Page 1

Featuring:

MILLEDGEVILLE’S HISTORIC HOMES AND SOME HISTORY BEHIND THEM

TROLLEY TOURS SEEING THE SIGHTS

JARRETT SPRINGS WHERE IT ALL BEGAN

+EMVENORE

INSIDE

THE HISTORICAL ISSUE

September - October 2010


Leviton (wiring devices) Senator (wire & cable) Crouse Hinds (boxes & covers) Arlington (snap-tit diecast fittings Madison (steel fittings) Howard (lamp & ballast) Ipex (pvc fittings & condulets) B-Line (strut & spring steel fasteners) Amfico (steel & non-metallic liquidtite fittings) E-Box (screw cover & gasketed boxes) Conduit (steel, pvc, & greenfield flex) 3M (tape & wire nuts) Ideal (wire nuts) Land Contact (GE & Siemens) Miscellaneous (threaded rod, couplings, pigtails, cable ties & ground rods)

358 Blandy Way • Milledgeville, GA

478-414-1009

www.electricalaccessorysales.com

¥ 24 Hour Construction Service ¥ 30-40 Minute Response Time, On Site arrival within 1-2 Hours ¥ All Construction Repairs: Roofing, Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, Masonry, Flooring, Foundation,Vinyl Siding, Gutters, Fence, etc. ¥ Professional, Local & Reputable Subs ¥ Remodeling or New Construction

Call (478) 452-7681 for estimate & information

• Landscapes Design & Installation • Outdoor Patios & Fireplaces • Driveways & Sidewalks • Custom Stone Work • Irrigation Installation & Repair • Retaining Walls • Sod Installation • Lawn Maintenance • Water Features • Night Lighting

(478) 414-6925 www.oldcapitolfence.com

• Swimming Pools

Residential & Commercial Licensed & Insured

478-456-4339 • 478-452-5296 Sam Hall • Renee Johnson • Randale Johnson

358 Blandy Way • Milledgeville, GA • www.rjiinc.net

(478) 454-1184 • (478) 454-1185 2 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010


scene Established 2007 • Volume 3 No. 5 PUBLISHER Keith Barlow

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS

Fall is a great time to get the cart you need

MANAGING EDITOR Natalie Davis ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Erin Simmons CIRCULATION DIRECTOR Michael Evans CREATIVE MANAGER Brooks Hinton

Work Carts

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sarah Beth Ariemma Jonathan Jackson Jessica Luton Vaishali Patel Dr. Bob Wilson ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Chai Giles Melissa Hinton Miriam Lord

Recreational Carts

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Hamp Jones Theresa Willis COVER PHOTO Jessica Luton Milledgeville Scene magazine is published by The Union-Recorder bimonthly at 165 Garrett Way, Milledgeville, GA 31061. For more information on submitting stor y ideas or advertising in Milledgeville Scene, call (478)453-1430.

Hunting Carts 601 N. Jefferson Street • Milledgeville, Georgia 31061

(478) 454-CART (2278) SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 3


Contents

SeptemberOctober 2010

7

56

14

FEATURES 7

Q&A

with Twin Lakes Library System’s Barry Reese.

14 Architectural Gems Take a tour of some of the downtown historic district’s architectural gems through the eyes of a camera.

22 All Aboard The Convention and Visitors Bureau trolley tours bring the rich and colorful history of Milledgeville alive to countless locals and tourists alike.

36 Bubbling Spring A historic marker will soon designate the spot where Milledgeville was founded.

56 Memory Hill This local cemetery is the final resting place for some of Milledgeville’s most famous and infamous. 4 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

22


General Auto Repair & Service on Domestic and Foreign Cars 

Brake Service



Alignment



Exhaust Work



Diagnostic Testing



Oil Change



Lube

Norris Wheel & Brake 401 E. Hancock St. Milledgeville, GA

478-452-2211 H. Miller Norris Owner

C&R Cabinet Shop CUSTOM MADE CABINETS

Mark Salter 478-452-1281 3037 N. Columbia Milledgeville

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 5


the Ed i From t o r

“History is a cyclic poem written by Time upon the memories of man.” —Percy Bysshe Shelley

S

everal weeks ago, the editorial staff and I boarded the candy apple colored trolley at downtown’s Convention and Visitors Bureau for a tour of the historic district in the name of research for this our History Issue of Milledgeville Scene. Call it research, by the time our tour was complete, we were all in agreement that research had given way to a great way to spend an August morning. Our experience got me thinking about the value of this community’s history and its place in the larger context of Georgia’s history. It also got me thinking about those who work so intensely and tirelessly in this community to ensure that all of us, and even generations to come, have a clearer view of history’s value for Milledgeville and beyond. Piece by piece and bit by bit, these local history enthusiasts have collected these factual nuggets to amass colorful anecdotes and historical facts like those relayed to us during our tour. It’s these types of factual nuggets that add to the scope and character of this

6 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

community — and they continue to thrive and have breath through the research and efforts of local volunteers and history buffs who pass along their love of the past to others. Inside this edition of Milledgeville Scene, our annual History Issue, we take you on a pictorial tour of some of the local community’s historic architectural gems with photographer Danielle Fields. We’ll also share with you a bit of the history of Jarrett Springs courtesy of Georgia College & State University professor and contributing writer Dr. Bob Wilson, and you’ll take a tour of Georgia’s Old Capital Museum with staff writer Jessica Luton. Writer Sarah Beth Ariemma shares the story of one of Milledgeville’s oldest congregations, Sacred Heart Catholic Church, while Jonathan Jackson brings you inside his journey through Memory Hill Cemetery. Staff writer Vaishali Patel shares more on our trolley experience and those who work behind the scenes to pull together these historic tours that delight tourists and locals alike year after year. And don’t miss our dining feature on Crockett’s or our Q&A with Twin Lakes Library System director Barry Reese as he and his staff prep for their 30th annual book fair. Each one of this community’s numerous historians — from Dr. Bob Wilson’s insight on Jarrett Springs, to Hugh and Sue Harrington and Friends of Baldwin County Cemeteries, Amy Wright and the founders of Georgia’s Old Capital Museum, to our local trolley tour guides — deliver their insight to us as a labor of love. It’s a poetic ode to a community that many of them, though not all local natives, have grown to love so dear. Their dedication to presenting the rich and oftentimes colorful history of this community as accurately and detailed as they can is a testament to what really makes this community so special and so near and dear to so many of our own hearts — its people. We hope you enjoy this issue of Milledgeville Scene, and as you pour through the pages, take a moment to reflect on all the rich history this community has to offer. It’s certainly worth cherishing. And if you haven’t spent time on a local tour, you certainly should. Thanks again for reading. Don’t forget to e-mail and give us your feedback and let us know what stories you’d like to see in upcoming editions. E-mail me at ndavis@unionrecorder.com and let us know what you think of this issue.

NATALIE DAVIS/MANAGING EDITOR


Twin Lakes Library System

QA &

with

Barry Reese

Barry Reese, director of the Twin Lakes Library System, is busier than usual these days as he and the library staff are in full preparation for the annual library book fair. This year marks the 30th Friends of the Library Twin Lakes Library System Fair, which brings large crowds each year bright and early on a fall morning in September to downtown’s Mary Vinson Memorial Library. Eager patrons scour thousands upon thousands of books and titles in anticipation of that rare and special find. We recently spoke with Reese about the upcoming book fair, which looks to be bigger and even better this year with a few added features, and to discover what’s new and what’s upcoming at the library.

Q: Will there be any changes or new features implemented to this year’s Annual Library Fair? A: The library invested in a new sound system that will allow fair-goers to hear the announcements and music over the entire property. In the past, only those folks who were near the speakers could actually hear what was being said. We’re also going to have a few new musical acts for everyone’s enjoyment, as well as Mr. Ollie, who will be doing caricatures. Q: How can others become a sponsor for the event? A: It’s very easy to become a sponsor — all anyone has to do is send a check to: Friends of the Library 151 S. Jefferson Street Milledgeville, Ga. 31061 We’ll accept donations of any amount and include all sponsors in our advertising leading up to the event, and we thank them repeatedly during the Library Fair itself. Sponsorships are the best way we can assure that the Library Fair will be a success because that’s money that’s guaranteed, so we’re not dependent on a good turnout on Library Fair day and aren’t hampered by weather or other events that might be going on that same day. Q: How many books are typically featured at the annual event? A: A conservative estimate of the number of books we have for sale would be over 7,000. It’s far too many

to actually count! Q: Old Capital Press, the publishing arm of the library, showcases the works of authors throughout the region, and among the featured works are two books that focus on the history of Central State Hospital, “But for the Grace of God,” by Peter Cranford and “Posey with the Insane and Sane,” by Lois Lane. Please share some insight as to why these two books were chosen for rerelease last year. A: From the moment we founded Old Capital Press, we always intended to bring those works back into print. We had a backlog of new materials to publish up front but after that, we wanted to take our focus to bringing out new editions of works that are considered local classics, but were very hard to find for anyone besides collectors. The Central State Hospital books were ones that we were repeatedly asked about as CSH continues to be an area of our history that appeals to historians. We were proud to not only bring them back into print individually, but also in a shared volume entitled “Damnation Hospital.” Q: How are titles selected for publication by Old Capital Press? A: We don’t really want to compete with other Georgia-based publishers like Mercer University Press so our interests are very restrictive. We’re looking for books that have special interest to residents of Baldwin County, be it from a historical or personal perspec-

tive. At present, we’re focusing on bringing back out-of-print materials, but we’d be interested in new works of a historical nature as well. Continuing with what was said earlier about Central State Hospital, I’d love to see someone tackle its mid- to late-20th century history, which hasn’t been covered in book form at all. Q: Please tell us more about the In the Stacks podcasts, the libraryrelated series you do with assistant director LaToya Davidson. A: In the Stacks is a fun way to try and interact with our patrons. We highlight library news and also veer off into our opinions about popular culture and politics. Ultimately, the opinions expressed are simply our own and aren’t meant to be indicative of the library’s positions, but I think it helps humanize us and allows people to view us as people. We like to say that our patrons are like family, and this is a wonderful chance for them to get to know us in a new way. We release the podcasts weekly and have seen a lot of interest in them, including from folks around the country and even in other nations! Since we’re on iTunes, it’s very easy to jump on board the In the Stacks bandwagon. We always try to have some sort of guest on the show and so far we’ve had authors, library staff members and even musicians stop by.

Q: Earlier this year, Mary Vinson Memorial Library was awarded a grant to fund new computer stations. What does this grant help provide for area residents and how is it being utilized in computer literacy improvements? A: With the money we received from the Knight Foundation, we were able to purchase additional Internet stations, boost the strength of our wireless network and also purchase a mobile computing lab. The computing lab has been used by Digital Bridges to offer beginners’ computer classes at the Mary Vinson Memorial Library and has been a huge success, helping many older citizens become more comfortable with technology. Our increased wireless offerings also allow people to spread out over the entire building, meaning they’re no longer fighting for space in various “Hot Spots” — our entire property is now one giant “Hot Spot!” Q: Any additional thoughts or comments? A: Just to thank the community for showing so much support to us over the years. This will be our 30th Annual Library Fair and we’re always happy to see so many familiar, smiling faces. For a town our size, I think we have a terrific library system and we’re always looking to get better. Stick with us — the best is yet to come!

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 7


Are you puzzled by your financial plan? Putting all the pieces of your financial strategy in place can be a daunting task. We specialize in helping investors construct unique financial plans through fee-based asset management. Fee-based guidance means your assets will be allocated carefully, monitored regularly and that our success is aligned with the performance of your account. Contact us today for more information. Side by side we’ll begin putting the pieces together to help meet your investment goals. 3006 Heritage Rd., Suite C Milledgeville, GA 31061 William Black, CTFA President

(478) 414-1004 www.lpl.com/whb

Securities and investment advisory services offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC and a registered investment advisor.

