel information March 1 at www.brafords.org/allamerican. Entries due June 1.


Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

5


An Exploration

of Selection Tools,

Both Genotypic and Phenotypic Based on a talk by Dr. Matt Spangler and Dr. Bob Weaber at the Range Beef Cow Symposium By Courtney Wesner, Freelance Writer

Dr. Bob Weaber

As we draw nearer to a close on the first quarter of 2018, there’s a lot to digest for the cattleman, as it seems there is with every New Year, new season and cycle. The tools used to make selection decisions in the beef industry seem to be changing with leaps and bounds. It also seems that with every passing year those changes are coming at a faster and faster pace. This is a disparaging reality for even the most optimistic cowboy or cowgirl at times because the inability to grasp these changes could result in significant disadvantages to the bottomline, or worse. Understanding change and utilizing available selection tools have become requirements for the economic-minded cattle producer. “There are different tools for us to use in making selection, we should use the right tools at the right time,” explained Dr. Bob Weaber, of the Department of Animal Science and Industry at Kansas State University during a recent talk at the Range Beef Cow Symposium. “Genetics and genomics are changing fast. The amount of change in our business over the last 12 to 18 months has been pretty phenomenal. I’d like to remind you though, that the basics haven’t changed. We can approach selection much the same way as we have for many years, in a very systematic approach,” Weaber added.

Developing a Breeding Objective

Dr. Matt Spangler

6 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

This systematic approach Dr. Weaber speaks of starts out with identifying an objective. “The fun part is going out and actually doing the selection. The un-fun part, but the $500 and hour work, is really spending time to understand what it is that we are selecting for. What is our objective,” said Weaber. A breeding objective is, in its most simple form, a written statement that answers the following four questions: — What are my breeding and marketing goals? — What traits directly impact the profitability of my operation? – Are there environmental constraints that dictate or determine the level of performance that is acceptable for any given, or multiple traits, within my operation? — How are females replaced within my herd? Either raised in herd or purchased elsewhere. Beyond answering the previous four questions, this statement should also paint a clear picture of the operation and how it works and runs. “A number of years ago when I was at Mizzou, I googled breeding objective, and this is one of the first ones that came up from a commercial operation in New Zealand. ‘Our objective is to breed cattle that breed as yearlings, calve unassisted and rear a good calf for sale at weaning every year. We aim to breed functional cattle that flesh easily and can forage on the hills over winter, but must have the temperament and soundness to be farmed intensively during calving and the breeding season’. With that we’ve got a pretty clear picture about this operation in our head. We know what things are important and what drives profitability in this operation. One thing that is missing here is how females are replaced in the herd,” said Dr. Weaber. He reminds us that this exercise, of developing a breeding objective, keeps the breeder focused on what is important within his or


her specific operation and is something that should be revisited often. Key points within an operation inherently change over time in an adjustment to current markets, available labor, farm transitioning, etc., and the breeding objective must be updated accordingly.

Production Level Considerations Once a suitable breeding objective has been identified, this tool should then help to guide in the determination of what traits directly determine profitability in the outlined setting. “One of the things that is becoming more and more important to recognize is the understanding that maximum trait selection often is probably not our objective if we are a commercial-minded producer. Maximums in biology, the extremes in biology, always come with consequence,” cautioned Weaber. With maximum trait selection taken off the table, the economic-minded producer must then begin to think through what is an acceptable level of lactation, calving ease, mature weight, and other economically relevant traits (ERT) in relation to the amount of feed and labor availability for their specific production setting. It is the answers to the four questions outlined in the breeding objective that lead a producer to which traits directly affect their bottomline or, in other words, which traits are an ERT within their operation and to what level they should select for those traits to maximize profit. “Maximum calving ease, maximum yearling weight, maximum milk, maximum carcass is likely not the optimum solution for anyone. Figuring out the optimum level is what drives profitability,” explained Weaber. “Profit is revenue minus cost. We can make it a lot more complicated than this, but at the end of the day, this is it. What we need to be able to do is connect our ideas relative to revenue and cost streams back to our selection objectives. Practicing selection without understanding-- that is a hobby. If you have enough money that you can select for anything and the outcome doesn’t matter, profitability in cow calf production is probably not the primary focus in your operation. If profitability is really important in your operation, getting your arms around this and making the connection to which traits are important is really critical,” concluded Weaber.

Economically Relevant Trait (ERT) An Economically Relevant Trait is just what it seems. This is a trait that is directly associated with a revenue stream or a cost. “An ERT is a trait that either has a cost directly associated with it, or a revenue stream directly associated with it. The other traits that may have a genetic association or some relationship to our system are called indicator traits,” explained Weaber.

Calving Ease (CE), for example, would be an ERT. Calving ease, or difficulty, has a cost associated with it. A dead calf costs the producer money, while a live calf contributes to the revenue column. On the other hand, Birth Weight (BW) would be an indicator trait. Birth Weight can indicate the ease or difficulty that a calf is born, and it is also positively associated with Weaning Weight (WW), and thus provides an indicator, though an indirect one, of scale weights at weaning time. Both CE and BW are measured and expressed with genetic predictors, or EPDs, and this is where the importance of understanding the difference between an ERT and an indicator trait becomes important. The economically-minded producer should place the most selection pressure on the ERT, while all the while remembering that the importance of those traits will differ based upon the objective and production level considerations. EPDs as a Selection Tool “Ultimately, the phenotype of animals, other than a few traits, do not matter. If you are going to communicate value and try and solve the optimization problem, EPDs and selection indexes provide that,” explained Weaber. Phenotype includes what we see on foot and what is measured, such as actual weights or ultrasound scan data. Reported phenotypes prove important in the calculation of EPDs, but it is important for the contemporary beef producer to not overestimate the importance of phenotype in selection. Phenotypic indicators are a combination of both genetic effects and the environmental effect. The goal of the producer when selecting either herd bulls or replacement females is identifying those animals that have the most potential as parents, or the most genetic potential. In doing so, it is important that all environmental effect is removed, so as to effectively and efficiently compare one animal to its contemporaries. Some examples of environmental effects that would affect phenotypic selectors are age of the animal, age of the animal’s dam, breed composition, feed supplementation, forage resources, sex and more.

