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UNITED NATIONS PAKISTAN Magazine 2 / 2018

Focus on Transforming Communities Empowering Women Special Feature Towards Universal Health Coverage real lives: stories that inspire us The time when I counted cash for my uncle! Page 38

human rights and sdgs: promoting human rights through world press photo exhibition

new faces

World Press Photo Exhibition came to Islamabad

New UNICEF Representative, Aida Girma-Melaku presents her credentials to the Foreign Page 46

news and events

Government of Pakistan and United Nations in Pakistan sign the UN Sustainable Development Framework (UNSDF) 2018-2022 Page 48

Page 72

guest in town

The Chairman of the Independent Council of the FAO, Mr. Khalid Mehboob visits Islamabad Page 110

messages from antรณnio guterres, secretary-general of the united nations

International Day of Solidarity With Detained and Missing Staff Members Page 113

video corner

Refugees to study at universities and colleges in their host country Page 115


The United Nations Pakistan Newsletter is produced by the United Nations Communications Group

Editor in Chief: Neil Buhne, Resident Coordinator, United Nations Pakistan and Acting Director, UNIC Deputy Editor and Content Producer: Ishrat Rizvi, National Information Officer, UNIC Sub Editor: Chiara Hartmann, Consultant, UNIC Photos Producer: Umair Khaliq, IT Assistant, UNIC Graphic Designer: Mirko Neri, Consultant, UNIC Contributors: Anam Abbas, Mahira Afzal, Qaiser Afridi, Rizwana Asad, Blinda Chanda, Shaheryar Fazil, Camila Ferro, Saad Gilani, Razi Mujtaba Haider, Shuja Hakim, Mehr Hassan, Fatima Inayet, Humaira Karim, Imran Khan, Samad Khan, Adresh Laghari, Sameer Luqman, Abdul Sami Malik, Waqas Rafique, Ishrat Rizvi, Maliha Shah, Zikrea Saleh, Asif Shahzad, Maryam Younus.


INDEX

United Nations Pakistan / Magazine / 2 / 2018

|6| Editor’s note

focus on transforming communities

empowering women

|8 | “Progress for women is progress for all”

|9| Time is now: rural and urban activists transforming women’s lives

|17| Senior Government officials, celebrities, politicians and activists tell gripping stories in ‘SEVEN’

10| Stepping up for women’s participation in the digital economy |11| Celebration of International Women’s Day 2018 with the women prisoners, and residents of Darul Aman: an effort to improve women’s access to justice |13| Female inmates of Karachi Central Jail ome together to celebrate womanhood on International Women’s Day |14| All on board – closing the digital gap for women and girls in developing countries |15| Policy dialogue seeks recommendations to strengthen the role of women entrepreneurs |16| Interprovincial Women

Parliamentary Caucus (WPC) Legacy Workshop

|19| New UN Women report uncovers significant gaps for women’s empowerment |20| Powerful global coalition to boost equal pay for women at work |21| UN Women, World Bank, and Women on Board Pakistan join to ring market-opening bell for gender diversity |22| 2018 World Employment Social Outlook trends for women |24| Change is necessary for rural women |25| Less than 1% Pakistani women among overseas workers: ILO study

|39| WFP helps to tackle acute malnutrition |40| UNDP paving the way to better education in Balochistan |41| Relief packages help vulnerable

through collective bargaining

|27| Meet Batool, Balochistan’s first female Assistant Commissioner |28| Meet Farzana…a female lawyer’s tale of courage: fighting the odds in Balochistan’s male-dominated legal profession |29| Meet Rubina…making Women Crisis Centres a place of refuge for women in distress |30| Khadija Tul Kubra Award |31| Gender equality in public administration launched |32| Bridging the gender divide with more opportunities for women in the ICT sector |33| The power of radio and volunteerism continues to transform women’s lives in remote localities of Balochistan |35| Empowerment of Garment Workers in Sialkot’

|26| Achieving gender equality

real lives: stories that inspire us |38| The time when I counted cash for my uncle!

families get through the winter

|42| FATA’s women-headed households |43| Vulnerable displaced families helped to rebuild homes in FATA |44| Brings girls back to school

new faces |46| New UNICEF Representative, Aida Girma-Melaku presents her credentials to the Foreign Minister |47| Deputy FAO Representative joins the team in Islamabad


INDEX news and events one programme (opiii)

|48| Government of Pakistan and United Nations in Pakistan sign the UN Sustainable Development Framework (UNSDF) 2018-2022

|60| Improving police prosecutors’ cooperation in criminal cases education

/

literacy

children

|61| Education Sub-Sector consultation on SDG-4 held in Islamabad

|49| Workshop on countering child abuse inaugurated in Islamabad

|62| Republic of Korea supports UNESCO’s programme for girls’ education in Pakistan

climate change

food security

|50| Development experts discuss impacts of climate change on water resources

|63| 40 years of dynamic teamwork

cultiral heritage

51| UNESCO signs USD 2.8 million project with the Government of Punjab disaster risk reduction

|52| Disaster risk reduction can protect smallholder farmers, experts say drugs and crime

|53| MoU Signing between WWF Pakistan and UNODC to check illegal wildlife trade |52| A proactive approach to counter terrorism |54| Criminal intelligence analysis workshop in Karachi |55| Prime Minister of Islamic Republic of Pakistan appreciates UNODC’s support in countering terrorism |56| Finding regional solutions to global challenges of illicit narcotics trafficking |57| UNODC Goodwill Ambassador promises positive change in the fight against narcotics |58| Railway Police committed to curbing human trafficking and migrant smuggling in Pakistan |59| Case Management and Monitoring System in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa inaugurated

|64| Transforming the Indus Basin with climate resilient agriculture and climate-smart water management |65| FAO conducts SDGs multi stakeholder workshop in Pakistan Administered Kashmir |66| The Pakistan-China’s recovery initiative for the crisis-affected population of FATA and Balochistan |67| FAO to support policies for modernizing agriculture extension services freedom of expression

|68| UNESCO organized roundtable on sharpening SDG 16.10 recommendations governance

|69| Strengthening the justice system of Balochistan |70| UNDP, the Government of Pakistan, and Accountability Lab launch SDG-16 innovation challenge industrial development

|78| Trainings on market potential and business opportunities for renewable energy and energy efficiency conducted |79| Pakistani startups snag UN environment sustainability grants |81| UNIDO trained over 100 professionals on financing of Renewable Energy and Energy

Efficiency projects

|82| Stakeholder consultation on agribusinesses in Gilgit-Baltistan labour

&

decent work

|83| World Day for Safety and Health at Work |84| Youth safety and health at work: Early education equals early protection |85| Sialkot sports goods sector promotes a level playing field |86| Thirteenth batch of national labour inspectors’ training program completed |87| Collective bargaining and effective negotiation skills to promote decent work in Pakistan |88| Effective collective bargaining and negotiation skills for industrial harmony refugees

|89| UNHCR and the Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund launch new livelihoods programme |90| UNHCR provides high-tech medical equipment worth Rs.710 million to Peshawar hospital |91| UNHCR supports Pakistan and Afghanistan to secure sustainable solutions for Afghan refugees


United Nations Pakistan / Magazine / 2 / 2018

human rights and sdgs: promoting human rights through world press photo exhibition |72| World Press Photo Exhibition came to Islamabad |74| Debating migration and human trafficking

|76| Women Empowerment is essential to achieve sustainable development

|77| Justice and Human Rights

|76| Climate change and wildlife

special feature: towards universal health coverage |93| “Join me in calling for Health for All” |94| Developing a Pakistan-specific World Health Day Poster 2018 |95| H.E Shahid Khaqan Abbasi , Prime |100| Accelerating efforts to reduce communicable disease burden is a critical strategy towards UHC

Minister of Pakistan attends World Health Day special Event

|96| World Health Day-2018: key messages

for cooperation towards defeating TB

|101| Wanted: leaders for a Tuberculosis-free world

|104| Engagement of civil society organizations crucial in fight to end TB

|102| Government strongly commits to global efforts towards eliminating tuberculosis

|104| Raising awareness among youth and community and addressing stigma attached with TB

|103| National TB Control Programme highlights progress and the need

|105| Media plays vital role in scaling up awareness about TB

guest in town |110| The Chairman of the Independent Council of the FAO, Mr. Khalid Mehboob visits Islamabad |111| WFP Executive Director, Mr. David Beasley visits Pakistan |112| WFP Executive Director’s exclusive interview with the PTV World

|97| World Health Day walk |97| Commemorating World Health Day at the provincial level

|106| Call for concentrated efforts to work together and save millions from the consequences of TB |107| Playing on the football field to raise awareness on TB |108| Signing of TB Declaration |109|

United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs Miroslav Jenca completes visit to Pakistan

messages from antónio guterres, secretary-general of the united nations |113| International Day of Solidarity With Detained and Missing Staff Members

|114| International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi In Rwanda

|114| International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade

video corner |115| Refugees to study at universities and colleges in their host country |115| Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) |115| Once a Cleantech entrepreneur, always a Cleantech entrepreneur - UNIDO/GEF GCIP Pakistan

|116| UNIDO and Pakistan to jointly develop Country Programme UNIDO Inception mission to Pakistan |116| UNRC Pakistan Mr. Neil Buhne, shared how SDGs are important for Pakistan to adopt Biomass

|116| Project Manager - Mr. Alois Mhlanga speaking at GCIP Awards Ceremony 2017 and Investor Connect


editor’s note

Editor’s Note

The second issue of the United Nations Pakistan magazine for 2018 focuses on activities to commemorate International Women’s Day. In most parts of the world, women are more likely to be unemployed or unfairly treated in the workplace, serving to increase inequality between the genders. This unfortunately is true also in Pakistan, where the low Female Labour Force Participation rate (24 per cent of the labour force i.e. only 15 million out of 61 million female workers), the persistent gender pay gap, the high degree of informal work, violence at work, and sexual harassment impede productivity and progression of women in the workforce. These factors all contribute to Pakistan being near the bottom of global scales measuring gender equality and empowerment. But Pakistan has made progress, most evident in the growing number of women graduating from universities. Some of the stories in this issue showcase the benefits of female inclusion in the labour force for everyone – whether it be employers or workers. This includes inspirational first-hand stories of women workers, such as Balochistan’s first female assistant commissioner, women working for community radio,

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or those striving to support disabled women to have a better education and more and improved work opportunities. This issue’s distinctive feature puts the spotlight on World Health Day, a global health awareness day celebrated every year, of which theme this year was ‘Universal health coverage: everyone, everywhere’. Some countries have already made considerable progress towards universal health coverage, but much of the world’s population is still unable to obtain the health services they need, and efforts need to be scaled up or too many will be left behind. In Pakistan, this important occasion was marked through a variety of activities across the country: ranging from a special event attended by the Prime Minister, His Excellency Shahid Khaqan Abbasi who expressed his commitment for strengthening health care to cover the entire population, to a walk for health awareness, important messages being spread by media and academia, and several activities at the provincial level in hospitals and in schools. Under the umbrella of World Health Day, focus on one disease: tuberculosis was enhanced through World Tuberculosis Day, which was commemorated under the theme of TB leadership. About 10.4 million cases of TB occur each year worldwide, and Pakistan contributes to half a million of cases of drug sensitive, and 27,000 cases of drug resistance every year. It was stressed that commitment was needed not only at the level of Heads of State, ministers, mayors and parliamentarians, but also at the level of community leaders, health workers, and

people affected by TB and their families. A series of awareness raising events at the provincial and national level held on world TB Day are highlighted in this issue. Amongst a multitude of activities by the UN Pakistan team, we look at the efforts made by UNODC in partnership with the Prosecution Department of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and with support from the European Union, who inaugurated a Case Management and Monitoring System (CMMS) designed for the Prosecution Department of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) to counter terrorism. We also highlight the launch of a pilot programme to help provide sustainable livelihood opportunities to both Afghan refugees and Pakistani nationals, targeting families living in extreme poverty on less than USD 1.25 a day and having no access to basic services.As is customary this issue includes information on the several development activities undertaken by different UN agencies in the areas of employment, green growth, drug and crime prevention, and education. I would like to express my gratitude to the members of the UN Communications Group and the UN Country Team for their continued support for this magazine and for working in partnership to communicate to the UN’s partners in Pakistan, to Pakistanis, and to UN staff, what we are achieving and still need to achieve to meet the Sustainable Development Goals in Pakistan.

Neil Buhne Resident Coordinator, United Nations Pakistan and Acting Director, UNIC


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TRANSFORMING COMMUNITIES – EMPOWERING WOMEN


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“Progress for women is progress for all” By António Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General in many countries. But serious obstacles remain: more than a billion women around the world lack legal protection against domestic sexual violence. The global gender pay gap is 23 per cent, and the unpaid work done by many women goes unrecognized. Where

We are at a pivotal moment for women’s rights. The historical and structural inequalities that have allowed oppression and discrimination to flourish are being exposed like never before. Achieving gender equality and empowering women and girls is the greatest human rights challenge in our world. The activism and advocacy of generations of women has borne fruit. There are more girls in school than ever before; more women are undertaking paid work and are in senior roles in the private sector, academia, politics and in international organizations, including the United Nations. Gender equality is enshrined in countless laws, and harmful practices like female genital mutilation and child marriage have been outlawed

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laws exist, they are often ignored, and women who pursue legal redress are denigrated and dismissed. We now know that sexual harassment and abuse have been thriving in workplaces, public spaces and private homes, in countries that pride themselves on their record of gender equality. The United Nations should set an example for the world. I recognize that this has not always been the case. Since the start of my tenure last year, I have set change in motion at UN headquarters, in our peacekeeping missions and in all our offices worldwide. We have now reached gender parity for the first time in my senior management team, and I am determined to achieve this throughout the organization. I am totally committed to zero tolerance of sexual harassment and have set out plans to improve reporting and accountability. We are working closely with countries around the world to prevent and address sexual exploitation and abuse by staff in peacekeeping missions, and to support victims.

We at the United Nations stand with women around the world as they fight to overcome the injustices they face. Women’s empowerment is at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Progress on the Sustainable Development Goals means progress for all women, everywhere. There is ample evidence that investing in women is the most effective way to lift communities, companies, and even countries. Women’s participation makes peace agreements stronger, societies more resilient and economies more vigorous. Where women face discrimination, we often find practices and beliefs that are detrimental to all. Paternity leave, laws against domestic violence and equal pay legislation benefit everyone. At this crucial moment for women’s rights, it is time for men to stand with women, listen to them and learn from them. Transparency and accountability are essential if women are to reach their full potential and lift all of us, in our communities, societies and economies.


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Time is now: rural and urban activists transforming women’s lives By Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, UN Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director, UN Women

This year’s theme captures the vibrant life of the women activists whose passion and commitment have won women’s rights over the generations, and successfully brought change. We celebrate an unprecedented global movement for women’s rights, equality, safety and justice, recognizing the tireless work of activists who have been central to this global push for gender equality. What we see today is a remarkable gathering of strength among women all over the world, demonstrating the power of speaking with one voice. These movements grow from the work of multigenerational activists—from the late feminist human rights leader Asma Jahangir of Pakistan, to the powerful new genera-

tion represented by young women like Jaha Dukureh of The Gambia, UN Women’s Regional Goodwill Ambassador for Africa on ending FGM and child marriage. We salute those who have bravely spoken out to gain access to justice, such as those from the #MeToo movement, who in recent months have found their voice in social media in more than 85 countries to expose those who have preyed on the less powerful and shown how when women support one another, they help to overcome stigma and ensure that their stories are believed. The feminist movement must continue to increase the diversity and the number of people working on gender equality, bringing in individuals and groups to support and shape the agenda, so young men and boys learn to value and respect women and girls and so men can change the way they behave. Today’s activism needs to alter the way we listen to women and the way we look at them, recognizing the power of stereotypes to influence how we value people. Today’s activists must empower those most likely to be left behind, the majority of whom are women, as our latest report, Turning Promises into Action reveals. Across all regions, women are more likely to live in extreme poverty than men. This gender gap is as high as 22 per

cent for the 25 - 34 age group— women’s peak reproductive years, starkly highlighting the dilemma so many face of reconciling income with care—for which policy change and action is so needed. UN Women has a special relationship with the women’s movement; we arose from that activism. Civil society has had a historically crucial role in leading global action on gender equality by promoting reform, highlighting the complexities of the challenges facing women, influencing policies, participating in monitoring, and upholding accountability. We must deliberately create stronger support for women’s political activism and a broader space for women’s civil society voices so that our efforts combine to target those who truly need change most. The culture of gender-based poverty, abuse and exploitation has to end with a new generation of equality that lasts.