STONECREST COMMUNITY If you are ready to downsize or just tired of the yard work, Stonecrest Community is perfect for you. Located just inside Greystone Arbor Subdivision • Log Cabin Road • Milledgeville, GA

Completely Custom-Built, Luxury, One-level Homes Featuring: Brick Exteriors, Architectural Roof Shingles, Enclosed Garages, Metal Clad Windows, 9’ Ceilings throughout with Crown Moldings, Hardwood and Porcelain Tile Flooring and Solid Surface Countertops For Further Information Contact:

Fordham & Company 478-454-2176 8 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010


If you could travel back in time to one period in history what would it be? Jessica Luton Staff Writer If I could go back to any time in history, I’d have to travel back to the early 1800s. As an avid music fan and classical piano player, I can’t imagine anything more wonderful than being able to see my favorite composer, Frédéric Chopin perform a nocturne or mazurka live and in person. My second choice would have to be the 1950s and 1960s though because it would be hard to resist being able to watch the birth of rock and roll.

Keith Justice Production Director I would have to say I’d go back to the 1960s. That was the time period for Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream Speech.”

Kirk Williams Creative Services I would probably go back to the late 18th or early 19th century to the Age of Enlightenment. It would be interesting to go back and see all of those new ideas take shape.

Miriam Lord Advertising Sales If I could choose to live in any time period, I would love to experience the ‘50s as a teenager. Times seemed much simpler, wholesome and proper. Not to mention the fun clothes, shoes, cars and the beginning of Rock and Roll music!

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 9


a look at the arts & culture of Milledgeville and Baldwin County

 Georgia Military College will present “An Evening with Dixie Haygood” Thursday, Oct. 28 at the Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts at 7 p.m. Susan Harrington will portray Dixie Haygood, commonly known as Milledgeville’s “witch,” who performed feats of strength all over the world more than 100 years ago under the stage name of Annie Abbott. Harrington, who is co-author of the recent book, “Annie Abbott, ‘The Little Georgia Magnet’ and the True Story of Dixie Haygood,” will relay some of Haygood’s experiences as an internationally famous performer and demonstrate part of the “Annie Abbott Act” that earned Haygood her fame. A donation to Georgia's Old Capital Museum Society is requested for admission, and a book signing will occur after the performance. Harrington and her husband Hugh’s recently released book on Haygood includes material from Haygood’s family members, who uncovered some of her personal papers in a garage and contacted the couple. The papers turned out to be Dixie Haygood’s diary and autograph album. The Harringtons also explore in the new book theories and first-hand information from Haygood herself related to her shows. The book is a culmination of more than a decade’s worth of research and collaboration between the couple. “Annie Abbott ‘The Little Georgia Magnet’ and the True Story of Dixie Haygood” is available at The Red Door, The Old Governor’s Mansion Gift Shop, Georgia’s Old Capital Museum gift shop and at Box Office Books, located in the old Campus Theatre. The book is also available online at AnnieAbbott.com and Amazon.com.

 A recently unveiled exhibition in the Executive Chamber at Milledgeville City Hall details life in the Antebellum Capital through the present times. “Milledgeville: Honoring the Past, Building the Future,” includes 24 images of downtown Milledgeville and was compiled by Allied Arts at the request of city officials. According to Allied Arts Director Randy Cannon, “This really isn’t art work per se, more like photo-documentation of the downtown area. The images show the subtle and not so subtle changes that have occurred over the years, the show will be updated periodically, such as when the streetscape improvements are completed.” According to its website, Allied Arts began in 1977 as a “The 100 block of McIntosh Street, about 1979.” Georgia Council for the Arts Community Development site. In © Randy Cannon 1987 local city and county governments reorganized and Allied Arts Incorporated became a secondary agency of the City of Milledgeville. Anyone that has older photos of the downtown area is encouraged to contact Randy Cannon at Allied Arts at (478) 452-3950 or alliedarts@windstream.net. 10 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010


 To mark the golden anniversary of writer Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Georgia College & State University will present a stage adaptation in September in collaboration with the Kazanetti String Quartet and the Global Citizenship Symposium on Poverty, along with a special visit by actress Mary Badham, who played the principal character, “Scout,” in the original “To Kill a Mockingbird” film starring Gregory Peck. The novel and subsequent film is the emotionally charged tale of a girl growing up in a small southern town in the 1930s. “To Kill a Mockingbird,” dramatized by Christopher Sergel and directed by Amy Pinney, will be performed at Russell Auditorium September 15 through September 19. Badham, “Scout,” will visit the campus and conduct workshops on the 50th anniversary of the novel Oct. 7. For additional information, call (478) 445-8290.

Books lovers rejoice. Thanks to the broad scope of the Internet, new websites for avid book readers and writers alike keep popping up. If you miss the lazy days of summer already, perhaps you can take a vacation vicariously through a book. Check out www.bookcrossing.com, a website that lets you send a book off for others to enjoy and then follow the book’s journey to wherever it might end up. Another website, http://www.webook.com/, allows amateur authors to post writings online that are voted on by fellow webook.com members. If you haven’t visited www.goodreads.com, the website is a great way to keep track of what you’ve read and what you’d like to read, get recommendations from people you know and even form an online book club complete with book trivia and you’re favorite quotes. Additionally, if you’re looking for a way to pass the time, be sure to check out the local library system’s blog, http://tlls.livejournal.com/, for new books in the stacks, book recommendations, podcasts and website recommendations from the staff at the Mary Vinson Memorial Library.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 11


PAMLICO POOL COMPANY

3 Generations Serving Baldwin County SINCE

1976

1889 North Columbia Street • Milledgeville (478) 452-1003 • www.pamlicopools.com

Let us create the pool of your dreams!

(478) 452-2621 (478) 453-1281

Let us create the pool of your dreams!

Serving Middle Georgia for Over Twenty-Five Years!

900 N. Jefferson Street • Milledgeville, GA 31061

Spend your money at home! …WE DO!

o L • d e n w O y ll a c o L 12 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

ca

io t a c o L t n ie n e v n o ll y O p e r a t e d • C turn at edgeville • Just ill M • t. S ia b 1897 N. Colum

n!

fic light! the Kmart traf

478.453.8714


Milledgeville 571 Hammock Rd • Suite 106 • (Old McGaw Building)

(478) 452-6252

Denny Wood, Shawn Roberts, Chris Alford, PT, DPT, SCS, PT PT

Allyson Wood,

Jill Smith,

PT

PTA

ATC, CSCS

Constance Wesson, OTRL, CHT

Gray

Lake Oconee

222 West Clinton St., Suite 3 (Next to Advance Auto)

1001 Village Park Drive Suite 105

(478) 986-5400

(706) 454-2000

Kim Bershadsky, Chris Hairie, PTA, MBA PT

Chris Alligood, Michael Dunning,

PT, MS, OCS

MPT, FAOMPT, ATC

Bluegrass Festival at Andalusia, the Home of Flannery O’Connor Saturday, October 2 5:00-8:00 p.m. featuring

Heart Pine Make plans to join us! For more information, call 478-454-4029.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 13


Myrick-Jenkins House, 220 Liberty Street, c. 1890 The Victorian, two-story clapboard home features an unusual asymmetrical design with corner fireplaces in both the living and dining rooms. Carved lintels are a distinctive feature of this spacious Victorian dwelling, which has since been adapted for modern living. Susan Myrick owned the home first. Myrick was a close friend of writer Margaret Mitchell of “Gone with the Wind” fame, and during the filming of the iconic movie, she journeyed to be with Mitchell and teach actress Vivien Leigh, Scarlett O’Hara in the film, and others in the production how to perfect their southern dialects and understand southern graces. She was paid $125 a week for her position and wrote columns for the Macon Telegraph about her experiences in between working 16-hour days on set for the film.


Milledgeville’s downtown historic district is filled with architectural gems. On the following pages, we take a scenic tour down Liberty Street and beyond as seen through the lens of photographer Danielle Fields. — Compiled by Sarah Beth Ariemma with historical credit to Milledgeville Convention and Visitors Bureau and Sara Brantley

Sanford- Powell House, 330 West Greene Street, c. 1824 The Sanford-Powell house is on the National Register of Historic Homes. When Gen. John W.A. Sanford built the house, there were only four columns. Gradually, the portico was enlarged until it extended around three sides of the house, with 14 columns. Originally there were landscaped gardens, greenhouses, and beautiful boxwoods bordering the patio. When Dr. T.O Powell became the owner in 1890, the house was rebuilt in the Neo-classical style, using the same 14 columns.


Cline-O’Connor-Florencourt House, 311 West Greene Street, c. 1820 The home is a Milledgeville federal two-story clapboard house with a Victorian standing-seam terne metal roof and rear additions. The Ionic columns, hand-carved from solid timbers, are original as are the major rooms in the house. The openwork brick fence is the only extant part of a fence that once encompassed the entire square. The home was used as the residence for Georgia’s governor in 1838 and 1839 during construction of the present governor’s mansion. The house is also the family home of the late Flannery O’Connor.


Newell-Watts House, 201 South Clarke Street, c. 1825 The home is a late Georgian, Greek revival portico with Doric columns. The same family owned the Newell House for more than 100 years. In the settlement and development of Milledgeville, the Newell family played a conspicuous part. Prior to the Civil War their home was the gathering place for the aristocracy of the day and numerous visitors including Sidney Lanier. Georgia College & State University now uses the house for the admissions office and the department was transferred to the building in 2008.


Brown-Stetson-Sanford House, 601 West Hancock Street, c. 1825 This house has a beautiful Palladian double portico and original pilasters. Fanlights have a spread eagle and dogwood blossoms ornament the lead dividers. A cantilevered oval spiral stair dominates the central hall and hand grained woodwork remains in the parlor. A picket fence encloses the Southern perennial flower garden. From 1951-1966 the Sanford House was a tearoom noted for its excellent cuisine. It was a favorite place to dine for Flannery O’Connor as well. The original Stetson-Sanford house located on Wilkinson Street, owned by the same family for more than 100 years. It was given to the Old Capital Historical Society and moved to the present site in 1966.

Orme-Sallee House, 251 S. Liberty Street, c. 1822 The architecture of the home is generally attributed to Daniel Pratt and the Sallee house is considered one of the most architecturally beautiful homes in Milledgeville. The home boasts fanlighted doorways and a trellised balcony. Its Doric columns are fashioned from matching pine trees and the heavy front door is held together with wooden pegs. The hand planed wainscoting and sunburst mantels in each room are particularly beautiful. 18 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010


Maj. Edward White House, 247 South Clarke Street, c. 1806 The home was originally located in the 300 block of West Greene Street, and was moved in the late 19th century and extensively restored in 1989. A native of Massachusetts, Maj. White served as adjutant to the Marquis de Lafayette during the Yorktown campaign. Mildred Scott Stubbs White was the niece of Gen. John Scott, builder of the statehouse. The Whites maintained a home at Savannah and a plantation known as Brookline in Jones County. Their son, Dr. Benjamin Aspinwall White served as mayor, surgeon general of the state of Georgia, and was on the founding board of Georgia Lunatic Asylum. Later this was the home of the Moore family, publishers of The Union-Recorder. Today, it is a private residence.

Local Tradition meets Modern Technology Now Offering Digital Customization With our New Jewelery Design Software J.C.GRANT COMPANY JEWELERS

116 South Wayne Street • (478) 452-2222 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 19


MUSUEM STORE AT THE OLD GOVERNOR’S MANSION

THE OLD GOVERNOR’S MANSION Special Curator’s Tour and our new Labor Behind the Veil Tour by Appointment Regular Tour Hours: Tues. - Sat 10am-4pm; Sunday 2-4pm

Gifts with a Southern Flair Tues-Sat 10am-4pm • Sun 2pm-4pm

102 S. Clarke St. Call: 478.445.4545 www.gcsu.edu/mansion

1 Br 1 Ba Townhome………...................………….... $535 2 Br 2 Ba Townhome……………...............................$605 Lakefront ………………………...................……....…$705 Phase 2-2Br 2.5 Ba ………...................….........$665-$765 One Level

478-445-SHOP(7467) 120 S. Clarke Street (Entrance on W. Greene St.)