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

7


“EPDs are time proven. We know that it works. We combine all of the different sources of information and weight them appropriately. What we are really trying to do when we develop an EPD is separate the proportion of differences between animals in their phenotype that are due to differences in their genetic value. The bull that you buy isn’t going to pass on his advantages in terms of the amount of feed he got, he’s not. The only thing that he can pass on are his advantages in terms of genetic potential,” explained Dr. Matt Spangler, of the Department of Animal Science, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, on the importance of EPDs as a selection tool. When the producer defers to what an animal looks like, or phenotype, an inefficiency is created in selection.

Economic Index Values as a Selection Tool Though EPDs serve to isolate genetic predictors and in doing so sure up selection, they still leave the producer with the uphill task of trait optimization. The reality of profitability is that several or many traits determine an animal’s relative value to the bottomline. Though EPDs have taken variations caused by the environment out of the equation, they have not helped in determining the relative weighting of each Economically Relative Trait for an operation. “Figuring out what’s the relative importance of calving ease vs. weaning weight vs. marbling score and milk EPD for different marketing schemes is pretty complicated. So we use selection index as a way to formalize that discussion. We can make it simpler by building objective selection indexes,” said Weaber. Economic indices can greatly simplify selection as they are designed to place the appropriate emphasis, or weighting, on a multitude of traits and report them as one number, or EPD. An economic index is simply a collection of EPDs that have been deemed economically relevant to a specific breeding objective. Within the index then, each of these EPDs is multiplied by an associated economic weight. In many ways a selection index is the culminating tool to all of the above considerations. It is important, however; that the correct index is being used and paired with a producer’s particular breeding objective. “Describing your production system, the first step that we talked about, will guide you as to which selection index to use,” concluded Weaber. Does Phenotype Play a Role in Commercial-minded Selection? “We realize that selection is challenging. Producers are faced with selecting for multiple traits simultaneously and not all of the ERTs have an associated EPD,” said Spangler. There are some Economically Relevant Traits that are only presented to the producer in the form of visual appraisal. Spangler and Weaber encourage the profitminded commercial producer to use phenotype in the sense of a pass/fail criteria in selection. “Did they pass a breeding soundness exam? I consider that a phenotype. A ‘no’ would make me question the bull’s ability to pass on his genetics, which is his job. Are they docile enough? Particularly for handlers that may have to interact with those bulls frequently, their actual phenotype for docility matters. Feet and leg traits, are they sound enough to go out and breed cows? Again, to be able to pass on their genetics to the next generation. So these are pass and fail criteria related to their ability to do their job, but we are not advocating in any way that using the raw phenotypes as a proxy of trying to determine how well they are going to improve those traits in the next generation. That’s the job of the EPDs,” explained Spangler.

8 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018


BRAFORD B

+ PLUS Adding More

The Braford Plus Program Developed with Design in Mind

The Braford Plus program was designed to allow producers the opportunity to register cattle that perfectly mix the maternal strength and built-in longevity of the Braford with the earlier maturing, carcass-driven strengths of the Angus and Red Angus breeds. The end-product is cattle that combine the best of three worlds — cattle that exceed all expectations in terms of longevity, with innate mothering ability, heat tolerance; and that suit the feedlot and packers ever increasing standards for efficiency, rate of maturity; and ultimately land on the right side of the grid. The advantages of the Braford Plus program will be seen in a better ability to market these composite cattle to all sectors, whether it be the commercial cowman, the backgrounder, the feedlot, the packer and ultimately the consumer.

BRAFORD B

What is Braford Plus?

PLUS+

Braford Plus refers to the offspring of the mating of a purebred Braford (3/8 Brahman, 5/8 Hereford) or F1 Braford (1/2 Hereford, 1/2 Brahman) to a registered Angus or Red Angus. Braford Plus cattle can be registered as multi-generational breeding of Braford Plus cattle (i.e., the resulting offspring of a registered Braford Plus bred to a registered Braford Plus). All Braford and F1 sires and dams must be registered with the UBB, and all Angus and Red Angus sires and dams must be on file with the UBB.

BRAFORD B

By the numbers, a Braford Plus is a 3/16 Brahman, 5/16 Hereford and 1/2 Angus or Red Angus if the result of a mating of a purebred Braford to an Angus or Red Angus or, if the Braford Plus is the result of mating an F1 Braford to an Angus or Red Angus, the Braford Plus is a ¼ Brahman, ¼ Hereford and ½ Angus or Red Angus.

Why Braford Plus?

PLUS

The function of crossbreeding is to optimize heterosis and it is important to utilize breeds whose genetics will complement each other. Braford Plus is the convenient way to capture heterosis and value. This crossbreeding system has the ideal balance of maternal and carcass traits. No two breeds offer more commitment to profitability and function in the southeast and southwest United States than the Braford x Angus or Braford x Red Angus mating. Braford Plus cattle are registered with documented parentage and EPDs. Braford Plus offer a simple and powerful way to optimize hybrid vigor. Use Braford Plus cattle to take advantage of management convenience and hybrid vigor in a single package while producing cattle that fit the pasture, the feedlot, and the meat case.