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Stepping up for women’s participation in the digital economy By Neil Buhne, Resident Coordinator, United Nations Pakistan and Acting Director, UNIC

The month of March has provided us tremendous opportunities to engage and interact with women who are working day in and day out in rural and urban areas to transform not just their families, but also their communities. Coming on the heels of global movements for gender equality and women’s empowerment, opening avenues for growth and development of the women who are transforming communities, has become the need of time. There are various ways through which women are participating in the economy by extending their services in certain professions such as academia, medicine, engineering and entrepreneurship. While women and girls in rural areas, through their consolidated efforts in various walks of life, are ensuring the sustenance and livelihood of their families. But, with changing technologies and advanc-

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es of the present world, one thing seems untapped for many women and girls i.e. the use of ICT or their participation in the digital economy. ICTs has become a key driver of gender equality and women’s empowerment with changing times. However, women and girls are often ignored in terms of development, due to the long-held cultural norms or stereotypes which translate into predicaments for women and girls in several capacities. Many women and girls in Pakistan have never even seen a mobile phone, let alone have access to internet. There are many reasons for this, but much stems from patriarchy in the family. For example, women are often prohibited from accessing technologies as their family deems that a girl who uses a mobile phone, brings shame to the family. While men of the family may enjoy the freedom to use technologies/ platforms of their choice. Slowly and steadily, this gap would widen, creating a rift in men and women’s access to ICT the digital economy and broader development opportunities. Where do we start from? Breaking the stereotypes and creating meaningful access to ICTs for girls and women must start early. Pakistan accounts for 8 percent of the worldwide digital gig (freelance) economy. As the digital economy is soaring, opportunities in the ICT sector are multiplying, however, the gaps of

women’s access to technology and digital space are unserved. The rise of freelance work can have a trail blazing effect in terms of creating flexible jobs for Pakistani women. It gives a unique economic opportunity for women in Pakistan, allowing women to earn a living or access a service from the home in the face of cultural and social constraints which impede them from working outside the home. Besides enhancing the potential employment for women and girls in Pakistan, access to ICTs can introduce also the element of financial sustainability in the lives of women, who can begin to dream of a promising future. To bridge this gap, many partners are need to equip these girls with the skills needed to drive the economy such as coding, programming, design and development, communications skills, which in turn can drive larger economic transformation. Therefore, with improved access to these transformative technologies, women and girls can benefit from increased employment and business opportunities not just in urban areas but also in rural areas. This improvement will not only benefit women and girls: by giving them access to ICTs, the future of a whole generation can be improved.


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Celebration of International Women’s Day 2018 with the women prisoners, and residents of Darul Aman: an effort to improve women’s access to justice

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In Balochistan, UN Women is working on improving women’s access to justice. On International Women’s Day, an advocacy event was held on 1 March in women prisons in Quetta with the women prisoners and jail authorities. Another event was held on 2 March in Quetta’s Darul Aman to highlight the situation and policy gaps in providing women an access to the formal justice system. Women service providers such as lawyers, police officers, medico-legal advisors along with civil society were given an avenue to voice their opinions about the policies that they are entrusted to implement. The events were co-hosted by the Government departments including active involvement of the Women Development Department, Social Welfare Department and the Prison Department. The Ending Violence Against Women/Girls (EVAWG) Alliance actively participated and supported the activities.

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Female inmates of Karachi Central Jail come together to celebrate womanhood on International Women’s Day

The commemoration of International Women’s Day – ‘Rights of Women in Prison’ in the Central Prison for Women, Karachi was one of the joint efforts by UN Women Pakistan, in collaboration with the Committee for the welfare of Prisoners – Legal Aid Office, Women Development Department and the Sindh Prison Department. The initiative aims to amplify and support global efforts for women rights, equality and justice, and highlights the grievances of incarcerated women who are far less likely than men to have committed violent crimes, or who break the law to support their families.

The number of incarcerated women in the world has observed a tremendous rise, and the phenomena related to it need to be addressed. Speaking on the commemoration of International Women’s Day, Ms. Haya Eman Zahid, Executive Director, Legal Aid Office, stated that since its establishment, the ‘Committee for the welfare of prisoners – Legal Aid Office’ has provided free legal aid to 1,545 women inmates. She also stated the intention of building more humane prison facilities. Special Assistant to Sindh, Chief Minister, Ms. Iram Khalid stated the government is keen to support the

criminal justice system, and ensure women empowerment as well as address the problems faced by women prisoners at all levels for speedy and fair trial. Mr. Jamshed M. Kazi, Country Representative, UN Women Pakistan noted in his remarks that the event will amplify the voices of those who are unheard, and identify the ways in which the UN system can support and accelerate the actions towards gender equality and women empowerment.

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All on board – closing the digital gap for women and girls in developing countries

A high-level event, co-hosted by the European Commission, the European Parliament and UN Women was held on 11 April in Brussels. Bridging the gender digital divide would help deliver the benefits of development to the millions of unconnected women and girls. Yet, 4 billion people remain unconnected – too often, these are women in developing countries. Women are less likely to own a mobile phone, and affordability is another obstacle, particularly for women and girls who represent the majority of the 1 billion poorest people in the world. Free access to the Internet and mo-

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bile connectivity, along with provision of digital literacy, can therefore be a strategic tool to reduce social and gender inequalities. Jamshed Kazi, Country Representative of UN Women Pakistan participated in the event and showcased positive examples of private sector engagement, along with the speedy progress towards women’s economic empowerment.


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Policy dialogue seeks recommendations to strengthen the role of women entrepreneurs

A policy dialogue for entrepreneurs and social activists on Women Economic Empowerment (WEE) was held at Quetta, organized by the Women Development Department (WDD), Balochistan and with the technical assistance of UN Women Balochistan. The participants at the event were key government stakeholders, academia, UN representatives, civil society, businesswomen, entrepreneurs, social activists and media. The major objective of the dialogue was to share the recommendations extracted during the WEE Conference, and to seek recommendations on policy for entrepreneurs, as well as create awareness through advocacy to target audiences, and partnerships for a future action plan. Siddique Mandokahil, Secretary WDD, expressed his enthusiasm that the Provincial Government has come up with something commendable and concrete. The successful dialogue was the second step of the previously held ‘First Women Economic Empowerment Confer-

ence’ for Balochistan. Women in Balochistan have a low literacy rate and high maternal mortality. There are also issues around malnutrition, social stigma, low representation of women in public offices, and lack of gender responsive infrastructure. Despite these challenges, the women of the province are contributing to the economy, and to social and political life, and their efforts must be recognized. Inam ul Haq, Director WDD shared the initiatives of the department, including progress on the implementation of gender policy, and pro-women legislation. Kailash Nath Kohli, Chairperson, Public Commission (PCS) Balochistan, said that he has already been involved in the provision of free of cost services for pro-women legislation and is currently technically facilitating the Women Development Department in amendments in the Inheritance law. Rehana Khilji, Head of the UN Women Sub Office Balochistan, emphasized on leaving no one behind in the sustainable development process. At the same time, she stressed on the importance of addressing the root causes on inequality, ensuring an enabling environment for women in the workforce. Ambreen Gul shared the recommendations of the Women Conference with the participants that included legislative, policy and operational aspects.

Sana Durrani, Member of the National Commission on the Status of Women (NCSW), recommended inter-sectorial convergence at all levels in order to economically empower the women of the province and to put them in a better position to participate and benefit from the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) and beyond. Roshan Kurshid Barocha, the chief guest, highly commended the role and initiatives of the Women Development Department. She stressed on capacity building of entrepreneurs in the emerging sectors and added that concrete steps should be taken to incorporate the elderly, women with disabilities, widows and vulnerable women. The overall recommendations provided by the participants included, among others, creating an enabling business environment for women, promoting gender analysis and data, gender budgeting, endorsement of home based workers and youth policy, and providing women entrepreneurs with voice and agency in the form of provincial and divisional networks. The materialization of a display center and a women enclave was highly recommended for the Women’s Economic Empowerment (WEE) package Balochistan.

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Interprovincial Women Parliamentary Caucus (WPC) Legacy Workshop

Parliaments use a number of mechanisms to address gender equality issues and facilitate women’s political solidarity. Women Parliamentary Caucuses (WPC), or parliamentary groups, are mechanisms that have been created within the parliaments of many countries including Pakistan to strengthen cooperation among women engaged in political life, as well as mainstreaming gender in the political agenda. WPCs also serve to bring women parliamentarians together across party lines in effective alliances around a common agenda. In Pakistan, WPCs have been formed in all of the Provincial Assemblies, however they have various capacity challenges and gaps, which hinder effective functioning.

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The Human Resource Capacity Development (HRCD) Assessment identified the weaknesses of the WPCs as a key area for support to help strengthen and enhance the role and work of the WPCs in the provinces. The major findings identified were WPCs’ lack of technical capacity and political experience in pushing for policy changes, and a lack of legislative knowledge and tools to undertake gender mainstreaming, gender analysis and gender responsive budgeting to promote gender mainstreaming in the work and functioning of parliament, and improving the institution’s sensitivity to gender. In this context, it is imperative that support and guidance is provided to women legisla-

tors so that they are confident and knowledgeable enough to actively engage in their roles as legislators, whilst mainstreaming gender. In seeking to develop a holistic approach to improve the capacity and effectiveness of the WPCs, SUBAIPakistan conducted a series of Provincial roadshows with the following objectives: reflecting on the importance of the role of WPCs; sharing best practices (national/ international) of effective WPC functioning; agreeing on broader objectives and strategies for cohesive functioning of WPC; and building consensus on identification of key leadership competencies and skills for WPC members. The legacy workshop was planned at a crucial time considering the transitional phase of the present assembly and upcoming elections this year. The workshop was a precursor to a National Convention to be held in November 2018, inviting members from the newly formed assemblies.


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Senior Government officials, celebrities, politicians and activists tell gripping stories in ‘SEVEN’ The internationally acclaimed documentary play ‘SEVEN’ toured Pakistan, with an ensemble-reading staged in three Pakistani locations: the Habib University in Karachi; the University of Balochistan in Quetta; and Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.SEVEN is based on the real-life stories of seven women’s rights activists from Nigeria, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Russia, Pakistan, Northern Ireland, and Cambodia. The tour, now into its tenth year, has reached over 50,000 people in more than 38 countries. Over 700 men and women, politicians, one former president, media personalities, members of the

European parliament, sports stars, high ranking police officers and military officials amongst others, have stepped on stage to lend their voice to these marginalized women. Readers on stage in Karachi were Chairperson, Sindh Commission on the Status of Women (SCSW) Ms. Nuzhat Shirin; Member of National Assembly (PPP) Ms. Shazia Atta Marri; Women and Human Rights Activist, Ms. Pushpa Kumari; TV and Film Actress Ms. Sarwat Gilani Mirza; Singer Mr. Asim Azhar; Musician and Actress Ms. Natasha Humera Ejaz, and Lawyer and Broadcast Journalist Ms. Ayesha Tammy Haq.

Readers on stage in Peshawar were Deputy Representative of UN Women Ms. Sangeeta Thapa, Representative of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI), Ms. Meraj Hamayun Khan; President of International Research Council for Religious Affairs, Mr. Muhammad Israr; Executive Director of PAIMAN Alumni Trust Ms. Mossarat Qadeem; Inspector, Anti-Narcotics Force Ms. Rafia Qaseem Baig; Women and Child Rights Activist Ms. Valerie Khan; and Guitarist of musical band ‘Khumariyaan’ Mr. Aamer Shafiq. The play was directed by Ms. Tülin Khalid Azim. Readers on stage in Quetta included

Guitarist of musical band Khumariyaan Mr. Aamer Shafiq

Inspector, Anti-Narcotics Force Ms. Rafia Qaseem Baig

Lawyer and Broadcast Journalist Ms. Ayesha Tammy Haq

Musician and Actress Ms. Natasha Humera Ejaz

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students and teachers of the university from various departments. The play was directed by Mr. Faheem Baloch. The purpose of the events was to promote access to justice for female victims of violence by raising awareness on Pakistan’s existing legal services and frameworks, such as the Federal Ministry of Human Rights’ toll-free helpline (1099), the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Directorate of Social Welfare toll-free Bolo helpline (080022227), provincial laws and services such as the Sindh Domestic Violence

Act 2013, Balochistan Domestic Violence Act 2014 and the Women Complaint Cell established by Sindh’s Women Development Department; along with legal advice to victims of violence. The event in Karachi was attended by approximately 100 people, including high-level officials, activists, and students and dignitaries; the event in Quetta was attended by 250 participants; and the concluding event in Peshawar was attended by 100 participants. UN Women, The Embassy of Swe-

den in Pakistan, The European Union Delegation to Pakistan and the Potohar Organisation for Development Advocacy (PODA) in collaboration with the Swedish Institute, organized the event. The play is produced by Hedda Krausz Sjögren and written in 2007 by seven playwrights: Paula Cizmar, Catherine Filloux, Gail Kriegel, Carol K. Mack, Ruth Margraff, Anna Deveare-Smith and Susan Yankowitz, in collaboration with Vital Voices Global Partnership.

President of International Research Council for Religious Affairs, Mr. Muhammad Israr

Sindh Commission on the Status of Women (SCSW) Ms. Nuzhat Shirin

Singer Mr. Asim Azhar

TV and Film Actress Ms. Sarwat Gilani Mirza

Women and Child Rights Activist Ms. Valerie Khan

Women and Human Rights Activist Ms. Pushpa Kumari

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New UN Women report uncovers significant gaps for women’s empowerment

‘Turning promises into action: Gender equality in the 2030 agenda’, a flagship report of UN Women, makes an urgent call to the international community to step up its efforts to achieve gender equality and address discrimination against all women and girls, everywhere. Two years after the adoption of Agenda 2030 by world leaders, this first-of-its-kind report examines the progress and challenges in the implementation of all the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through a gender lens and puts forth actionable recommendations. The report provides key recommendations for governments, civil society and the UN to maintain momentum for change and turn promises into action. Pakistan is one of the four countries highlighted in the report, where 4.9 million women aged 18-49 are simultaneously deprived in four SDG-related dimensions. This includes being married before the age of 18, lacking access to education, to health-care,

decision-making and employment. Moreover, a closer look uncovers the vast gaps between women and girls who are living worlds apart even in the same country because of their income status, ethnicity, or geographical location. The most disadvantaged ethnic group oscillates between the Sindhi, Saraiki and Pashtun women, while in some indicators poor rural women are equally disadvantaged across all ethnicities and locations. A data snapshot suggests that the national average of women and girls with less than six years of education is 74 per cent; the data when disaggregated shows that poor, rural Pashtun women are the most disadvantaged in education. Of the poorest households in Sindh, 40 per cent are impacted by malnutrition, compared to the national average of 13.2 per cent and 4.2 per cent in the richest households. Women and girls from the poorest households, irrespective of location and ethnicity, are the most disadvan-

taged with regards to access to skilled attendance at birth. While poverty pushes women into precarious work, among the richest, significant barriers— including biased gender norms, discrimination in wages and limited job options—contribute to low labour force participation rates. This timely report underscores the need to make gender equality a prerequisite for turning the ambitious Agenda for Sustainable Development a reality. It highlights both the ends (goals and targets) and the means (policies and processes) that are needed towards this goal. It provides wide-ranging recommendations for change, including the roll-out of integrated approaches to implementation that can leverage policy synergies, looking at two specific areas: unpaid care work, and ending violence against women.