Lease:....................................................... 12 months Deposit:............................................................. $310 Pets:....................................................... Conditional App Fee:.............................................................. $25 Hours:.......................................................... M-F 9-5

342 Log Cabin Road N.E. • Milledgeville, GA

(478) 452-1424 Fax (478) 452-0357 • 1, 2, & 3 Bedroom Townhomes • 2 Bedroom Garden Homes / Lakefront Garden Homes • Double Walls, Insulated, Fire Rated, Soundproof Between Each Unit

20 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

• Natural Beauty of the Woods & Lake • Boat Ramp • Private Dock • 2 Swimming Pools • Clubhouse • 2 Tennis Courts


Have the greatest tailgate party with the Greatest Smoker Grill...

BIG GREEN EGG

115 N. Wayne Street Downtown Milledgeville • 478-452-2613

1895 N. Columbia Street North Milledgeville • 478-452-1205

3011 N. Columbia Street Lake Sinclair. • 478-452-9111 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 21


THIS IS A

SPECIAL

PLACE

Story and Photos By VAISHALI PATEL


fter almost three decades of carrying captivated passengers to and from Milledgeville’s historic district, the Convention and Visitors Bureau trolley tour continues to provide out-of-towners and even locals an informal and unique drive through the city’s significant landmarks, including rotating visits to the Old Capitol Building, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Lockerly Hall, the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House and Memory Hill Cemetery. Milledgeville Convention and Visitors Bureau Tour Coordinator Linda Bailey said the first-ever trolley tour in Georgia became a huge hit more than 30 years ago. “The first trolley initially ran in Underground Atlanta and Gov. Jimmy Carter was one of the first passengers,” she said. “After Carter became president, the vehicle wound up in Plains [GA], where it was used for tours in his hometown. When Carter lost his job in Washington, tourism in Plains dwindled, and Milledgeville bought the trolley for about $8,000 in 1981.” While growing up with a grandmother who happened to live in Milledgeville’s historic downtown district, Sara Brantley’s newfound love of the city’s yesteryears grew, and she eventually became one of 11 volunteer CVB tour guides. “My grandmother instilled a love of his-

A

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 23


“The tour is all about helping people learn about our history. I love going into the Old Capitol and helping people envision a momentous event and what it would’ve been like back then.”

Kathe Fuller Milledgeville Trolley Tour Guide

tory in me and that’s where I learned about the history of Milledgeville. I remember I took my first trolley tour with my history class in high school and I just fell in love with it. I’ve always loved Lockerly Hall and giving tours was a good way to go to there,” she said. “Since I became a trolley tour guide, I have been able to expand to other ventures. I love sharing Milledgeville with people from sometimes other countries, and sharing with tourists the history of Milledgeville. This is a special place.” Since 2004, Rick Amor has also been administering tours, providing travelers with a sense of past life in Georgia’s old capital. “I never took a trolley tour before, but my brother came into town a few years ago and to give us something to do, we took a tour,” he said. “Milledgeville’s history didn’t come alive for me until [Memory Hill] Cemetery. I [think the history really comes alive and] I can actually show and tell [tourists] … For me, giving tours is a

24 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

way to give back to the community.” Now a seven-year volunteer guide, Kathe Fuller’s appreciation and perspective of the city turned around after she came aboard the trolley years ago, taking in the fascinating tales of “the once rootin’ tootin’ town.” “I came to school in Milledgeville, taught for six years and then left for over 30 years. I came back and took a group of friends on the trolley tour and I knew I loved this,” she said. “The tour is all about helping people learn about our history. I love going into the Old Capitol and helping people envision a momentous event and what it would’ve been like back then.” For the past two years, Bill McRae’s love of the Antebellum Capital has continued to grow with each tour. “I want to see Milledgeville succeed, and tourism plays a major part in that. If you’re talking to people outside the city and you tell them about our history, it’s surprising to how many people are interested,” he said after taking a group on his


LEADERSHIP. •

Left to Right Representatives Terry Barnard-R, Rusty Kidd-I, Adam Powell-D

As an Independant, Rusty has the unique ability to work with both side of the aisle to get results

Bill McRae leads a group through a tour of historic St. Stephen’s Church.

143rd tour in early August. “I’ll keep giving tours until I can’t do it anymore.” Fannie Robinson has been behind the trolley’s wheel for 18 years, following the lead of tour guides every other week. “The trolley tour is a good way to tell others about Milledgeville,” she said. Fuller said tour guides regularly try to separate fact from fiction as they continue learning about the constantly-changing city, adding depth to a town that in a way spread like an oasis in a desert. “There are layers to a town like Milledgeville. It started as the capital of the state and then suffered a loss of the capital, but it did not die; it continued to grow and change,” she said. “Milledgeville was not an independent town; it was a state town like Washington. They wanted to attract people to the town ... and if they could get churches, then we wouldn’t be the wild west any-

more.” Today, visitors can hop on the current 21-passenger, $59,000 trolley, which hailed from Boston in 1997. “Sometimes people come to Georgia’s old capital and think we’re a small reenactment town,” Fuller said. “We’re not a reenactment town; we’re a living, breathing town. It’s nothing in comparison to our 800- and 900-year history.” Available at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and at 2 p.m. Saturday for the price of $12 per adult, $10 per senior, $5 per child between the age of 6 and 13 and free of charge for children 5 and under, all trolley tours begin at the CVB downtown. “The thing that unites us tour guides is our love of history and the history of Milledgeville,” Amor said. For more information or to book a tour, call the CVB at (478) 452-4687 or visit www.milledgevillecvb.com.

• Rusty served on the following committees; all of which directly impact Baldwin County: • • • •

Health and Human Resources State Institutions & Properties Government Operations Science and Technology

RE-ELECT RUSTY KIDD STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 141 AN INDEPENDANT THINKER, A LEADER ON THE ISSUES

VOTE KIDD • NOVEMBER 2 To contact Rusty: Call 478-452-1354 Email Rustykidd@gmail.com Visit www.rustykidd.com Paid for by the Rusty Kidd Campaign

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 25


Carl S. Cansino & Amanda S. Petty Diana K. New, of Counsel Attorneys at Law 150 W. Washington Street • Milledgeville, Georgia 31061 • 478-451-3060 • 478-451-3073 fax

Nancy Chambers New Horizons Director 478-457-2217

“Banking with Exchange Bank has been a genuine pleasure. All the personnel have been efficient, friendly and most helpful. Our good friend Nancy Chambers asked us to visit the travel club, New Horizons, and we immediately fell in love with the concept. In November when we travel to China with Nancy, we will be on our 10th New Horizons trip. We have visited Thailand, South Africa, Croatia, Italy, Switzerland, Canada, New England, multiple trips to the Fox Theater and others. Nancy travels with you, gives personal attention to detail, and always delivers a first class experience at a reasonable price.” Member FDIC

26 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

...Bill and Jennie Sharp


Organically grown... Naturally sweet. We Deliver.

Each year, over 750 babies are born in our state-of-the-art labor and delivery rooms, with mothers and newborns carefully attended by our skilled and compassionate staff. The New Mother Inn at Oconee Regional Medical Center provides a comfortable overnight stay for mothers whose babies must receive continued treatment at the hospital. ORMC is proud to be the only facility in the area that provides this service during this joyful yet tumultuous time for families.

478-454-3505

www.oconeeregional.com SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 27


Haunted

Trolley

Tour! Haunted Trolley Tour returns for another season by VAISHALI PATEL The ever-popular annual Haunted Trolley Tour is back for its 10th year to haunt Milledgeville residents with stories and ghosts of times past as characters come aboard the trolley while taking a dark ride through Memory Hill Cemetery. “We started 10 years ago because we had several tour guides who did ghost tours and a lot of people requested them,” CVB Projects Coordinator Heather Kennedy said. “There’s much folklore of ghosts and legends, but everything we do and the stories we tell are never claimed as fact or true.” Author Flannery O’Connor, U.S. Congressman Carl Vinson and Georgia State Hospital for the Insane founder Dr. Benjamin White are a few of those who call Memory Hill their final resting place. Local residents and Georgia College

28 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

& State University students transform themselves into those buried in the cemetery and tell the tales of their lives. Sponsored by the CVB, two tours will be held at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. from Oct. 25 through Oct. 28. “The tour at 8:30 is just for adults. No one under the age of 16 is allowed unless a parent says it’s OK,” Kennedy said. “Last year was the first time we had an adults only tour and it sold out quickly. It was extremely successful.” A limit of four tickets per person can be purchased at the CVB office located at 200 West Hancock St. starting Friday, Oct. 1 for $15 per adult and $10 per child. For more information, call (478) 452-4687 or visit www.milledgevillecvb.com.


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 29


TREASURE TROVE OF HISTORY

Georgia’s Old Capital Museum is a unique community gem Story and Photos by JESSICA LUTON


M

illedgeville is a treasure trove of history. A simple drive or walk through the downtown area reveals the remnants of times past, and just around every corner is a little gem of history — whether it’s an Antebellum home, a historic old theater or a history-laden church — that helps tell the story of Milledgeville. One such historical gem, which can be seen in the horizon as you drive south on N. Jefferson Street into the downtown area, is the old state Capitol Building, located on the campus of Georgia Military College, that was used when Milledgeville was the state capital from 18031868. On the bottom floor of the building is one of Milledgeville and Baldwin County’s greatest historical resources, a museum known as Georgia’s Old Capital Museum, which not only documents the history behind local buildings, artifacts and Antebellum life, but also details the history of a people. Georgia’s Old Capital Museum, which details life in Milledgeville from the pre-historic era through the Antebellum years and beyond, came about as a result of the work of several dedicated individuals who came together looking for a way to celebrate Milledgeville’s bicentennial in 2003 and Baldwin County’s bicentennial in 2004. According to Betty Snyder, a local resident who helped create a local nonprofit organization known as Allied Arts and played a pivotal role in getting the museum off the ground and going, the project has been years in the making, and a former local educator, Dr. Barbara Chandler, and then-mayor James E. Baugh’s wife, Beegee Baugh, helped get the idea off and running. “I was one of a group we started in 1990 that was pulled together by Dr. Barbara Chandler,” said Snyder, adding that the group consisted of nearly 30 volunteers. “She got to thinking about how busy we ought to be planning for the bicentennial, and she got together with Beegee Baugh.” By 1993, the group had settled on the idea of what to do in honor of the bicentennial and Georgia’s Old Capital Museum was the resulting brainchild of that effort. “We kicked around a whole lot of different ideas,” she said. “We worked for about three years to figure out what would be a fit vehicle.


EXPERIENCE. •

A lifetime member of the Milledgeville Community. Rusty knows the needs of Baldwin County. Rusty’s decades of experience in government affairs gets the job done.

Contributed photo courtesy Georgia’s Old Capital Museum

We wanted something that would be here when we were gone.” As luck had it, Georgia Military College’s Maj. Gen. Peter Boylan (Ret.) graciously offered the group space in the old Capitol Building, and the beginnings of a local history museum gained footing as a reality in Milledgeville. “Then, General Boylan found out what we were up to,” Snyder said. “He offered us the ground floor, but basically, what he gave us was a 6,000 square foot open space.” The group of volunteers pooled their resources together and went about systematically researching other local history museums, especially museums in other former frontier cities such as Montgomery, Ala., researching funding opportunities and soliciting for area American Indian artifacts through an ad in the paper. According to Snyder, five or six people came forward with unique American Indian artifacts and the beginnings of a museum were born. The museum, which details what life was like beginning with four distinct prehistoric American Indian eras, has 10 galleries dedicated to sections of time within the Milledgeville and Baldwin County history. The result is a journey from pre-historic times

to the beginnings of a capital city to the Civil War and beyond that now draws in visitors from across the state and all across the nation. In 1999, the group put together a traveling exhibit, thanks to a grant from the Knight Foundation, and created plans for the museum. The group was finally able to get into the designated space at Old Capitol in 2001 and in 2002 the group merged with the Old Capitol Historical Society and subsequently inherited the Brown-StetsonSanford House, a former inn and tavern and Antebellum home, which had been saved from demolition and moved to a new location. “We knew the people that helped the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House survive,” she said. “It seemed a natural merger for us, and that’s how we acquired a second museum.” From 2003-2005, despite funding cuts resulting from 9/11, the group finally unveiled the first gallery of the museum to the public with great success. The group presented a pageant and living history experience complete with people in costumes, and finally a grand opening was held in 2004. Now, as the museum enjoys its fifth year as a local tourism staple, Executive Director Amy Wright and a dedicated pool of

• A strong advocate for the disabled, Rusty passed legislation benefitting the handicapped of Georgia alongside UGA Baseball player Chance Veazy.