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

9


Welcome World Braford Congress! Exportable embryos and semen available

RCM 9182 Stealth

2017 National Champion Bull

RCM 6718 Online Maggie 2011 National Champion Female

Feature donor cow

Robert & Carol Mills • Trey Abney Athens, Texas www.rockcrestranch.com Home: 903-489-0869 Office: 903-489-0837 Fax: 903-489-3414 Robert: 903-676-8930 Trey: 903-676-7055 Email: info@rockcrestranch.com

10 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018


Advancing the Braford Breed X Sale Lot 201

Lot 202

BW 1.9 WW 20 YW 29 MILK 7 REA 0.26

BW 1.1 WW 17 YW 27 MILK 6 REA 0.20

BR MANSO Y003 825/82

BR MANSO Y003 989/83

Lot 207

Lot 212

BW 1.3 WW 13 YW 21 MILK 4 REA 0.19

BW 0.5 WW 12 YW 19 MILK 5 REA 0.20

BR MANSO B1024 532/91 Lot 204 BR MANSO Y003 826/85 BW 1.7

WW 18

YW 27

MILK 7

BR MANSO Y003 433/102

Lot 209 BR MANSO Y003 240/95

REA 0.28

BW 1.2

WW 19

Lot 213 BR MANSO B1024 993/110 BW 1.5

H MANSO BLOODLINE H Bred from JD Hudgins Brahman Cattle

WW 13

YW 20

MILK 4

REA 0.18

YW 27

MILK 4

Lot 211 BR MANSO B1024 282/101

REA 0.30

BW 1.8

WW 14

YW 20

MILK 6

REA 0.19

Lot 216 BR MANSO Y003 997/113 BW 1.2

WW 16

YW 22

MILK 5

REA 0.23

H Tim Bauer Winnie, Texas tim@bauerranch.com

409-656-0030 H

H Bauer R anch F1 Braford Bulls • K nown For Gentle Disposition H

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

11


By Passes Time With Amanda Lee Gross of Bar A Brafords

By Courtney Wesner, Freelance Writer

In the last USDA Census, it came as no surprise when it was reported that 56% of all farm operators have a primary occupation other than farming. This changing demographic is a sign of the times, and with these new times also come new challenges to the farm operator of 2018. Amanda Lee Gross, owner and operator of Bar A Brafords, together with her husband Tom, have been able to overcome the challenges that working a primary occupation off the farm can carry, and they have managed to do it partially by running a low-maintenance Braford cowherd. Amanda and Tom Gross make their home in Folsom, Louisiana, where Tom works offshore every two weeks and Amanda works as an FFA teacher in the local school system. Amanda, better known to the Braford community by her maiden name, Amanda Lee, from her younger years exhibiting Braford cattle, has managed to evolve what started out as an FFA project, to an after-work hobby, to its current form, a sustainable seedstock operation. In its infancy, Bar A Brafords operated like all good hobbies, centered primarily on enjoyment and personal preference without much thought given to profitability or sustainability. “In the beginning, it was as simple as oh these are the ones I like, these are the ones I am going to keep,” said Amanda when asked about selection and herd retention decisions. As the operation slowly grew and the pair decided to market cattle in the UBB Bull Development Program, new considerations arose. “We wanted to be a part of the Bull Development Program and started consigning. From there we started having discussions. Why did the one (bull) that we put in the program not do as well as some of the others? Through that we moved to starting to consider numbers in our selection and breeding,” said Amanda. With their decision to start incorporating and utilizing EPDs (Expected Progeny Differences) in their program, also came the need for an investment in new and superior genetics. The first priority in the quest to increase the genotypic value and overall performance of the progeny produced at Bar A Brafords was placed on finding herd bulls that would help them in achieving those goals. “If you really want to move forward, the numbers is where it’s at. Breeders can still take into consideration looks on foot, I get that, and that makes sense, but you have to have numbers also,” explained Amanda, and so started another conversation. As many breeders find, the quest to purchase herdimproving genetics without breaking the bank can be an uphill 12 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

battle. This proved true for Amanda and Tom. They were now at a point of wanting and needing to improve quality to reach their production goals, but all the while working within the constraints of a small herd size, and fighting time as a limiting factor due to their occupations, and it was that limiting factor that excluded A.I. and E.T technologies as being the complete answer to reaching their goals. “Good herd bulls are not cheap. What you want you are going to have to pay for,” said Amanda. So they did. With the decision to purchase high-end bulls, they were able to string together a consistent group of quality replacement females as an end product of their investments. However, their quest for improvement did not end there. Bar A Brafords is now working on perfecting the balance between replacing their older breeding females and offering their best for sale. A complicated rope to walk, at best. Now with a mature cow herd of 50 head, their increased volume has allowed them to better balance replacing and increasing herd quality with marketing. Making the decision to purchase replacement genetics elsewhere, they now market more of their top-end genetics. Bar A Brafords has seen tremendous growth and advancement, but more importantly, as often is the case with agriculture enterprises of today, it’s rooted in passion and history. That passion and history have been the lifeblood of the operation from the start. Amanda started exhibiting Braford cattle in high school for an FFA project when a generous neighbor gave her a Braford female of her own. “That cow was there. She was mine, and she wasn’t just something that I was just going to say, Okay, I’m done with it, let me sell this cow. Being part of the FFA stuff and showing animals for two years, you learn so much, you gain so much from that process, and it just kind of stuck, and that cow stuck around,” said Amanda as she explained her beginnings in the Braford breed. Today, Bar A Brafords makes sure to hold back several females with the idea of giving back what they have been given. “Here and there, there have been kids our way who want something to show, and want something decent to show, so we give what we have been given so a kid can show a calf. They don’t have to pay for anything that we wouldn’t pay for ourselves if the project was just a pasture cow and in the end it is our cow to breed. We appreciate the chance to help the kids who want to do it and who put in the