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Powerful global coalition to boost equal pay for women at work New initiative will support innovative and effective equal pay policies and practices around the globe.

One of the most persistent barriers to

equal value a reality. EPIC is a global re-

of Women, will also contribute to strength-

women’s success at work and to eco-

sponse to a critical problem that has been

ening advocacy on equal pay, as part of

nomic growth: unequal pay, will be ac-

prioritized in the UN’s Sustainable Devel-

EPIC.

tively challenged by a new global partner-

opment Goals (SDG), in particular Target

A recent ILO-Gallup report, based on a

ship- the Equal Pay International Coalition

8.5 which calls for equal pay for work of

representative survey of 142 countries,

(EPIC).

equal value by 2030. Equal pay, in addi-

shows that women and men alike want

With the launch of EPIC, ILO, UN Women

tion to empowering women, can have a

women to be in paid jobs, but there re-

and the OECD bring together a diverse

significant impact on achieving other key

main a range of challenges for women

set of actors at the global, regional and

goals such as promoting inclusive socie-

at work, including unequal pay, balanc-

national levels to support governments,

ties, reducing poverty, and creating condi-

ing work and family responsibilities, lack

employers and workers and their organ-

tions for decent work and gender equality.

of access to affordable care, and unfair

izations, and other stakeholders, to make

Phumzile

treatment.

equal pay between women and men for

Director of UN Women said there is no

The issue of equal pay remains high on

work of equal value a reality.

justification for unequal pay for a wom-

the UN’s agenda. This year, the UN Secre-

Guy Ryder, the Director-General of the

an, that this injustice has been unseen for

tary-General’s High-level Panel for Wom-

ILO said one of the most visible, tangible

too long, and we must work together to

en’s Economic Empowerment, released

and pervasive manifestations of discrimi-

change that. Equal pay for women trans-

a report that focused on transformative

nation was that women across the globe

lates into lifelong benefits for them as well

actions needed to advance women’s

are still being paid less than men for work

as their families: better career prospects

economic empowerment, highlighting the

of equal value. He said this was the ra-

and lifetime earnings, greater independ-

importance of equal pay for work of equal

tionale behind the equal pay initiative, and

ence, and higher investments in their chil-

value.

why it is a focus area of the ILO’s Women

dren’s education and health.

The innovative work of the newly created

at Work Centenary Initiative. He reminded

Employers and trade unions, as well as

EPIC will contribute significantly to chal-

that the principle of equal pay for work of

other key stakeholders, will have a central

lenging some of the main assumptions

equal value is enshrined in the ILO Con-

role in the application and rolling out of

reinforcing unequal pay, which were also

stitution of 1919, that one hundred years

equal pay policies. A Platform of Cham-

highlighted by the High-Level Panel and

is too long to wait, and we must all work

pions, launched earlier this year by UN

the ILO-Gallup report.

together to make equal pay for work of

Women at the Commission on the Status

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Mlambo-Ngcuka,

Executive


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UN Women, World Bank, and Women on Board Pakistan join to ring market-opening bell for gender diversity The Pakistan Stock Exchange (PSX), for the second year in a row, commemorated International Women’s Day in a befitting manner. This time, PSX gave its floor to three leading gender diversity promoting organizations – UN Women, World Bank, and Women on Board Pakistan, to perform the opening ‘Gong ceremony’. In ringing the bell for gender equality, the ‘Gong Ceremony’ was held to express solidarity with the cause of promoting women inclusiveness and mainstreaming in the business world. The ‘Gong Ceremony’ was performed by Mr. Jamshed Kazi of UN Women, Ms. Rahat Kaunain Hassan of WOB Pakistan, Ms. Shazia Syed of Unilever Pakistan, Ms. Sabrina Dawood of Dawood Foundation, and Ms. Elin Burns, UK’s Deputy High Commissioner in Karachi. The leading women professionals, together with Mr. Jamshed Kazi, Mr. Muneer Kamal, Richard Morin and Aftab Ahmad, took turns to open the market with one Gong hit each, underscoring the objective of achieving a perfect gender balance in the economic, business, and commerce sectors of the country. The ‘Gong Ceremony’ is also a symbolic activity to pronounce the opening of the market on special occasions including as International Women’s Day. Each year, a large number of stock exchanges across the World ded-

icate a day for such events during the month of March to mark their solidarity for the cause of greater gender inclusiveness in the listed sector. PSX joins over 65 global stock exchanges who this International Women’s Day hosted a bell ringing ceremony to raise awareness of the pivotal role the private sector can play in advancing gender equality to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5. Addressing the ceremony, Ms.

Shazia Syed said that although leadership has no gender, women’s influence on the lives of every child makes it clear that they have a lasting impact in the emergence of leaders. She supported the agenda of women mainstreaming, stating that the ceremony serves to recognize the progress having made by our women corporate professionals.

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2018 World Employment Social Outlook trends for women on the current trends on women in the labour force. The report reveals that the past 20 years have witnessed some progress for women in the world of work, and in terms of gender equality in society. This report looks at the progress (or lack thereof) made during the past decade and assesses women’s la-

As part of the events leading up to this year’s International Women’s Day, the ILO took the lead in publishing its flagship World Employment Social Outlook, with a focus

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bour market prospects. The report is available at: http://www.ilo.org/ global/research/global-reports/ w e s o / t r e n d s - f o r- w o m e n 2 0 1 8 / WCMS_619577/lang--en/index. htm The highlights of the report are depicted in the graphics here:


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Change is necessary for rural women By Guy Ryder, Director-General, International Labour Office

Change is necessary and will benefit all.

As the world celebrates International Women’s Day, the ILO joins the UN system in placing the spotlight on rural women, a group often overlooked despite their enormous contributions to agricultural production and food security, and to the management of natural resources. Deep inequalities still persist and women continue to be left behind. Rural women make up over one-fourth of the world’s population and between 41 and 60 per cent of its agricultural workforce. They are farmers, wage earners and entrepreneurs. Women from indigenous and tribal communities are often custodians of traditional knowledge that is key for communities’ livelihoods, resilience and culture, as well as for strong climate action.

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Yet, rural women are more likely to be informal, low-wage workers without any social protection, and many work without pay for a family enterprise – and that means their work is largely unrecognized and undervalued. They also shoulder a disproportionate amount of unpaid care and household work. In addition, women’s presence in rural workers’ and employers’ organizations remains low, leaving them without voice and representation. They are at high risk of abuse, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based violence.

Rural women must not be overlooked in policy decisions that can drive empowerment and improvement: policies for productive employment with equal opportunities and treatment; policies to promote entrepreneurship; and policies that support affordable child and eldercare. Tackling legislative, social and cultural barriers to equal access to land, finance, technology and markets will go a long way to empower rural women. Employers’ and workers’ organizations can reach out to rural women so that through organization they gain increased voice and influence. Cooperative forms of organization also have a role to play. Social norms that render women more vulnerable to violence and harassment must be tackled with determination. At the same time this needs to be backed by effective legal and policy frameworks and enforcement mechanisms, which cover rural and agricultural workers. There will be an opportunity to pursue these issues at the International Labour Conference in June 2018 in the discussion on violence and harassment in the world of work, with the possible adoption of new international labour standards. It is more than time to redouble our efforts to bridge the gaps that deny rural women access to decent work.


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Less than 1% Pakistani women among overseas workers: ILO study fied, they could facilitate more job opportunities for women abroad.

While Pakistan’s immigration laws provide a level playing field to women and men, women participation in labour migration is still less than 1 per cent, pointing towards gaps in practices and procedures. The Overseas Employment Promoters expressed their willingness to explore more employment opportunities for women abroad. This was stated in a meeting of Experts organized by the ILO as part of a national study on ‘Women migrant workers from Pakistan: why there are so few’ in Islamabad. Dr. Hashim Popalzai, Federal Secretary, Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis and HRD, in a message read on his behalf by Mr. Kashif Noor, Managing Director Bureau of Emigration and Overseas Employment (BE&OE), said that Pakistan is the second largest labour exporting country in South-Asia – with major outflows to the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. However, women constitute only 0.21 per cent

of Pakistani migrant workers – despite that fact the there are no legal restrictions on women’s employment abroad. The Federal Secretary mentioned that his Ministry was working with the National Vocational and Technical Training Commission (NAVTTC) to explore avenues for women’s skills development and their overseas employment. Mr. Noor reaffirmed the Government’s commitment to promote legal and decent overseas employment opportunities for women. Mr. Aqeel Awan from Pakistan Overseas Employment Promoters Association (POEPA), in his remarks said that POEPA does not encourage women labour migration due to the unclear policy of the Government on the subject. He also mentioned that the procedural requirements for sending women for overseas employment were much more than those of men. However, he assured the meeting participants that if procedures were clarified and simpli-

The participants to the meeting drew consensus on the following issues: negotiating with high-income European Countries to encourage Pakistani women for jobs; highlighting the issue in the ‘Labour Emigration Policy’ currently being drafted by the Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis and Human Resource Development; fixing targets for increasing overseas employment for women; and promoting standard ‘contracts’ between overseas employers and Pakistani workers. It was mentioned that the Government should consider fixing minimum wages for the migrant workers in the Countries of Destination and engage Community Welfare Attachés in all countries to identify specific employment opportunities for women. The study is part of ILO’s ‘Global Action to Improve the Recruitment Framework of Labour Migration- REFRAME’ project, funded by the European Union. The aim is to improve the understanding and awareness of women’s labour migration from Pakistan and to better understand the various causes associated with these limited numbers. The study, based on desk research and interviews with relevant stakeholders and potential women migrant workers, will be completed by mid-May 2018 and will be broadly disseminated for general information and future actions.

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Achieving gender equality through collective bargaining

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, the ILO organized a session on ‘Women and Collective Bargaining’ under the overall theme of the day: ‘Time is Now: Urban and Rural Activists transforming lives of women’. Representatives of Government, employers, workers, academia, civil society, and development agencies attended the event. Addressing the audience, Ms. Atifa Raffat, Joint Secretary at the Ministry of Overseas Pakistanis and Human Resource Development stressed that Gender parity calls for a collective action from all stakeholders. Mr. Majyd Aziz, President, Employers Federation of Pakistan extended support and commitment to take tangible measures to achieve gender parity through gender balance leadership respecting and valuing gender differences and developing more inclusive and flexible work culture by routing out workplace biases.

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Ms. Zahida Parveen, Chairperson, Women’s Wing, Pakistan Workers’ Federation (PWF) and an activist of women’s rights, stressed on the need to recognize women as an equal productive workforce and to enable them to participate fully in economic activity by ensuring equal opportunity to employment and training; harassment free workplaces; career growth opportunities; active participation in trade unions and collective bargaining among others. Ms. Belinda Chanda, program Analyst, ILO shared statistics from the ‘2018 World Employment and Social Outlook: Trends for Women’. She highlighted the unlikelihood of women to participate in the labour market and the fact that in most parts of the world, women were more likely to be unemployed as factors that served to increase inequality between men and women. Ms. Chanda also highlighted labour market trends in Pakistan including the low Female

Labour Force Participation rate i.e. 24 per cent of the labour force (i.e. only 15 million out of 61 million workers are female); the persistent gender pay gap where, in Pakistan, women earn 60 per cent of the wages earned by men in most sectors, the high degree of informal work out of which 73 per cent of women in the labour force are engaged in unacceptable forms of work, widely known factors such as occupational segregation, violence at work and sexual harassment which impede productivity and progression of women as well as the gaps in coverage of female dominated sectors by labour laws, e.g. domestic workers, agricultural workers, home based workers; Mr. Fernando Fonseca, Senior Programme Officer, ILO/ITC highlighted the four key ILO Conventions that promote Gender Equality. Pakistan has ratified Convention 100 on discrimination and Convention 111 that sets out objectives of elimination of gender discrimination and promotion of the concept of ‘equal pay for work of equal value’. The presentation delved deeper into the benefits that employers and workers could reap from gender equality in the workplace. The ILO Country Office for Pakistan organized this commemorative event under the German funded Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains Project in Pakistan.


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Meet Batool, Balochistan’s first female Assistant Commissioner

Despite the volatile law and order situation in Balochistan, Batool Assadi – Balochistan’s first-ever female assistant commissioner – is fearlessly serving the people. “Being a woman from the Hazara community, I appeared in the Central Superior Services (CSS) examination in 2012 and stood 1st in Balochistan, and 21st overall in Pakistan. My husband always encouraged me to try my luck in civil services as he thought I had all the qualities to become a civil servant. After my first posting in Punjab, I chose to serve in Balochistan. People were initially reluctant to accept my orders as they were not used to a woman being in control.

A common response I would overhear to my requests was ‘you would not understand.’ I stayed principled and strict and things changed with time. Experience has shown me that change depends on how you deal with things. I always remained accessible to the general public. I never surrendered before references. For a woman, it takes time to create space but it depends on how you handle matters. I have seen that sometimes women create weaknesses for themselves. They try to run away from hard work and choose easy tasks.

more conducive to women so they can have access to and benefit from law enforcement mechanisms. Better infrastructure facilities such as the provision of daycare centers, separate washrooms, and sensitization of people involved in rule of law are vital to encourage women to access the justice sector. Despite having a few pro-women legislations, women are under-represented because the overall environment is discouraging. For example, there are complaint desks for women at the police stations but the environment there is not welcoming. The women who visit the police stations or courts are considered to be ‘bad’ women. Presence of women in the law and justice sector can bring about change. Whenever I am in the field, women approach me and discuss their issues with me. Only recently, a man in a remote area came up to me and said he had put his daughters in school so that they could grow up to be like me.”

The environment should be made

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Meet Farzana…a female lawyer’s tale of courage: fighting the odds in Balochistan’s male-dominated legal profession

“I always saw women being robbed of their voices whenever they tried speaking for their rights, so I came into this profession wanting to give them back their voice and rights. My father, a teacher, wanted me to teach too. He stopped me from studying law as he thought that the court environment, police offices and prisons weren’t places fit for women. But seeing my passion and devotion in advocating for women’s rights finally convinced him that law was the field for me. I was married off at the age of 21. Contrary to my fears of having my passion for law cut short after marriage, my husband was supportive and didn’t stop me from pursuing my education. Unfortunately my

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husband died and I was left to raise our two children single-handedly. I did everything on my own – picking and dropping children to school, fighting cases in court, going to the law chamber, sending children to tuition and cooking food. Besides raising my children and earning a living, I am working hard to break into Balochistan’s predominantly male profession. Female lawyers are not considered hardworking and are expected to drop out early on, due to the pressures of work and gender bias. In law colleges out of 100 law students, 15 are female, of which only 5 or 6 will progress and practice law. There are certain ‘taboo’ cases which male lawyers feel embarrassed to talk about to a female lawyer. This happened to me when I was fighting a case of a minor who was raped: the defense lawyer requested I handover the case to a male lawyer as my colleague felt embarrassed arguing about this case in front of me, a woman. It is a common perception amongst people that women cannot handle tough cases, as they are already too busy running their households, or raising children. Female lawyers are offered Rs. 5,000 for any such cases while male lawyers are paid Rs. 50,000. There is nothing that can be done - only a change in perception can help dispel these notions

that restrict a woman’s growth in this profession. We need more women in services that enhance women’s access to justice. There is not a single female Investigation Officer in Balochistan, leaving male police officers to handle cases registered by women. This leaves female victims hesitant to report incidents and crimes against them and they choose to stay silent for the sanctity of their honor. This is the reason why we are unable to control the crime rate and cases of violence against women till now. Similarly, in courts, we have only eight family judges in Balochistan – many cases are queued up due to lack of family judges who can ensure a quick disposal of cases. More and more women should join this field – we need to smash all the stereotypes that hold us back, and need to bounce back as warriors, enablers and justice providers.”