RE-ELECT RUSTY KIDD STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 141 AN INDEPENDANT THINKER, A LEADER ON THE ISSUES

VOTE KIDD • NOVEMBER 2 To contact Rusty: Call 478-452-1354 Email Rustykidd@gmail.com Visit www.rustykidd.com Paid for by the Rusty Kidd Campaign

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 33


Contributed photo courtesy Georgia’s Old Capital Museum

volunteers continue the mission of making the museum a success with an array of interactive programs and educational activities that complement the museum’s content. “There are things every month that are creative, innovative and offer people — even those that have been before — something new to see,” Wright said. In 2009, 5,500 visitors walked through the front doors of the museum to tour the local history. Halfway through 2010, 5,156 visitors have already been through the museum. “I credit all the hard work of our volunteers to implement exhibits and programs for teachers, to tour groups of all ages who want to increase their knowledge of Milledgeville as a capital city and what it was like to live in an Antebellum home,” she said, adding that the museum has become a popular destination for grandparents and grandchildren and parents and children who want to share stories or talk with a younger generation about times past. Wright has been working hard to create what is known as a ‘House Museum’ at the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House, and she felt a calling to take on the task of becoming the executive director of the museum. “When the position opened up, I just felt a calling,” she said, adding that her father was one of three men who helped save, relocate and make improvements to the existing structure of the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House. “Now that he’s gone, I feel like I’m carrying the torch. I have a lifelong love affair with Milledgeville and its people.” As the executive director of the museum, Wright has implemented an array of activities and programs meant to compliment the regular museum tour including history lectures, a heritage garden project with Georgia Military College eighth grade students, a children’s Victorian Christmas house, and a Hands On History pro34 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

gram that provides teachers a day to access the museum for free. Additionally, several upcoming programs, such as a Dixie Haygood re-enactment performance scheduled for Oct. 28, the unveiling of a new exhibit in the rotating gallery titled “King Cotton: The Common Thread,” on Oct. 21 and a re-enactment of the 1861 convention, in which Georgia seceded from the Union, will take place in January 2011. According to Wright, the exceptional response from the community is not only in attending special programs, events and the museum, but also from contributing to the museum’s content. “People are so supportive,” said Wright. “It’s been really rewarding and encouraging to see how the community has gotten behind the museum and house. I see our job as to make sure that in an age of lightening speed technology and inventions that we don’t forget from whence we come. It’s the debt we owe to the people that came before us.” Milledgeville and Baldwin County’s history is truly a community effort. “Rarely does a day go by when I don’t pick up some wonderful gem of history from someone else,” she said. “People are so willing to share. They’re all the time bringing in little gems, little pieces of history. People want the story to be told. They’re so generous in allowing us to use things.” For more information on Georgia’s Old Capital Museum, the Brown-Stetson-Sanford House or other programs at either venue, please visit http://www.oldcapitalmuseum.org/ or call Georgia’s Old Capital Museum Assistant Director Sally Holmes at (478) 453-1803. The museum, which is located at 201 E. Greene St., is open Tuesday – Friday, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and Saturday, from noon until 4 p.m.


Get an ACS Precision Tune Up before your heating system leaves you in the cold.

• Restores Lost Efficiency • Prevents Costly Breakdowns • Extends Life of Equipment

PRECISION TUNE UP

ONLY

89

$

• Provides Maximum Comfort and Safety

We service all makes and models

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 35


Commemorating Jarrett Springs By DR. BOB WILSON Photos by JAMES MCCUE

At a fresh, cold, bubbling spring — Milledgeville was borne

36 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 37


The William Sherrill Chapter, Colonial Dames XVII Century, will, in the near future, dedicate a marker commemorating the site of Jarrett Springs (also known as Commissioner Springs), the site where Milledgeville was founded. On behalf of the chapter, Dr. Bob Wilson, who teaches history at Georgia College & State University, has prepared an informative essay about the springs.

38 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


In 1803, as the population of Georgia was migrating south and west, the Georgia legislature, located in the capital of Louisville, determined that a new capital should be established further into the interior. Accordingly, Georgia Gov. John Milledge appointed a commission, composed of five good surveyors, to locate a suitable location as near to the center of the state as possible. The commissioners, headed by John Clark, son of Revolutionary hero Gen. Elijah Clarke, centered their efforts on the west bank of the Oconee River, on land ceded by the Creek Indians the year before. Fort Wilkinson had already been established in the area, and the commissioners focused their attention on an area between what is now Fishing Creek on the south and Tanyard Branch on the north. The commissioners ultimately found eight fresh springs in that area which, since a good water supply would be essential to the new capital, caused them to decide that this would be an ideal location for the new capital. The most important of these springs is located near what is now the southwest corner of Wayne and Thomas streets in Milledgeville. On an oppressively hot July day, John Clark and his fellow commissioners, nearly exhausted, came upon a grove of hickory trees and live oaks that were watered by a fresh, cold, bubbling spring. Resting under the shade of one of those oaks, they refreshed themselves with drinks from the spring. One of the commissioners then produced some whisky, which was tempered from water from the spring. A strong tradition has it that John Clark quaffed the drink, pounded his staff on the ground and said, “This is it!”— and Milledgeville was borne.

This site, which was so central to the town’s founding, now languishes in obscurity. One of the great live oaks, which was considered a historic landmark in 1881, still stands. Though much of the top of the tree has been lopped off for telephone wires, it still measures 15 feet in circumference near its base, and a core sample was recently interpreted by a representative of the Georgia Forestry Commission suggesting that the tree is approximately 300 years old. A few yards below, under the floor of a Georgia College & State University Physical Plant building, the spring still flows, though no longer open to the general public. When a metal plate is removed from the floor, one can descend five steps and see the water gushing out of one pipe, flowing into a small basin, then exiting through another pipe. It is as clear and cool and refreshing today as it was 207 years ago. In early days it was known as Commissioners’ Spring, but by the 1870s it was more commonly known as Jarrett’s Spring. To quote from an 1881 article in The Union Recorder, “No Georgia legislator, living or dead, from the first sitting of the Legislature at Milledgeville, to the last before removal, ever failed to quench his thirst in the waters of this grand old spring.” It was once “the resort of young and old on Sunday afternoons to drink its cool water out of an iron dipper made tight and fast by an iron chain, and out of its spout, today, passes enough water to supply an engine from Camak to Macon — eighty miles.” Jarrett Springs furnished the water for a small hotel that in the 1880s stood on the corner of Wayne and Montgomery, the site of Miller Gym today. Its waters also slaked the thirst of the families who were employed by the

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 39


Anything to do with Transportation • No matter what you drive we’re here for you. • Free locator service on any vehicle not on our lot. • We sell and service all brands.

Your East Central Georgia Dealer for Dodge-Chrysler-Jeep.

Open Monday - Saturday for your convenience

• New & Used Vehicle Sales & Service • Finance Department • Full Service & Parts Department • Tire Center • Body Shop (Free Estimates) • Detail Center • Rentals • Buy Here Pay Here Lot • Towing • Accessories • Striping, Moulding • Upholstering • Performance Modifications (We have staff expertise)

With over thirty six years under our belt we specialize in putting you in the vehicle of your dreams. Locally owned and operated for a hands on approach.

night o T e id R , y a d o T l l Ca 724 South Harris Street Sandersville, GA 31082 1-877-297-7857/478-552-5111

www.dormandodgechryslerjeep.com

“ a friend of the family”

40 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


RESULTS. •

In 2010, Rusty secured jobs for 1200+ new State Employees in Baldwin County • New 1500-bed Prison • Re-opening of Kidd Medical and surgery Unit at Central State Hospital • New Nursing Home for Prisoners • New request for Proposal for the Youth Detention Center

What’s Next? Bringing private manufacturers to Baldwin and Putnam County with job opportunities totaling 1000+ Address the expansion needs of our local colleges: GCSU, GMC, & CGTC

Milledgeville Manufacturing Company (1840s to 1870s) a four-story textile mill that stood on the spot later occupied by the Atlanta Gas Company; the high prominence where those factory workers lived rises up to the Thomas Street fire station and is still called Factory Hill by some old-timers today. Finally, one doesn’t have to be especially old to remember getting water from Jarrett Springs. On into the 1960s, people could still open a covering gate, descend those five steps and fill up a jug from the springs. Kids who played baseball in Gilbert Park in the late 1950s remember that the springs stood just a bit behind second base. The effort to commemorate Jarrett Springs by the William Sherrill Chapter of the Colonial Dames, 17th century, is to be highly applauded by all those who care about Milledgeville’s heritage.

Actively work with the Milledgeville Mayor, City Council, and County Commissioner on the consolidation of City/County Government.

RE-ELECT RUSTY KIDD STATE HOUSE DISTRICT 141 AN INDEPENDANT THINKER, A LEADER ON THE ISSUES

VOTE KIDD • NOVEMBER 2 To contact Rusty: Call 478-452-1354 Email Rustykidd@gmail.com Visit www.rustykidd.com Paid for by the Rusty Kidd Campaign

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 41


dining directory 119 Chops 30 W. Main St. Milledgeville AJ’s Hotwings & More 2601 North Columbia ST Suite 4 Milledgeville (478) 804-0101 Amici Italian Cafe 101 W Hancock St. Milledgeville (478) 452-5003 Applebee’s 106 NW Roberson Mill Rd. Milledgeville (478) 453-8355 Asian Bistro & Grill 124 W. Hancock St. Milledgeville (478-452-2886 Aubri Lane’s 114 S Wayne St. Milledgeville (478) 454-4181 Barberito’s Restaurant 148 W Hancock St Milledgeville (478) 451-4717 Blackbird Coffee 114 W Hancock St. Milledgeville (478) 454-2473 Bo Jo’s Cafe 3021 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 453-3234 The Brick 136 W Hancock St. Milledgeville (478) 452-0089 Bruster’s Ice Cream 1801 North Columbia St Milledgeville (478) 453-1303 Burger King 2478 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 453-3706

42 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

Captain D’s Seafood 2590 N. Columbia St, Milledgeville (478) 452-3542

Domino’s Pizza 1909-B N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 453-9455

Chick-Fil-A 1730 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 451-4830 W. Hancock St., Milledgeville (478) 452-0585

Down South Seafood 972 Sparta Hwy Milledgeville (478) 452-2100

Chili’s Bar & Grill 2596 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 452-1900 China Garden 1948 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 454-3449 China Wings 3 1071 S. Wayne St., Milledgeville (478) 453-3655 Choby’s at Little River 3065 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 453-9744 Church’s Chicken 620 N Jefferson St., Milledgeville (478) 414-1808 Country Buffet 1465 SE Jefferson St., Milledgeville (478) 453-0434 Crooked Creek, Bone Island Grill 208 Crooked Creek Dr., Eatonton (706) 485-9693 Dairy Queen 1105 S Wayne St., Milledgeville (478) 452-9620 3 Guys Pies 128 N. Wayne St., Milledgeville (478) 414-1155

Dukes Dawghouse 162 Sinclair Marina Road, Milledgeville (478) 453-8440 El Amigo Mexican Restaurant 2465 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 453-0027 El Tequila 1830 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 414-1702 Golden Corral 1913 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 414-1344 Goodie Gallery 812 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-8080 Great Wall Chinese Restaurant 1304 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 452-5200 Grits 132 Hardwick St. Milledgeville (478) 453-2520 Harold’s BBQ 411 Pea Ridge Rd. Eatonton 706-485-5376 Haynes Snack Bar 113 SW Davis Dr. Milledgeville (478) 453-4155