time that it takes but may not have the resources to do so,” says Amanda. In addition to being a way to give back to the youth in the community, exhibition has also played a role in networking for Amanda and Tom. “When we started, we really just did a few little local things. As we grew, and grew on our own, we started traveling to some of the bigger open shows,” said Amanda. She credits these shows with meeting and networking with numerous people and experiencing so many things that otherwise they would not have been exposed to. Past the exposure, she reminisces about how few young people are taking the next step in becoming involved in agriculture. “Of all the kids that were involved with showing when I was young, there are now just three or four of us in my age group that are still involved and still raising cattle. We took the step and made something of our own of it. Those aren’t seemingly good odds, three or four. If the kids who grew up in this, who know this life, who know the breed are not moving up, who is? There are so many other options, and so many other options that don’t require as much work. All of the things that you have to do and all of the things that you have to take care of compared to just an office job, it comes as no surprise. But you have to look at it from a different perspective,” said Amanda. That different perspective is not only the one that Amanda and Tom have chosen, but also the one that she advocates to interested students and prospective youth buyers. “With off the farm jobs, the biggest challenge that we face in our operation is time. I’m not one to complain about it because this is a choice that we made. We could get out at any given time and say this is just too much. Coming home straight from school, rushing to beat the dark because no one is home to feed and check cows, and especially when something is wrong, it’s tough. But it’s not something that I would just give up and say it’s not worth it. It’s a go to. Some days at school can be pretty rough and so home, the calves, and dealing with them, no matter what it is, it’s a go to. It always brings me back to Life isn’t so bad,” said Amanda about her lifestyle choice to remain involved in cattle production. For as much as working off the farm poses challenges in terms of time and labor in the operation, Amanda also credits it with helping them to remain on top of technology and to welcome it into the day-to-day operational workings of the farm. “You know, being a school teacher and seeing technology every day, seeing it change, that’s where it is. It makes life so much easier. We do almost everything that way. Being offshore, Tom deals with a lot with computerized equipment and spreadsheets and whatnot. We set up everything in that manner, so that all we have to do is inputs when something happens. It’s so easy to just pull it up from a phone or the computer, wherever you are, and take a look at whatever we have going right now. Here’s when we moved this bull to here. This is when that calf was born. It’s all always right there,” said Amanda about how technology plays a role. “I am mindful that the changing technology is hard for older generations that weren’t forced to use it in their jobs, and thus don’t have the luxury of knowing how to use it,” she further explained. “It’s the same concept across the board whether it be education or cattle, change is more often than not a good thing. It’s not always taken willingly by all, and that’s understandable, as it does complicate things sometimes. But it’s inevitable in every field,” finished Amanda. Amanda continues to blend traditional methods of marketing with new ones centered in technology. She has seen success in this blend thus far. Last year they consigned a lot to the Houston sale, and they will consign a lot again this year. They continue to use the UBB Bull Development Program. Recently they have also used less traditional marketing methods like cattlerange.com and Facebook to assist with marketing. “Everybody has Facebook, so I have been really good about just posting something on there and then people start commenting. Brafords are super sought after, and I am always reading, ‘Hey, I need one,’ or ‘Hey, I need a bull.’ This year we were really lucky and all of our bull calves were sold before they were even weaned,” said Amanda. With a healthy balance of low-maintenance, productive cattle, technology, passion and work-ethic, Amanda and Tom may fit into a Census statistic, but they have also managed to prove a finer point with their operation. In 2018, you can work a primary occupation off the farm and make it work. “With Brafords, there is a lot of good there that helps to keep us caught up,” said Amanda. She also credits the ever helpful Braford community with teaching them and setting them up for success. “All of the people that we have purchased Braford cattle from have been more than willing to share whatever knowledge that we may need to be successful,” said Amanda. “Here, we aren’t trying to be better than anybody in particular, we are just trying to be better than we were yesterday and the day before,” concluded Amanda.

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

13


4:00

F r i d ay, M a r c h 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 p. m . • K i n d e r L i v e s t o c k M A R K E T • K i n d e r , L A

Selling 50 Ranch-ready bulls 35 Open Braford heifers

LOT 136

LOT 145

LOT 326

LOT 147

LOT 333

Request a catalog at

www.brafords.org/sale Regional Sale Contacts Rhea Shields, LA 225.279.3212 • Jim Harvey, FL 863.697.6624 Bill Rainer, AL 903.780.6455 • Rodney Roberson, TX 936.569.4872 14 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018


Your best source for Braford semen! RMR Ranger’s Legacy 6180 RM MUSCLES LAD 7010 (89272) Sire: RMR MUSCLES LAD 0148 (99669) RM PROSPECTRESS 6010 (86316) RANGER (027740) Dam: GDQ RANGERETT 981 PRN (88579) GDQ TN VICTORIA 787 (P18781988)

EPD Acc %Rank

BW -2.5 0.82 2

BWM -1.6 0.68 15

RCM 2149 Davidson 9182 RCR CHAMP B615 (83996) Sire: RCM 615 HARLEY ET (105323) EG MS ONE STEP 904E (R14185)

BW: 78 WW: N/A YW: N/A Weight: N/A Height: N/A Frame: N/A SC: N/A

MR AR 515 (82609) Dam: AR MS FT WORTH 7182 (93729) MS AR 577 (90760)

EPD Acc %Rank

BW 2.8 0.74 95

BWM -1.1 0.25 35

WW 12 0.29 15

YW 8 0.07 99

Milk 3 0.14 30

TM 9 -

CW 7 -

Fat 0.03 0.05 10

WW 12 0.78 15

YW 17 0.64 10

Milk 7 0.64 2

Reg. #111932 • CSS Exportable semen available, limited quantity available • Deep bodied, extra length, polled and attractive • Producing beautiful daughters with high maternal value • Top 1% for Milk, HCW and MARB • Top 5% for BW, top 2% FAT, top 6% REA • With well over 100 registered offspring, Legacy is a maternal King

