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What the guides cover ICT learning centres – What is a workplace learning centre and what can they offer? What do you need to think about in order to set up an ICT centre? Wireless networks – What is a wireless network and how can it help you set up a learning centre? How can you set up mobile access using broadband phone networks?

Mobile learning – How can you use new-generation mobile internet gadgets to This series of guides has been produced by the ICT and workplace learning project team. Any views expressed are those of the project team.

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widen access to learning and support? e-assessment – What opportunities are there for learners to gain qualifications using on-screen tests in ICT learning centres?

e-portfolios – What is an e-portfolio?

By working together with Sector Skills Councils, the trade union movement can ensure that the focus of the Skills Agenda encompasses workers as well as employers, in employment led programmes. This pack gives trade unionists the information they need to make the most of the opportunities offered.” Brendan Barber, TUC general secretary

The views expressed in these guides

www.unionlearn.org.uk

unionlearn with the TUC

cover photos: Janina Struk/reportdigital.co.uk; Jess Hurd/reportdigital.co.uk; John Birdsall design: www.wildstrawberry.uk.com print: College Hill Press

The pack includes the following materials y Sector Skills Councils: An overview for trade unionists y Working with Sector Skills Councils: for ULRs, workplace reps and negotiators y A model trade union action plan for Sector Skills Agreements y 25 fact sheets – one for each of the Sector Skills Agreements

An information pack for trade unionists

Sector Skills Councils

Sector Skills Councils

Published by unionlearn Trades Union Congress Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS t: 020 7079 6920 f: 020 7079 6921 www.unionlearn.org.uk Unionlearn’s SSC information pack is part of a community programme called Equal – a European Social Fund initiative which tests and promotes new means of combating all forms of discrimination and inequality in the labour market. The GB Equal Support Unit is managed by ECOTEC.


Sector skills councils A guide for union learning representatives, workplace representatives and negotiators

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Contents



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3

Skills in the UK ❙ The problem ❙ Sector skills councils: a solution? ❙ So what is a sector skills council?

4 5

Sector Skills Agreements ❙ The SSA process ❙ Case study – removing barriers to communication ❙ Union input into SSAs

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How do SSCs fit into the wider skills picture? ❙ Case study – promoting learning in small companies

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Getting involved ❙ ULRs ❙ Shop stewards, workplace representatives, etc ❙ Regional forums

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Further information

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Skills in the UK The problem In December 2006, the final report of the Leitch Review set out the key ‘skills challenges’ facing the nation, based on the following findings: ❙ the UK has a serious legacy of low skills, especially at intermediate and technical levels, and is also likely to fall behind at degree level and above ❙ those with the lowest skill levels are least likely to receive work-based training ❙ by 2020 nearly 20 million additional people will need higher skill levels than at present, ranging from basic skills to degree level ❙ we cannot depend on young people to solve our skills deficit in the immediate future as "over 70 per cent of our 2020 workforce has already completed their compulsory education". In effect, the above analysis demands that a major plank of government reforms needs to be focused on improving the skills of the existing workforce.

Sector skills councils: a solution? The Leitch review included proposals that would greatly strengthen the role of Sector Skills Councils (SSCs) in meeting the skills challenge, to the extent that only those vocational qualifications with SSC approval would qualify for public funding.

So what is a sector skills council? Between 2003 and 2005 the Government set up and licensed 25 SSCs as part of its strategy to achieve a "high-skill, high-productivity economy". SSCs are employer-led bodies that have the responsibility for identifying the skills needs of workers in their sector, and ensuring that there is adequate provision of high quality training that will meet those needs. The interests of workers are represented at board level by the appointment of at least one senior trade union official with knowledge of the sector. Trade unions are also often represented on other specialist and/or regional committees of the SSCs. SSCs have a number of tools for achieving their objective, including the development of sector skills agreements (SSAs) and national occupational standards (NOSs). Some SSCs will also be able to develop National Skills Academies.

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Sector skills agreements A sector skills agreement (SSA) is the mechanism for bringing employers in a sector together to identify and address their priorities for action on training and skills. Employers are at the centre of the SSA. However, there is scope for employees, through their trade unions, to contribute to the process. Once the sector’s requirements have been clearly set out, training providers can determine how to respond to them rather than having to set the agenda according to their own perceptions of the priorities.

The SSA process The first four SSAs were signed off during 2005, and a further six during 2006, leaving 13 for 2007 and the last two early in 2008. The basic process involved in all of these has five stages:

Stage 1 Skills need analysis assessment of short, medium and long-term skills needs in the sector

Stage 2 Assessment of current provision the range, nature and relevance of training currently available

Stage 3 Gap analysis identify the main gaps and weaknesses in current provision then make priorities

Stage 4 Employer collaboration to find out what employers are likely to sign up to

Stage 5 Sector skills agreement the final document shows how the SSC and employers will work with partners, including unions

Case study Removing barriers to communication In an attempt to improve the communication channels between ULRs on the shop floor and senior full time officials on SSC boards, Amicus accessed funding to provide a selection of ULRs in the aerospace, automotive, print and finance sectors with either a laptop, a PDA or a tablet PC. A dedicated website was also set up, with contributions from the board members and other union officers involved with the SSCs, where the ULRs are able to discuss sector skills related issues with each other as well as the board members. In addition to its primary purpose of improving communications, this project provided a platform for experimenting with other online tools for ULRs, such as interview record sheets and the collection of ULF outcomes.



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Union input into SSAs Unions have been using their influence on the boards of SSCs to ensure that the interests of workers are represented. Union priorities are not necessarily being addressed in the same way in every SSA, but some early examples are as follows: ❙ Up-skilling the existing workforce in the workplace From e-skills UK collaborative programme 1.2, Careers advice This programme is designed to promote a clear, current understanding of IT careers options, skills requirements and development routes. The trade union contribution is: ”Union Learning Representatives to utilise e-skills research, sector knowledge and material to support individuals in the workplace”. ❙ Promoting the important role of union learning From SEMTA trade union action plan issue 2; sustainable demand-led provision SEMTA and the sector trade unions to work together to maximise the impact of the union learning. SEMTA to provide briefing and training in the sector skills needs to union learning representatives ... SEMTA and the sector trade unions to work together to maximise the impact of the union learning representatives to sustain both employer and individual take-up of skills development. ❙ Promoting the equality and diversity agenda From the Skills for Health agreement with trade unions: Skills for Health to facilitate a UK-wide employer/trade union statement of intent to take forward equality of access in respect of learning opportunities – for those with particular needs related to lack of previous opportunities and confidence to learn, changes in roles, in technology and employment conditions. ❙ The need to balance employer business needs with personal development and

employability needs and the wider economic and social agenda From Skillset SSA, section 12; taking action: “Where unions are recognised, they will work with the company to support the development of People Development Plans, using the expertise of Union Learning Representatives where appropriate and agreed, and will hold meetings to discuss development and progress.”

Find your SSC Find the SSC for your industry with SSDA's online search tool: www.ssda.org.uk/ssda/default.aspx?page=579

Find your sector skills agreement The search tool has a link to the SSC’s website, for access to all documentation in the SSA process.

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How do SSCs fit into the wider picture? Although SSCs are responsible for setting the standards of vocational training in the sector, they do not have money to fund that training. Sector skills councils work at both national and regional levels with the whole range of agencies involved in skills development, to ensure that their sector’s priorities are adequately catered for. Agreements reached at the sectoral level can be used by trade unions, especially union learning representatives, to encourage employers to provide better access to skills development at the workplace level. Employers

funding

Trade union Learning and skills council

learning needs Sector skills council

Workers content and standards Learning providers

regional priorities

Regional skills partnership

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Regional development authorities

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Case study Promoting learning in small companies When the unions sat down with Lantra, the sector skills council for land-based industries, to discuss how they could help implement the sector skills agreement, they realised they shared one major problem. Almost all of the workplaces covered by the SSC are micro-businesses, and very few have more than 50 employees. Employers such as these are the most likely to have genuine difficulties in both accessing and paying for learning, and in giving their staff time off. They are also the least likely of workplaces to have any sort of union organisation. As part of the action plan between Lantra and the unions, Prospect has embarked on a pilot project to develop rural and roving ULRs. The intention is that these ULRs will be able to work across these small organisations, providing access to lifelong learning for a wide range of land-based workers in eastern England.



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Getting involved The main link between trade unions and the SSCs is the board member, however there are many other ways in which workplace trade union representatives can get involved in the work of their SSC.

ULRs Union learning representatives have a great deal of information and expertise that is likely to be of value to SSCs, and they will also benefit from up-to-date knowledge of developments such as sector skills agreements, national occupational standards and national skills academies. Some unions, for example Prospect and Amicus, have developed websites to help ULRs and SSC board members to exchange information:

www.unionskillsforum.org.uk Members and representatives of unions in the Cogent, Semta, Government Skills, Creative and Cultural Skills, or Lantra sectors can read and comment on a ‘blog’ written by their union board member.

www.amicussectorskills.org.uk Initially just for Amicus ULRs in the print, finance, automotive and aerospace sectors, but eventually planned to roll out to all Amicus sectors. This website contains general information of value to ULRs plus a discussion forum for the SSC board members and ULRs in their sector. Even without this resource, ULRs can use the normal democratic channels of their union for two important purposes: ❙ to campaign for inclusion of useful elements of the sector skills agreement in a collective agreement with their employer ❙ to inform those in their union with the opportunities to influence SSAs, about the actual training needs in their workplaces.

Shop stewards, workplace representatives, etc The most effective way of ensuring employer engagement in the activities of the SSCs is for trade unions to seek to incorporate relevant elements into the collective bargaining agenda. In preparation for this you can: ❙ raise the issues with union colleagues in your workplace, region and sector ❙ ensure your ULRs are invited to branch meetings so that they can contribute to the debate ❙ find out how your union is involved in the SSC at both national and regional levels, whether officially or through the unionlearn SSC network.

Regional forums Each of the unionlearn regions has some form of forum for promoting work and dialogue with SSCs. To find out what happens in your region, and how you can get involved, contact the regional office (see further information at the back of this booklet).

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unionlearn Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS www.unionlearn.org.uk

Unionlearn’s SSC information pack is part of a community programme called Equal, a European Social Fund initiative which tests and promotes new means of combating all forms of discrimination and inequality in the labour market. The GB Equal Support Unit is managed by ECOTEC.

Contact unionlearn

For general information about sector skills activities in your region, see the unionlearn website www.unionlearn.org.uk or contact the appropriate unionlearn office:

Northern region 5th Floor, Commercial Union House 39 Pilgrim Street Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 6QE Tel: 0191 232 3175

North West region Suite 506-510, The Cotton Exchange Old Hall Street Liverpool L3 9UD Tel: 0151 236 5366

Midlands region 24 Livery Street Birmingham B3 2PA Tel: 0121 236 4454

Southern and Eastern region Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS Tel: 020 7467 1251

South West region All TUC publications may be made available for dyslexic or visually impaired readers, on request, in an agreed electronic format or in accessible formats such as Braille, audiotape and large print, at no extra cost.