Huddle House 300 E. Hancock St. Milledgeville (478) 452-2680 206 NW Roberson Mill Rd., Milledgeville (478) 452-3222 IHOP 2598 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 452-0332 James Fish and Chicken 905 S Wayne St. Milledgeville (478) 453-8696 Judy’s Country kitchen 1720 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 414.1436 Kai Thai 2600 N. Columbia St. Milledgeville 478-454-1237 Kentucky Fried Chicken 2337 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 453-2456 Kuroshima Japan 140 W. Hancock St., Milledgeville (478) 451-0245 Lieu’s Peking Restaurant 2485 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 804-0083 Little Tokyo Steak House 2601 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-8886 Margarita’s Mexican Grill 2400 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 453-9547 McDonald’s 2490 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-1312 611 S Wayne St., Milledgeville (478) 452-9611


McDonald’s Wal-Mart, Milledgeville (478) 453-9499

Pig in a Pit Barbecue 116 West Hancock St., Milledgeville (478) 414-1744

Sylvia’s Grille 2600 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 452-4444

Mellow Mushroom 2588 N. Columbia St., Milledgeville 478-457-0144

Pizza Hut 650 W Wayne St., Milledgeville (478) 453-3703 2511 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 452-7440

Taco Bell 2495 N Columbia St.,Milledgeville (478) 452-2405

Metropolis Cafe 138 N. Wayne St., Milledgeville 478-452-0247 Mida Sweet 201 S. Wayne St Milledgeville (478) 453-8634 Octagon Cafe Milledgeville Mall (478) 452-0588 Old Clinton Barbecue 2645 N. Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 454-0080 Old Tyme Dogs 451 W. Montgomery St. Milledgeville Original Crockett’s Family Cafeteria and Catering 1850 N. Columbia St. Suite 10 Milledgeville (478)804-0009 Paradise Country BBQ 111 Old Montgomery Hwy Milledgeville (corner Hwy 441 N. & Log Cabin Rd) (478) 452-8008 Papa John’s Pizza 1306 N Columbia Street, Milledgeville (478) 453-8686 Papa and Nana’s Wang House 174 Gordon Hwy SW Milledgeville (478) 414-1630 Pickle Barrel Cafe & Sports Pub 1892 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-1960

PJ’s Steak House 3052 Highway 441, Milledgeville (478) 453-0060 Puebla’s Mexican Restaurant 112 W Hancock St, Milledgeville (478) 452-1173 Quizno’s Subs 1827 N Columbia St, Milledgeville (478) 451-0790 Ruby Tuesday’s 2440 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-5050 Shrimp Boats 911 S Elbert St. Milledgeville (478) 452-0559 Sonic Drive In 1651 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 451-0374

TNT Icy Remedy 1820 N. Columbia ST (478) 451-0342 Velvet Elvis 118 W Hancock St., Milledgeville (478) 453-8226 Vinson Diner 2136 SE Vinson Hwy, Milledgeville (478) 453-1171 Waffle House 1683 N Columbia St Milledgeville (478) 452-9507 3059 N Columbia St.,Milledgeville (478) 451-2914 Wendy’s 2341 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 453-9216 Zaxby’s 1700 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 452-1027

Subway 1692 N Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 453-2604 2600 N Columbia St. Milledgeville (478) 804-9976 Super China Buffet 1811 N. Columbia St., Milledgeville (478) 451-2888

Wednesday:

3 Martinis

$

Thursday:

Live light Jazz on the Porch (no cover, no minimum)

Friday & Saturday:

All You Can Eat Crablegs

Sonny’s Brew’N Que 120 N. Greene St., Milledgeville (478) 452-0004 Soul Master Barbecue & Lounge 451 N Glynn St. Milledgeville (478) 453-2790

Where the food is fresh, the wine is flowing, and the laughter has already begun.

If you don’t see your restaurant listed here then please call us at 478-453-1436 to have it added to our directory

Seafood, Pasta, Steaks and updated Regional specialties!  Private Dining Rooms Available for parties, meetings or events including Rehearsal Dinners & Small Receptions up to 45 people!

 Fine Wines and Full Bar!

2600 N. Columbia Street (in Wal-Mart Plaza)

478.452.4444

www.sylviasgrille.com SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 43


ds e e f a i r e t e f a mily C a F l a n i g i r O mily a Crockett’s f e k i l t s u j ulars g e r d n a s r e newcom TH ARIEMMA By SARAH BE MES McCUE Photos by JA


Crockett’s Original Family Cafeteria originally opened as a soup and sandwich concept in 2000. Frances and Allen Crockett have an extensive background in cafeteria-style dining, and the husband and wife duo have managed to perfect every recipe over their course of time in the business. “When Lawson Lawrence bought the Columbia Center [at the intersection of Fieldstone Drive and Hammock Road] in 1998, he offered us a space that used to be another old cafeteria for the workers of Milledgeville. The idea expanded from a simple soup and sandwich concept shortly after Crockett’s opened, but a fire on January 1, 2001

The soup and sandwich selection is the same from the original Crockett’s restaurant, along with four daily entrees. “Everyday we make our food fresh. We serve roast beef, any number of chicken items, fried fish three days a week, baked fish two, and any specialty the customer requests,” Allen said. “If you want something that isn’t on our menu, we can just go make it for you in the back.” The check on a fairly regular basis for a typical meal comes to less than $7. Nine different vegetables are offered daily with substitutions based on the time of year and what is in season. Crockett’s also offers a $1.99 children’s menu, which consists of half an entrée, half of two vegetables and a bread item, drink not included. The proportions are perfect for little ones whose stomachs are not able to consume as much as in an adult portion, and the tiny price makes the deal irresistible. Crockett’s can seat about 160 people with ease. The open eating area is a throwback to 1950s-style grace and dining comfort, with checkered tablecloths and flowers in the vases. It’s all smoke-free and family-friendly. Crockett’s also has a dessert section that offers 10 differ-

took us out for about six months,” Allen explained. After the fire, the Crocketts added some seating and cooking space in order to expand their prospering business. In 2007, the Crocketts sold the business, although the name stayed the same. After the business had changed hands twice, it later closed its doors. Frances and Allen decided to open a new establishment back in July, utilizing the original recipes the local community had already come to enjoy. They currently lease three units near LA Nails in the old Winn-Dixie shopping center. “Everything we sell here in the cafeteria is a la carte,” Frances said. “You select what you want, and you only pay for what you get.”

ent items, from key lime cheesecake to banana pudding. “We have the widest selection of salads in town,” Allen said, “corn bread salad, broccoli, apple, cucumber, beet, chicken, tuna, chef, tossed, and fresh fruit is always available.” “A lot of business people eat here, along with other groups that meet here once a week,” said Allen. “We’d like to expand to have meeting rooms for small groups to have lunch and meet.” Many of Crockett’s former customers have been waiting for the opening of Crockett’s Original Family Restaurant. The same customers, along with new fans, flock to Crockett’s on their lunch breaks. “The best thing about the restaurant is that we are here

Crockett’s Original Family Cafeteria is not what you’d find behind the counter in your middle school’s lunch line — get that idea out of your head right now. Once inside the cheerfully decorated, light and open space of Crockett’s, the aromas of fresh a la carte items engulfed a nose that didn’t even realize how hungry the body truly was.

46 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


so people can come and talk to the source if there is any problem with their dining experience,” Frances said. “If we’re here, and you want something to eat, you’re going to be fed, even if we are closed. If we are here and we see you outside, we’re going to feed you like family,” said Allen. Besides offering a little taste of home, Crockett’s also caters. If the order is big enough, Crockett’s will also deliver. “We do anything, anytime, and anywhere. We’ve done everything, in-house or out.” Allen said. “The cost varies depending on what the cus-

tomer orders. We do anything from prime rib to hot dogs and hamburgers.” A testament to the business, half of Crockett’s current staff has worked for the family business before, when the old restaurant was owned by the Crocketts the first time. “People tell us all the time that our staff is some of the best around. When you have hardworking, dedicated and knowledgeable people, the restaurant just flourishes.” Frances Crockett said. The mouth-watering recipes come from the Crocketts’ heads. There are few formal or precise

recipes, so many of the delicacies come from Allen’s old cafeteria days. The recipes continue to live on. “Our cookbook is in our heads,” joked the Crocketts. The 35 years of experience are evident with every bite — so is their passion for business. “We are not the restaurant from three years ago. We are the original Crockett’s from 13 years ago. We’re so grateful to be back and have our customers dine with us again.” That’s a bite, we’re all going to love to chew.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 47


48 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


Milledgeville 111 Fieldstone Dr. 478-452-0578

Serving Middle Georgia since 1988 1013B Fernwood Drive Milledgeville

478-452-9415 Macon 478-742-0342 Fax 478-454-6532 Josh Eady ~ 478-457-5215 Jason Latimer ~ 478-451-7615

Cochlea versus Nerve Loss Auditory nerve deafness is a rare condition. Over the past 20-30 years, many patients have been diagnosed with nerve deafness, which is a misnomer. The ear is divided into the outer ear (auricle and ear canal), middle ear (eardrum and bones), and inner ear (cochlea). Thousands of microscopic hair cells line the inside of the cochlea, which are vulnerable to noise exposure, ototoxic drugs, free radicals, etc. Cochlear hair cell fibers send signals via the auditory nerve to the regions of the brain that process auditory information. Once these cochlear hair cell fibers become damaged, the signal becomes degraded. Therefore, a Joy Pritchett, Au.D. better description of Doctor of Audiology www.HearAtlanta.com acquired hearing loss is cochlea hair cell loss rather the common term “nerve deafness”. Once the cochlea has sustained severe hair cell loss, the patient becomes a candidate for a cochlear implant, which replaces the cochlea and connects directly to the auditory nerve. The current guideline for cochlear implantation is a score of 50% or less for continuous speech. To learn more about cochlear implants contact Dr. Joy Pritchett, Audiologist 478-452-0578.

including Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry Our caring and friendly staff will listen to your needs and concerns. In addition to cosmetic and implant dentistry, we offer “one day” crowns, oral sedation, treatment for TMJ disorders, in-office CT Scans, medical insurance billing for accident cases and certain other dental treatments including implants and reconstructive dentistry. We also help patients with root canal treatments, periodontal care (Gum disease), extractions, premium dentures and denture repairs 112 Wrights Drive, Suite E • Milledgeville, GA • (478) 454-2114

Dunwoody

Lake Oconee

All Major Credit Cards Accepted including CARE CREDIT

1713 Mt. Vernon Rd. 770-394-9499

1051 Parkside Commons 706.454.0578

WE DO NOT accept Medicaid nor Peach Care.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 49


Photo by James McCue Photography

50 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


‘Faith & works go hand in hand’ Sacred Heart parish weaves rich, distinguished history and Southern hospitality with Catholic faith By SARAH BETH ARIEMMA

S

acred Heart Catholic Church is the only Catholic church in Milledgeville and has been since 1874.