BW: 68 WW: 476 YW: 1056 Weight: N/A Height: N/A Frame: N/A SC: N/A

TM 13 -

CW 6 -

Fat 0.01 0.66 1

REA Marb 0.03 0.05 0.59 0.48 99 35

Reg. #122452 • Grand Champion Bull — 2011 HLSR • Deep, soggy made bull with an attractive look • Reserve Champion — Fort Worth 2010 and 2011 • 2010 Braford Show Bull of the Year • Full sibling to the 2-time National Champion Female • Top 10% for HCW, top 8% for REA and top 9% for WW and YW • CSS qualified exportable semen, limited quantity available

REA Marb 0.06 0.06 0.04 0.03 95 25

LSU Mr 2515 657

Reg. #111766

C4 MR 189 9605 (102748) Sire: LSU MR 2515 (107844) EE 206 MSL1 5228 1ET (H19547282)

BW: 82 WW: 657 YW: N/A Weight: N/A Height: 47 Frame: N/A SC: N/A

EG TCR CHAL 3157 (R24687) Dam: MS LSU 2042 (105919) MS LSUAC 2 (100757)

EPD Acc %Rank

BW -0.3 0.50 30

BWM 0.4 0.29 95

RCM 9182 STEALTH 5139 RCM 615 HARLEY ET Sire: RCM 2149 DAVIDSON 9182 AR MS FT WORTH 7182

BW: 61 WW: 595 YW: N/A Weight: N/A Height: N/A Frame: N/A SC: N/A

MDR ROOKIE 695 Dam: RCM 695 MS ROOKIE CJH L1 DOMINETTE 9117

EPD Acc %Rank

BW 0.6 0.35 50

BWM -0.9 0.16 40

WW 1 0.21 85

YW Milk -2 55 0.03 0.84 95 0.076

TM 1 -

CW 5 -

Fat 0.03 0.02 35

WW 21 0.38 2

YW 25 0.10 25

Milk 10 0.21 1

TM 20 -

CW 16 -

Fat 0.04 0.06 99

REA Marb 0.22 0.08 0.05 0.04 2 3

• Deep ribbed with extra length and clean underline • Free moving, attractive and extremely sound • Grand Champion Bull – 2008 Louisiana State Fair • Grand Champion Bull — 2008 Shreveport Show • Grand Champion Bull — 2009 Fort Worth • Outcross pedigree with performance and carcass merit • Top 2% for Milk, top 7% for WW and HCW • Top 8% for MARB and REA, top 9% for YW • CSS exportable semen available

Reg. #130878 • 2017 National Grand Champion Bull - HLSR • 2016 Reserve Champion - HLSR • 2016 Reserve Champion - Dixie National Livestock Show • 2018 Reserve Champion Fort Worth Livestock Show • Deep bodied, attractive, with a sound structure and build • CSS exportable semen available

REA Marb 0.08 0.06 0.02 0.01 90 30

TR GENESIS D105P ET SCHU-LAR ON TARGET 22S Sire: KCF BENNETT ENCORE Z311 ET KCF MISS REVOLUTION X338 ET MR. V8 958/5 (958/5) Dam: J7 LADY V8 827/0 J7 LADY HAMILTON 827

EPD Acc %Rank

BW 0.0 0.12 40

BWM -0.8 0.07 45

WW 13 0.11 10

YW 13 0.05 80

Edengarry Emperor 1845 EG 1056 Champ 4031 LSU Mr. 2515 657 RCM 2149 Davidson 9182 RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 RCR Champ B615 RMR Ranger’s Legacy 6180 TR Genesis D105P ET

Milk 5 0.07 10

Reg. #131816 • Extremely fertile with quality semen collected at 12.5 months of age • Thick made, with extra depth and volume, sound structured • Reserve Champion 2017 Fort Worth Stock Show • 2016-2017 Braford Show Bull of The Year • His first calves are just a month old at press time • Outcross pedigree utilizing V8 and JDH genetics • Domestic semen available

BW: N/A WW: N/A YW: N/A Weight: N/A Height: N/A Frame: N/A SC: N/A

TM 11 -

CW 10 -

#122493 #R25005 #111766 #122452 #130878 #83996 #111932 #131816

Fat 0.04 0.06 99

REA Marb 0.17 0.05 0.05 0.03 5 50

$30.00 $25.00 $25.00 $35.00 $ 35.00 $25.00 $30.00 $30.00

Semen & Embryo Sales AI & ET Equipment Sales TruTest Scales AI/Palpitation Clinics Professional Exporting Semen & Embryo Warehousing AI Consulting

3300 Longmire Drive • College Station, TX 77845 (979) 693-0388 • (800) 786-4066 • (979) 693-7994 Fax info@bovine-elite.com • www.bovine-elite.com

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

15


Miss Hazel

HB

Shown by Luke Natali

0317

Congratulations from

Holmwood Brafords

• State Fair of Louisiana Open and Junior Show Grand Champion Braford

Holmwood Brafords The Natali and Harrington Families 6415 Mark Le Bleu Road Lake Charles, LA 70615 337.540.2695

Running

• Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo Grand Champion Braford • Dixie National Livestock Show Grand Champion Braford

Ranch

Our goal is to produce maternal, moderate framed cattle with lots of growth at weaning and yearling ages. We do not creep feed. We keep replacement heifers from those that were born in the first 60 days of our calving season. We look for structural soundness and use our records, EPDs and ultrasound in making mating decisions. We would like to show you our cattle!