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Meet Rubina…making Women Crisis Centres a place of refuge for women in distress

“I assumed the charge of the center in the year 2010. Before that, I was the Manager of Khuzdar’s WCC. Since its establishment in Quetta in 2005, the WCC has provided relief to 3,018 women. WCC is not a shelter and only provides temporary medical, psychological and legal help. The majority of the cases received here are linked to domestic violence. I belong to the Zehri tribe, and was lucky to have studied in schools established by my family elders. Being interested in academia, I was sent to my maternal grandmother in Khuzdar to complete my studies, including a Masters in Social Sciences. I worked extensively with the community under different projects.

It was my father’s support, which enabled me to make progress despite negative pressure from other family members. When the WCC was established in Khuzdar, I joined as the Manager. Most of the cases that I resolved were through negotiations. I believe Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) mechanisms do not work in favor of women since every decision is taken by the male village elders. When Government departments are not sensitive towards women, how can we expect ADR to be gender-sensitive? I have observed a change in the environment. More and more women are approaching the Government departments - by visiting their of-

fices or through helplines - for protection and justice. Now is the time to make these institutions more efficient and resourceful. Our WCCs do not provide shelter to victims due to lack of resources. Those who arrive here are provided medical services and they are then presented before the court, following which they are shifted to Dar-ulAmans where they can stay for as long as needed. Simpler procedures of accessing legal aid and counseling along with additional facilities should be introduced. Women who come here for help get disappointed when they come to know about the procedures. If proper funds are provided for basic facilities such as security, doctor, and food, women victims could be provided shelter in the Quetta WCC as is the case in Islamabad and Lahore. It is important to provide women in distress the kind of facility where they can stay as long as they need to and also learn employable skills. Despite these challenges, I remain hopeful – as we aim to make the Centres a place of refuge for women in distress.”

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Khadija Tul Kubra Award Khadija Tul Kubra Award on prodigious contribution for empowerment of women with disabilities in Pakistan

Women with disabilities are Pakistan’s largest overlooked minority. Accurate statistics for the number of people with disabilities living in Pakistan are not available and estimates vary from 3.3m to 27m. Data for women with disabilities is even more limited. A 2012 research report gave a total of 2,092,439 in Pakistan. Many live-in poverty and suffer discrimination, exclusion, inequality and prejudice. This calls for the need for a conducive environment based on strong legal steps taken towards elimination of gender discrimination through participation of women with disabilities in the process. Women Parliamentary Caucus and STEP embarked on the idea to acknowledge the significant contribution of women with disabilities, and of those who have been instrumental to support women with disabilities in their struggle for rights. The Embassy of the United States in

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Pakistan extended support to execute this initiative through the Public Affair Section Grant and UN Women also joined as strategic partner. The award distribution ceremony was supported by Trócaire under its Gender Program, funded by The Australian Government and Mobility International USA. The Khadija-Tul-Kubra award was named after the wife of the Prophet, whose courage, righteousness, and perfection in all relationships made her a role model for all women, and a successful businesswoman. The Award recognizes and honors the achievements and contributions of Women with Disabilities that provide support, leadership, advocacy, service and education to increase the social, economic and civic participation of disabled women. To acknowledge the tireless efforts in promoting inclusion and defending human rights, this is the time to reflect on progress made, to call for change, and to celebrate women’s achieve-

ments. Welcoming guests, Ms. Shaista Parvez Malik MNA and Secretary of WPC said that The Pakistan Rights of Persons with Disabilities Bill, 2017 was introduced in the assembly on 16 January 2018. She added her confidence that the bill to protect the rights of persons with disabilities will become a law soon, and that persons with disabilities in Pakistan will be able to live in equality, having access to education, employment, and every other right. She also said that the award had been introduced to develop the capacity to identify and address relevant gender perspectives in all areas of work, at both normative and operational levels. Gender perspectives are being incorporated into the planning, budgeting and reporting processes.


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Gender equality in public administration launched New research shows major efforts are required to enhance women’s representation in Pakistan’s civil service UNDP and UN Women jointly released a study of women’s representation and access to decision-making roles in the civil service under UNDP’s global Gender Equality in Public Administration (GEPA) initiative at a launch event today. The study found that there are still societal barriers to women’s representation and advancement in the civil service. The recommendations will support the Government of Pakistan and its development partners in forming evidence-based programming to address barriers to gender equality in public administration. The case study found that while civil service promotions are based on years in service, gender stereotyping and social norms affect civil service postings and women tend to be concentrated at entry-level positions. It also found that women in Pakistan face entrenched societal attitudes, and that a multi-faceted approach that accounts for socioeconomic realities must be devised in order to increase women’s access to decision-making positions in public administration. Naoko Takasu, Deputy Country Director, UNDP Pakistan remarked on how commendable it was that women’s labour force participation in Pakistan has increased by 50 per cent in the past 15 years. He noted however, that only one in four women currently participate in the labour force, meaning that there is a vast treasure of talent, which remains

at the moment unutilized. Enhancing women’s role in leadership and decision-making will thus have an immense impact on gender equality and on Pakistan’s successful achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. UN Women Country Representative Jamshed Kazi said in taking forward the Beijing Platform of Action, Pakistan is committed to achieving 30 per cent representation of women in leadership positions. To enhance women’s access to decision-making in public administration, the case study recommends capacity building to achieve gender mainstreaming in government institutions through gender responsive budgeting; and the establishment of a supportive environment for women in the civil service by fostering women’s networks and South-South engagement. The Gender Equality in Public Administration Pakistan Case Study 2017 is one of 15 in-depth case studies conducted around the world with UNDP

support. The Pakistan case study was conducted using a new methodology developed in collaboration with the OECD and explores the development of women’s representation and access to decision-making roles in the civil service, surveys women’s perceptions of barriers and opportunities, and proposes policy and programmatic interventions. The case study launch event was attended by the UN Resident Coordinator Neil Buhne, UNDP Deputy Country Director Naoko Takasu, UN Women Country Representative Jamshed Kazi, Chair of the National Commission on the Status of Women, Khawar Mumtaz, Director Programmes Federal Judicial Academy, Huma Chughtai and Director Bureau of Statistics, Rabia Awan, and featured a panel discussion on ‘Addressing Impediments to promote Gender Equality in Public Administration’.

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Bridging the gender divide with more opportunities for women in the ICT sector

In today’s advanced world, it is imperative to empower youth with digital skills and make them self-sufficient. Providing equal opportunities and bridging the gender gap is the way to go. On International Girls in Information Communications Technology (ICT) Day, UN Women and the Universal Service Fund signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) to work together towards the employment of women and girls who were trained under the Ministry of IT’s ICT for Girls programme. Addressing the ‘Meet the Girls Who Code’ event organized by the Ministry of Information Technology and Telecommunication at the PM Office, the Prime Minister, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, said he believes that Pakistani women had the potential to deliver their best if provided a level-playing platform. The programme is devised to impart digital skills to over 30,000 women, who were part of the Pakistan Bait

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ul Maal training programme and 110,000 from the ICT school programme. He appreciated the role of Ministry of Information Technology in reaching out to the far-off areas of the country and to connect those with the cyber world. The prime minister said the government was giving women an opportunity with the belief that they would rise and shine. He said that the programme needed to be expanded and urged upon the provinces to follow the suit by learning from the experiences in the education sector. Minister of State for Information Technology, Anusha Rahman, said the programme had enabled the girls to learn computer skills resulting in their mainstreaming in various jobs. She mentioned that the girls received training in coding, computing, and coaching at the 144 facilities set up in the country. Beneficiaries of the project – girl stu-

dents – also shared their experience during the event and thanked the prime minister and the minister for IT and Telecom for their efforts in making their lives better and giving them a bright future. She thanked the Universal Service Fund (USF), Microsoft, UN Women and Huawei for being exceptionally supportive partners in the programme to bridge the gender digital divide, which is paving the way for socio-economic uplift of the very important segment of the society. UN Women and the Universal Service Fund signed a Letter of Intent to work together towards the employment of women and girls who were trained under the Ministry of IT’s ICT for Girls programme.


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The power of radio and volunteerism continues to transform women’s lives in remote localities of Balochistan The UN Women and United Nations Volunteers commemorated International Women’s Day by acknowledging the ‘Power of Radio and the Spirit of Volunteerism’ in Quetta, Balochistan. During the event, inspirational stories were shared from volunteers of the joint UN project on Community-Focused Radio. Sohail Khattak, Station Director of Radio Pakistan highlighted the importance of women in the field of media and particularly radio and encouraged women to join such fields and platforms from where they can to raise their voices. He said, he believes every day should be women’s day, and that all women should come forward and join different professions as teachers, police officers, radio disc jockeys, doctors etc. Dr. Rasheeda Panezai, Head of Mahec Trust, said women-friendly facilities and infrastructures in institutions, courts, secretariat, and public spaces should be put in place so that women can feel comfortable accessing them. She added men should not only give respect to women who are in their homes, but they should also respect women in markets, public spaces or workplaces. Yasmin Lehri, Member of Provincial Assembly, Balochistan said it is undeniable that women face difficulties in proving themselves or getting their due acknowledgement, starting from homes – we need to admire and acknowledge daughters more than sons

because they struggle every day to break the barriers laid in their ways. She urged educated women to join government institutions so that they have a say in decision making, which

can then have a trickledown effect on women, both in urban and in rural areas who are unable to claim their rights. Volunteers, in sharing their inspirational stories, under the Community-Fo-

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cused Radio project, said: “Through the Community- Focused Radio, I got a chance to express myself beyond the bounds of my home. I felt like a valuable member of the society who could play an equally important role in development of the community. Today, I feel driven to stand up for women rights as I have realized the importance of having a voice” - Nighat Michael “Men and women together can work to improve the living conditions of communities. We need to realize how important women are for building a society. We have produced four radio programs to highlight the importance of women’s rights and their empowerment. And, I believe this is just the

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The focus of the event was on the success stories that came out of the Community-Focused Radio. The activities planned for the event focused heavily on community volunteers, especially female volunteers, and the difference that they have made along with the inspirational stories shared by women in the audience. The event began with a special song prepared by school children and was followed by a performance from a local theatre group who highlighted women’s rights to education and inheritance, and choice of profession. The event was attended by representatives from civil society, local government, Academia, community members, rural and urban activists, and

youth groups. Under the Community-Focused Radio Project launched in 2016, young women and men from marginalized communities are being empowered through content development (entertainment and education) and broadcasting programmes, and volunteerism. Through this project female volunteers and female members of the local communities have taken steps bringing change, to not only their families, but to their communities too.


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Empowerment of Garment Workers in Sialkot’ Muqadas, who couldn’t get an education herself, is now working to afford her siblings education

“If you call us the poorest of poor, it would not be wrong. After my father’s death, we spent days without eating proper food since there was no breadwinner in our family. My mother used to work as a maid in nearby houses, but due to her age and deteriorating health, she was compelled to leave her job. We are nine brother and sisters. My brother and sisters do nothing – it’s their age to study but we cannot afford to pay their education expenses. Even my sister and I had to drop out of school (after 8th grade) as we had no means of earning left. I started looking for job opportunities as soon as I dropped out of school. I got a job at a football factory but it

only paid me Rs. 4,000 a month. The work was very tiring for me, my hands and back would ache so bad. I would come home with a painful backache and swollen hands and feet. I was putting so much effort into my work only to earn 4,000 Rupees. This income couldn’t help me buy bread for even two times a day, couldn’t help me get an education for my siblings or buy clothes they wished to wear. So, I heard about the project ‘Empowerment of Women Garment Workers in Sialkot’, launched byUN Women Pakistan and implemented by Baidarie with the generous support of the Benetton Group. I saw it as a great opportunity to learn new skills and earn money that

would help improve the living conditions of my home. It’s been two months that I have started my training at RAH Associates – I have been appreciated by my instructors for my adept glove stitching. These two months, we were just getting training, but now we have got an order for gloves. I’m hopeful that my work will be appreciated. I am hopeful that the remuneration that I will be getting in return for my work i.e. Rs. 14,000 (approx. USD 120) will be enough to buy a meal for three times. I will also admit my siblings into school so that they can start studying and live a life where they can afford to fulfil their dreams. In addition to fair remuneration, we are provided with a pick and drop facility; a safe working environment where we feel protected as we are in our homes. During my childhood, I always dreamed to join the army as I was, and still am, very patriotic. But, my conditions didn’t allow me to pursue my dreams. Nevertheless, I am using my skills to contribute to the economy and reputation of Pakistan across the globe.

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focus on

A survivor of poverty and unemployment, Aleeza is now helping her father, financially and emotionally, in running the household. first time that female workers also have rights. If more of us are made aware of our rights, we can certainly protect ourselves and be respected at home and in the workplace. Participation in the project activities has definitely changed my life. My father now makes it a point to include me in discussing important family matters. In addition to financially helping my father, I will share some of my salary my marriage, and subsequently, for my sisters’ marriages, too.

“My father, for as long as I can remember, was working day and night for us, but still, his income was not sufficient to make our ends meet. My siblings are all younger than me – I made a promise to help my father in bringing home the bread. As I searched for job opportunities, I doubted myself because I had no work experience, but as they say, ‘when there is a will, there is a way.’ I started working as a trainee at a local clothing factory, with on-the-job training I learned different techniques – I think I was a fast learner. I was very excited to receive my first paycheck – earning Rs.12000 (approx. USD 120) per month was a dream come true. After the completion of my training, I was given several responsibilities which included looking after two departments (overlock and stitching). Throughout this journey, I have grown into a confident person, making my way up the ladder of success through

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hard work and dedication. People from my village used to say that the working environment in factories is not safe for women. The place where I work has been very welcoming to me - a woman who came in without skills. There has been a solution to every issue that women face. For example, traveling from home to the workplace has become easier with pick and drop facilities as part of employee benefits. Now I know that by law, I am entitled to different workplace benefits, such a Social Protection Coverage, Marriage Grant, Food Allowance, Employees Old Age Benefits, Death Grants, Pick and Drop facilities etc. Such benefits are very encouraging for women who like me, hesitate to come out of their homes, assuming that they might not be welcomed in the job market. This has been something new and refreshing for me. I realized for the

About the project: Aleeza Hafeez is a beneficiary under the project ‘Empowerment of Women Garment Workers in Sailkot’, launched by UN Women Pakistan with the support of Baidarie.


focus on

A young girl’s journey from being a maid to becoming an empowered worker more caring than sons. I don’t want my father to ever feel weak in the face of circumstances and societal norms that daughters can’t do any good. I am satisfied with the working conditions provided at the football factory. The transport facility makes it easier for us to travel, otherwise girls’ and women’s mobility is a big issue in our society. In the future, I can see myself occupying a senior post in this factory, someday. All I want to be in my life is a good daughter and I know my parents are proud of me.” “Watching my parents stress over financial matters everyday was a painful sight – paying rent for our house, paying bills or buying food were the biggest worries; education wasn’t on that list. My father works at a fruit market where he helps vendors in carrying fruit baskets, while my mother works as a maid. I used to accompany my mother as a maid to work in people’s houses. It made me feel bad whenever someone would ask me if I got an education ever in my life. Although I longed for education, I never pushed for it, knowing that my parents were working day and night just to feed us. We are six siblings, one brother and five sisters – my elder brother died as his appendix burst and no one treated him until we borrowed money from the houses where we used to work, but this didn’t help to save him. I, along with my sister, started working for a football factory when a team from Baidarie visited our

house and took us onboard to train us for football stitching under UN Women’s project ‘Empowerment of Women Garment Workers in Sialkot’. From earning nothing to earning Rs. 10,000 (approx. USD 100) we found a way to help our aging parents whose health and energies have withered with laborious work. Every month I look forward to receiving my salary just to hand it over to my parents and see their eyes glow with pride. We still can’t afford any luxuries but we are hopeful to pay our house rent on time as I can’t see my father getting insulted by the landlord anymore. My younger brother and sister are studying as well. I don’t want them to become domestic workers like myself, when they are supposed to be studying and enjoying the tenderness of this age. By being enabled to earn a living, I have realized that daughters are no less than sons – they are equally talented, hardworking and even 37


real lives: stories that inspire us

The time when I counted cash for my uncle!