Contributed Photo

It began as a missionary church providing a home and safe haven for those sharing in the Catholic faith. Today, Sacred Heart serves nearly 600 people with ministry and the sacraments. Father Young Nguyen has served as priest of Sacred Heart since 2009. His passion for Christ and the church is evident with every carefully chosen word. “In the beginning, Sacred Heart was just a missionary church. Today, we’re here to reach out to both Catholics and

non-Catholics alike. We want people to know that the church is available whenever a need arises.” Mass is celebrated Monday through Thursday at 12:10 p.m. Friday night services are at 5:30 p.m. There are two services on Saturday, 9:30 a.m. and a 5:30 p.m. vigil mass. Sunday services begin at 9 a.m., followed by an 11:15 a.m. service and a 5 p.m. mass. “We have a choir that sings at the 5 o’clock mass on Sunday nights,” Nguyen said. “A lot of people attend the 11 a.m. mass, which is more traditional, while the 5 p.m. Sunday mass is more contemporary with more praise and worship-style songs.” Sunday school begins at 10 a.m. Children preparing for the sacraments of First Communion and Confirmation can also take their preparatory classes during this time as well. During the Lenten season, a fish fry is held every

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 51


Friday night to feed those who attend the vigil mass. All times and information can be found on the church website — sacredheartmilledgeville.org. “The children go on retreats and do voluntary acts of helping. We teach the children about their faith, but also show them the importance of good works. Faith and works go hand in hand,” Nguyen said. For those who are not Catholic, the priesthood remains a fascination. Priests in the Catholic faith never marry and take a vow of abstinence. “I decided to become a priest by asking myself how I can become more Christ-present. I got a call, nurtured it, learned all about it, and I’ve lived in prayer every day. This is not just a job, but also a way of living. And I love living it,” Nguyen said with a smile. Sacred Heart Catholic Church has recently undergone a major renovation to bring the church to a more atheistically appealing glory. The outside sidewalk is new, along with the

marble pavement. The organ is completely restored, along with the pews, which have been given a fresh coat of varnish and refinished. Because the church is on the National Register of Historic Places, Nguyen and those who have been involved in overseeing the renovations have been careful to follow all guidelines that the national register mandates. “It is good that there is a code to follow [when renovating places on the national register]. You need to keep the traditions alive. Generations that come afterward can look upon the building and say, ‘that’s how they used to do it. That’s our history,’” Nguyen said. Any renovation is expensive, but Sacred Heart intends on updating every possible space to both modernize and maintain the building’s upkeep. The church has just re-finished the outside of the Parrish Hall, and the outside of the church and rectory are next on the church’s list of to-dos. Notable Southern-Catholic writer, Flannery O’Connor attended mass at the quaint little church, along with numerous

As the church looked when Flannery

O’Connor was living in the late 1950s

contributed photo


contributed photo

Sunday school classes. She was considered a Southern Gothic writer who utilized her Catholic faith to both examine and question issues of morality and human nature. It was within Sacred Heart’s hallowed halls that her understanding of Catholicism and religion would ultimately shape her life’s work: writing. While Flannery O’Connor is considered one of the most notable members of Sacred Heart, Nguyen is quick to both acknowledge her fame and discuss other members of his parish. “Everybody that comes to church is important. Our differences are what make the church special,” Nguyen said, “The people at this parish are very genuine — true Southern hospitality at its finest.” The church also implements numerous community help projects. The projects are not bound within the church walls, nor are they bound by community. Whoever has a need for food, shelter, or payments can find solace and face no judgment at Sacred Heart. “The people do ‘Helping Hands,’ which helps people pay bills in which they find themselves unable to pay that month. We are constantly aware of the changes in the economy and how it affects people. The parishioners and myself rush to

respond in any way we can be of service.” The Campus Catholics at Georgia College & State University volunteer their time as well with the teen students in the church, establishing a perfect alignment for both groups of students to talk openly about age-appropriate issues and answer questions without judgment. Nguyen knows the importance of people. His quiet and understanding ways, along with jokes to begin many of his sermons, are subtle reminders that no one is perfect. “I always have the people,” Nguyen said. “People still faithfully come every Sunday. They come to God’s table. If you take care of people spiritually, they will be able to respond to God in different ways to build his kingdom here on earth.” The bells of Sacred Heart can be heard throughout Milledgeville. Every so often, one may catch their peals of music. The bells stand as a testament to those first Catholics in Milledgeville, and a reminder to those who may have fallen away from the church, beckoning them to return. “The church is made of all sinners — if you are one of them, come worship with us. This is a special invitation to those who have fallen away or do not practice faithfully, come whenever you can. It is time to come home.”


worship directory

Located at 2988 Hwy. 441 N. Lake Sinclair Inside the Ranch Park Complex

Call for your next quote 478-452-4538 OR

1-800-694-7003 THE ONLY INSURANCE AGENCY OUT AT THE LAKE!

Antioch Primitive Baptist Church 512 NW Monticello Rd. 478-968-0011 Baldwin Church of Christ 57 Marshall Rd. 478-452-5440 Bible Rivival Church 101 Deerwood Dr. 478-452-4347 Black Springs Baptist Church 673 Sparta Hwy NE 478-453-9431

First United Body of Christ Methodist Church Deliverance Church of

Milledgeville

366 Log Cabin Road Milledgeville, GA 31061

478-452-4597

478-452-3015

“Where Caring Comes From the Heart”

325 Allen Memorial Drive

453-8514

Countyline Baptist Church 1012 Hwy 49W 478-932-8105 Countyline Primitive Baptist Church 120 NW Neriah Rd. 478-986-7333 Covenant Presbyterian Church 440 N. Columbia St. 478-453-9628 Discipleship Christian Center Church 113 SE Thomas St. 478-452-7755

First United Methodist Church 366 Log Cabin Rd. 478-452-4597

Gumhill Baptist Church 1125 Hwy 24 478-452-3052

Flagg Chapel Baptist Church 400 W. Franklin St. 478-452-7287 Flipper Chapel AME 400 W. Franklin St. 478-453-7777 Freedom Church, Inc. 500 Underwood Rd. 478-452-7694

140 SW Effingham Rd. 478-453-4459

Elbethel Baptist Church 251 N. Irwin St. 478-452-8003

Central Church of Christ 359 NE Sparta Hwy 478-451-0322

Emmanuel Baptist Church 384 Gordon Hwy 478-453-4225

Friendship Baptist Church 685 E Hwy 24 478-452-0507

Church of God 385 Log Cabin Rd. 478-452-2052

Faith Point Church of Nazarene 700 Dunlap Rd. 478-451-5365

Friendship Baptist Chapel 635 Twin Bridges Rd. 478-968-7201

Community Life Baptist Church 1340 Orchard Hill Rd. 478-414-1650

First Baptist Church 330 S. Liberty St. 478-452-0502 First Christian Church 555 N. Columbia St. 478-452-2620

Community Baptist Church 143 NE Log Cabin Rd. 478-453-2380

First Presbyterian Church 210 S. Wayne St. 478-452-9394

OCONEE UROLOGY

CENTRAL GEORGIA BATTERY COMPANY

M. FREDERICK STEWART M.D. BORIS VELIMIROVICH M.D., F.A.C.S. Board Certified Adult & Pediatric Urology

Grace Baptist Church 112 Alexander Dr. 478-453-9713 Greater Mount Zion Baptist Church 171 Harrisburg Rd. 478-452-9115 Green Pasture Baptist Church 150 N. Warren St. 478-453-8713

3020 Heritage Road Milledgeville, GA

1217 Columbia Dr. Milledgeville 478-453-7516

453-9335

Hope Lutheran Church 214 Hwy 40 W. 478-452-3696

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses 2701 Irwinton Rd. 478-452-7854 Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses 110 NW O’Conner Dr. 478-452-8887 Lakeshore Community Church 882 Twin Bridges Rd. 478-986-7331 Life and Peace Christian Center 116 SW Frank Bone Rd. 478-453-3607

METRO WATER FILTER

“We Outsell Because We Outserve”

www.oconeeurology.net

Hardwick United Methodist Church 195 Hardwick St. 478-452-1513

Hopewell United Methodist Church 188 Hopewell Church Rd. 478-453-9047

Freewill Fellowship Worship Center 115 Cook St. 478-414-2063

Church of Jesus Christ 1700 N Jefferson St. 478-452-9588

Hardwick Baptist Church 124 Thomas St. 478-452-1612

“We Treat Water Right” Since 1972

Service for Generations

888-692-8375 “

FREE WATER TEST

112 Joyner Rd. Milledgeville, GA 31061

478-452-7576


Living Word Church of God 151 W. Charlton St. 478-452-7151 Milledgeville Christian Center The Sheep Shed 120 Ivey Dr. 478-453-7710 Miracle Healing Temple 133 Central Ave. 478-452-1369 Missionaries of Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints 141 Frank Bone Rd. 478-452-5775 Montpelier United Methodist Church 449 Sparta Hwy 478-453-0040 Mosleyville Baptist Church 106 SE Oak Dr. 478-452-1723 Mount Nebo Baptist Church 338 Prosser Rd. 478-452-4288 Mount Pleasant Baptist Church 265 SW Mt Pleasant Church Rd. 478-452-7978 Milledgeville Study Group 140 Chase Ct. 478-414-1517 New Beginning Church of Christ 325 Hwy 49 478-454-5489 New Covenant Community Outreach Ministries 321 E. Hancock St. 478-453-3709

HATTAWAY SCREEN PRINTING Church Events • Family Reunions School Events & Clubs T-Shirts-Jackets • Caps

478-452-6435 800-792-8228

New Hope Baptist Church 345 E. Camden St. 478-452-0431

Rock of Ages Baptist Church 601 W. Montgomery St 478-453-8693

New Life Fellowship Church 123 Ennis Rd. 478-414-7654

Rock Mill Baptist Church 2770 N. Columbia St. 478-451-5084

New Life Foursquare Church 112 Jacqueline Terrace 478-452-1721

Sacred Heart Catholic Church 110 N. Jefferson St. 478-452-2421

New Life Ministries 1835 Vinson HWY SE

Salvation Army Corps Community Center 478-452-6940

New Vision Church of God in Christ 941 NE Dunlap Rd. 478-414-1123

Second Macedonia Baptist Church 2914 SE Vinson Hwy 478-452-3733

Northridge Christian Church 321 Log Cabin Rd. 478-452-1125 Northside Baptist Church 1001 N. Jefferson St. 478-452-6648 Oak Grove Baptist Church No. 1 508 Hwy 49 478-453-3326 Oak Grove Independent Methodist Church 121 Lingold Dr. 478-453-9564 Old Bethel Holiness Church 866 SE Stembridge Rd. 478-451-2845

Seventh Day Adventist 509 N. Liberty St. 478-453-3839 Seventh Day Adventist Church of Milledgeville 156 Pettigrew Rd. 478-453-8016 Shiloh Baptist Church 204 Harrisburg Rd. 478-453-2157 Sinclair Baptist Church 102 Airport Rd. 478-452-4242 Spring Hill Baptist Church 396 Lake Laurel Rd. 478-453-7090 Saint Mary Missionary Baptist Church 994 Sparta Hwy 478-451-5429

Pathfinder Christian Church 120 N. Earnest Byner St. 478-453-8730

Saint Mary Baptist Church Hwy 212 478-986-5228

Pine Ridge Baptist Church 657 Old Monticello Rd. 478-986-5055

Saint Paul Baptist Church 485 Meriweather Rd. 478-986-5855

WHIPPLE OFFICE EQUIPMENT Sales & Service Since 1964

HARGROVE ACCOUNTING & TAX

Tabernacle of Praise 304 Hwy 49 W. 478-451-0906 Torrance Chapel Baptist Church 274 Pancras Rd. 478-453-8542 Trinity Christian Methodist Church 321 N. Wilkinon St. 478-457-0091

26 YEAR ANNIVERSARY

Invoice Sale! Stop in for Details

(478) 452-4538

Union Baptist Church 720 N. Clark St. 478-452-8626 Union Missionary Baptist Church 135 Prosser Rd. 478-453-3517 Vaughn Chapel Baptist Church 1980 N. Jefferson St. 478-452-9140

2353 River Ridge Road Milledgeville, Ga 31061

(478) 452-6474

BECKHAM’S USED CARS

800 N. Jefferson St.

452-1909 • 452-8208

Victory Baptist Church 640 Meriweather Road 478-452-2285 Wesley Chapel AME Church 1462 SE Elbert St 478-452-5083

478-452-8080 Wesley Chapel Foundation House 211 S Clark St. 478-452-9112

812 N. Columbia St. at the railroad tracks

Milledgeville, GA 31061

Westview Baptist Church 273 W Hwy 49 478-452-9140 Zion Church of God in Christ 271 E. Camden 478-453-7144

G&S GAS SERVICE

1201 N. Columbia St.

Locally Owned and Operated 507 S. Wayne St.