Design: www.wildstrawberry.uk.com Print: College Hill Press Cover picture: John Harris/reportdigital.co.uk

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Ground Floor, Church House Church Road Filton Bristol BS34 7BD Tel: 0117 947 0521

Yorkshire and the Humber region Friends Provident House 13/14 South Parade Leeds LS1 5QS Tel: 0113 245 4909

Š 2007 unionlearn

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Working with the sector skills councils A guide for ULF and unionlearn project workers and union negotiators

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Contents 3 4 5 5 6 7 7 8 9 9 10 10 10 10 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15



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Introduction What are SSCs? How are SSCs managed? An example of the structure of an SSC Where do SSCs fit in the wider picture? What do SSCs do? Sector skills agreements The SSA process The union role in developing SSAs What should a trade union be looking for in a SSA? Other SSC activities The 14-19 curriculum Apprenticeship frameworks Credit and Qualification frameworks Information Advice and Guidance National occupational standards National skills academies (NSAs) Skills passports Train to Gain brokerage Women and Work sector pathways initiative Getting involved ULRs Shop stewards, workplace representatives etc. Union officials Sectors not yet covered by SSCs Contacts Union SSC coordinators Union learning contacts

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Introduction Developments in the world of work combined with changes in the demography of the UK mean that there is a premium on skills, abilities and qualifications. The need for skilled workers is increasing continuously, while the pool of young people available to take on the new roles is decreasing. As a result, the demands on workers of all ages to develop existing skills and acquire new ones are inescapable. These demands are expressed in two recent White papers: "21st Century Skills: Realising our Potential" (2003) and "Skills: Getting On in Business, Getting On at Work" (2005); collectively described as the government’s skills strategy. The aim of the strategy is to achieve a “high-skill, high-productivity economy”, and one way of achieving this is through the sector skills councils (SSCs). 85 per cent of all workers in the UK are covered by one of the 25 sector skills councils. Although they are employer led bodies, each SSC has trade union representation at board level, and many have trade unionists involved at other levels as well. This booklet explains how the SSCs operate, and how trade unionists can use them to advance the learning agenda within their own workplaces. For a more detailed description of individual SSCs, see the accompanying factsheets, or visit the website of the Sector Skills Development Agency (SSDA): www.ssda.org.uk

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What are SSCs? ❙ Sector skills councils (SSCs) are independent organisations, limited companies licensed by the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, in consultation with the relevant ministers in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ❙ Each of the 25 SSCs has been developed by a group of employers from one specific industrial sector ❙ 85 per cent of the UK workforce is covered by a sector skills council ❙ Each SSC has the same four key goals: – to reduce skills gaps and shortages – to improve productivity, business and public service performance – to increase opportunities to boost the skills and productivity of everyone in the sector’s workforce – to improve learning supply including apprenticeships, higher education and National Occupational Standards (NOS). ❙ To achieve these goals, SSCs have access to: – a substantial amount of public investment (£138m between 2003-06) – the opportunity for dialogue with government departments across the UK – the opportunity to influence policies affecting skills and productivity – increased influence with education and training providers. ❙ Collectively, the SSCs form the Skills for Business network



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How are SSCs managed? ❙ The Skills for Business network is funded, supported and monitored by the Sector Skills Development Agency (SSDA), which is a non-departmental public body, whose chair and chief executive are appointed by the Secretary of State for Education and Skills. The SSDA is also responsible for those industries that are not covered by the SSCs. ❙ Each SSC has a board of management, including at least one member representing the unions that are active in the sector. ❙ Operational teams of staff are employed to deliver core functions, such as research, policy and services. ❙ Advisory panels and working groups will also be convened as appropriate for the particular sector. These can include: – sub-sector groups, focusing on distinct sub-sectors that make up the ‘footprint’ of the SSC – ‘country’ groups – ie England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – regional groups – project, or task groups. ❙ Union representation below board level is discretionary, however trade union officers are increasingly involved in the work of sub-groups.

An example of the structure of an SSC Go Skills main board

Stakeholder board one from TGWU

Specific industry groups eg Scheduled Road

National and regional groups eg Northern Ireland, NW England

Whole sector groups eg training standards and qualifications

Cross sector and cross industry ad hoc groups Convened and attended according to need, eg National Skills Academy, or for an issue common to adjacent nations/regions Adapted from the Go Skills Business Plan 2006/7 – other SSCs will have similar, but not identical structures

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Where do SSCs fit in the wider picture? Nationally ❙ The Skills for Business network is part of the skills alliance, which brings together the four key government departments with employer and union representatives and the key delivery agencies. ❙ Led by the LSC, the skills alliance meets regularly to agree priorities for action, stimulate wider engagement and focus on the effective implementation of the skills strategy.

Regionally ❙ Regional groups of the SSCs are also members of the regional skills partnership, along with the regional development agency, the regional LSC and Job Centre Plus. ❙ SSCs will also be responsible for setting up skills academies, which will (amongst other things) build networks with a range of other learning providers, so that new thinking, new methods and higher standards are not limited to single organisations, but work to the benefit of learners and employers across the training and skills sector.

At the workplace Sector skills councils are responsible for ensuring high quality training is available to meet the foreseeable needs of employers in the sector. They develop agreements at a sector level, which trade unions, especially union learning representatives, can encourage employers to implement at the workplace level.

Links between the parties to learning through work lifelong learning opportunities

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Sector skills council

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What do SSCs do? The full range of activities undertaken by each SSC will vary according to the needs of the sector and the availability of funding, however each SSC is charged with development of a range of specific resources:

❙ Sector skills agreements SSAs analyse the sector’s skill needs and provision, and then create deals with the supply side (providers) to fill skills gaps and shortages.

❙ National occupational standards NOS are statements that explain the competencies needed to carry out a job role effectively, and form the basis of NVQs in the sector.

❙ Apprenticeship frameworks SSCs are responsible for quality assurance of any apprenticeship schemes in their sector.

❙ The 14-19 curriculum and vocational diplomas Vocational diplomas in 14 skills based ‘learning lines’ are being developed by the relevant SSCs to provide an alternative or supplementary educational route for 14-19 year olds in school.

❙ National skills academies Funded jointly by employers and public money, these will “deliver training that fits with the wider sector priorities”.

❙ Sector qualification strategies SSCs are responsible for finding ways to improve the match between skills needs and training provision, both currently and in the future.

❙ Credit and qqualification frameworks SSCs are also working to improve the flexibility of qualification frameworks so that, for example, learners can receive credits for short courses that only cover part of a qualification.

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Sector skills agreements A sector skills agreement (SSA) is the mechanism for bringing employers in a sector together to identify and address their priorities for action on training and skills. Employers are at the centre of the SSA, however there is scope for employees, through their trade unions, to contribute to the process. Once the sector’s requirements have been clearly set out, training providers can determine how to respond to them, rather than having to set the agenda according to their own perceptions of the priorities.

The SSA process The first four SSAs were signed off during 2005, a further six in 2006 and the rest will be finalised by early 2008. The basic process involved in all of these has five stages: 1 A skills needs analysis – an assessment of short, medium and long term skills needs, including any factors that might influence change in the sector over the next 5-10 years 2 Assessment of current provision – to determine the range, nature and relevance of training currently available 3 Gap Analysis – identification of the main gaps and weaknesses in current provision in order to agree priorities 4 Employer collaboration – an assessment of what employers are likely to sign up to 5 Sector skills agreement – the final document shows how the SSC and employers will work with partners, including unions, to secure the necessary supply of training.



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The union role in developing SSAs One trade union representative on the board of an SSC is unlikely to be aware of the full range of learning and skills issues of all union members in the sector. Unionlearn convenes meetings of representatives of all trade unions involved in a sector, giving them the opportunity to contribute to the development and implementation of the agreement. The opportunities for union influence include: ❙ the contribution of data on skills needs – Some unions may have data from their own surveys that are relevant to the skills needs analysis ❙ views on the current provision of training and development – ULRs and negotiators are more likely than employers to have feedback on the training currently in use, especially if it is critical ❙ ensuring the inclusion of all employees in the sector ❙ commenting on the SSC’s analysis of priorities ❙ ideas for action to address the agreed priorities.

What should a trade union be looking for in a SSA? The sector skills agreement process provides an opportunity for unions to promote their learning and skills priorities. Elements that might be considered include: ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

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the promotion of the role of ULRs a commitment to the ongoing collaboration between the unions, employers and the SSC action to ensure that qualifications are relevant and of a high quality the development of links between qualifications that will facilitate career progression routes a focus on employability, including personal development proposals for the development of collective agreements on training and skills information, advice and guidance services that are specific, relevant and up to date models of training delivery that support the inclusion of all workers action to improve equality and diversity in the sector, in particular reference to how the sector plans to address the findings of the Equal Opportunities Commission inquiry into occupational segregation.

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Other SSC activities The 14-19 curriculum

In order to ensure that education provision for 14-19 year olds supports the needs of employers, SSCs are developing specialist diplomas to be used alongside GCSEs and A levels in English schools. To achieve a diploma, candidates will need to achieve appropriate standards in English and maths, specialised vocational subjects, relevant GCSE/A levels and work experience. By 2015 there will be diplomas in 14 ‘specialised learning lines’: ❙ health and social care ❙ public services ❙ land based and environmental ❙ engineering ❙ manufacturing ❙ construction and the built environment ❙ information and communication technology ❙ retail ❙ hospitality and catering ❙ hair and beauty ❙ sport and leisure ❙ travel and tourism ❙ creative and media ❙ business administration and finance.

Apprenticeship frameworks Apprenticeships provide a structured training programme for employees in a sector, combining the skills needed for work with general education. There is a new blueprint for apprenticeships in England and Wales, and SSCs are responsible for their quality assurance. Trade unions have traditionally been closely involved in apprenticeship systems, and the TUC is actively involved in supporting SSCs and unions in their efforts to tackle gender segregation in apprenticeships.

Credit and Qualification frameworks The SSCs are working with key partners in each of the four UK nations to influence the overall structure for learning and qualifications. There are already frameworks within which qualifications are developed. These are the national qualification framework (NQF) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the Scottish Credit and Qualifications framework and the framework of higher education qualifications (FHEQ). To date these frameworks have tended not to have the flexibility to address the skills needs of employers or employees. For example, shorter courses covering partial elements of a qualification have not been accredited within the NQF and hence have not attracted public funding. 10

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To address this problem, work is in progress to develop national credit systems that will recognise partial achievement. SSCs are working with partners to advise on the appropriate structure of the framework.

Information Advice and Guidance Skillset has the lead responsibility for Information, Advice and Guidance (IAG) across the Skills for Business network, which has signed a memorandum of understanding with unionlearn to promote collaborative working to progress the mutual skills agenda through the provision of IAG in the workplace. Some sector skills councils have set up online IAG tools that can be used by current or potential workers in their industries, and their advisers, to map out career pathways in the sector. In addition, Construction Skills, Asset Skills and Summit Skills have developed a sustainability skills matrix for the built environment, which sets out the abilities required to achieve sustainability by social, environmental and economic means.