In the early 1980s, in the beautiful Husseini village in Upper Hunza Valley, people in rural areas led a life of self-subsistence. They relied on the more developed southern area of the country for meeting most of their needs. It was also a time when almost 80 per cent of the local population lived below the poverty line. Villagers grew and ate their own food and milked their own cows, without a clue on how to use their resources to improve the quality of life for themselves and their children.The local climate was very suitable for cultivating potatoes but the quality of the seeds that were being used brought just enough produce for survival. Muzaffar Ud Din, Chief Executive Officer at the Agha Khan Rural Support Programme was a schoolboy then and describes the surprise his maternal uncle gave him one day when he returned from school. “Look, I have thirty thousand rupees!” His uncle had showed him the rupee

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notes with excitement. “Cash was a rare find in our village and my uncle didn’t know what to do with it,” recalls Muzaffar. Muzaffar’s uncle had sold his potatoes in the market and had earned the money. These potatoes had been grown using the seeds that FAO had provided to the communities. Almost 35 years ago, FAO had focused on horticulture, livestock and building capacity of Government institutions in the area. Research-based interventions that transformed traditional cropping patterns and helped farmers adopt innovative techniques and models were what FAO became known for at that time.The introduction of the better seed potato variety simply changed the lives of the people. FAO introduced good quality potato seeds, established storages but also helped farmers create market linkages to empower the farmers. Almost 50 percent of the population in Hus-

seini village was now holding cash in hand. It simply changed the way they lived. “After I had counted the cash for my uncle, he asked me and his sons to go buy new notebooks, books and stationery items. We were all so excited,” smiles Muzaffar. Potatoes remain a source of significant returns for the people in the area, but FAO helped reduce poverty by enabling people to earn extra income, which was then used on educating their children, while at the same time securing savings


real lives: stories that inspire us

WFP helps to tackle acute malnutrition Shafeena, a 32-year-old housewife resides in Village Akam Khel, Tehsil Mir Ali, North Waziristan Agency-FATA. She was in her early twenties when she got married, and now has six children. Her husband, Shafiq is a shopkeeper and can hardly afford the monthly expenses of his family. They have to struggle to make ends meet for their large family. During the second trimester of her seventh pregnancy, Shafeena was screened by a lady health visitor (LHV) during her routine checkup at Tehsil Headquarter Hospital Mir Ali. She was found to be acutely malnourished, with a 20.0 cm MUAC (Mid-Upper Arm Circumference), as per the CMAM programme protocol. As is the case with most women in her situation, Shafeena was found to be lacking basic know-how of proper dietary intake and had poor knowledge and practices relating to Maternal Infant and Young Child Nutrition (MIYCN). She had absolutely no information about early and exclusive breastfeeding practices, which are the core contributors in the development of malnutrition. Shafeena was enrolled in the World Food Programme (WFP) CMAM programme and was provided with locally produced LNS-Maamta on monthly basis (30 sachets every month). During her stay in the programme, she was also educated on maternal infant and young child nutrition practices, early initiation and excusive breastfeeding

practices, antenatal and postnatal checkups. She received treatment and remained in the programme for three months, obtaining specialized nutritious supplements. She was advised to regularly visit the nearest health facility and finally discharged as cured from the programme with a MUAC of 21.2 cm. Feeling restored and energized, Shafeena thanked the nutritional support provided to her, and affirmed her commitment to follow the healthy practices that she was taught. WFP is grateful for the landmark contribution by the Government of China for providing food and nutrition assistance to displaced people and returnee families in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and FATA.

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real lives: stories that inspire us

UNDP paving the way to better education in Balochistan Coping with poverty and marginalization has been a way of life for residents in the remote town of Bagan Baba, in Jaffarabad district, Balochistan province. Seven-yearold Shama, a resident of Bagan Baba has spent most of her days helping her family with household chores. With a multi-dimensional poverty headcount of 75 per cent in the Jaffarabad district of Balochistan province, Shama is amongst the fortunate few young girls who are supported by their families to attain a formal education. For as long as she could remember, Shama and her family led simple lives with just enough earnings to support their everyday expenses. Her family had lost many of their belongings in the 201011 floods. She often heard tales of the devastation caused by the floods from her parents and teachers. However, the only life she had ever known was one where floods had already destroyed the necessary infrastructure across the Balochistan province. The educational infrastructure in the region was particularly damaged; the school she attended was also destroyed. The school management barely had enough funds to keep the building running — they could not afford to provide furniture or any other teaching materials for the

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classrooms. Shama, along with most of the other children from her school, had to sit outside on rags — making it difficult for them to write and concentrate on their lessons. It was especially tricky during extreme weather conditions when the children had to sit on the ground during hot summers and harsh winters. In February 2018, Shama’s school was amongst the 375 schools in three districts of Balochistan that received additional assistance. Government Girls Middle School in Bagan Baba was provided furniture and educational kits including chairs and tables, blackboards, cupboards, and school bags under the China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in the Federally Ad-

ministered Tribal Areas (FATA) and Balochistan. This assistance made a drastic improvement in enhancing the state of the schools. Under the South-South agreement, the People’s Republic of China has provided US$4 million to support education in Pakistan’s Balochistan province and provide assistance to vulnerable families in FATA. This funding helped refurbish schools that were damaged by severe flooding in Balochistan during 2010–2011 and benefited 19,000 school children. The assistance has significantly reduced the challenges Shama and her schoolmates had to face every day.


real lives: stories that inspire us

Relief packages help vulnerable families get through the winter As a child, Zia-ul-Haq, now 34, contracted polio. In his remote village of Chota Bizote in Orakzai Agency of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), high quality medical care was difficult to access. Although he survived the terrible disease, Zia’s legs were paralyzed. Nevertheless, he was determined not to let his disability stop him from leading a fulfilling life. He married and soon became a proud father. In 2009, fighting between militants and security forces reached Orakzai Agency. Families fled their homes, seeking security and a means to keep earning livelihoods elsewhere in Pakistan. Zia’s disability made it even harder for him to find ways of getting by and supporting his young family. Thanks to his indomitable spirit, however, Zia soon found work, learning to ride a small ‘loader’ bicycle to transport cargo short distances in Peshawar, the nearest large city. Finally, in 2010, he returned to Chota Bizote, hoping that he could use this skill to earn a living. With four children under the age of 10, Zia was constantly on the lookout for cargo transport jobs. But insecurity had devastated livelihoods in FATA, leaving few opportunities in a sparsely populated area where distances are substantial and infrastructure is poor. Food was expensive and hard to come by, and even accessing the nearest market, Kalaya Bazaar, was difficult due to poor roads and perceived security threats.

With a relief package provided by UNDP in partnership with the Government of China, however, Zia and his family have been able to get through the winter months. This package, provided to vulnerable families returning home to FATA after their temporary displacement, includes essential household goods such as blankets and cooking pots, both of which are exorbitantly expensive or simply unavailable in Kalaya Bazaar. Zia says he is very thankful to the Government of China and UNDP for reaching out. In 2018, the United Nations Development Programme and the Government of China initiated a unique south-south cooperation, the US$ 4 million China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in FATA and Balochistan. Under

this project, relief packages are provided to 8,100 FATA families (56,700 people) who are returning home to areas that have been declared secure. The project is also funding the refurbishment of schools that were damaged by the 2010–2011 flooding in Balochistan, benefiting 19,000 school children in 375 schools.

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real lives: stories that inspire us

FATA’s women-headed households

At ten years of age, Rahat Khan has no memory of his home in the remote Orakzai Agency, in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), before it was swept by insecurity. In 2009 when he was only a toddler, the family was forced to leave their village. They fled their home and settled for two years in Peshawar, the capital of neighbouring Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province. In 2011 they were able to return to their village in Orakzai Agency but tragedy soon struck again. With the region’s fragile health services devastated by the fighting, Rahat’s father died after an illness. The family was left without a male head

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of the household – a crucial need in FATA’s heavily male-dominated society, where women are often barred from any public dealings. Today, Rahat’s mother supports her four children, undertaking domestic labour for wealthier households. She is determined to let her children have a good education, and that Rahat should study medicine and raise himself out of poverty. Every month, she scrapes together 100 rupees (USD 0.80) to pay the fees for a small private school that lacks electricity or furniture, in the hope that Rahat will receive a better education. For the rest, the family depends on whatever cash

or food their equally impoverished extended family can spare. In February 2018, Rahat and his family were identified as eligible for a UNDP-supported aid package intended for vulnerable families that had been displaced by insecurity in FATA. Provided under the China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in FATA and Balochistan, it includes basic humanitarian assistance and household goods to 8,100 vulnerable families.


real lives: stories that inspire us

Vulnerable displaced families helped to rebuild homes in FATA

Ashraf Khan, 60, had lived much of life in the village of Karay Deray in Orakzai Agency in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), where he had a small landholding that his hardworking young son farmed to support the family. Then, tragedy struck: Ashraf Khan’s son was killed. Old and bereft, the grieving father had to flee with his wife, daughter-in-law and two granddaughters to Hangu and find work as a wage labourer. But lack of education, old age and a fractured leg due to a road accident made it difficult to make ends meet. He learned that their home had been destroyed during the fighting. Today, even as peace returns to Orakzai and the family is able to go back home, he remains worried

about how they will rebuild their lives. Ashraf’s situation rendered him and his family eligible for assistance from the China South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund for the Recovery Project in FATA and Balochistan. This UNDP-supported initiative provides basic humanitarian assistance to 8,100 vulnerable families that were temporarily displaced by insecurity in FATA as they return to rebuild their homes. Ashraf is delighted that this assistance includes construction tools to help rebuild his home. Insecurity and remoteness mean that it is hard to procure quality construction materials and tools from the local markets in FATA. He is also relieved that the aid package fulfills basic needs, as he is con-

cerned about the availability of food supplies for his granddaughters in the markets. Under a unique south-south partnership, the People’s Republic of China has provided US$4 million to support vulnerable families in FATA and Pakistan’s Balochistan province. In addition to humanitarian assistance for 56,700 people affected by insecurity in FATA, the project is funding the refurbishment of schools that were damaged by the 2010–2011 flooding in Balochistan, benefiting 19,000 schoolchildren in 375 schools. The project was initiated in February 2018, and will continue for a period of four months.

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real lives: stories that inspire us

Brings girls back to school UNICEF/EU Supported Balochistan Basic Education Program

“I stopped going to school last year as there was no washroom, water or electricity in the one I used to attend,” says Sumaira, 12, a fourthgrade student at Government Girls Community Model School in the village of Rind Ali. “One day my friend brought me to this school. I loved it instantly. It had classrooms with beautiful wall paintings, a clean washroom and a big playground. I convinced my parents and although it was a bit far from my home, they enrolled me. I love coming to this school and have become a keen student.” The Government Girls Community Model School (GGCMS) is the only school in the Kachhi district that

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has classes up to eighth grade. The area is dominated by tribal leaders, who do not encourage girls’ education. The population of the district is largely poor and depends on cattle farming or daily wage labour. Rabia Kausar, who is the acting headmistress and also an activist for girls’ education says: “Some of the girls here belong to families that cannot afford buying shoes, uniforms or stationery. To ensure this, teachers contribute some money every month to support these children. We believe that education is a basic right and all children should have access to it.” Unfortunately, around 60-70 per cent of children in Balochistan in

the primary and secondary age group are reported to be out of school. More girls than boys are out of school: 78 and 63 per cent respectively. To improve the existing education system and provide children an impetus for quality learning, UNICEF with funding support from the European Union, initiated the Balochistan Basic Education Programme (BBEP), in 2016. Being implemented in 11 districts of the province, the programme is led by the Education Department, Balochistan. With guidance and in close collaboration with the Secondary Education Department, management


real lives: stories that inspire us

committees have been established at different levels to ensure schools are functioning well and children are provided education in a child-friendly environment. These committees include Parent-Teacher School Management Committees at the school level, Local Education Councils for several schools in a ‘school cluster’, and a District Education Group. Currently, 36 per cent of girls drop out of school in grades four and five in Balochistan. To reduce the number, teachers and students of all girls’ schools in the focus districts are being trained on menstrual hygiene management (MHM). Highly qualified trainers are conducting these sessions with BBEP support. Not only are the students taught proper management of menstruation but schools are also

provided MHM kits that have all the essential sanitary supplies. The trainings have been completed in 83 schools so far, and will be continued for the remaining schools in programme districts. “We have observed that since the time our students have received training on MHM, they are more confident and comfortable,” says Rabia Kausar, headmistress at GGCMS. BBEP has numerous examples from communities where rejuvenated schools have proven that good teachers and students can enroll, teach and retain children. Providing a safe and comfortable environment to children, especially to girls, not only helps them learn better, but also improves their chances of contributing to the well-being of society.

The initiative is playing a crucial role in strengthening the quality, performance and management of the education systems in Balochistan. Having impacted the lives of children, BBEP has received recognition at the highest level in the Secondary Education Department, Government of Balochistan.