453-7531

452-3625

Typewriters • Cash Registers • Copiers

100 East Hancock St (478) 452-3710

Saint Stephen’s Episcopal Church 220 S. Wayne St. 478-452-2710

Gymnastics Dance Cheer Karate

478-454-3446 EVANS AUTOMOTIVE YOUR COMPLETE CARE CENTER

1525 N. Columbia St.• Milledgeville, GA 31061

478-452-5448


The secrets of Memory Hill Story by JONATHAN JACKSON Photos by JESSIC A LUTON

Murderers, politicians, a literary icon, a bona fide superstar and a Wild West bandit, share a final resting place along with ordinary citizens of a town with an extraordinary history

56 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


M

emory Hill Cemetery is a treasure in downtown Milledgeville. It is a peaceful place filled with quiet beauty that transcends busy surroundings. It contains the graves of some of Milledgeville’s most famous — and most infamous — as well as those who contributed in less celebrated and quiet ways, to the fabric of a town at the center of some of the most significant events in the history of the United States. One local couple, Hugh and Sue Harrington, stands at the heart of the cemetery alongside other volunteers who are passionate about historic preservation of Memory Hill and other cemeteries throughout the area. Hugh sums the importance of the Memory Hill institution best: “There’s so much history here. The history of all of Milledgeville is in this cemetery,” he said during a recent tour. “It all ends up here.” The Harringtons spoke of their work with local cemeteries and uncovered some of the most interesting facts about Memory Hill on a recent hot morning in mid-summer. Their abbreviated stories about Memory Hill were reminiscent of an essay penned by local English teacher Josephine King, who likened obituaries to icebergs — so much of what they talked about was the part of an iceberg that is visible above the surface while the bulk of the lives of the individuals buried at Memory Hill lies beneath the surface. Memory Hill is whatever you want it to be. You can find peace, quiet, sadness, loss and even a little spookiness. All it takes is a little figurative digging and you can uncover scandal, riotousness, sex and murder — if you know where to look. “Memory Hill has artwork, famous people and trees and plants that have been here forever,” Susan Harrington said. Hugh echoed his wife remarking on the makeup of the cemetery. “It has evolved like the city of Milledgeville,” he said. “The burials reflect the larger community. About 50 percent of the people buried here are African-American. There are 350 Confederate graves.” The Harringtons and some volunteers at the cemetery have uncovered some of the secrets that Memory Hill is so good at keeping. Speaking of their work without mentioning the work of another devotee to Memory Hill’s history would be remiss. Paul Farr’s loving and non-judgmental devotion to all kinds of history — especially that of Memory Hill — laid much groundwork for the work undertaken by the Harringtons and the Friends of Baldwin County Cemeteries. Farr was a frequent contributor to many publications including 50 Plus Lifestyles, another magazine formerly published by The Union-Recorder. He was the first to introduce many to Memory Hill’s “witch” and Wild West bandit. He witnessed some of the events that are now part of Memory Hill’s story and in 1999, he became part of Memory Hill as he was interred in the cemetery upon his death.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 57


Farr joined the ranks of the dearly departed at Memory Hill and is now among such notable people as Dixie Haygood, who performed in the late 1800s under the stage name of Annie Abbott. “She was literally a household name,” Hugh said. “Dixie Haygood was probably the most famous person to ever be in Milledgeville. She had a sad life, but for 10 years, she was like The Beatles.” Haygood’s reputation today is most prominently recalled as the “witch of Memory Hill,” but the Harringtons hope to change that perception. Through genealogical research, the Harringtons were able to uncover Haygood’s diary and autograph book from a relative. They have since been able to construct a history of her life and have recently published “Annie Abbott ‘The Little Georgia Magnet’ and the True Story of Dixie Haygood.”

‘The history of all of Milledgeville is in this cemetery. It all ends up in here.’ -Hugh Harrington The book sheds light on Haygood’s ability to remain standing even while strong men tried to pick her up. “Some people believe her ability was not normal,” Sue said. The belief in some sort of supernatural ability has fed the legend around Haygood, but the Harringtons said that Haygood never claimed to be able to perform tricks. Instead she insisted that she had an ability and had no idea where it came from. Haygood’s act likely evolved from her own fascination with a predecessor, Lula Hurst, who was billed as the Georgia Wonder. Hurst performed a similar act and Haygood saw her perform at the Milledgeville Opera House. Haygood, who wasn’t well-received in Milledgeville because of her foray into show business, traveled the world with her act and spent a lot of time in Europe. She endured many impostors using her stage name and when she died, she was buried in Memory Hill. Perhaps one of the more intriguing people at Memory Hill is Bill Miner. Miner is known through history as The Grey Fox and The Gentleman Bandit. He was the last known Wild West bandit to be captured and when he was, he was incarcerated in the state prison in Milledgeville. Miner is widely attributed as the originator of the phrase “hands up,” having supposedly used those words as he robbed multiple trains. His polite manner during robberies earned him the moniker The Gentleman Bandit. Miner’s story made it to the big screen in the 1982 Golden Globe nominated film “The Grey Fox” starring Richard Farnsworth. Miner escaped from the state prison numerous times. The last time, though, he spent considerable time in a swamp near Toomsboro. Miner got sick and never recovered. He died in prison and was buried at Memory Hill. Hugh pointed out two peculiarities surrounding Miner’s grave. His date of death is incorrect, and according to cemetery records the marker and the actual grave are in two different locations, hinting that perhaps Miner once again escaped his confines. Hugh calls it Bill Miner’s final

escape. Some of that history Hugh speaks of is salacious, and the Harringtons agree that the common conclusion is that it is best not to talk about the murdered and murderers that were interred in the cemetery in the 1900s. One murderer buried in Memory Hill that both agree has an astounding story is Julia Force. She is buried in the same family plot as former Georgia Gov. John Mitchell. “Julia Force was a multiple murderer who decided she was going to disgrace her family,” Hugh said. “She shot both of her sisters in their heads, then turned herself in. She had a trial and was committed to Central State Hospital in the 1890s. While she was there, she was befriended by a matron in one of the women’s dormitories. That matron was a granddaughter of Gov. John Mitchell. When Force died in 1915, she was buried in an unmarked grave in the Mitchell family plot.” Part of the work of the Friends of Baldwin County Cemeteries is to preserve and note the locations of graves, some of which contain symbols common on older graves. “Memory Hill is not full of a lot of fantastic symbols, but it is a good representation,” Hugh said. The cemetery group is non-profit, and Sue explained some of the goals of the organization. “Our goals include publishing information about the cemetery and its inhabitants,” Sue said. “There are 170-something cemeteries in Baldwin County, and documenting the cemeteries and gravestones allows among other things, for people to trace their ancestry. The mission has expanded to serious preservation of the cemeteries themselves.” The group has evolved in its scope and mission in recent years, but is rooted in preservation efforts that predate the Harringtons’ involvement. “Floride Gardner was working with a committee regarding the local cemeteries and asked for my help with the unmarked graves,” Sue said. Other group members, including Ann King, Louise Horne and Betty Davidson, also worked for years on the effort that resulted in the dissemination of information about the county cemeteries. “When we got done with that, we’d had so much fun we decided to create Friends of Baldwin County Cemeteries,” Sue said. The mission expanded to include preservation efforts, and Sue said the group is at the forefront of that effort. “I think at this point, we’re probably more knowledgeable about preservation efforts than anyone in the middle Georgia area,” Sue said. Sue said the group is an active one and meets every other month. There are 50 to 60 members that are concerned with the preservation and mapping effort. The work always seems to lead back to a familiar place. “Memory Hill is almost always the focus of attention,” Sue said. “There are so many notables here.” The group publishes informational brochures about Memory Hill and has burned through 2,000 of them since November 2009. “It’s a real tourist attraction,” Hugh said. “It has endured. General Sherman did no damage to the cemetery.” Memory Hill is located on the square designated for public use in the original plan for Milledgeville and is open to visitors daily. An information center contains the brochures and a map for self-guided tours. “Annie Abbott ‘The Little Georgia Magnet’ and the True Story of Dixie Haygood” is available at The Red Door, The Old Governor’s Mansion Gift Shop, Georgia’s Old Capital Museum gift shop and at Box Office Books, located in Campus Theatre. The book is also available online at AnnieAbbott.com and Amazon.com. For more information about Memory Hill, visit www.friendsofcems.org/memoryhill. For more information about the Friends of Baldwin County Cemeteries, visit www.friendsofcems.org/Baldwin./


Advertisers Ace Hardware ...................................................................................................................................................................................................21 ACS ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................35 Andalusia ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................13 Another World..................................................................................................................................................................................................61 Beckhams Used Cars.........................................................................................................................................................................................51 Cansino and Petty.............................................................................................................................................................................................26 Central Georgia Technical College..............................................................................................................................................................48, 50 Century Bank .....................................................................................................................................................................................................3 Chaplinwood ................................................................................................................................................................................................8, 50 C&R Cabinets ....................................................................................................................................................................................................3 Dorman Dodge.................................................................................................................................................................................................40 Dr. Eisner .........................................................................................................................................................................................................68 Dr. Arnold ........................................................................................................................................................................................................49 Edward Jones ....................................................................................................................................................................................................61 Elite Gymnastics ...............................................................................................................................................................................................51 Evans Automotive .............................................................................................................................................................................................51 Exchange Bank .................................................................................................................................................................................................26 First United Methodist Church ........................................................................................................................................................................50 Fordham & Company ........................................................................................................................................................................................8 Gerald Grimes Plumbing ..................................................................................................................................................................................50 Georgia Military College...................................................................................................................................................................................35 Golf Cart City ....................................................................................................................................................................................................5 G&S Gas Service ..............................................................................................................................................................................................51 Happy Times Jumpers & Party Rentals.............................................................................................................................................................50 Hargrove Accounting and Tax...........................................................................................................................................................................51 Hattaway Screen Printing .................................................................................................................................................................................51 Hearing Associates ............................................................................................................................................................................................49 Heritage Printing ..............................................................................................................................................................................................51 Ivey’s Tire..........................................................................................................................................................................................................12 JC Grant...........................................................................................................................................................................................................19 KC Eady ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................49 Metro Water Filter ............................................................................................................................................................................................50 Norris Wheel and Brake .....................................................................................................................................................................................3 Oconee Urology................................................................................................................................................................................................50 Old Governor’s Mansion...................................................................................................................................................................................20 Old Governor’s Mansion Store..........................................................................................................................................................................20 Oconee Regional Medical Center .....................................................................................................................................................................27 Quality Pawn ....................................................................................................................................................................................................61 Pamlico Pools....................................................................................................................................................................................................12 Ranch Park .................................................................................................................................................................................................50, 51 RJI, Inc. .............................................................................................................................................................................................................2 Rusty Kidd ...........................................................................................................................................................................................25, 33, 41 Southside Equipment........................................................................................................................................................................................48 Sylvia’s Grille.....................................................................................................................................................................................................43 Texaco Express ..................................................................................................................................................................................................12 The Goodie Gallery ..........................................................................................................................................................................................51 The Savior’s Touch............................................................................................................................................................................................50 Twin Lakes Physical Therapy ............................................................................................................................................................................13 Varsity Ink ........................................................................................................................................................................................................50 Villamar ............................................................................................................................................................................................................20 WHB..................................................................................................................................................................................................................8 Williams Funeral Home....................................................................................................................................................................................40 Whipple Office Equipment ..............................................................................................................................................................................51

Thank you to all of our advertisers for their commitment to local patronage and their confidence in Milledgeville Scene! SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 59


arts & entertainment SEPTEMBER September 18 30th Annual Twin Lakes Library System Library Fair. Mary Vinson Library, 151 S. Jefferson St. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (478) 452-6522.

October 19 Pony rides with Mr. Horst. Milledgeville Marketplace, 222 E. Hancock St. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Visit www.milledgevillemarketplace.com. Call (478) 414-4413 for more information.

“A Night to Remember.” Boys & Girls Club of Baldwin and Jones Counties fundraiser. Milledgeville Country Club. RSVP. $40 per person, $45 at the door. (478) 456-5602.

October 21 “King Cotton: The Common Threat.” Georgia’s Old Capital Museum. 6 p.m. Reception follows. (478) 453-1803.

ARF Pet Walk. Oconee River Greenway. 10 a.m.