National occupational standards National occupational standards are statements that set out the competencies needed to carry out a job role effectively. They are developed in consultation with people working in those job roles, and then submitted to the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA) or Scottish Qualifications Authority for approval. Once approved they form a ready made, nationally agreed set of competencies, that can be used in the workplace to help develop: ❙ appraisal schemes ❙ learning and development programmes ❙ definitions of work standards ❙ job descriptions and person specifications ❙ organisational planning ❙ objectives for training ❙ specifications for what teams must achieve. Unions may be involved in both the development and implementation stages of NOS: ❙ there will often be union membership on specific SSC working groups charged with this remit, as trade unionists can bring their knowledge of the ‘real’ job roles that union members do and the skills that are required in those roles ❙ ULRs in many workplaces are involved in the set up of NVQ programmes and in supporting NVQ learners by encouraging participation in workplace programmes. ULRs may also be involved in screening and support to address Skills for Life needs that might prevent a learner from completing their NVQ.

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National skills academies (NSAs) The government aims to develop employer led national skills academies for 12 major sectors of the economy that will deliver high quality training, be centres of innovation and creativity for skills training and build networks with a range of other learning providers. Employers will have a key role as sponsors of national skills academies, and will be expected to contribute 50 per cent of the start-up capital costs. The government has not been prescriptive about the form the academies will take, however they must be: ❙ proposed by employers with formal endorsement of their SSC ❙ deliverers of learning and training that must be available to the full range of students and not be restricted to particular employers ❙ delivering training that fits with wider sector priorities backed by clear evidence of skills needs within the sector, including SSC/SSA data where available ❙ subject to the usual inspection, accountability and audit arrangements that apply to organisations receiving public funds and be able to comply with legislative requirements (eg health and safety and child protection). The construction, food and drink, financial services and manufacturing sectors were the first to have their skills academy plans approved in 2006. A further five proposals for the process, nuclear, creative and cultural, hospitality and active leisure industries, were being considered during the spring of 2007. Although unions are not guaranteed direct involvement in NSAs, they have been involved in the development of several of the proposals, and in some cases there will be union representation on the governing bodies.

Sector qualification strategies (SQS) SQS outline current and future learning and qualification needs of employers in sectors. They are being developed as part of the SSA process, and will be used to influence provision by the qualifications awarding bodies.

Skills passports

Several SSCs have commissioned a ‘skills passport’ for their sector. A skills passport is an online verified record of an individual’s skills, qualifications and achievements, which automatically transfers on to their CV. They are said to have advantages over a CV including simplicity, security and versatility.

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Train to Gain brokerage In March 2006, 12 SSCs were planning to provide sector based Train to Gain brokerage, and by the spring of 2007 one (Go Skills) had trained a team of business advisers to the standard required for Train to Gain brokers. Most of the other SSCs provide pages on their websites specifically designed to provide relevant information to Train to Gain brokers.

Women and Work sector pathways initiative In response to recommendations in the Women and Work Commission’s report ‘Shaping a fairer future’, the government provided up to £10m of funding, to be matched by employers, to pilot methods of increasing the participation of women in sectors where they are currently under-represented. The specific aims of the project are to: ❙ raise recruitment levels ❙ increase earning potential, and ❙ aid career progression. Nine SSCs were successful in bidding for this money, and the projects will run until March 2008. The TUC has been involved in the development of the project specifications, the assessment of the bids and the monitoring of the projects. There is trade union involvement at some level in each of the projects, such as membership of the steering committee, the active involvement of ULRs and, in one case, the secondment of a union representative to the project team.

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Getting involved The main link between trade unions and the SSCs is the board member, however there are many other ways in which trade unionists can get involved in the work of their SSC.

ULRs Union learning representatives have a great deal of information and expertise that is likely to be of value to SSCs, and will also benefit from up-to-date knowledge of developments such as SSAs, NSAs and NOSs. Some unions, for example Prospect and Amicus, have developed websites to help ULRs and SSC board members to exchange information: www.unionskillsforum.org.uk www.amicussectorskills.org.uk Even without this resource, ULRs should be able to make the necessary connection with the board member, through either their normal trade union channels, or their regional unionlearn office.

Shop stewards, workplace representatives, etc The most effective way of ensuring employer engagement in the activities of the SSCs is for trade unions to seek to incorporate relevant elements into the collective bargaining agenda. In preparation for this you can: ❙ raise the issues with union colleagues in your workplace, region and sector ❙ ensure your ULRs are invited to branch meetings so that they can contribute to the debate ❙ find out how your union is involved in the SSC at both national and regional levels, whether officially or through the unionlearn SSC network.

Union officials If you wish to engage in the sector skills agenda, you should first contact the official in your union at the national or regional level who has responsibility for this. You may have union board members on the relevant SSC and in that case you may want to contact this individual. If you have some degree of responsibility for sector skills in your union and you wish to get involved In a particular SSC, you should contact the union board members and ask what union networking arrangements are in place. Some multi-sector unions have an officer with specific responsibility for coordinating SSC activity, and this person will be able to advise you on how to proceed. Unionlearn and the TUC coordinate networks at both regional and national levels aimed at all officials involved in the learning and skills arena. These include meetings of all unions involved in a particular sector, cross-sector meetings to address the whole skills policy agenda, and regional meetings on specific current issues, such as Train to Gain, migrant workers, etc.

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Sectors not yet covered by SSCs These organisations and areas require tailored arrangements to relate them constructively to the skills for business network, and have developed memoranda of understanding to take that process forward. Sector Engineering construction industry training board

Link to memorandum of understanding www.ssda.org.uk/ssda/pdf/ ECITB%20MOU%20with%20signatures.pdf

Local government

www.ssda.org.uk/ssda/pdf/ LG%20MOU%20with%20signs%20200605.pdf

Voluntary sector www.ssda.org.uk/ssda/pdf/ 041213%20PM%20MOU%20Final%20Draft %20VS%20with%20sigs.pdf The training and development agency for schools

www.ssda.org.uk/ssda pdf/ 051010%20D%20TDA%20MOU.pdf

Union learning contacts Unite (Amicus section) David Tarren National Training Officer Amicus 0207 780 4134 david.tarren@amicustheunion.org

Unite (TGWU section) Mary Sayer National Union Learning Organiser T&GWU 0161 814 2600 msayer@tgwu.org.uk

Prospect Sue Ferns Head of Research and Specialist Services Prospect 020 7902 6639 sue.ferns@prospect.org.uk

unionlearn

working with SSCs.indd 15

Amicus Tom Beattie ATL Mark Holding Connect Kirsi Kekki CWU Trish Lavelle FBU Trevor Shanahan NASUWT Jennifer Moses/ Stephen Smith NUT Andrew Parry Williams PCS David McEvoy POA Andy Rowett Prospect Rachel Bennett RCN Andrew Barton T&G Jim Mowatt Rail Unions UCATT Jeff Hopewell Unison Pam Johnson URTU Graham Cooper USDAW Ann Murphy

Working with the sector skills councils

tom.beattie@amicustheunion.org mholding@atl.org.uk kirsi.kekki@connectuk.org tlavelle@cwu.org.uk Trevor.shanahan@fbu.org.uk lifelong.learning@mail.nasuwt.org.uk learning.representatives@nut.org.uk david.mcevoy@pcs.org.uk poaulf@yahoo.com Rachel.Bennett@prospect.org.uk Andres.barton@rcn.org.uk jmowatt@tgwu.org.uk info@rul.org.uk jhopewell@ucatt.org.uk pam.johnson@unison.org.uk grahamcurtu@yahoo.co.uk ann.Murphy@usdaw.org.uk

15

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unionlearn Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS www.unionlearn.org.uk

Unionlearn’s SSC information pack is part of a community programme called Equal, a European Social Fund initiative which tests and promotes new means of combating all forms of discrimination and inequality in the labour market. The GB Equal Support Unit is managed by ECOTEC.

All TUC publications may be made available for dyslexic or visually impaired readers, on request, in an agreed electronic format or in accessible formats such as Braille, audiotape and large print, at no extra cost.

Design: www.wildstrawberry.uk.com Print: College Hill Press Cover picture: John Harris/reportdigital.co.uk

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Š 2007 unionlearn

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Sector skills agreements Model trade union action plan


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Model trade union action plan for sector skills agreements This model trade union action plan demonstrates the areas in which trade unions are attempting to make an impact on the sector skills agenda through the sector skills agreements. It is a revision of a proposal drawn up by Mary Sayer (Unite, TGWU section) working in collaboration with representatives of GMB, Prospect, The Rail Unions, UNISON, Unite (Amicus section) and Baroness Wall working with DfES & SSDA to develop those action plans that are already in place. Final action plans will vary in content according to the characteristics and priorities of each sector.


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Issue 1. Recognition of key trade union role in sector skills councils

Page 4

Action [The SSC] to actively promote the role of trade union(s) in terms of the skills ag by way of: ❙ explicitly acknowledging the extent and value of trade union involvement in t related publicity materials ❙ inviting trade union representation onto all national, regional, sub-sector and project committees, working parties and steering groups ❙ encouraging employers to engage with trade union(s) on the sector skills age

2. Role of [the SSC] to work with trade union(s) in promoting the need for employers to have a skilled and competent workforce

[The SSC] to encourage employers and relevant trade union(s) to develop a m agreement to assist delivery of the SSA for the sector incorporating: ❙ key role of ULRs working with employer in identifying and encouraging memb employees ❙ relevant structures, facilities and resources to support the added value of tra the workplace

3. Role of trade union(s) in actively involving themselves in delivery of the sector skills agreement

Trade union(s) will through their representative(s) on the board of [the SSC] and s their officers and representatives in the sector, commit to be a partner in delivery ❙ unionlearn will establish a network of trade union officers involved in the sect ❙ trade union representatives on [the SSC] board and sub-groups will keep mem trade union network informed of all relevant developments ❙ the network will meet at [insert period] intervals with representatives from [the progress and plan future activity ❙ the trade union(s) will publicise the benefits of the Sector Skills Agreement to workplace representatives and union learning representatives in the sector ❙ trade union negotiators in the sector will encourage employers who are not al with the sector skills agenda to ‘sign-up’ to the sector skills agreement ❙ trade unions will take forward the provisions of the SSA at workplaces by way – collective bargaining – learning agreements – workplace learning committees – union learning reps

4. Working in partnership to deliver the

Trade union(s) will map the ULR coverage in the sector, and seek to recruit in t SSA at the workplace, the trade union(s) where gaps are identified will ensure they have sufficient skilled representatives to fulfil the trade union Trade union(s) will work with employers, encouraged by [the SSC], TUC and un ensure ULRs have the knowledge & skills to play a key role in supporting indiv role at the workplace. ensuring they have the opportunity of gaining / updating their skills as identifi

2

Model trade union action plan


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Issue

Timescale

5. Role of trade union and employers to agree

genda,

delivery of training needs analyses (TNA)

[The SSC] each indi of employ delivery o

the SSA and

Short term

d special

Short to medium term

enda

Short to medium term

odel learning

Medium and longer term

7. Apprenticeships

Following SSA launch employers and trade union(s) at workplace level ensure partnership working in rolling out SSA. Employers recognising the value of trade union(s) in achieving the commitments in the SSA.