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new faces

New UNICEF Representative, Aida Girma-Melaku presents her credentials to the Foreign Minister

The new UNICEF Representative in Pakistan, Ms. Aida Girma-Melaku, met the Foreign Minister, Khawaja Muhammad Asif, and presented her credentials. She has recently arrived in the country to assume charge of her office. The Foreign Minister welcomed Ms. Girma-Melaku and appreciated UNICEF’s continued support to Pakistan’s National Development Programme, especially in the context of improving social indicators pertaining to children and women in the country. The Minister, Khawaja Muhammad Asif, said that polio eradication, reduction in child mortality and addressing similar social issues are common priorities for the Government and UNICEF. He assured Ms. Girma-Melaku of all his support in

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UNICEF’s pursuit of its mandate in Pakistan. Ms. Girma-Melaku commended the Government of Pakistan on its efforts and achievements to-date in reducing maternal and child mortality. She emphasized the need to further strengthen routine immunization and improve access to basic health services, especially for marginalized communities in hard to reach areas. Referring to the tireless efforts of thousands of the frontline polio workers, Ms. Girma-Melaku praised the government-led Polio Eradication Initiative for edging towards a polio-free Pakistan. She appraised the Minister of UNICEF’s ongoing efforts to reduce neonatal mortality, which will also help sus-

tain the gains by the polio eradication programme. She mentioned that UNICEF’s support to the federal and provincial governments in enrolling out-of-school children has borne positive results but large number of school going age children still remain out of school. In the framework of the country’s UN Delivering as One Programme, Ms. Girma-Melaku will head a multi sectorial operation in education, health, nutrition, child protection, water and sanitation, as well as polio eradication. Ms. Girma-Melaku brings with her nearly 30 years of experience focusing on planning, leading and managing complex development and humanitarian assistance programmes. She joined UNICEF in 1991 and has since worked in various capacities. In addition to being UNICEF’s Representative in Uganda, Malawi and South Africa, Ms. Girma-Melaku also served as Deputy Representative of UNICEF in Mozambique and Somalia. Originally from Ethiopia, Ms. Girma-Melaku is a naturalized citizen of Italy. She holds a Master’s degree in Development Economics and a Certificate in Management and Financing of Health Programmes in Developing Countries from Harvard University, USA, amongst other qualifications.


new faces

Deputy FAO Representative joins the team in Islamabad

Mr. Farrukh Toirov, a Tajikistan national, joined the FAO Pakistan team in April as the Deputy FAO Representative in Pakistan. Born in January 1977 in Tajikistan, he holds a Postgraduate Diploma in International Economic Relations and a Master’s Degree in Social Research and Demography. He has close to 20 years of experience working in the humanitarian and development contexts with FAO, other UN agencies, NGOs, the World Bank and the private sector. He joined FAO in 2006 as a National Program Assistant in Tajikistan. He worked until 2012 as an Emergency Coordinator in Chechnya and in Kyrgyzstan. In the period

2012-2013 Mr. Toirov worked for the World Bank as Country Officer, and with the private sector back in Tajikistan. In 2014 he joined FAO again for one year as Operations Officer in Somalia, and has since then been the Emergency Coordinator in Ukraine until end March 2017. Food security, emergency preparedness, poverty reduction, self-employment, agricultural value chains, and promotion of small and medium scale farming are the programmatic areas he has worked on.

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news and events

signing of the

one programme (opiii)

UNITED NATIONS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK (UNSDF) 2018-2022

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news and events

The Government of Pakistan and the United Nations in Pakistan signed the UN Sustainable Development Framework (UNSDF), also known as the One Programme III (OP III) 2018-2022 in a ceremony held in the Economic Affairs Division, Islamabad. Secretary EAD and United Nations Resident Coordinator signed the document along with other UN agencies working in Pakistan. Syed Ghazanfar Abbas Jillani, Secretary of the Economic Affairs Division remarked that the signing was an important milestone for the Government of Pakistan as it reinforces 70 years of trusted partnership with the UN. Pakistan is amongst the first countries that adopted the SDGs as National Development Goals and one of the few countries that is investing its own resources to achieve the SDGs. He stated his confidence that the new 5-year programme will create impactful

results for the people of Pakistan. The 5-year partnership framework sets-out the direction of the UN’s support to the Government of Pakistan to achieve the 17 Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The UNSDF/OPIII outlines 10 key outcomes in areas in which the UN can leverage its strong comparative advantage in support of Pakistan’s commitment to the

one programme (opiii)

SDGs: inclusive and sustainable economic growth; decent work for all; improved health coverage and equitable WASH services; better nutrition; lasting food security and sustainable agriculture practices; greater resilience; quality education and learning; gender equality and dignity for all; strengthened governance; and more effective social protection. Strong partnerships and coun-

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news and events try-ownership are the twin pillars of the UNSDF/OPIII. The Programme is aligned both with the SDGs and the aspirations of Pakistan’s Vision 2025. Neil Buhne, UN Resident Coordinator said the programme commits the UN to greater inter-agency collaboration while working closer than ever with partners – federal, provincial and local governments, the private sector, civil society, donors and the international community – to deliver a more prosperous, inclusive and equitable future for the country.

Since 2009, the UN has contributed over $2.3 billion to support the Government of Pakistan to tackle its development challenges. This has benefitted millions of Pakistanis throughout the country.

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one programme (opiii)


news and events

children

Workshop on countering child abuse inaugurated in Islamabad A two-day national workshop on countering child abuse brought together key stakeholders from across the country to discuss and commit to a clear roadmap for the establishment of responsive and coordinated child protection systems. Hosted by the Government of Balochistan in collaboration with the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Inception Workshop on Child Protection Case Management and Referral System in Pakistan, was the first of its kind in the country. The inauguration session was chaired by the Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting, National History and Literary Heritage, Marriyum Aurangzeb, who is also the chairperson of the Parliamentary Special Committee on Child Abuse. Balochistan is the only province to have enacted child protection legislation completely aligned with the minimum standards set by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), a process that was technically supported by UNICEF. Likewise, the Government of Gilgit-Baltistan has recently approved a Child Protection Bill, fully aligned with the UNCRC. The other provinces are likely to follow suit given the political will and commitment exhibited by their respective governments to tackle this evil. The objective of the workshop as highlighted by the speakers was to support the creation and strengthening of a protective environment for children in Pakistan, primarily through adopting a

systems approach to tackle the issue and gain a common understanding of how the systems should operate. The speakers emphasized that Pakistan needs to break new ground and set itself as a regional leader in establishing a public coordinated child protection case management and referral system to prevent and respond to cases of child abuse. DFID is supporting the Government through technical assistance of UNICEF to strengthen public child protection service delivery particularly to protect children in the country from abuse. UNICEF Pakistan Country Office provides technical assistance to the Government of Pakistan with regard to its national and international obligations on child rights. The workshop marks a critical step forward in engaging technically with provincial governments on legislative reforms aimed at strengthening the right

of a child to protection, thus supporting establishment of child protection case management and referral systems to prevent and respond to child abuse. The workshop was attended by members of the Parliamentary Special Committee on Child Abuse, senior officials of the Federal Ombudsman’s Office and the Ministry of Human Rights as well as the members of the National Commission for Human Rights. Provincial parliamentarians from Balochistan and Gilgit-Baltistan, Secretaries of the Social Welfare Departments, members of the Child Protection Commission Balochistan including the relevant line ministries and the civil society also attended.

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news and events

climate change

Development experts discuss impacts of climate change on water resources

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and Pakistan convened a one-day seminar to exchange knowledge on innovative climate change adaptation and mitigation practices, which rural communities and smallholder farmers can adopt to increase production and improve household incomes. The role of South-South and Triangular Cooperation (SSTC) in furthering the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was also discussed. The seminar brought together experts and practitioners from IFAD, Pakistan and the international development community. In Pakistan, agriculture provides employment for approximately 25 million people. Over the last few decades, Pakistan has suffered from alternating cycles of extreme flooding in irrigated plains, and prolonged droughts in arid zones. Per capita

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water availability has fallen below 1,200 cubic meters and it is estimated that it will be halved by mid-century. Water security for both agriculture and domestic use is becoming critical, and climate resilience practices need to be transferred to the rural population urgently. Speakers at the event included Stephane Mousset, Director and Chief of Staff, Office of the President and the Vice-President, IFAD; Sikandar Hayat Khan Bosan, Minister for National Food Security and Research; Sartaj Aziz, Minister, Ministry of Planning Development and Reform; Arif Ahmed Khan, Secretary, Ministry of Finance; Marvi Memon, Minister of State and Chairperson, Benazir Income Support Programme; Khizar Hayat Khan, Secretary, Ministry of Climate Change; Khalid Mehboob, Independent Chairman of the Council, Food and

Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; Yusuf Zafar, Chairman, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council; and IFAD experts. The seminar’s focus on climate change impacts on water resources comes at a crucial time. In Pakistan, significant agricultural production and an increasing population place high demands on water resources. Approximately 90 per cent of the country’s water is used for agriculture, as stated by Hubert Boirard, IFAD’s Country Programme Manager for Pakistan. Pakistan’s rural development objectives are linked to strengthening the rural economy, improving the quality of life of rural populations and enhancing their living conditions. Provincial governments are committed to increasing agricultural productivity and food security, augmenting the supply of critical water resources, improving rural infrastructure, and delivering social amenities that meet community needs. IFAD has financed 27 rural development programmes and projects in Pakistan since 1978, with a total investment of $730 million, or $2.51 billion when co-funding from the Pakistan government and others are included in the total. These projects have directly benefitted more than 2.4 million rural households.


news and events

cultural heritage

UNESCO signs USD 2.8 million project with the Government of Punjab

A project agreement was signed by UNESCO and the Government of Punjab on 19 February, during an event in Lahore. With the financial support of the World Bank, under the Punjab Tourism for Economic Growth Project (PTEGP), UNESCO signed the component of the ‘Protection and Promotion of Cultural Heritage of Punjab for Sustainable Tourism and Economic Growth.’ This is an opportunity to promote Pakistan as a country where people of various religions and cultures can congregate to reminisce and relive their shared history. Sikhism, Buddhism, Islam and Hinduism all have spiritual significance grounded in Pakistan. According to a recent study conducted by the World Bank, it is estimated that Sikh and Buddhist tourism alone could yield PKR 20 billion per annum and have the ability to generate

40,000 jobs every year. In line with UNESCO’s mandate, the project aims at promoting the effective management of tourism to heritage of religious interests. The overall goal is to foster tolerance and peace by raising awareness and cultural respect for diversity, while implementing effective cultural heritage and tourism management policies and plans through institutional reform. In addition to creating site management plans, the project takes a community-centered approach within the framework of this project, through capacity-building of communities surrounding the sites, promoting respect for cultural diversity through education, and providing support to the current custodians of the sites through training- all the while, maintaining the sanctity and religious value of the sites through consultation with key stake-

holders in the religious communities. The chief guest Malik Nadeem Kamran, Minister for Planning and Development, expressed the government’s commitment to strategically reform the tourism sector of Punjab, providing state-of-the-art tourism services across the province in conjunction with the World Bank and UNESCO, while also mobilizing private investment in the tourism sector, specifically targeting heritage tourism to promote a pluralistic image of the country. Ms. Vibeke Jensen, Representative/ Director of UNESCO Pakistan said that the beauty of the project is the holistic approach it has adopted, which brings together the economic and livelihood dimensions with social cohesion objectives and the fostering of respect for cultural and religious diversity.

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news and events

disaster risk reduction

Disaster risk reduction can protect smallholder farmers, experts say

A cutting-edge report entitled ‘Risk management practices of small farmers: a feasibility study for introducing R4 - Rural Resilience Initiative in Punjab’ shows that with adequate investments in disaster risk reduction, smallholder farmers in Punjab could better withstand climate-related shocks. Calling for increased investments in this area, the report carried out by the Sustainable Development Policy Institute (SDPI) advocates for the Rural Resilience-building approach (R4), pioneered by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), OXFAM and the Punjab Social Protection Authority. Pakistan ranks amongst the top ten most climate-vulnerable countries globally, according to the Global Climate Risk Index. Natural disasters are increasing in frequency

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and intensity, and can have devastating and widespread impacts, as demonstrated by the 2010 floods that affected 20 million people. Understanding the potential impact of climate change on food and nutrition security, and the populations most likely to be affected by it, allows identifying what interventions need to be prioritized to help manage and mitigate the risks, said Finbarr Curran, WFP’s Country Director in Pakistan. Climate change poses severe risks to the agricultural sector, leaving farmers particularly exposed and vulnerable to climate risks. This is especially true for smallholder farmers, who face other challenges including unfavourable terms of trade, extension gaps and productivity challenges. An integrated risk management

model such as R4 can help build the resilience of smallholder farmers against multiple risks and eventually make their yields and livelihoods more secure, said Abid Qaiyum Suleri, Executive Director of the SDPI. The study assessed the viability of integrated risk management approaches, which could be used to enhance the resilience of smallholder farmers in Punjab. Looking at the relevance of WFP and Oxfam’s global R4 Rural Resilience Initiative, the study found the approach to be relevant to the Punjab context. In particular, strategies relating to risk reduction and risk transfer could significantly augment smallholders’ capacities to withstand shocks. The R4 Rural Resilience Initiative is a strategic partnership between the United Nations World Food Programme and Oxfam America to enable the vulnerable rural households to increase their food and income security in the context of increasing climate risks. The Initiative is built on an innovative model that combines four risk management strategies: disaster risk reduction, micro insurance, access to credit, and savings.


news and events

drugs and crime

MoU Signing between WWF-Pakistan and UNODC to check illegal wildlife trade

WWF-Pakistan and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to work together through innovative means to curb illegal wildlife trade in Pakistan. The collaboration will enhance capacities of relevant law enforcement agencies in particular Pakistan Customs, and train them about the key aspects of illegal wildlife trafficking in order to enhance vigilance. Both organizations will also launch joint campaigns to raise awareness on this issue. Rab Nawaz, Senior Director, WWF-Pakistan said that illegal wildlife trade is a persistent conservation challenge that could be managed through collaborative efforts. The illegal wildlife trade is recognized as transnational organized crime due to its lucrative nature and organized criminal networks. According to him, this partnership with UNODC would set a benchmark to address the wildlife trafficking issue in the country and further strengthen the efforts

to support capacity building of trade monitoring and regulating authorities. WWF-Pakistan has recently initiated a snow leopard conservation initiative focusing on adoption of a zero-poaching framework to protect the species from poaching and illegal trade. This would include piloting of Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART), a technology-based approach to support effective conservation of the species. Speaking on the occasion, Mr. Cesar Guedes, Representative UNODC said wildlife crime destabilizes ecosystems and, alongside habitat destruction, poses a grave threat to endangered wildlife. Illegal wildlife trade is not solely an environmental injustice, but also undermines state authority, fuels violent conflict and terrorism, impacts national and global security and socioeconomic development. Estimated to generate US$20 billion annually, illegal wildlife trade is one of the largest global illegal activities. The partnership is well aligned with

the objectives of the National Plan of Action developed by WWF-Pakistan in collaboration with the Ministry of Climate Change and the involvement of relevant stakeholders. The Action Plan provides a roadmap to combat illegal wildlife trade in Pakistan. WWF-Pakistan has a long history of working and addressing the issue of illegal wildlife trade. For the first time in Pakistan, the organization will initiate the first Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool (SMART), a technology-based system to protect wildlife from poaching and illegal trade in the country. The partnership between WWF-Pakistan and UNODC-WCO’s Container Control Programme (CCP) aims to strengthen collaboration for effective management of illegal wildlife trade through effective coordination, knowledge and information sharing, and institutional capacity building, of the relevant law-enforcement agencies in Pakistan.

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news and events

drugs and crime

A proactive approach to counter terrorism

UNDOC in collaboration with the National Counter Terrorism Authority (NACTA) and with the support of the European Union organised the second ‘Workshop on Proactive Approach to Counter Terrorism’ from 11 to 13 April at the Marriott hotel, Islamabad. The Workshop brought together 25 participants from provincial and federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies to discuss and deliberate upon approaches for developing a mechanism on national threat levels and assessment to effectively counter terrorism. On the first day, Mr. Mohsin Hassan Butt, Member Counter Terrorism and Counter Extremism from NACTA and Mr. Arslan Malik, Associate Program Coordinator, Pakistan Action to Counter Terrorism (PACT) Project at UNODC welcomed the participants and delivered presentations on their organization’s role and mandate in countering terrorism.