Running

Ranch

4686 N.W. C.R. 150, Greenville, FL 32331 16 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

Call for more information

Payne Midyette Will Moncrief Kit Storey 850-566-6070 850-544-5195 850-464-1399


FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 2018 • 7 P.M. NRG EAST ARENA • HOUSTON LIVESTOCK SHOW AND RODEO

Selling 11 elite, haltered Braford females and 2 herd picks JOIN US AT 6 P.M. FOR A CAJUN SUPPER! Sale catalog availabe at www.brafords.org/internationalbrafordsale

For more information contact: Larry Stanberry, International Sale Co-Chair - 214.924.9202 Danny Boudreaux, International Sale Co-Chair - 337.249.9066 Robert Mills, UBB President - 903.676.8930 Hannah Wine, UBB Exectuive Director - 540.272.1682

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

17


Junior Focus

Meet one of NJBA Families, The Richards of Far Away Farms By Brynlee Boudreaux, NJBA Secretary

Far Away Farms is a small family operation based in Grand Chenier, Louisiana. Owned by Bubba and Jessica Richard. Bubba raised commercial cattle with his grandfather, Sonny McCall, when he was a child and showed Beef Master and Romagnola cattle in 4-H. Jessica’s family raised commercial cattle. Their daughter Audreanna grew up watching her cousins Christian and Hannah Doucet show Brafords. She showed in Pee-Wee, and her passion for showing took off from there. Audreanna started with Braford Base cattle from Canik Farms. Their son Grady loves raising and showing cattle. It’s is all he wants to do. After school and on the weekends at daylight he is ready to head outside to feed the show cattle and check on the registered and commercial cattle. Audreanna and Grady have done well in the show ring winning grand champion and reserve grand champion, and they have won showmanship. They are both still young, so they have many years ahead of them in the show ring. As they continued to go to the shows following Doucet Brafords, they took an interest in Braford cattle. To start their own Braford herd they purchased some Braford heifers from Scott Nunez and Fred Denison, and one bull from Boudreaux & Son Brafords, and a bull from Doucet Brafords. Bubba and Jessica currently raise Braford, Braford Base and commercial cattle, and they have a Jersey cow named Bella. Their herd continues to grow, and they are now able to show some of the cattle they raised. It’s a team effort. Bubba works shift for Energyxxi, were he is the logistic superintendent overseeing their Shore base operations. When he is on his seven days off, he tends to the cattle. When the kids get out of school, after they finish their homework, the go taking off to the barn. When Bubba goes to work, Jessica does it all from bushing hogging, mending fence, taking cows to the vet and getting their hooves trimmed. The Richards love that the Braford Association is one big family. Everyone is always willing to help whether it’s in the show barn or at home. Bubba and Jessica have hosted two different Louisiana Braford family gatherings. They enjoy just getting together, visiting and watching the kids have fun together. Their kids have made many friends that they know will be friends for a lifetime. “With everyone living busy lives these days it’s nice to all get in one vehicle to head to a show for a weekend. The kids know our summer family vacations are now our state and national summer shows. We cannot wait to find out where we will be traveling to next,” Jessica remarked.

18 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

NATIONAL JUNIOR BRAFORD ASSOCIATION

2017-18 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OFFICERS President Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Vice President Kylea Mansfield Katy, Texas Secretary Brynlee Boudreaux Grand Chenier, LA Reporter Ashlee Primeaux Bell City, LA DIRECTORS Gene Natall Louisiana Logan Vest Louisiana Brady Harrington Louisiana Audreanna Richard Louisiana Amber Lee Staltzman Louisiana Mallory Hobson Arkansas UBB AMBASSADORS Jamie Davis Pearland, Texas Hayden Hyman Fouke, Arkansas Kylea Mansfield Katy, Texas Mallory Hobson Arkansas


Save The Date: July 5-7, 2018

2018 NJBA All American at the Four States Fairgrounds in Texarkana, Arkansas L AL

AMERICAN

JU

A

o

NA

, AR

se d r o f a r Bn the State Lin LY AR 5-7 • TE X

K

2 018 N

Reserve your hotel rooms today! Headquarters Hotel Holiday Inn Texarkana, Arkansas, Convention Center 5200 Convention Plaza Dr, Texarkana, AR 71854 (870) 216-2000 Group Rate: $69/night includes complimentary breakfast buffet Group Name: National Junior Braford Association​ Cut Off Date: June 20, 2018 Located just 2 miles from the fairgrounds and next door to the waterpark!

JB A

• Entries Close June 1 • Entry checks must be postmarked by June 3 • Fairgrounds open for early arrivals on July 3 and 4

Hosted by Nathan, Perri, Katelin and Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR

Selling the herd pick of our 2018 calf crop in the International Sale

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

19


Show Results Open Braford Base and Braford Show, State Fair of Louisiana Saturday, November 4, 2017 Judge: Webb Fields, College Station, TX

Braford Base Female Show Results

Class 1: MS D&D Sandy Shores 42/7 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 2: 6W Miss 3/7 exhibited by Ryann Landry of Creole, LA Class 3: 6W Miss 2/7 exhibited by Talan Canik of Lake Charles, LA Champion Heifer Calf: Ms D&D Sandy Shores 42/7 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: 6W Miss 3/7 exhibited by Ryann Landry of Creole, LA Class 6: Miss Dubina Rose 92 exhibited by Ashton Smith of Creole, LA Champion Fall Heifer Calf: Miss Dubina Rose 92 exhibited by Ashton Smith of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: GV Progress 798/4 K168 exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Class 10: Miss Diamond R573 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 11: CT Ms Teaux exhibited by Circle T Cattle Company of Church Point, LA Class 12: Miss 4-J 112/6 exhibited by Kirston Landreneaux of Lake Charles, LA Class 13: Miss Welch 102 exhibited by Shelby Welch of Grand Chenier, LA Champion Yearling Heifer: CT Ms Teaux exhibited by Circle T Cattle Company of Church Point, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: Miss Diamond R573 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Female: CT Ms Teaux exhibited by Circle T Cattle Company of Church Point, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Female: Ms D&D Sandy Shores 42/7 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA

Braford Base Bull Show Results

Class 22: Mr AN 102 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Class 24: Mr TBR Bob exhibited by Connor Thibodeaux of Iowa, LA Champion Bull Calf: Mr AN 102 exhibited by Karlee Nunez of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Bull Calf: Mr TBR Bob exhibited by Connor Thibodeaux of Iowa, LA Class 33: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Champion Yearling Bull: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: CFCC Mr Rhinaux Woody 7133 exhibited by Ashlee Primeaux of Bell City, LA Class 37: Mr BR Woodman Manso exhibited by Maeleigh Conner of Grand Lake, LA Champion Senior Bull: Mr BR Woodman Manso exhibited by Maeleigh Conner of Grand Lake, LA Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: Mr Foster 571 exhibited by Bralen Bertrand of Creole, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Base Bull: Mr BR Woodman Manso exhibited by Maeleigh Conner of Grand Lake, LA

Braford Female Show Results

Class 1: HB Miss Hazel 0316 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 2: 4D Miss Winnie exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Class 3: S5 DC Ms 701 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA Champion Heifer Calf: HB Miss Hazel 0316 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: S5 DC Ms 701 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA Class 6: WB LG Prom Queen 703PE exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Class 7: NPH 1054 Ms Woozy Red 3 exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Champion Fall Heifer Calf: WB LG Prom Queen 703PE exhibited by Hannah Doucet of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: NPH CAPT’S 9389 Missy Re exhibited by Hayden Hyman of Fouke, AR Class 10: LSS Miss Major Thunder exhibited by Boudreaux and Son of Grand Chenier, LA Class 11: AG MT Dory 420P exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Class 12: RCM 9182 Emma 6174 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 13: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA 20 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018

Champion Yearling Heifer: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: AG MT Dory 420P exhibited by Amanda Lee of Folsom, LA Class 16: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Champion Senior Yearling Female: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Reserve Champion Senior Yearling Female: DD 4014 Jewel 1501 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Grand Champion Braford Female: HB Miss Hazel 0316 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA

Braford Bull Show Results

Class 22: GPN Mr PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 23: TR CM Quarterback 752 exhibited by Luke Mhire of Welsh, LA Class 24: BR 6930 Mr 7133 exhibited by Ashlee Primeaux of Bell City, LA Champion Bull Calf: GPN Mr PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Bull Calf: BR 6930 Mr 7133 exhibited by Ashlee Primeaux of Bell City, LA Class 27: TR Thor 2.0 714P exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle of Nacogdoches, TX Class 28: AG MT Mr 3D exhibited by Destiny Doxey of Lake Charles, LA Champion Fall Bull Calf: TR Thor 2.0 714P exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle of Nacogdoches, TX Reserve Champion Fall Bull Calf: RCM 1703 Stricker 6502 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 31: RCM 8105 Chandler 6199 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 32: RCM 9182 Creed 6189 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 33: HB Mr Cookie Monster exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 34: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 160 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 8105 Chandler 6199 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: HB Mr Cookie Monster exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 39: RCM 9182 Classified 514 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Senior Bull: Reserve Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5137 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 8105 Chandler 6199 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 Classified 514 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Produce of Dam: RCM 695 Rookie owned by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Get-of-Sire: RCM 2149 Davidson 9182 owned by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Best Six Head: exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX


Show Results 2018 Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo Results Date: Judge: Pasquale Swaner of Waco, Texas

Show Results

2018 FWSSR Champion Heifer HB Miss Hazel 0137 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA

2018 FWSSR Reserve Champion Heifer RCM 1703 Carmen 6161 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

2018 FWSSR Champion Bull TR 2012 Mike E2065 ET exhibited Thunderstorm R Cattle Co., S5 Farms and Ryan Danos of Nacogdoches, TX

Class 2: HB Miss Hazel 0137 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 3: RCM 9182 Selena 7293 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 4: ACC 53Z MS E867 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 5: S5 DC MS 701 exhibited by Logan Vest of Iowa, LA Champion Heifer Calf: HB Miss Hazel 0137 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Champion Heifer Calf: RCM 9182 Selena 7293 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 8: RCM 1703 Sydney 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Fall Heifer Calf: RCM 1703 Sydney 6463 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Fall Heifer Calf: WB LG Prudence 702P ET exhibited by Logan Vest of Iowa, LA Class 12: 4MB Lucy exhibited by Jesse Marrett of Montgomery, TX Class 13: CK Miss Danni 4286 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 14: RCM 9182 Emma 6174 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 15: RCM 1703 Carmen 6161 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Yearling Heifer: RCM 1703 Carmen 6161 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Heifer: WB DC Mila 622 exhibited by Ryan Danos of Iowa, LA Class 18: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Champion Senior Female: Savell’s L 254/3 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Reserve Champion Senior Female: DD 4109 Jewel 1501 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Grand Champion Braford Female: HB Miss Hazel 0137 exhibited by Luke Natali of Lake Charles, LA Reserve Grand Champion Braford Female: RCM 1703 Carmen 6161 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 24: CK Bumble Bee 7247 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 25: GPN MR CM PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 26: RCM 8105 Matlock 7144 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 28: TR 2012 Mike E2065 ET exhibited Thunderstorm R Cattle Co., S5 Farms and Ryan Danos of Nacogdoches, TX Champion Junior Bull Calf: RCM 8105 Matlock 7144 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Junior Bull Calf: GPN MR CM PFTW exhibited by Gene Natali of Lake Charles, LA Class 31: RCM 1703 Striker 6651 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Fall Bull: RCM 1703 Striker 6651 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Fall Bull: TR Thor 2.0 714P exhibited by Thunderstorm R Cattle Co. of Nacogdoches, TX Class 35: RCM 8105 Chandler 6199 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Class 36: CK Mr Lewis 4816 exhibited by Hailey Sheffield of Pearland, TX Class 38: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 1601 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Champion Yearling Bull: RCM 8105 Chandler 6199 exhibited Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Yearling Bull: DD 2300 Daddy’s Money 1601 exhibited by Clayton Owens of Hillsboro, TX Class 43: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Reserve Champion Senior Bull: RCM 9182 Classified 5145 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX Grand Champion Braford Bull: TR 2012 Mike E2065 ET exhibited Thunderstorm R Cattle Co., S5 Farms and Ryan Danos of Nacogdoches, TX Reserve Grand Champion Braford Bull: RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