The trade initiatives with area recruitme

8. Information Advice & Guidance (IAG)

[The SSC] the SSA in and signp in necess

9. Embedding skills for life / basic skills across

Trade uni of literacy workforce

6. Role of [the SSC], employers and trade union(s)

bers /

de union(s) in

sub groups, and Medium and longer term y of the SSA: Following launch of the SSA. or

addressing equality and diversity issues

Trade uni training o

training provision

mbers of the

[The SSC] to identify

e SSC] to review

their officers,

10. Assisting the integration of migrant workers

[The SSC] the provis a particul and safet play a key

11. Ensuring sustainability and environmental

[The SSC] technique into train

lready engaged

of

those areas

Short to medium term Medium and longer term

ionlearn to viduals in ied in the SSA.

Trade union(s), the TUC and unionlearn will publicise training and support available. Employers will support relevant training working with shop stewards/ relevant officials to agree process to achieve this.

3

concerns are addressed within the content of training material

12. Providing an adequate framework for promoting [The SSC] a healthy and safe working environment

Model trade union action plan

that work working e


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Action

Timescale

will work with partners to encourage the principle that vidual employed should have TNA. It is the responsibility yers to work with their trade union(s) in order to effect of the SSA and to agree how best this can be achieved.

Medium and longer term

should actively encourage joint working with all partners y and work to resolve issues in these important areas

Short, medium and long term Evidence of equality and diversity issues should be shared and a programme of work to address these agreed.

Workplace level agreement on relevant action to ensure this takes place.

ons and [the SSC] will establish initiatives for improving opportunities for all disadvantaged groups of workers. e unions and [the SSC] will work together to establish s for the expansion of apprenticeship programmes in line s identified in SSA, that include targets for the ent of under-represented groups of workers.

Short to medium term

to provide labour market information used in producing n a format that is accessible to ULRs providing a support posting service to members in order to fill gaps identified sary skills in the SSA.

Short term Trade unions to clarify their requirements to [the SSC] Medium term [The SSC] to provide regularly updated LMI in the requested format

on(s) to work with SSCs and employers to raise awareness Short term [The SSC] and the trade union(s) will jointly encourage y, numeracy and language in the context of a skilled employers to sign up to the employer skills pledge. e. Short to medium and long term Employers, [the SSC] and trade union(s) working to identify key areas where ULRs can play key role in addressing these issues. to work with the union(s) and employers in the sector on sion of support and services for migrant workers. There is lar issue on understanding their rights at work and health ty regulations to ensure they have a real opportunity to y role in the workforce.

Short term Employers to enable access to ESOL training

and trade union(s) to work with employers to ensure that es for minimising environmental hazards are incorporated ing materials.

Short term Environmental impact assessment to be conducted and a programme of work agreed

trade union(s) and employers to work together to ensure kers have the skills and training to operate safely in their environment.

Short term Evidence of health and safety issues should be shared and a programme of work to address these agreed.

4

Employers, [the SSC] and trade union(s) to lobby for statefunded ESOL training for migrant workers

Model trade union action plan


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unionlearn Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS www.unionlearn.org.uk

Unionlearn’s trade union model action plan is part of a community programme called Equal, a European Social Fund initiative which tests and promotes new means of combating all forms of discrimination and inequality in the labour market. The GB Equal Support Unit is managed by ECOTEC.

All TUC publications may be made available for dyslexic or visually impaired readers, on request, in an agreed electronic format or in accessible formats such as Braille, audiotape and large print, at no extra cost. Design: www.wildstrawberry.uk.com Print: College Hill Press Cover picture: Janina/reportdigital.co.uk

 2007 unionlearn


Factsheet 1:

www.assetskills.org/site 01392 423399

Asset Skills 

the sector skills council for property services, housing, cleaning services  and facilities management

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

property managers residential estate agents caretakers facility management professionals cleaners town planners and letting agents and housing managers.

Union board member

Nominations being considered at time of going to press

Union members on other committees Lynn Ferguson – Unison – cleaning committee

Unions in sector

Unison Accord (Halifax estate agents) Unite (Amicus section) UCATT Unite (TGWU section) GMB

Sector skills agreement Completion September 2007

Includes recommendations on Skills for Life (cleaning industry), sustainability, terms and conditions and diversity (property industry) The unions are collaborating to produce an action plan to implement the SSA.

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills for Life Asset Skills has the lead responsibility across all of the SSCs for Skills for Life and will be helping to organise a joint trade union/SSC event for the autumn of 2007.

❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid to provide 1,000 opportunities for cleaners, initially in London

❙ Skills passport Pathway card

❙ Sustainability Matrix for the Built Environment A document that identifies the skills and competencies that are needed by those involved in every stage of designing, building, managing and maintaining the built environment, to make it more sustainable www.assetskills.org/site/tabid/513/default.aspxi unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Asset Skills


Key statistics: Asset Skills

Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated

Employees Total in UK 2006 667,686 Status Employed 79% 20% Self employed Full time 67% Part time 33% Permanent 76% Temporary 3%

Administrative and secretarial

8%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

3% 31%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

51% 49%

Ethnicity White 92% Asian 3% Black 3% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 96,385 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

93% 6% 1% 0%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

4,100 10% 7%

Associate professional and technical occupations

10%

8% 2%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

23% 29,000

Managers and senior officials

12%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

6%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

20% 7% 18%

Sales and customer service

9%

Process plant and machine operatives

1%

Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Real estate Industrial cleaning

25%

439,993 employees 227,693 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 2:

www.automativeskills.org.uk 0207 4366373

Automotive Skills

the sector skills council for the retail motor industry

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

new vehicle sales used vehicle sales routine maintenance and repair MOT inspections accident/body repair restoration/rebuilding fast fit (tyres, exhausts, batteries, etc) post-factory fitting and adaption (electricals, motability, etc) parts and accessories sales roadside rescue/recovery contract hire/operational leasing ‘daily’ rental (self drive or with driver) valeting/preparation

Union board member

Unions in sector Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) GMB NACO

Sector skills agreement

This includes recommendations for competitive wages for adult apprentices, skills for life provision and increasing the proportion of women employed in the businesses. The trade unions have produced an action plan for implementing the SSA that covers all the elements of the model action plan.

John Rowse – Unite (TGWU section)

Special projects/resources ❙ Business and administration Automotive Skills has the lead responsibility across all of the SSCs for business and administration and participates with the council for administration in the Business and Administration Skills Alliance.

❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid for funding to train 500 women to enter or progress in the industry

❙ Careers web portal A constantly updated resource that provides all the information needed about careers in the industry, and includes live course and job search functions: www.automotiveskills.org.uk/careers

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Automotive Skills


Key statistics: Automotive Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 580,934 Status Employed 85% Self employed 15% Full time 85% Part time 15% Permanent 83% Temporary % Gender Female Male

21% 79%

Ethnicity 94% White Asian 4% Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 69,275 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

88% 10% 2% 0%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

48,252 4% 2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

6%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

17% 11%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

11% 10%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

10% 26,600

Managers and senior officials

8%

Professional occupations

1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

3%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

13% 41% 0%

Sales and customer service

19%

Process plant and machine operatives

7%

Elementary occupations

8%

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 3:

www.cogent-ssc.com 01925 515200

Cogent

the sector skills council for chemicals and pharmaceuticals, nuclear,  oil and gas, petroleum and polymers

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

oil and gas extraction nuclear and radiological technology chemicals and pharmaceuticals manufacturing downstream petroleum industry, (refining) polymers, (plastics, composites, rubber and sign-making)

Unions in sector

GMB Prospect Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) USDAW (Chemical processing)

Sector skills agreement

Union board member

Linda McCulloch – Unite (Amicus section) Phil McNulty – Unite (TGWU section) Dai Hudd – Prospect

Completed January 2007 Agreement with trade unions launched at a joint event on 23 January 2007

Special projects/resources ❙ Career pathways web-based IAG centre: http://cognet-careers.com

❙ Cogent apprentices Programme led system with pathways to employer-led schemes

❙ Upskill A scheme that incorporates accreditation of prior learning, a technician programme and a modular route to a foundation degree

❙ Skills passport The Cogent skills passport will be launched in 2007

❙ Skills academies National skills academy for the process industries (NSAPI), and National skills academy for nuclear, (NSAN), to be launched in 2007.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Cogent


Key statistics: Cogent

Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated

Employees Total in UK 2006 888,000 Status Employed 96% 4% Self employed Full time 93% Part time 7% Permanent 92% Temporary 4%

Administrative and secretarial

8%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

11% 1%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

15% 18%

29% 71%

Ethnicity White 95% Asian 3% Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 14,235 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

68% 23% 7% 2%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

14,640 3% 2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

38%

5% 33,500

Managers and senior officials

14%

Professional occupations

1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

10% 4% 0

Sales and customer service

16%

Process plant and machine operatives

31%

Elementary occupations

19%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Gas, oil and petroleum extraction Manufacture of coke, petroleum products and nuclear fuel Manufacture of basic chemicals Manufacture of pharmaceuticals etc Manufacture of soap and detergents etc Manufacture of other chemicals Manufacture of other rubber products Manufacture of plastic products

64,538 employees 50,502 employees 42,644 employees 122,560 employees 38,449 employees 13,316 employees 24,327 employees 160,819 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 4:

www.cskills.com 01485 577577

Construction Skills 

CITB-Construction Skills, CIC and CITB (NI) working in partnership as the sector skills council

Footprint

❙ public and private housing ❙ infrastructure (water, sewerage, electricity, gas,

communications, air transport, railways, harbours, roads) ❙ public non-residential (schools and colleges, universities, health, offices, entertainment, military, libraries and museums) ❙ industrial (factories, warehouses, oil, steel, coal, gas) ❙ commercial (offices, entertainment, leisure, shops, garages, agriculture) ❙ repair and maintenance (public housing, private housing, infrastructure, other public non-housing, industrial, commercial)

Union board member

Alan Ritchie – UCATT Bob Blackman – Unite (TGWU section)

Sector skills agreement Completed 2005

A bilateral agreement has been finalised with UCATT and another is in development with Unite. These bilateral agreements form part of the sector skills agreement for construction and focus on shared strategic goals, including health and safety, diversity and support for union learning reps.

Special projects/resources ❙ Migrant workers Construction Skills has recently published guidance for employers including guidance on ensuring migrant workers are qualified, competent and safe: www.constructionmigrantworkers.co.uk.

❙ Site safety plus Construction Skills’ site safety plus programme is a lifelong learning plan for health and safety in the sector: www.citb-constructionskills.co.uk/healthsafety/

❙ Access to learning on-site UCATT on-site learning centres at locations such as King’s Dock, Liverpool give workers increased access to training and development facilities where they need it most.

❙ Skills card Workers are increasingly expected to carry proof of their skills to get on site. This is usually in the form of a CSCS or affiliated card which demonstrates they have achieved an NVQ or SVQ qualification and passed the Construction Skills health and safety test.