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Later in the day, Mr. Ommaney Chinyungurwa from Interpol presented Interpol’s global mandate, strategy and policing capabilities in addition to demonstrating the use of the I24/7 database, which is available to Member States to fight transnational organised crime and terrorism. At the end of the first day, participants visited the NACTA Secretariat, where they were briefed by Mr. Ihsan Ghani, National Coordinator on the recent initiatives and achievements of NACTA in countering terrorism and extremism in the country. On the second day, various threat assessment models of European countries were presented by Ms. Olivia Hyvrier. A model of Canada was presented by Mr. David Thorne, and a model of Sri Lanka was presented by Major General Rajaguru and Captain Ranaweera. The session was followed by a group exercise during which participants

reflected and deliberated upon a possible national threat assessment templates. Methodologies for different threat assessment products were also presented and discussed in an interactive session with the facilitators. On the third day, participants were divided into four groups for a practical exercise, and were tasked with developing a threat assessment report based on the prevailing security risks Pakistan faces from various national, regional and international terrorist organisations. During the closing session, UNODC Criminal Justice Advisor on behalf of the Country Representative Mr. Cesar Guedes reiterated UNODC’s strong commitment and support to NACTA in developing capacity of federal and provincial authorities in proactively identifying risks and security threats emanating from terrorist groups while contributing to strengthening the Government of Pakistan’s response to counter terrorism. The Chief Guest on the occasion, Mr. Ihsan Ghani, National Coordinator of NACTA, appreciated the contributions of the European Union and UNODC and assured continued work with international partners through such initiatives.


news and events

drugs and crime

Prime Minister of Islamic Republic of Pakistan appreciates UNODC’s support in countering terrorism

The National Counter Terrorism Authority (NACTA), Government of Pakistan, organized a three-day conference titled ‘Islamabad International Counter Terrorism Forum (IICTF-2018)’ on the theme of Pakistan’s Endeavors and Achievements in Countering Extremism and Terrorism (PEACE). This theme symbolized Pakistan’s long struggle to achieve peace in the nation after facing a multitude of challenges on national and international fronts. On the margins of this forum, an Expo was jointly organized by NACTA and UNODC to showcase the success of provinces and other federal stakeholders in eradicating

terrorism from the country. Pakistan’s Action to Counter Terrorism (PACT) is a three-year project jointly developed by the Government of Pakistan and the UNODC with the financial support of the European Union. Through the implementation of PACT, it aims to enhance the knowledge and skills of criminal justice practitioners and promote use of forensic evidence in terrorism cases, while strengthening coordination and information sharing between federal and provincial authorities to proactively counter terrorism. During the last day of the Expo, the honorable Prime Minister of the Is-

lamic Republic of Pakistan Shahid Khaqan Abbasi and the Minister of the Interior Mr. Ahsan Iqbal visited the UNODC booth and were briefed by staff members on the key objectives of the project. They appreciated the support delivered to law enforcement and criminal justice agencies by UNODC and the European Union.

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news and events

drugs and crime

Finding regional solutions to global challenges of illicit narcotics trafficking

A high-level Pakistan delegation with a new leadership of the Ministry of Narcotics Control (MNC) and Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) attended the 61st Session of the Commission on Narcotics Drugs (CND). The delegation was headed by Mr. Iqbal Mehmood, Secretary MNC and Director General, Major General Musarrat Nawaz Malik, Hilal-i-Imtiaz, along with other senior members form MNC and ANF. A special side event at the Commission entitled ‘Regional Solutions to Global Challenges of Illicit Narcotics Trafficking’ was hosted by the Government of Pakistan. Lt. Col. Shakeel, Joint Director HQ ANF moderated the event; Mr. Iqbal Mehmood, Secretary Ministry of Narcotics Control, Government of Pakistan, chaired and welcomed the guests. He thanked the participants, and stated it was an impor-

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tant opportunity for the international community to learn more about the challenges Pakistan is facing in illicit narcotics trafficking, and how successful the country’s response to this global problem has been. Mr. Cesar Guedes, Representative UNODC Country Office Pakistan, said that UNODC and Pakistan have a very long and collaborative partnership spanning over four decades. The agency has always been in the forefront in supporting Pakistan and its hardworking law enforcement agencies in discharging their responsibilities with knowledge and equipment. Syed Sijjeel Haider, Joint Director International Cooperation ANF, Pakistan, presented an overview of Pakistan’s response. He also discussed all the factors that are affecting the drug situation. The international intel-

ligence-led coordinated operations from 2016 to 2018 were highlighted along with the assistance that Pakistan has provided to international partners during 2017. A way forward was also given to the audience. After the question and answer session, Major General Musarrat Nawaz Malik HI(M), Director General ANF, Pakistan concluded the event and thanked the delegates and representatives from various international organizations who attended. He also said that Pakistan is committed to curb the menace of drugs and has a zero-tolerance policy against drug trafficking and narcotics.


news and events

drugs and crime

UNODC Goodwill Ambassador promises positive change in the fight against narcotics

The Ministry of Narcotics Control (MNC) in collaboration with UNODC Country Office Pakistan organized a three-day workshop in Islamabad at the start of this year, as a follow-up on the implementation of the recommendations of the General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the world drug problem. The workshop was well attended by a wide range of participants including different Ministries, health, home and provincial departments, and law enforcement agencies. The highlight of the workshop was the participation of UNODC Pakistan’s National Goodwill Ambassador Mr. Shehzad Roy, who showed a keen interest in understanding and assisting in the solution of the problem.

After the successful conclusion of the workshop, the Government of Pakistan decided to showcase the best practices of UNGASS Implementation in Pakistan at the 61st session of the Commission on Narcotics Drugs (CND). The event was moderated by Lt. Col Shakeel, Joint Director Anti-Narcotics Force.Mr. Cesar Guedes, Representative UNODC Pakistan said Mr. Shehzad Roy’s inclusion as Goodwill Ambassador will add to UNODC’s visibility in mobilizing support to drug demand reduction, prevention and treatment, illicit drug trafficking, prison and police reforms, and advocating for gender-responsive services for drug dependents. Mr. Iqbal Mehmood, Secretary Ministry of Narcotics Control said Pakistan has

played a key role in the preparations for UNGASS, and is now actively contributing to the implementation of the document at the international level. The floor was then given to Mr. Shehzad Roy, who is also a Pakistani singer, social worker and humanitarian, and who had already created a sensation at the CND. He said that while attending the UNGASS workshop in Pakistan he became aware of the country’s drug related issues and decided he wants to make a solid difference and bring change. He said his ultimate effort would be to bring drug-related issues under the health umbrella, and catalyze a paradigm shift in policy. Syed Sijjeel Haider, Joint Director International Cooperation Anti-Narcotics Force, Pakistan gave a comprehensive presentation on UNGASS Implementation in Pakistan and gave inputs on the seven thematic chapters of the UNGASS outcome document, which was adopted by the General Assembly at its special session on 19 April 2016. The Government of Pakistan also presented the action taken and a roadmap for further implementation of the UNGASS outcome document. An active question and answer session allowed delegates and representatives from civil society to discuss drug-related issues and ask about best practices in Pakistan. Major General Musarrat Nawaz Malik HI(M), Director General Anti-Narcotics Force, Pakistan concluded the event.

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news and events

drugs and crime

Railway Police committed to curbing human trafficking and migrant smuggling in Pakistan

UNODC in partnership with Pakistan Railways Police conducted a sensitization session at Lahore. This is part of a series of sensitization workshops to raise the awareness level of Police officials regarding Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants. Sixty Police officials from across the country participated in the session along with senior officials of the Pakistan Railways Police, who benefited from target training, as the railway is the most common means of carrying victims of human trafficking, to then sell them to placement agencies and other buyers. The session aimed at educating officers about the issues of trafficking, particularly its adverse impact on human beings, its prevention and eradication, highlighting the role of the Pakistan Railways Police in this effort. One of the most important factors is the protection of victims. The Railways Police is already working to assist the citizens through its help centers, where assistance and protection services are provided es-

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pecially to unaccompanied children and women. This will further lead to identification of the trafficking victims and extend right assistance to prospective victims. The session was chaired by Dr. Mujeeb-ur-Rehman Khan, Inspector General Pakistan Railways Police, along with Deputy Inspector General Mr. Jawad Ahmed Dogar, Deputy Inspector General Mr. Shariq Jamal Khan, and Deputy Inspector General Mr. Naeem Ahmed. Deputy Inspector General Mr. Shariq Jamal Khan welcomed all the participants from the Pakistan Railways Police and highlighted the importance of curbing the issues related to Trafficking in Persons and Smuggling of Migrants. Mr. Ehsan Gilani from UNODC delivered a session on basic concepts of Trafficking in Persons and Migrants Smuggling while providing an insight on the United Nations Convention on Transnational Organized Crime and its supplementary protocols on the matter. He further shared the latest

trends and routes originating from Pakistan to Europe. Deputy Inspector General Mr. Jawad Ahmed Dogar highlighted the role of Police in combating the menace in a presentation. He added that sensitization among the Railways Police is necessary to combat trafficking. Inspector General of Police Dr. Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman Khan appreciated the efforts of UNODC and stressed the need for sensitization and coordination amongst relevant Law Enforcement Agencies. Two sessions were also delivered by young officers of Pakistan Railways Police along with a session by UNODC Consultant Mr. Asif Jah on raising the awareness level of the community and other relevant stakeholders. All the senior officials and participants agreed that the issue needs a proactive approach, which can only be adopted with an aggressive awareness campaign at all tiers of the social strata.


news and events

drugs and crime

Case Management and Monitoring System in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa inaugurated

UNODC in partnership with the Prosecution Department of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and with support from the European Union, inaugurated a Case Management and Monitoring System (CMMS) designed for the Prosecution Department of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) under Pakistan’s Action to Counter Terrorism (PACT) Project. Mr. Muhammad Azam Khan, Chief Secretary KP, presided over the ceremony as the Chief Guest along with Mr. Jean-François Cautain, Ambassador of the European Union to Pakistan and Mr. Cesar Guedes, Representative UNODC. Mr. Jaffar Khan, Director General CT NACTA; Mr. Ikram Ullah Khan, Home Secretary KP; and Mr. Adnan Zafar, Director General Prosecution Services KP, also attended the inauguration ceremony to deliver brief remarks on this initiative. Mr. Jaffar Khan commended UNODC’s efforts to bring together a dedicated team of experts to design and implement various capacity-building initiatives, and thanked the European Union for its support to the Government of

Pakistan in its counter-terrorism drive. Mr. Azam Khan appreciated the support being delivered to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa under Pakistan’s Action to Counter Terrorism Project by UNODC and the European Union. He also mentioned that by having a Case Management and Monitoring System in place, Prosecutors would be able to complete their tasks more effectively. Mr. Jean-Francois Cautain said this initiative was a great example of co-operation, which has led to the creation of a necessary tool for prosecution. By using this tool, the prosecutors will be able to do their work more efficiently which will lead to a more secure environment for Khyber Pakhtunkhwa’s public. During his keynote address, Mr. Cesar Guedes explained how UNODC has facilitated key meetings between provincial stakeholders and the developers of CMMS from October 2017 to March 2018 and how this launch is a result of a strong public-private partnership. He further stated that the CMMS is an excellent example of how the Criminal Justice Sector in Pakistan could benefit

from innovative solutions from the private sector. As a symbolic gesture to mark the inauguration of CMMS, Chief Secretary Mr. Khan logged into the system using his own credentials in presence of all the participants, before giving away Mementos as a token of appreciation.

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news and events

drugs and crime

Improving police prosecutors’ cooperation in criminal cases Prosecution is one of the main planks in the criminal justice system. It begins with the First Information Report (FIR) and rests until the culmination of the issue. During the phases of the investigation, prosecution is there to give its opinion, and workout the game plan with that of the investigating agency. After the completion of investigation, the prosecution must scrutinize the cases to make the appropriate prosecutorial decisions. Similarly, during trial the prosecutor assists the court to arrive at an appropriate conclusion of the issue. Over the course of the past year, UNODC Office in Pakistan (COPAK) has developed a programme of assistance in the area of police and prosecution services under its Country Programme II (CPII) for Pakistan 2016-2019 in consultation with the Government of Pakistan (GoP). UNODC COPAK is currently implementing several components, particularly in the areas of police and prosecution cooperation in Pakistan. For this purpose, UNODC COPAK conducted a training session on Police Prosecutors Cooperation on 16-20 March 2018, targeting prosecutors and investigation officers in collaboration with the Prosecution Department of Balochistan. The purpose of this training was to understand the roles and responsibilities of prosecutors and investigation officers before, during and after the investi-

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gation of a criminal offense and their cooperation throughout the process. On the closing day, the Prosecutor General of Balochistan Mr. Ameer Zaman Jogezai appreciated the support being provided by UNODC COPAK during the past six years. He stated that police and prosecution are very important actors in the criminal justice chain, and that their cooperation is crucial for the administration of justice. The training is one of a series of targeted training sessions

being conducted by UNODC COPAK for the police and prosecutors of Balochistan. UNODC COPAK will continue to support these actors of the criminal justice system in the future, as well build on the training that took place so far.


education

news and events

/ literacy

Education Sub-Sector consultation on SDG-4 held in Islamabad

A consultation to discuss findings of the national SDG-4 synthesis report was attended by over 70 education officials and representatives from Higher Education, Literacy and Non-formal Education, Special Education and TVET from provinces and areas, civil society organizations and academia. The participants took part in the daylong deliberations and group work, and provided inputs for inclusion of sub-sector priorities in the national SDG-4 synthesis report. Ms. Vibeke Jensen, UNESCO Representative, appreciated the role of the Ministry of Federal Education and Professional Training in spearheading the SDG-4 consultations in Pakistan and in finalizing the draft national synthesis report on the SDG-4. She highlighted that education is at the heart of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and is essential for achieving all the SDGs. She emphasized the importance of tar-

get 4.7 of the SDG-4, which relates to the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes that the education system needs to promote. She highlighted the need for its inclusion in sub-sector policies and plans. Mr. Akbar Hussain Durrani, Secretary Ministry of Federal Education and Professional Training stated that the SDG-4 agenda is fully in sync with Pakistan’s national development agenda. He acknowledged the importance of education sub-sectors in contributing to the achievement of SDG-4 targets and stressed the need for making sub-sector policies and plans fully reflective of the SDG-4 imperatives. He encouraged the participants to review the national synthesis report and provide maximum feedback for its finalization from the sub-sectors perspective. Highlighting the role of civil society organizations in Pakistan, the Secretary proposed to transmit the SDG-4 agenda as

part of their vision, plan and strategy. Concluding his remarks, the Secretary expressed the importance for financing SDG-4 and defining timeline for achieving its each of the seven targets. Muhammad Rafique Tahir, Joint Educational Advisor, Ministry of Federal Education and Professional Training presented the national perspective on SDG-4 and provided a holistic view of the process adopted for integrating SDG-4 in provincial and area specific education sector plans. He shared that after integrating feedback from the education sub-sector, the synthesis report will be presented to the Inter Provincial Education Ministers Conference (IPEMC) for review and endorsement. The report will guide implementation of the SDG-4 agenda at provincial and area levels.

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news and events

education

/ literacy

Republic of Korea supports UNESCO’s programme for girls’ education in Pakistan The Republic of Korea supported UNESCO’s Girls’ Right to Education Programme in Pakistan, with the signing of an agreement between UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay and the country’s Ambassador and Permanent Delegate to UNESCO, Mr. Lee Byong-hyun, on 23 March 2017. The USD 3.4 million project with the Korea International Cooperation Agency will support national capacity building to realize girls’ right to education in Pakistan’s Punjab province and Gilgit-Baltistan, through interventions targeting education officials, community leaders, teachers and parents. UNESCO’s Director-General stated the Republic of Korea’s growing support to the organization, especially to education, is extremely valuable and a proof of trust, and was deeply appreciated. She added that the success story is not only about economic development, but also shows the links between education and building a culture of peace, coherent with the values of UNESCO. Ambassador Lee recalled the role that foreign assistance and education had played in recovery after the Korean War. The breadth of cooperation with UNESCO, reflected in some 30 projects underway in education, science and culture, exemplifies the country’s policy to return what it received from the foreign community in

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the past and to accompany human development. The Ambassador and Permanent Delegate of Pakistan to UNESCO, Mr. Moin ul Haque, expressed his appreciation for the generous support, affirming that girls in Pakistan are passionate about education, for example, Malala is an icon and a symbol of the fight for girls’ education. The Government of Pakistan contributed USD 10 million to the Malala Fund for Girls’ Right to Education established in 2012, of which USD 7 million are earmarked for the Girls’ Right to Education programme in Pakistan, launched in 2015 to increase and improve the quality of girls’ education at primary level in four provinces and four federal areas.


news and events

food security

40 years of dynamic teamwork By Minà Dowlatchahi, FAO Representative in Pakistan

This year FAO completes 40 years of its operations in Pakistan. The establishment of our Representation office in Pakistan in 1978 presented an opportunity for FAO and the Government of Pakistan to strengthen their relationship, working together in agricultural and rural development, in modernizing the agriculture sector and achieving food Security and Nutrition in Pakistan. We are happy that this opportunity was utilized well. I congratulate the Government of Pakistan and the team of FAO who worked over the years to make life-changing contributions to the lives of poor farmers, men and women, and their families.