2018 FWSSR Reserve Champion Bull RCM 9182 Stealth 5139 exhibited by Rock Crest Ranch of Athens, TX

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

21


Look for our lots in upcoming sales… HLSR International • • Advancing the Breed 10 • •

REGISTERED BRAFORDS

LS Brafords THE FUTURE OF OUR BREED!

Larry and Sonja Stanberry 903.962.7219 Home 214.924.9202 Cell

Wade and Lynette Granger 675 Grangerville Rd. • Bell City, LA 70630 337.598.2759 • grangercattleco@camtel.net

996 C.R. 1805 Grand Saline, TX 75140 istanberry@rearthlink.net Visitors Always Welcome

MAKE PLANS TO ATTEND THE 2018 WORLD BRAFORD CONGRESS S C H E D U L E

Thursday/Friday, March 1-2 Delegates arrive in Houston Sleep in Houston

Friday, March 2 International Braford Sale, Houston Livestock Show Sleep in Houston

Saturday, March 3 International Braford Show, Houston Livestock Show Sleep in Houston

Sunday, March 4 MORNING Delegates attend Livestock Show Alternative: Visit NASA Space Center ​AFTERNOON Rodeo attendance for all delegates Sleep in Houston

Monday, March 5 MORNING Visit V8 Brahmans, Hungerford, TX

A​ FTERNOON Visit Bauer Ranch, Winnie, TX Dinner at Bauer Ranch, Winnie, TX Sleep in Houston

Friday, March 9

Tuesday, March 6

Genetics Herd Management

Visit Graham Land & Cattle, Gonzales, TX Visit Sexing Technologies, Navasota, TX Sleep in College Station

Wednesday, March 7 Visit Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Visit Rock Crest Ranch, Athens, TX Sleep in the Fort Worth Stockyards

Thursday, March 8 MORNING Tour of the Fort Worth Stockyards and Shopping Meeting of Country Presidents ​AFTERNOON Individual Country Reports Longhorn Saloon Party Sleep in the Fort Worth Stockyards

MORNING World Braford Congress Seminars — River Ranch Stockyards

(Refreshments and cattle displays)

Nutrition Animal Health Lunch at River Ranch AFTERNOON

Marketing Budgets & Record Keeping (Refreshments and cattle displays)

Soil & Pasture Management Human Capital Braford Gala evening — River Ranch Stockyards “Braford — Champion of the World” Awards Presentation

Saturday, March 10 Delegates leave from Dallas/Fort Worth Airport

22 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018


JOIN THE UNITED BRAFORD BREEDERS Your new UBB membership will come with a subscription to the Braford News, your source for all things Braford! I would like to become a new member of the United Braford Breeders… Annual Adult Membership ($100) q I hereby make application for membership with the United Braford Breeders and agree to be governed by the bylaws of the Association. Signature ________________________________________________________ Date______________________

Annual Junior Membership ($40, $25/year thereafter) q I hereby make application for membership with the United Braford Breeders and agree to be governed by the bylaws of the Association. I am eligible for junior membership until I reach the age of 22 years.

Name of Junior ___________________________________________________

Date of Birth_______________

Signature of Parent/Legal Guardian ___________________________________ Date______________________

Membership Application

Farm/Ranch Name (Adult Memberships only)________________________________________________________

Member Name _________________________________________________________________________________

Contact Person_________________________________________________________________________________

Address_______________________________________________________________________________________ Town/City_____________________________________________________________________________________ State______________________________________ Zip_________________ Country_________________________

Phone (private/business/cell)_____________________________________________________________________

Fax___________________________________________________________________________________________ Email_________________________________________________________________________________________

Website URL______________________________________________

Herdletters__________________________

Please complete and return to: United Braford Breeders P.O. Box 1177 Kingsville, Texas 78364 P: 361.516.0530 F: 361.592.8572 E: records@brafords.org

Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018 l BRAFORD news

23


Launched Online Looking for Braford-influenced replacement females or bulls? The United Braford Breeder’s free Braford Marketplace lists Braford and Braford influenced cattle, semen and embryos for sale to help match potential buyers with sellers. List your cattle, semen or embryos today! To access, click the Genetics tab followed by Braford Marketplace. http://www.brafords.org/brafordmarketplace

24 BRAFORD news l Volume 33 • Issue 1 • 2018


Profile for United Braford Breeders

Braford News | Volume 33, Issue 1  

Official publication of the United Braford Breeders

Braford News | Volume 33, Issue 1  

Official publication of the United Braford Breeders

Advertisement