❙ National skills academy for construction The Academy is a project based approach to learning and will help construction projects become high performing workplaces, built to time, quality, budget and safety standards by a properly qualified and motivated workforce.

❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative The Construction Skills project assists women of all ages into sustainable construction roles. It is currently being rolled out in Merseyside, Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield and is being extended into the five London Olympic boroughs during 2007. unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Construction Skills


Key statistics: Construction Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Workforce Total in UK 2006 2,579656 Status Employed 64% 35% Self employed Full time 91% Part time 9% Permanent 61% Temporary 3%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

28% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

3% 12%

12% 88%

Ethnicity White 97% Asian 1% Black 1% Mixed/other 1% Employers Total VAT registered 207,345 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 181,135 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

92% 6% 1% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

11,900 4% 31%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

13%

6% 357,200

Managers and senior officials

17%

Professional occupations

8%

Associate professional and technical occupations

19%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

11% 24% 0

Sales and customer service

3%

Process plant and machine operatives

8%

Elementary occupations

11%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Construction 2,249,226 employees Architectural and engineering activities and related technical consultants 330,430 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 5:

www.ccskills.org.uk 0207 0151800

Creative and Cultural Skills

the sector skills council for advertising, crafts, cultural heritage, design, the arts and music

Footprint

the arts – music, performing arts, visual arts and literary arts ❙ cultural heritage – museums, galleries and heritage organisations ❙ craft – including designer makers of contemporary crafts, covering over 50 specialist trades and occupations ❙ design – specialist consultancies covering graphic, spatial and domestic products. ❙

Unions in sector

BECTU Equity Musicians Union Prospect Unite (Amicus section) Writers Guild of Great Britain

Sector skills agreement Completion due November 2007 partner sign up December 2007.

Union board member Christine Payne – Equity

Union members on other committees Kenny Aitchison – Prospect – Cultural Heritage Panel Chris Ryde, Equity – Wales Advisory Group

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills academy Creative and Cultural Skills is preparing to launch its national skills academy, with a national centre planned for the Thames Gateway development area.

❙ Creative apprenticeship Statistics suggest over 90 per cent of CC skills' workforce is white and middle class. The new apprenticeship framework, ready for September 2008, is designed to open doors to a more diverse workforce.

❙ Creative Knowledge Lab From 2008, Creative Knowledge Lab will provide an authoritative source of industry-approved careers information, advice and guidance for the creative industries and cultural sector, including student and employer ranking of training provision and a range of career management tools.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Creative and Cultural


Key statistics: Creative and Cultural Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 Status Employed Self employed Full time Part time Permanent Temporary Gender Female Male

359,125 52% 47% 68% 32% 47% 6% 45% 55%

Ethnicity White 94% Asian Black 3% Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 43,945 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

94% 5% 1% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

1,500 7% 17%

Associate professional and technical occupations

36%

Administrative and secretarial

10%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

6% 2%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

16% 2%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

3% 8,100

Managers and senior officials

15%

Professional occupations

15%

Associate professional and technical occupations

9%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

14% 2% 5%

Sales and customer service

21%

Process plant and machine operatives

1%

Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Advertising Artistic and literary creation and interpretation Operation of arts facilities Other entertainment activities News agency activities Museum activities and preservation of historical sites and buildings

18%

90,175 employees 112,588 employees 27,832 employees 42,743 employees 22,515 employees 46,708 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 6:

www.euskills.org.uk

0845 0779922

Energy & Utility Skills

the sector skills council for the electricity, gas, waste management and water industries

Footprint

electricity, gas, waste management and water

Unions in sector

Mike Jeram – Unison

GMB Prospect Unison Unite (TGWU section) BACM

Union members on other committees

Sector skills agreement

Union board member

Dougie Rooney – Unite (Amicus section) – senior electrical forum

Completion due November 2007

Sue Ferns – Prospect – Electricity scenario planning

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills academy Power academy established 2004

❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid, March 2007, to train 380 women for progression plus two trainers and 18 mentors. The unions are represented on the steering committee by a GMB shop steward working in the water industry

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Energy & Utility


Key statistics: Energy & Utility Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 329,882 Status Employed 97% unavailable Self employed Full time 92% Part time 8% Permanent 93% Temporary 4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

22% 78%

Ethnicity White 96% Asian Black Data not available Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 21,550 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

73% 19% 6% 1%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

700

Data insignificant

Associate professional and technical occupations Administrative and secretarial

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

11,000

Managers and senior officials

14%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

6%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

15% 12% 0

Sales and customer service

15%

Process plant and machine operatives

20%

Elementary occupations

16%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Production and distribution of electricity Manufacture of gas, distribution of gaseous fuels through mains Collection, distribution and purification of water Transport via pipelines Sewage and refuse disposal, sanitation and similar activities

84,509 employees 28,948 employees 53,921 employees 14,099 employees 140,210 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 7:

www.e-skills.org.uk 0207 79638920

e-skills UK

the sector skills council for information technology, telecommunications and contact centres

Footprint

the IT industry, including IT professionals working in all industries ❙ the telecommunications industry ❙ contact centres dedicated to outsourced services and contact centres operating within IT and telecoms industries.

Unions in sector

ACCORD (contact centres) Connect CWU (telecommunications) PCS (private sector IT and other service companies) Unite (Amicus section) USDAW (contact centres)

Union board member

Sector skills agreement

Adrian Askew – Connect

Union members on other committees Leslie Mannaseh – Connect – IT curriculum group

Completed 2005 The role of trade unions in helping to implement the SSA is incorporated into an action plan covering all stakeholders. Union involvement is committed in four areas of the programme: ❙ careers advice ❙ business support – the business IT guide – professionalism in IT programme – e-skills passport/ITQ ❙ recognising achievement (standards and qualifications development)

Special projects/resources ❙ Contact centres e-skills UK is the lead body across the Skills for Business network for contact centres – overseeing the development and maintenance of national occupational standards and apprenticeship frameworks for the contact centre sector

❙ Skills passport e-skills UK has developed a skills passport for IT user skills (the e-skills passport)

❙ London CISCO academy for women e-skills UK is working with the charity UXL to improve access and learning and remove barriers to employment faced by women by delivering training in high technologies. This includes various level 4 qualifications such as for PC support technician and networking.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

e-skills UK


Key statistics: e-skills UK Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 IT for telecoms industry employment 772,003 Status Employed 52% 47% Self employed Full time 68% Part time 32% Permanent 92% Temporary 47%

Administrative and secretarial

9%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

3% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

55% 71%

Ethnicity White 94% Asian Black 3% Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 43,945 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

94% 5% 1% 0

Skills shortages* (England) Managers and senior officials

6,600 4%

Professional occupations

17%

Associate professional and technical occupations

13%

53% 1%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps** (England)

0 1,089

Managers and senior officials

22%

Professional occupations

29%

Associate professional and technical occupations

28%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

7% 2% 0

Sales and customer service

11%

Process plant and machine operatives

2%

Elementary occupations

0%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification (2006) Telecommunications 261,597 employees Software consultancy and supply 348,523 employees Data processing 11,405 employees Maintenance and repair of office, accounting and computer machinery 24,951 employees Other computer related activities 105,970 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 8:

www.fssc.org.uk 0845 2573772

Financial Services Skills Council the sector skills council for the finance industry

Footprint

banks, building societies and central banking leasing credit unions, factoring and other credit granting organisations ❙ investment, unit trusts and venture capital ❙ life insurance, non-life insurance (general insurance) and insurance brokers ❙ administration of financial markets ❙ pension funding ❙ independent financial advisers and tied financial advisors ❙ unit trust and investment trust companies ❙ fund managers, asset managers and pension management and ❙ securities and derivatives traders. ❙ ❙ ❙

Union board members

John Earls – Unite (Amicus section)

Unions in sector

Accord ALGUS ANGU BSU NGSU SKISA UBAC Unite (Amicus Section) USDAW YISA The Alliance for Finance

Sector skills agreement

Completion due September 2007 Trade unions are working to develop a trade union action plan for helping to implement the SSA.

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills academy Launched 31/10/2006, the Financial Services skills academy will initially be based in: ❙ Tower Hamlets in London ❙ Manchester in the North West ❙ Leeds in Yorkshire and Humber ❙ Norwich in the East of England

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Financial Services Skills


Key statistics: Financial Services Skills Council Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 772,003 Status Employed 88% 12% Self employed Full time 91% Part time 9% Permanent 84% Temporary 4%

Administrative and secretarial

35%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

1% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

24% 76%

Ethnicity White 89% Asian 6% Black 2% Mixed/other 3% Employers Total VAT registered 107,255 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

94% 4% 1% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

4,400 3% 8% 35%

Associate professional and technical occupations

16% 0

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

0 62,300

Managers and senior officials

19%

Professional occupations

8%

Associate professional and technical occupations

9%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

30% 1% 0

Sales and customer service

34%

Process plant and machine operatives

0%

Elementary occupations

0%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Financial intermediation except insurance and pension funding Insurance and pension funding, except compulsory social security Activities auxiliary to financial intermediation

737,781 employees 95,504 employees 402,750 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 9:

www.goskills.org

0121 6355520

Go Skills

the sector skills council for passenger transport

Footprint

❙ aviation (airlines) ❙ aviation (operations on the ground) ❙ bus (scheduled and non-scheduled)

coaches community bus services ❙ driver training ❙ private hire vehicles rail ❙ taxis ❙ trams and light rail ❙ trams and transport planners.

Unions in sector

ASLEF Association of Flight Attendants BALPA TSSA Unison Unite (TGWU section)

Sector skills agreement

Union board members

Completed March 2007 The unions are collaborating to produce an action plan to implement the SSA.

Graham Stevenson – Unite (TGWU section)

Union members on other committees Scarlett Harris – RMT – stakeholder group Allan Black – GMB – stakeholder group

Special projects/resources ❙ Languages Go Skills has lead responsibility across the Skills for Business network for languages

❙ Skills passport GoSkills Plus launched October 2006

❙ Train to Gain brokerage Go Skills has trained a team of business advisers to the standard required for Train to Gain brokers

❙ The employer pledge Go Skills are marketing membership of its membership scheme GoSkills Plus as a way of showing commitment to the skills agenda and avoiding the imposition of a training levy

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Go Skills


Key statistics: Go Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 712,906 Status Employed 73% 27% Self employed Full time 87% Part time 13% Permanent 71% Temporary 2%

Administrative and secretarial

8%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

2% 1%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

20% 80%

Ethnicity White 86% Asian 9% Black 4% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 50,420 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

80% 13% 5% 2%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

3,500 1% 0

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

3

1% 77% 7% 19,500

Managers and senior officials

8%

Professional occupations

0

Associate professional and technical occupations

1%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

12% 16% 0

Sales and customer service

7%

Process plant and machine operatives

49%

Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Transport via railways 57,708 employees Non scheduled air transport Other scheduled passenger land transport 171,395 employees Other supporting land transport activities Taxi operation 178,420 employees Other supporting water transport activities Other passenger land transport 22,845 employees Other supporting air transport activities Sea and coastal water transport 29,395 employees Driving school activities Scheduled air transport 38,177 employees

7%

12,422 employees 49,920 employees 25,893 employees 88,149 employees 36,973 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 10:

www.government-skills.gov.uk 0207 2761611

Government Skills

Footprint

Unions in sector

Union board members

Sector skills agreement

Central government (including government departments and their agencies, non-departmental public bodies and the armed forces)

Sue Ferns – Prospect Hugh Lanning – PCS

FDA PCS Prospect

Completion due September 2007 Unions have been involved in ‘scenario planning’ meetings towards establishing future skills needs and have been very supportive of the employee skills survey.