Deep Roots Festival BBQ Sneak Peek. Downtown Milledgeville behind City Hall. (478) 414-4014.

September 24 “Anne Carr: Coming Home.” Art exhibition. Allied Arts. Marlor Center, 201 N. Wayne St. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. (478) 4523950.

October 23 Deep Roots Festival. Downtown Milledgeville. Gates open at 10 a.m.

September 28 Randy Newton and the 120/80 Band. Milledgeville Marketplace, 222 E. Hancock St. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Visit www.milledgevillemarketplace.com. Call (478) 414-4413 for more information.

OCTOBER October 2 Bluegrass with Heart Pine. Andalusia front lawn. 5 to 8 p.m. October 5 GCSU Faculty Recital. Catherine KilgoreSmith, French horn; Lev Ryabinin, piano Max Noah Recital Hall. (478) 445-8289. October 9 “Hands on History.” Georgia’s Old Capital Museum. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. RSVP. (478) 453-1803. October 12 Smokey Pink Pig Children’s photos. Milledgeville Marketplace, 222 E. Hancock St. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Visit www.milledgevillemarketplace.com. Call (478) 414-4413 for more information. October 16 GCSU Choral Ensembles. First Baptist Church, 330 S. Liberty St. 7:30 p.m. (478) 445-8289. October 18 GCSU Orchestra fall concert. Magnolia Ballroom. 7:30 p.m. (478) 445-4789. “The Cailiffs of Baghdad, Georgia.” Reading with author Mary Helen Stefaniak. Andalusia main house dining room. 7 to 8 p.m.

“The Collections Tour.” Old Governor’s Mansion. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday-Friday (by appointment only). $15 for adults; $8 for seniors; $10 for groups; $4 for students. Hear an in-depth discussion on the Mansion’s varied material and textile collections, the process of building the collection, recent restoration, and culminating in the methodologies employed in locating both original and period appropriate pieces and materials for display within the museum. Call (478) 445-4545.

Attractions

October 25 Leroy Bynum, tenor, guest artist. Max Noah Recital Hall. 7:30 p.m. (478) 445-8289. October 26 Pumpkin decorating and demonstrations with John Sirmans. Milledgeville Marketplace, 222 E. Hancock St. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Visit www.milledgevillemarketplace.com. Call (478) 414-4413 for more information. October 28 “An Evening with Dixie Haygood.” Susan Harrington, co-author of “The Little Georgia Magnet.” Goldstein Center for the Performing Arts, Georgia Military College. 7 p.m. (478) 453-1803. Ongoing September 27-October 22 Craig Coleman. Photography exhibition. GCSU Department of Art. Blackbridge Hall Art Gallery. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Reception September 30, 5 to 7 p.m. (478) 445-4572. Through December 15 “Work from the Permanent Collection.” GCSU Department of Art. By appointment. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. Museum of Fine Arts. (478) 445-4572. Milledgeville Marketplace, 222 E. Hancock St. (City lot between the Golden Pantry and the Huddle House across from SunTrust Bank). Downtown farmer’s market sponsored by Milledgeville MainStreet featuring produce, plants, baked goods, arts and crafts. Open Tuesdays, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. through November. Public parking available. Visit www.milledgevillemarketplace.com. Call (478) 414-4413 for more information. “Labor Behind the Veil.” Old Governor’s

60 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER

Mansion. Tours by appointment only. A historically documented tour that provides mansion visitors a glimpse of the working lives of men and women who lived and worked on the mansion grounds. Call (478) 445-4545.

Andalusia Flannery O’Connor’s Farm, North Columbia Street, (478) 454-4029, www.andalusiafarm.org. Open to the public Monday, Tuesday, Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bartram Forest In 1794, Native Americans inhabited the Bartram Forest. Today, educational hiking trails allow visitors to see centuries of abundant wildlife, natural wetlands, and an erosion ravine with soil that is a remnant of the ancient shallow seas that covered Georgia 50 to 100 million years ago. Three looping trails cover this natural wonder. 2892 Highway 441 South. (478) 445-2119. Blackbridge Hall Art Gallery 111 South Clarke St., (478) 445-4572, www.gcsu.edu/art, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. This art gallery exhibits regional, national and internationally recognized contemporary artists. It also presents GCSU senior art major exhibitions at the end of each semester. Brown-Stetson-Sanford House 601 West Hancock St. (478) 453-1803. Open by appointment and on the Historic Trolley Tour. An architectural gem built by John Marlor in the “Milledgeville Federal” style with its characteristic columned double porch. It served the state capital as the Beecher-Brown Hotel and then the State’s Rights Hotel for the many visiting legislators who came to the area. GCSU Natural History Museum Herty Hall, Room 143, Wilkinson Street (478) 445-0809 for hours; also open by appointment. Visit the Paleozoic, Mesozioc and Cenozoic eras and see fossils from Georgia and across the world. The museum offers an explanation of the history of life through geological time. Georgia’s Old Capital Museum 201 East Greene St., Old Capital Building ground floor, (478) 453-1803,www.oldcapitalmuseum.org, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. Experience real Civil War history in the building where


Georgia legislators voted to secede from the Union and learn about Native Americans who lived in the area before European settlement. The Old Capital Building was the first public building designed in the Gothic Revival style. John Marlor Art Center 201 North Wayne St., (478) 452-3950, www.milledgevillealliedarts.com. This facility is one of three historic buildings that make up the Allied Arts Center. This area was once known as “The Strip,” which was the heart of the African-American district until the 1980s. It is a beautiful Milledgeville-Federal/Early Greek Revival. Originally two-over-two clapboard with shed rooms and an open dogtrot porch. It now houses arts offices and the Marlor Art Gallery. The Allen’s Market Building, across from the John Marlor Art Center, is a 1911 building that has been adapted into theatre, meeting and studio space. Visitors are given guided tours of current exhibitions. Allied Arts is open MondayFriday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on weekends by appointment. For more information (478) 452-3950.

Georgia’s Antebellum Capitol Museum Located at 201 E. Greene St., the Antebellum Capitol Museum is housed in the Old Capitol Building, and tours are available Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday noon to 4 p.m. For more information call (478) 453-1803. Olive Forge Herb Garden Located at 161 Brown’s Crossing Road in Haddock, the garden is open every Thursday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Still Room is always stocked with herbal goodies to eat, smell or wear. Call ahead during the summer months. Workshops available for groups of 7 to 15 participants and must be scheduled at least three weeks in advance and prepaid. For more information (478) 932-5737. oliveforge@alltel.net

Lockerly Hall 1534 Irwinton Road, (478) 452-2112, www.lockerlyarboretum.org. Lockerly Hall, a Greek Revival home circa 1839, is the centerpiece of the Lockerly Arboretum, and presides over its surroundings with elegance and grace. The mansion is a significant example of the finest plantation architecture of the area as well as the entire cotton belt of the Old South. Lockerly Hall is open for tours on the Monday and Wednesday Trolley Tour through the Convention & Visitors Bureau. (478) 452-4687 or (800) 653-1804. Mary Vinson Memorial Library Baldwin County’s first public library was founded in 1923 and at one time occupied the building that now serves as the Milledgeville Visitors Center. In 1961, the library’s name was changed to the Mary Vinson Memorial Library in honor of Congressman Vinson’s late wife. The current 18,900-square-foot building on Jefferson Street was completed in 1986. Today, the Mary Vinson Memorial Library is home to an extensive genealogical and local history collection. Located at 151 South Jefferson St. www.twinlakeslibrarysystem.org

John Kilgore

$

5

Bring in this ad for off of goods or services

Another World Hair Salon 760 N Jefferson St. Milledgeville • (478) 453-8174

Memory Hill Cemetery Originally designated as one of the four public squares of twenty acres each in the Milledgeville town plan of 1803, it later came to be known as Cemetery Square. Many people associated with Milledgeville and Georgia history, such as L.Q.C. Lamar, Congressman Carl Vinson, and Flannery O’Connor, as well as early Georgia governors, legislators, college presidents, slaves, and soldiers, are buried here. Liberty and Franklin streets; www.friendsofcems.org/MemoryHill. Milledgeville Convention & Visitors Bureau The CVB offers guided trolley tours Monday – Friday, 10 a.m. and Saturdays at 2 p.m. Group tickets available by request, as well as step-on guides at the CVB, 200 W. Hancock St. Office hours: Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed holidays. For additional information call (478) 452-4687 or 1800-653-1804 or visit www.milledgevillecvb.com

Tours Milledgeville’s Trolley Tour A drive through the landmark Historic District includes rotating visits to the Old Governor’s Mansion, c. 1838, Old State Capitol, c. 1807, Saint Stephen’s Episcopal Church, c. 1841, Lockerly Hall, c. 1839 and the Stetson-Sanford House, c. 1825. Tours are available at 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday. Adults $10; children ages 6 to 16 $5. Tours begin at Convention & Visitors Bureau, 200 West Hancock St. (800) 653-1804 or (478) 452-4687. The Old Governor’s Mansion The Old Governor’s Mansion, located at 120 S. Clarke St., was the home of 10 Georgia governors. Built in 1838, it is a superb example of Greek Revival architecture and was restored in 1967. Open for tours Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. with tours at the top of each hour. Closed on Monday, Thanksgiving, and the week after Christmas until New Year’s. Admission charged. For information (478) 445-4545.

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 61


Sightings

GMC’S USERY HALL OPENING

 Georgia Military College Prep students stand at attention during the special formation held as part of the opening ceremony for William Usery Hall, held in August on the first day of the 2010-2011 school year at GMC. W.J. “Bill” Usery, former U.S. secretary of labor during the Nixon administration and GMC alumnus, delivers remarks during the ceremony.  GMC President Maj. Gen. Peter Boylan (Ret.) and William Usery stand for a photograph during the ceremony.

 Georgia Military College Prep Principal Col. John Thornton gives remarks during the opening ceremony. 62 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


GMC’S USERY HALL OPENING

 Georgia Military College Prep School cadets stand in formation during the opening and ribbon cutting ceremony for Usery Hall.  GMC Prep students get their first look inside the halls of the new building on the first day of classes.

 GMC President, Maj. Gen. Peter Boylan (Ret.) and William Usery (right) prepare to cut the ceremonial ribbon marking the official opening of Usery Hall. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 63


Sightings

OLD CAPITAL MUSEUM BRIDGE BENEFIT

 Stephen Rogers plays a hand during the annual fundraiser, which was launched four years ago as a fundraiser for the museum.

 Sibyl Fowler contemplates her next move during the Georgia’s Old Capital Museum annual Bridge Benefit held at Georgia Military College.  Carol Dunlop, a member of the Georgia’s Old Capital Museum Society (GOCMS) board of directors, examines her hand closely.

Deedie Sibley takes part in the annual fundraiser, which raises money for Georgia’s Old Capital Museum. 64 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


JUNIOR POLICE ACADEMY

 Louie Herron, of Louie Herron Toyota, speaks to local students during the Milledgeville Junior Police Academy graduation program.  Milledgeville Police Department Lt. Etta Gray, who heads up the summer program each year, speaks to participants.

 Milledgeville Junior Police Academy participants take their turn on stage during the graduation ceremony. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the program, which is held each summer for local youth. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 65


Sightings

BACK TO SCHOOL

 Blake Harper, 4, was all smiles as his mother, Michelle Peacock, gives him a hug outside his classroom at the Early Learning Center.

 GMC Prep band members Stephanie Veal (front) and Audrey Vorhees practice during band camp in preparation for football season.

 Parents of pre-K students speak with teachers during open house at Sinclair Christian Academy. 66 • MS • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


BACK TO SCHOOL  John Milledge Academy students and supporters celebrate during the opening and ribbon cutting ceremony at the new Trojan Center during the first week of school.

 Baldwin County School Superintendent Geneva Braziel gives remarks during the annual Stay in School Rally held at Baldwin Stadium.

, s

 Blandy Hills Elementary School teachers and staff cheer from the stands of Baldwin Stadium during the annual Stay in School Rally. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 • MS • 67


Milledgeville Scene  

Sept-Oct Scene

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you