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills for Life Government Skills and PCS held a joint conference in February 07 on Skills for Life attended by HR practitioners and ULRs. This called for: – the Skills for Life strategy to be embedded into every central government department – all departments to engage with their staff to ensure that, where needed, they have adequate access and support for Skills for Life training and development.

❙ The skills pledge On 18 April 2007 leaders of 19 government departments covering 475,000 employees made a commitment that every eligible employee will be helped to gain basic skills and a full level two qualification or equivalent.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Government Skills


Key statistics: Government Skills Government Skills had not published a skills needs analysis when this leaflet was in production, although it is currently carrying out an extensive skills survey of all employees in its footprint. Further information may be available on the SSDA sector skills matrix at www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ The following is an indication of where the majority of employees in the sector are employed. Employees

2006

Cabinet Office inc agencies

2,440

Crown Prosecution Service

9,660

Department for Communities and Local Government

5,520

Department for Constitutional Affairs

Department for Culture, Media and Sport

630

Department for Education & Skills (DfES)

3,940

Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs

11,570

Department for International Development

Department for Transport

Department for Work and Pensions

115,540

Department of Health excl agencies

5,870

Department of Trade and Industry

10,110

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

6,060

Government Communications Headquarters

4,960

HM Revenue and Customs

HM Treasury

Home Office inc agencies

73,500

Ministry of Defence

84,670

National Assembly for Wales

6,680

Northern Ireland Civil Service

36,855

Northern Ireland Office

1,760 18,770

94,880 1,120

140

Office for National Statistics Office of Government Commerce

36,620

The Scottish Executive inc agencies

3,720 640 15,810

Source: PES Quarter 4 2006

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factsheet


Factsheet 11:

www.improveltd.co.uk 0113 241 1251/85 0845 6440448

Improve

the sector skills council for food and drink manufacturing

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

bakery brewery dairy distillery drinks manufacturing food manufacturing and processing fresh produce meat and poultry sea fish confectionery.

Unions in sector

BFAWU – Bakery, Food and Allied Workers Union Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) USDAW – Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers GMB

Sector skills agreement Completed March 2007

Union board member

Iain MacLean – Unite (Amicus section)

Special projects/resources ❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid will enable 500 women operatives to achieve an introductory certificate in management.

❙ Skills passport Improve’s Green Card was the first UK wide skills passport, launched on 1 July 2005

❙ National Skills Academy for Food and Drink Manufacturing This academy launches on 28 June 2007, with an IT hub and seven academy centres. ❙ Grimsby – fish processing ❙ Grimsby – lean manufacturing ❙ Lincoln – chilled ready meals ❙ Norfolk – meat and poultry ❙ Nantwich – dairy ❙ Northampton – food hygiene ❙ Billingsgate, Fleetwood, North Shields and Leeds – seafood

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Improve


Key statistics: Improve Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 379,645 Status Employed 96% 3% Self employed Full time 90% Part time 10% Permanent 90% Temporary 6% Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

32% 68%

Ethnicity White 91% Asian 6% Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 6,890 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

65% 21% 9% 5%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

1,100 3% 0

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial

6%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

9% 0 14% 50%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

14% 30,700

Managers and senior officials

9%

Professional occupations

3%

Associate professional and technical occupations

2%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

5% 6% 0

Sales and customer service

4%

Process plant and machine operatives

38%

Elementary occupations

34%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Processing and preserving of fish and fish products Processing and preserving of fruit and vegetables Manufacture of dairy products Manufacture of prepared animal feeds Manufacture of other food products Manufacture of beverages

15,087 employees 19,986 employees 27,162 employees 15,403 employees 175,572 employees 53,688 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 12:

www.lantra.co.uk 0845 707 8007

0113 241 1251/85

Lantra

the sector skills council for environmental and land based industries

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

agricultural livestock and crops animal care animal technology aquaculture environmental conservation equine farriery fencing fisheries management floristry trees and timber game conservation land-based engineering landscaping productive horticulture veterinary nursing.

Union board members

Miles Hubbard – Unite (TGWU section)

Union members on other committees Council – Nigel Titchen – Prospect

Unions in sector NFU Prospect Unite (TGWU section)

Sector skills agreement

Completed January 2007 Prospect and TGWU have each agreed a trade union action plan that is supplemental to the main SSA.

Special projects/resources ❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid to enable 600 women in micro businesses to progress into managerial and technical roles

❙ Prospect union learning fund project Prospect have secured funding from the union learning fund to pilot the use of mobile ULRs in land-based industries in the Eastern region

❙ www.afuturein.com A careers information service for adults looking to develop skills in practical, technical and specialised areas with opportunities for career progression and promotion in the land based industries. www.afuturein.com/

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Lantra


Key statistics: Lantra Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 429,597 Status Employed 52% 45% Self employed Full time 79% Part time 21% Permanent 49% Temporary 3% Gender Female Male

30% 70%

Ethnicity White 99% Asian Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 141,815 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

82% 16% 2% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

2,400 2% 7%

Associate professional and technical occupations

8%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

29% 13%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

1% 11%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

21% 14,200

Managers and senior officials

14%

Professional occupations

1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

4%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

9% 15% 11%

Sales and customer service

4%

Process plant and machine operatives

7%

Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Growing of crops, market gardening, horticulture Farming of animals Growing of crops combined with farming of animals Agricultural and animal husbandry activities, excluding veterinary activities Veterinary activities Botanical and zoological gardens and nature reserve activities

35%

86,030 employees 114,076 employees 21,772 employees 127,068 employees 39,852 employees 10,371 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 13:

www.lifelonglearninguk.org 0113 241 1251/85 0870 7577890

Lifelong Learning UK

Footprint

Community learning and development, further education, higher education, libraries, archives and information services, work-based learning and development

Union board members Paul Mackney – UCU Christina McAnea – UNISON

Unions in sector ACM ATL CYWU Prospect UNISON Unite (Amicus section)

Sector skills agreement Completion due October 2007

Unions represented on other committees

UCU UNISON – adult and community education CYWU

Special projects/resources

❙ National reference point for Skills for Life professional development The national reference point Skills for Life professional development (NRP) offers specialist information and advice to those intending to join the profession, existing teachers and learning support staff, as well as those with an interest in their development. www.lifelonglearninguk.org/nrp/aboutus/aboutus_index.html

❙ Standards development Lifelong Learning UK and ENTO have agreed a memorandum of understanding that establishes the respective roles of the two organisations in taking forward the standards development agenda for the lifelong learning workforce.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Lifelong Learning UK


Key statistics: Lifelong Learning UK Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 829,767 Status Employed 92% 8% Self employed Full time 66% Part time 34% Permanent 77% Temporary 15%

Administrative and secretarial

8%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

4% 4%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

3% 1%

58% 42%

Ethnicity White 93% Asian 2% Black 2% Mixed/other 3% Employers Total VAT registered 14,530 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

69% 20% 7% 3%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

2,500 5% 42%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

31%

1% 37,700

Managers and senior officials

9%

Professional occupations

36%

Associate professional and technical occupations

12%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

19% 3% 5%

Sales and customer service

7%

Process plant and machine operatives

0

Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Technical and vocational secondary education Higher education Adult and other education not elsewhere classified Library and archives activities

8%

103,456 employees 515,600 employees 156,655 employees 54,056 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 14:

www.people1st.co.uk 0113 241 1251/85 0870 0600550

People 1st

the sector skills council for the hospitality, leisure, travel and tourism industries

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

hotels pubs, bars and nightclubs membership clubs gambling tourist services youth hostels self-catering accommodation restaurants contract food service providers events travel services visitor attractions holiday parks hospitality services.

Union board members Jude Brimble – GMB

Unions in sector

GMB TSSA Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) UNISON USDAW (catering and gambling)

Sector skills agreement Completion due April 2007

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills academy A proposal for a 'federation model' skills academy will be submitted in June 2007

❙ Skills passport UK skills passport.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

People 1st


Key statistics: People 1st Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 1,385,685 Status Employed 91% 9% Self employed Full time 55% Part time 45% Permanent 82% Temporary 8% Gender Female Male

57% 43%

Ethnicity White 86% Asian 6% Black 2% Mixed/other 6% Employers Total VAT registered 134,455 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

76% 21% 3% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

12,900 6% 0

Associate professional and technical occupations

1%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

27% 3%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

7% 1%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

52% 144,500

Managers and senior officials

10%

Professional occupations

0

Associate professional and technical occupations

0

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

3% 5% 3%

Sales and customer service

13%

Process plant and machine operatives

0

Elementary occupations

65%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification

Hotels Other provision of lodgings not elsewhere classified Restaurants Bars Canteens and catering Activities of travel agents and tour operators Fair and amusement park activities Gambling and betting activities

229,254 employees 41,268 employees 479,714 employees 255,915 employees 176,406 employees 114,881 employees 10,767 employees 76,667 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 15:

www.proskills.co.uk 0113 241 1251/85 01235 833844

Proskills

the sector skills council for processing and manufacturing in the building products, coatings, glass, printing, extractive and mineral processing industries

Footprint

Union members on other committees

❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

Unions in sector

coatings extractives glass building products printing.

Glass – Alan Harvey – Unite (Amicus section) Print – David Tarren – Unite (Amicus section)

Union board members

Bernard Rutter – Unite (Amicus section) Vacancy for GMB officer

GMB NUM NACODS Unite (Amicus section) Unity

Sector skills agreement Completion July 2007

Special projects/resources ❙ Making skills work An online tool giving information about the industry sub-sectors, the types of jobs and the skills and qualifications needed. Includes pay and conditions data: www.proskills.co.uk/proskills_careersv2.asp

❙ British Print Industry Federation BPIF and Proskills have signed a memorandum of understanding ensuring SSC support of the learning and skills clause in the national print agreement with Unite

❙ Armed forces resettlement programme A programme to map the skills, knowledge and competencies of the armed forces to the skills needs of the extractives and mineral processing industry.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Proskills


Key statistics: Proskills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 712,906 Status Employed 73% 27% Self employed Full time 87% Part time 13% Permanent 71% Temporary 2%

Administrative and secretarial

16%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

27% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

8% 26%

20% 80%

Ethnicity White 86% Asian 9% Black 4% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 50,420 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

80% 13% 5% 2%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

1,500 2% 8%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

8%

4% 18,500

Managers and senior officials

12%

Professional occupations

1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

2%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

9% 14% 0

Sales and customer service

6%

Process plant and machine operatives

41%

Elementary occupations

14%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification (number of employees) Mining of coal and lignite, extraction of peat 6,382 Manufacture of refractory ceramic products 3,457 Mining of metal ores 2,183 Manufacture of bricks, tiles and construction 34, 102 products in baked clay 9,393 Other mining and quarrying Manufacture of cement, lime and plaster 4,283 Printing and service activities related to printing 175,762 Manufacture of wallpaper 2,737 Cutting, shaping and finishing of ornamental and building stone 7,796 Manufacture of paints, varnishes and similar 24,539 Manufacture of other non-metallic mineral products 9,865 coatings, printing ink and mastics Manufacture of glass and glass products 35,227

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

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factsheet


Factsheet 16:

www.semta.co.uk 0113 241 1251/85 01923 23441

SEMTA 

the sector skills council for science, engineering and manufacturing technologies

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

aerospace electrical engineering electronics, including semi-conductors mechanical engineering and metal trades motor vehicles shipbuilding, boat building and repair biotechnology nanotechnology mathematics forensic science.

Union board members John Wall – CSEU

Unions in sector Community CSEU GMB Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) Prospect

Sector skills agreement

SSA complete except for biosciences, completion due June 2007 Prospect is developing a trade union action plan for biosciences, including commitment to promoting the skills pledge.

Union members on other committees

Automotive – Tony Murphy – Unite (Amicus section) Mechanical – Ian Tonks – Unite (Amicus section) Electronics – Peter Skyte – Unite (Amicus section) Aerospace and marine – Ian Waddell – Unite (Amicus section) Nations sub group – John Quigley – Unite (Amicus section)

Special projects/resources ❙ National skills academy Manufacturing academy launched January 2007, will provide programmes which use a range of methods to transfer knowledge and teach skills, and provide portable qualifications.

❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Bid approved January 2007 to support the career development of 400 women technicians and managers.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Semta


Key statistics: SEMTA Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 1,749,444 Status Employed 95% 5% Self employed Full time 93% Part time 7% Permanent 91% Temporary 3%

Administrative and secretarial

3%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

45% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

4% 19%

19% 81%

Ethnicity White 95% Asian 3% Black 1% Mixed/other 1% Employers Total VAT registered 61,230 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees Data not 11–49 employees available 50–199 employees 200+ employees

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

6,700 2% 9%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

12%

5% 69,600

Managers and senior officials

9%

Professional occupations

5%

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

9% 22% 0

Sales and customer service

3%

Process plant and machine operatives

36%

Elementary occupations

11%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Manufacture of office machinery and computers Manufacture of electrical machinery and apparatus not elsewhere classified Manufacture of radio, television and communication equipment and apparatus Manufacture of medical and precision and optical equipment, watches and clocks Manufacture of motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers Manufacture of other transport equipment

88,487 employees 170,436 employees 90,098 employees 123,687 employees 253,909 employees 209,624 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 17:

www.skillfast-uk.org 0113 241 1251/85 0113 2399600

Skillfast UK

the sector skills council for apparel, footwear, textiles and related businesses

Footprint

production of raw materials eg leather production manufacture of apparel, footwear, textiles and fibres servicing of apparel, footwear and textile products eg dry cleaning and shoe repair ❙ design activities related to apparel, footwear and textiles and ❙ trading in apparel, footwear and textile products. ❙ ❙ ❙

Union board members

Peter Booth – Unite (TGWU section) Phil Davies – GMB Paul Gates – Community

Unions in sector Community GMB Unite (TGWU section)

Sector skills agreement

Completed August 2006 The SSA includes a proposal to provide support for employability skills and financial assistance for employers to provide an appropriate induction and training infrastructure.

Special projects/resources ❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Successful bid to provide 300 operatives with new skills and support 40 fashion graduate entrants

❙ Just the job An on-line tool that describes the jobs available in the sector and the qualifications needed for them www.skillfast-uk.org/activity_details.cfm?AudienceActivityID=11

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skillfast UK


Key statistics: Skillfast UK Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 429,597 Status Employed 52% 45% Self employed Full time 79% Part time 21% Permanent 49% Temporary 3% Gender Female Male

30% 70%

Ethnicity White 99% Asian Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 141,815 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

82% 16% 2% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

1,200 3% 6%

Associate professional and technical occupations

3%

Administrative and secretarial

2%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

23% 0

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

14% 40%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

7% 12,000

Managers and senior officials

9%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

1%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

11% 9% 1%

Sales and customer service

26%

Process plant and machine operatives

21%

Elementary occupations

20%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Manufacture of textiles Manufacture of wearing apparel and accessories Tanning and dressing of leather, manufacture of luggage, handbags, saddlery, harness and footwear Washing and dry cleaning of textile and fur products

92,959 employees 53,039 employees 13,262 employees 44,358 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Skills for Care & Development

Factsheet 18:

www.skillsforcareanddevelopment.org.uk 0113 241 1251/85

Skills for Care and Development the sector skills council for social care, children, early years and young people's workforces in the UK, incorporating the Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC) and adult care services

Footprint ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙ ❙

children’s homes care homes domiciliary care and support agencies day centres and services social work fostering agencies and services, and foster carers nurse agencies and adoption services.

Union board member

Jon Richards – Unison ) CWDC Brian Strutton – GMB ) Helga Pile – Unison – adult care

Unions in sector GMB Unison

Sector skills agreement Completion due November 2007

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills passport Care Skills passport – only in Berkshire LSC area at present

❙ Equality and diversity activity The CWDC is currently developing a diversity project, which will concentrate on improving the representation of ethnic minorities, gender, age representation and disability within the children’s workforce.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Care and Development


Skills for Care & Development

Key statistics: Skills for Care and Development Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 1,429,731 Status Employed 92% 7% Self employed Full time 63% Part time 37% Permanent 87% Temporary 6%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

2% 59%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

82% 18%

Ethnicity White 91% Asian 3% Black 4% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 5,605 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

55% 39% 6% 0

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

7,700 4% 7%

Associate professional and technical occupations

22%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

0 1% 2% 50,400

Managers and senior officials

10%

Professional occupations

5%

Associate professional and technical occupations

6%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

8% 1% 59%

Sales and customer service

3%

Process plant and machine operatives

1%

Elementary occupations

6%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Social work activities 1,429,731 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 19:

www.skillsforhealth.org.uk 0113 241 1251/85 0845 707 8007

Skills for Health

the sector skills council for the health sector across the UK

Union board members Bob Abberley – Unison

Unions in sector

British Dietetic Association British Orthoptic Society Chartered Society of Physiotherapists GMB Society of Chiropodists and Podiatrists Society of Radiographers Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) Unison

Skills for Health also work with non-affiliated professional trade unions/organisations such as the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and Royal College of Midwives (RCM)

Sector skills agreement

Completed England September 2006 The TU action plan includes publication of a joint statement of intent re innovative education provision and learning design solutions, including Skills for Life, equality of access and links with existing structures such as the knowledge and skills framework.

Special projects/resources ❙ Literacy, language and numeracy Supporting the Skills for Life agenda through the development and promotion of a ‘whole organisation approach’ to improving the language, literacy and numeracy skills of the workforce

❙ Career framework for health A framework designed to increase flexibility in career development and workforce planning. The framework can be used as a ‘route map’ to facilitate horizontal, vertical and diagonal movement across health careers

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skills for Health


Key statistics: Skills for Health Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 2,055,950 Status Employed 93% 7% Self employed Full time 64% Part time 36% Permanent 88% Temporary 6%

Administrative and secretarial

8%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

0 34%

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

78% 22%

Ethnicity White 88% Asian 5% Black 3% Mixed/other 3% Employers Total VAT registered 6,460 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

56% 33% 9% 2%

Skills shortages* (England only) Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

6,600 6% 5%

Associate professional and technical occupations

Elementary occupations Skills gaps** (England only)

42%

2% 0 3% 70,300

Managers and senior officials

11%

Professional occupations

8%

Associate professional and technical occupations

15%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

18% 2% 39%

Sales and customer service

2%

Process plant and machine operatives

1%

Elementary occupations

7%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Human health activities 2,055,950 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 20:

www.skillsforjustice.com 0113 241 1251/85 0114 2611499

Skills for Justice

Footprint

Custodial care, community justice, court services, prosecution services, customs, excise and police

Union board member Rosie Eagleson – PCS

Unions in sector NAPO Unison UCU PCS Prospect POA

Sector skills agreement Completion due August 2007

Special projects/resources â?™ Total equality scheme The Skills for Justice total equality scheme sets out the values of equality to which the organisation adheres, and how it will meet the general duty to promote inclusion across all aspects of diversity. The SSC has also established a diversity working group, formed of representatives from across the Justice sector as well as outside experts on race and diversity. For more information on the diversity working group, please contact Sue Hunter at sue.hunter@skillsforjustice.com

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skills for Justice


Key statistics: Skills for Justice Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 428,499 Status Employed 99% Self employed Full time 87% Part time 13% Permanent 97% Temporary

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

Ethnicity White 95% Asian Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 85 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

52% 26% 13% 9%

400

Data insignificant

Associate professional and technical occupations Administrative and secretarial

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

173

Managers and senior officials Professional occupations Associate professional and technical occupations

Data insignificant

41% 59%

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives Elementary occupations

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Justice and judicial activities Public security, law and order activities

128,597 employees 299,902 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 21:

www.skillsforlogistics.org 0113 241 1251/85 01908 313360

Skills for Logistics

the sector skills council for the freight logistics industry

Footprint ❙ ❙

Unions in sector

freight logistics industry wholesale industry

Union board members

Ron Webb – Unite (TGWU section) Robert Monks – URTU

CWU USDAW Unite (Amicus section) Unite (TGWU section) URTU Nautilus RMT

Sector skills agreement

Completion likely summer 2007 Trade union action plan in development.

Special projects/resources ❙ Women and Work sector pathways initiative Skills for Logistics successfully bid for funding to recruit and train women to become LGV drivers and to enable progression to management roles for women warehouse operatives.

❙ Memorandum of understanding (MoU) Skills for Logistics is working with unionlearn to develop a model MoU for SSCs and unionlearn working together in the regions. It will be rolled out initially in the Midlands regions.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skills for Logistics


Key statistics: Skills for Logistics Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees freight (wholesale 2006) Skills shortages* freight (wholesale 2006) Total in UK 2006 860,629 (667,654) Managers and senior officials Status Professional occupations Employed 91% Associate professional and technical occupations 9% Self employed Full time 87% Administrative and secretarial Part time 13% Permanent 86% Skilled trades Temporary 5% Personal service occupations Gender Female Male

19% (33%) 81% (67%)

Ethnicity White 92% (94.5%) Asian 4% (5.5%) Black 2% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 64,805 (126,923) businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

83% (84%) 11% (13%) 4% (2%) 1% (1%)

2,900 (4%) 5% 1% 1% 10% 2% 5%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

10% 60%

Elementary occupations

5% 27,000 (15%)

Skills gaps** freight (wholesale 2006) Managers and senior officials

10%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

2%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

16% 9% 2%

Sales and customer service

12%

Process plant and machine operatives

20%

Elementary occupations

26%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Freight transport by road Cargo handling and storage Activities of other transport activities Post and courier activities Wholesale on a fee or contract basis Other wholesale

227,682 employees 176,639 employees 122,630 employees 333,678 employees 66,352 586,047

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 22:

www.skillsactive.com 0113 241 1251/85 0207 6322000

Skills Active

the sector skills council for sport and fitness, the outdoors, playwork and the caravan industry

Union board member

Sector skills agreement

Completed November 2006 Skills Active has a regional plan in each of the English regions.

Karl Mansell-Green – Unison

Unions in sector

Unison Unite (TGWU section) CYWU PFA GMB Skills Active also has links with all of the professional associations in the sector.

Special projects/resources ❙ Skills passport

Active Passport launched 1 May 2007, SkillsActive has offered to provide free passports for a three-month union-led pilot exercise in Yorkshire and Humberside

❙ Management and leadership Skills Active is the lead SSC for management and leadership across the Skills for Business network

❙ Skills academy Proposal resubmitted to the LSC March 2007. Skills Active was shortlisted and expects to hear the result on 14 June 2007.

❙ Nancy Ovens bursary Funding available annually for coaches or leaders to enhance their skills and knowledge by taking part in work experience, studies or experience outside their community; see www.skillsactive.com/resources/news/last-chance-for-nancy-ovens-bursary-applications This project is in its second year; the panel which decides who will receive the bursary in 2007 meets on 5 June.

❙ Educational sports forum Skills Active has made links and started to collaborate with the GFTU’s educational sports forum.

❙ Coaching bursary A proposal for a coaching specific bursary is being developed in connection with Legacy 2020 (arm of the East London Business Alliance). unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skills Active


Key statistics: Skills Active Data is for 2004 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2004 634,000 Status Employed 90% 10% Self employed Full time 48% Part time 52% Permanent 74% Temporary 10% Gender1

Skills shortages (2005)* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

60% 40%

Ethnicity2 White 95% Asian 1% Black 2% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 17,820 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms in 20053 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

72% 22% 5% 0

1,600 3% 0

Associate professional and technical occupations

33%

Administrative and secretarial

5%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

4% 39% 3% 0

Elementary occupations Skills gaps (2005)**

12% 16,000

Managers and senior officials

12%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

10% 8% 26%

Sales and customer service

8%

Process plant and machine operatives

1%

Elementary occupations

27%

Distribution of jobs within sector by sub-sector***

Sport and recreation Health and fitness The outdoors Caravan industry Playwork

363,100 employees 44,800 employees 25,000 employees 31,900 employees 132,700 employees

*Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed ***Overlap of employment sub-sectors 1 Experian 2005 (SkillsActive); 2 Labour Force Survey; 3 Annual Business Inquiry

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 23:

www.skillset.org 0113 241 1251/85 0207 6322000

Skillset

the sector skills council for broadcast, film, video, interactive media and photo imaging

Union board members

Martin Spence – BECTU (acting) Jeremy Dear – NUJ Christine Payne – Equity

Sector skills agreement

Completed 2005 The SSA includes trade union commitment to work with SkillSet on the development of apprenticeship programmes.

Unions in sector BECTU Equity NUJ

Special projects/resources ❙ Information Advice and Guidance (IAG) SkillSet is the lead SSC for IAG across the Skills for Business network, and has entered into a memorandum of understanding with unionlearn to work together in a long term strategic relationship in the area of skills related information provision, advice and guidance.

❙ Funding 0pportunities Skillset offers several funding opportunities, including: ❙ Skillset film skills fund for organisations to deliver, develop or facilitate film specific training programmes for existing film professionals ❙

Screen bursaries for individuals – supporting training and qualifications for practitioners in the film, TV, animation, computer games and interactive industries: www.skillset.org/film/funding/

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skillset


Key statistics: Skillset Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated

Gender Female Male

165,139 68% 31% 82% 18% 60% 8% 35% 65%

Ethnicity White 93% Asian Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 13,010 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

500

Associate professional and technical occupations Data insignificant

Employees Total in UK 2006 Status Employed Self employed Full time Part time Permanent Temporary

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

6,200

Managers and senior officials

14%

Professional occupations

3%

Associate professional and technical occupations

14%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

28% 5% 0

Sales and customer service

14%

Process plant and machine operatives

12%

Elementary occupations

10%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification Photographic activities Motion picture and video activities Radio and television activities

31,402 employees 43,849 employees 88,774 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 24:

www.skillsmartretail.com 0113 241 1251/85 0207 3993450

Skillsmart Retail the sector skills council for retail

Footprint

supermarkets, department stores and corner shops specialist food, drink and tobacco stores specialist retailers of goods including textiles, clothing footwear and leather, furniture, electrical, hardware, books and stationery, floor coverings and photographic equipment ❙ antique retailers and ❙ markets and mail order ❙ ❙ ❙

Unions in sector GMB NACO Unite (TGWU section) Unite (Amicus section) Usdaw

Sector skills agreement Completed April 2007

Union board member James Rees – USDAW

Special projects/resources

❙ Retail apprentice of the year award Launched in 2007, applications need to be submitted by mid June.

❙ British Shops and Stores Association ‘Oxford Summer School’ Each year Skillsmart funds ten scholarships for a week long training programme for junior managers from small and independent retailers.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Skillsmart Retail


Key statistics: Skillsmart Retail Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 2,965,176 Status Employed 91% 9% Self employed Full time 51% Part time 49% Permanent 87% Temporary 4% Gender Female Male

60% 40%

Ethnicity White 90% Asian 6% Black 2% Mixed/other 2% Employers Total VAT registered 196,025 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees Data not available 50–199 employees 200+ employees

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

9,400 11% 1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial

4%

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

13% 1%

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

59% 1%

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

5% 186,000

Managers and senior officials

0%

Professional occupations

1%

Associate professional and technical occupations

1%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

3% 2% 0

Sales and customer service

64%

Process plant and machine operatives

2%

Elementary occupations

19%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification

Retail trade

2,965,176 employees

Source: SSDA sector skills matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies that cannot be filled because there are insufficient skilled people seeking employment **Skills gaps = existing employees do not have the skills needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


Factsheet 25:

www.summitskills.org.uk 0113 241 1251/85 01908 303960

Summit Skills

the sector skills council for building services engineering

Footprint

design, installation and maintenance of electrotechnical heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration and plumbing ❙ oil and gas fitting design, installation and maintenance. ❙

Unions in sector UCATT Unite (Amicus section)

Sector skills agreement Completion due March 2008

Union board member Tom Hardacre – Unite (Amicus section)

Special projects/resources ❙ Careers map Summit Skills has produced a careers map for building services engineering. It summarises progression routes throughout the sector and demonstrates the many career options available, from apprenticeship level through to chartered engineer. The map tracks typical routes through a building services engineering career, from entry, through structured training and workplace experience, to professional qualifications and career functions. It also summarises core craft, technical and engineering job descriptions to provide a flavour of what the work would entail and assist learners to select the right path to reflect their individual interests.

❙ Equality and diversity activity Summit Skills has established a careers and diversity interest group comprised of employers, employer representative groups, providers and careers/diversity agencies. The group has identified three key areas of focus: widening the recruitment pool; providing professional and career progression; improving the image of the sector.

❙ Training groups Summit Skills has set up training groups which bring together all parts of the sector for discussion of training and skills issues.

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

Summit Skills


Key statistics: Summit Skills Data is for 2005 unless otherwise stated Employees Total in UK 2006 325,394 Status Employed Self employed Data not Full time available Part time

Skills shortages* Managers and senior officials Professional occupations

2,800 5% 2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

1%

Administrative and secretarial

2%

Permanent Temporary

Skilled trades Personal service occupations

78% 0

Gender Female Male

Sales and customer service Process plant and machine operatives

Ethnicity White Data not Asian available Black Mixed/other Employers Total VAT registered 65,550 businesseses in UK Total VAT registered businesses in England 2005 Size of firms 1–10 employees 11–49 employees 50–199 employees 200+ employees

91% 7% 1% 0

Elementary occupations Skills gaps**

3% 3% 4% 14,000

Managers and senior officials

6%

Professional occupations

2%

Associate professional and technical occupations

5%

Administrative and secretarial Skilled trades Personal service occupations

7% 60% 0

Sales and customer service

2%

Process plant and machine operatives

2%

Elementary occupations

14%

Distribution of jobs with sector by standard industrial classification – 2004 Manufacture of electric motors, generators and transporters 19,390 employees Manufacture of other electrical equipment, not elsewhere classified 26,527 employees Manufacture of industrial process control equipment 7,342 employees Installation of electrical wiring and fittings 149,555 employees Plumbing 113,463 employees Repair of electrical household goods 9,117 employees

Source: Source: SSDA SSDA sector sector skills skills matrix: matrix: www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ www.ssdamatrix.org.uk/ *Skills shortage = vacancies *Skills shortage = vacancies that that cannot cannot be be filled filled because because there there are are insufficient insufficient skilled skilled people people seeking seeking employment employment **Skills **Skills gaps gaps = = existing existing employees employees do do not not have have the the skills skills needed needed

unionlearn Congress House, Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS. 020 7079 6920

factsheet


23/5/07 12:43:48

What the guides cover ICT learning centres – What is a workplace learning centre and what can they offer? What do you need to think about in order to set up an ICT centre? Wireless networks – What is a wireless network and how can it help you set up a learning centre? How can you set up mobile access using broadband phone networks?

Mobile learning – How can you use new-generation mobile internet gadgets to This series of guides has been produced by the ICT and workplace learning project team. Any views expressed are those of the project team.

folder sector skills.indd 1

widen access to learning and support? e-assessment – What opportunities are there for learners to gain qualifications using on-screen tests in ICT learning centres?

e-portfolios – What is an e-portfolio?

By working together with Sector Skills Councils, the trade union movement can ensure that the focus of the Skills Agenda encompasses workers as well as employers, in employment led programmes. This pack gives trade unionists the information they need to make the most of the opportunities offered.” Brendan Barber, TUC general secretary

The views expressed in these guides

www.unionlearn.org.uk

unionlearn with the TUC

cover photos: Janina Struk/reportdigital.co.uk; Jess Hurd/reportdigital.co.uk; John Birdsall design: www.wildstrawberry.uk.com print: College Hill Press

The pack includes the following materials y Sector Skills Councils: An overview for trade unionists y Working with Sector Skills Councils: for ULRs, workplace reps and negotiators y A model trade union action plan for Sector Skills Agreements y 25 fact sheets – one for each of the Sector Skills Agreements

An information pack for trade unionists

Sector Skills Councils

Sector Skills Councils

Published by unionlearn Trades Union Congress Congress House Great Russell Street London WC1B 3LS t: 020 7079 6920 f: 020 7079 6921 www.unionlearn.org.uk Unionlearn’s SSC information pack is part of a community programme called Equal – a European Social Fund initiative which tests and promotes new means of combating all forms of discrimination and inequality in the labour market. The GB Equal Support Unit is managed by ECOTEC.

Sector Skills Councils: An information pack for trade unionists  

Sector Skills Councils set the standard for skills training across the UK. The sector skills information pack for trade unionists contains f...

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