During the first years of its operations in Pakistan, FAO assisted the Government of Pakistan in building and strengthening the national agriculture infrastructure with emphasis on irrigation – the lifeline of the country’s agriculture system. In the decades to follow, FAO focused its efforts on poverty reduction, food security, sustainable livelihoods and rehabilitation, disaster risk management and rural development. It has partnered with the Government of Pakistan on research and development, training, extension services and strengthening of the staff capacity in planning and policy making, in agriculture and associated sub-sectors (fisheries, forestry, and livestock). Today, FAO focuses on poverty reduction, food security, sustainable livelihoods and value chains, and rural development. FAO partners with Government at federal and provincial levels to improve the agriculture sector and food security policy, strengthen institutions, improve nutrition, help farmers adapt to climate change, with emphasis on the use of technology and innovative agricultural practices, training and extension, and expand participation of vulnerable communities, including women and youth associated with the agriculture sector in Pakistan. FAO’s commitment to supporting the country’s food security and agriculture sector continues and the part-

nership between FAO and Pakistan is stronger than ever. As progress continues and opportunities evolve, support from FAO will help ensure that Pakistan successfully makes strides towards its vision of people and institutions-centred, inclusive and sustainable development, global food security and resilience and achieves the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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news and events

food security

Transforming the Indus Basin with climate resilient agriculture and climate-smart water management Pakistan ranks 7th after the Philippines and Bangladesh on the 2018 Global Long-Term Climate Risk Index published by German Watch. The country will be severely impacted by the negative effects of climate change in the future. Much of the country’s vulnerability is linked to its dominant arid to semi-arid climate, high dependency on a single river system, and snow and glacial melt water for the supply of water for agriculture. FAO has been tasked by the government of Pakistan to prepare a project proposal to tackle the impact of climate change in the agriculture sector. This project is designed to increase the resilience to climate change of agricultural producers in the Pakistan’s Indus River Basin. FAO experts in collaboration with national and other international experts and institutions started work to identify the impact of climate change on the agriculture sector in the country in July 2017. Changes in water availability were identified as the major climate impact on the agriculture sector especially in the wake of temperature increases. FAO has engaged in a series of discussions with different stakeholders at federal, provincial and local levels, including the Government of Pakistan, to finalize a project that will help small farmers in selected districts of the Indus Basin to build their resilience and adapt to climate

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change. The climate impact on the agriculture sector was also analyzed and discussed with a wide range of stakeholders including communities, provincial and federal governments, academia, civil society organizations and other international organizations. The project is now in its final design stage and will directly benefit an estimated 1.5 million rural people. The effects could provide benefits across the entire Indus Basin in Pakistan. The proposal is spearheaded by the Ministry of Climate Change, with strong engagement from the Ministry of National Food Security and Research and the Ministry of Water at federal level, and the Secretaries of the Agriculture and Irrigation departments at provincial level. Three workshops were held to validate the contents of the proposal in Karachi,

Lahore and Islamabad this month. The project proposal will be submitted to Green Climate Fund for financing. The Green Climate Fund (GCF) is a unique global initiative that responds to climate change by investing into low emission and climate-resilient development. GCF was established by 194 governments to limit greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries, and to help adapt vulnerable societies to the impacts of climate change.


news and events

food security

FAO conducts SDGs multi-stakeholder workshop in Pakistan Administered Kashmir FAO in collaboration with the Planning and Development Department Pakistan Administered Kashmir, organized a two-day Multi-Stakeholders Workshop on SDGs- Agriculture and Natural Resources (ANR) on 18-19 April in Muzaffarabad. The workshop was chaired by Mr. Muhammad Shamoon Hashmi Chief Economist, Planning and Development Department, and provided a platform to discuss and prepare recommendations around selection of SDGs related to ANR management, finalization of indicators, prioritization of SDGs and respective targets, and preparation of a provincial SDG framework. The workshop was also instrumental for the agreement and endorsement of indicators, baselines and end-goals for each target, and paved the way for finalization and endorsement of the AJK State SDG Framework. More than 50 officials from relevant government line departments and UN agencies attended the workshop. Mr. Hashmi from the Planning and Development Department, Government of AJK emphasized the need for policy coherence and close coordination between all relevant departments to jointly achieve the SDG agenda. He appreciated the integrated approach for achieving the targets relevant to ANR. Mr. Shahbaz Bokhari, SDG Advisor, FAO provided the overview of SDGs and Agriculture and Natural Resources Management. Mr. Imtiaz Ahmed, Training Officer and Raja Ajmal Jahangir,

Statistician – FAO facilitated the group work and familiarized the stakeholders with the SDG Goals and Targets related to ANR. The Declaration of the Sustainable Development Agenda 2030 states that its implementation requires an inclusive approach, as the SDGs and targets are integrated and indivisible. Based on this consideration a roadmap was conceptualized, focusing on aligning SDGs for Agriculture and Natural Resources Management – into national planning and budgeting – as an inclusive exercise. The Roadmap and Pragmatic Reference Guide intends to provide an easy-to-understand tool for the overall SDG Agenda at national levels follow-

ing MAPS (Mainstreaming, Acceleration and Policy Support) Guidelines, and with relevance to a thematic/sector approach in case for ANR.

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news and events

food security

The Pakistan-China’s recovery initiative for the crisis-affected population of FATA and Balochistan A groundbreaking collaboration between the United Nations, the Government of the People’s Republic of China and the Government of Pakistan has helped the people affected by natural disasters and displacement in Balochistan and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). With generous funding from the People’s Republic of China, and in partnership with the FATA Secretariat and the Government of Balochistan, the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) project, of USD $4 million, has benefitted 80,269 people and 8,100 temporarily displaced families from Kurram, South Waziristan, North Waziristan, Khyber and Orakzai Agencies in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). In Balochistan’s Naseerabad, Jafferabad and Sohbatpur districts — which were worst affected by the 2010 floods — new furniture and education kits were provided to 19,000 school children in 423 schools. In its first ever support to WFP in Pakistan, China contributed US$1 million to enable the World Food Programme (WFP) food assistance for 158,000 people in FATA. These include those who are returning to FATA, and those who are still displaced. Thanks to China’s contribution, WFP procured and distributed food assistance, which included yellow split peas, iodized salt, vegetable oil and ‘Mamta’ – a nutritious supplementary food. In addition,

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5,600 children under five months and pregnant and nursing mothers received six months of support to prevent malnutrition. By providing assistance to the most vulnerable families, China Aid is helping marginalized communities to manage shocks and build a foundation for the future. These initiatives build upon the Government of China’s continued commitment and contribution to the international emergency response efforts under the framework of the China South-South Cooperation Fund, managed by the Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China. Neil Buhne, Resident Coordinator, UN Pakistan, said the partnership was an impressive example of how the United Nations agencies can work as One UN, bringing together their unique strengths to provide the right assistance to the right people at the right time. Katrien Ghoos, WFP Acting Country Representative, said families who have been affected by displacement and insecurity in recent years are vulnerable to food insecurity. They often

lack the resources to access nutritious foods. This has impacts on every aspect of life, from health and education to work and well-being. Ignacio Artaza, UNDP Pakistan Country Director, said the challenges that FATA and Balochistan’s communities face require new partnerships and coordinated action. UNDP has a long history of working closely with the Pakistani government and communities to help them achieve their development goals. The project was implemented in partnership with the FATA Disaster Management Authority, FATA Secretariat, the TDP Secretariat, and the Departments of Education and Planning and Development, Government of Balochistan.


news and events

food security

FAO to support policies for modernizing agriculture extension services The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) organized a two-day consultative workshop on improving the agriculture extension services in Pakistan on March 8 at the Marriot Hotel in Islamabad. The workshop reviewed existing agriculture extension services, mechanisms and approaches adopted by the provincial agriculture departments and other institutions and organizations, in order to identify ways to improve these. Speaking at the opening session at the stakeholders’ workshop, Mr. Fazal Abbas Maken, Secretary Ministry of National Food Security and Research emphasized that agricultural research needs to be directed towards finding ways to meet the demands of farmers. He stressed the importance of building resilience of communities to climate change. Welcoming participants to the workshop, Ms. Mina’ Dowlatchahi, FAO Representative in Pakistan said to reach those who can transform the agriculture sector, it is essential to modernize the agriculture extension services by adopting a multi-sectoral integrated approach to knowledge and systems through use of Information and Communication Technologies and other sustainable agriculture practices. FAO is playing

its part by providing active support in policy making to improve and strengthen agriculture extension services and to ensure that no one is left behind. Participants included representatives from Federal and Provincial Ministries of Climate Change and National Food Security and Research, agriculture extension departments, Pakistan Meteorological Department, IFPRI, and international organizations. The workshop suggested appropriate holistic mechanisms and approaches for timely and effective dissemination of agriculture, water and climate-related information to the farming communities through various means, including modern ICT.

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news and events

freedom of expression

UNESCO organized roundtable on sharpening SDG 16.10 recommendations

UNESCO organized a multi-stakeholder roundtable discussion conceived during the 2017 International Day to End Impunity for Crimes against Journalists (IDEI), on April 12 8. As the specialized UN agency with a mandate to promote freedom of expression and the safety of journalists, UNESCO has been assigned to monitor and report on SDG 16 target 10: ‘Ensure public access to information and protect fundamental freedoms, in accordance with national legislation and international agreements’. The roundtable reviewed recommendations made on IDEI, which strongly resonated with the UN Plan of Action and SDG 16.10, and deliberated on their prioritization and implementation. The participants further reflected on the special importance of taking practical steps for SDG.16.10 in the light of Pakistan’s upcoming general elections.

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The meeting was attended by the Director of UNESCO, Ms. Vibeke Jensen and government counterparts from the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Right to Information (RTI) Commission, National Commission on Human Rights, Ministry of Human Rights, development partners, leading CSOs and Journalists. Ms. Jensen lauded the presence of female representatives and specially thanked government officials who attended the meeting and said the reason why UNESCO commemorates International Day on Universal Access to Information, International Day to end impunity for the Crimes against Journalists and World Press Freedom day every year is to link the three occurrences, and keep the dialogue going among government, CSOs, journalists, and the international community, which is crucial for developing democracies. She added that with the upcoming elections, the role of media is even more relevant for achieving SDG 16.10 as journalists can be instruments of inclusive political discussion. Challenges to access to information and safety of journalists covering the elections, prevention and protection mechanisms to promote safety of media workers and monitoring and documentation to promote safety of journalists were dis-

cussed at length at the roundtable. The event concluded with exploring future mechanisms of action.


news and events

governance

Strengthening the justice system of Balochistan

A key document for the future of Balochistan was launched during the Conference on the Rule of Law Roadmap of Balochistan. The Roadmap details the reforms aimed at strengthening the Justice system of Balochistan over the next five years (2018-2022). The Conference was chaired and led by the Government of Balochistan together with the Judiciary. Among the participants were key representatives from the Government of Balochistan’s relevant departments and institutions including the Judiciary and Civil Society. The donors’ community was also represented along with UNODC, UNDP and UN Women. Mr. Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman, Chief of Foreign Aid of the Government of Balochistan underscored the current lack of trust of the citizens of the Province in the justice system, and the dire need for a comprehensive reform including the judiciary.

Presenting the Roadmap, representatives of all stakeholders in Balochistan confirmed their high commitment and consensus among the government, the judiciary and civil society to implement these reforms. The Government of Balochistan then presented their implementation plan, including crucial processes and mechanisms that are pre-requisites to operationalizing and rolling out the Roadmap. It has been emphasized that the commitment of the Government of Balochistan to implementing the Roadmap is strongly evident through their persistent engagement and the allocation and cost-sharing of resources. The importance of partnerships with donors and development agencies was highlighted. The Roadmap aims at improving every segment of the justice system, from the enhancement of the capacities of the law enforcement

agencies including the judiciary, to the transformation of prisons and the generalization of access to justice. A monitoring mechanism will closely follow the impact of the project while ensuring its adaptability. Representatives from the Government of Balochistan reassured the donors and foreign partners over their concerns regarding the space left for human rights, gender equality and accountability in the reforms. They also confirmed the Roadmap’s alignment with national priorities, ensuring its continuity over the five years. At last, they reaffirmed their strong engagement in working in collaboration with all the stakeholders, donors and with UNODC, UNDP and UN Women in order to build a just, secure and peaceful Balochistan.

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news and events

governance

UNDP, the Government of Pakistan, and Accountability Lab launch SDG-16 innovation challenge First ever competition in Pakistan to address issues of peace, justice, and accountability UNDP the Government of Pakistanthrough the Young Peace and Development Corps (YPDC) and the Accountability Lab Pakistan launched the country’s first SDG-16 Innovation Challenge. The Innovation Challenge is a month-long competition where young Pakistanis can submit creative ideas related to issues of peace, justice, and accountability. Twenty finalists are selected from around the country for a two-day workshop in Islamabad to develop and pitch their ideas, after which, the winners will be supported by the agencies. The organizing team expect hundreds of submissions from across Pakistan, and will host orientation workshops in Lahore, Karachi, Quetta and Peshawar over the next month to guide potential applicants and receive preliminary feedback on ideas. At the launch event, Accountability Lab Pakistan headed a workshop with over 100 young people who developed initial ideas for the campaign, which included new technology tools for gender inclusion and new ways to support women’s voices in FATA. Ignacio Artaza, Country Director, UNDP Pakistan said the competition will pave the way to finding inventive ways to create impact for people by providing new opportunities to startup businesses and engaging citizens. Executive Director of the Accountability Lab, Blair Glencorse, added that young people in Pakistan are incredi-

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bly innovative, and are constantly developing world-class ideas. Deputy Head of Mission, the Embassy of Japan in Pakistan, Mr. Takashi Harada stated his hope that Japan’s contributions will help youth in Pakistan to contribute achieving the SDGs in Pakistan. Ideas were invited to be submitted by anyone under the age of 35 through http://www.accountabilitylab.org/innovation/ until May 5th, after which 20 winners will be selected to attend a finalists workshop in Islamabad to develop and pitch their ideas. The winners at the workshop will be provided with ongoing support by UNDP and Accountability Lab Pakistan. Questions about the Challenge can be sent to: SDG16challenge@accountabilitylab.org


human rights and sdgs

PROMOTING HUMAN RIGHTS THROUGH WORLD PRESS PHOTO EXHIBITION

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World Press Photo Exhibition came to Islamabad Commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the world-famous photojournalism exhibition - World Press Photo - was launched at the Pakistan National Council of Arts, Islamabad. Depicting the stories that connect the world to the lives that matter, the World Press Photo Exhibition was jointly organized by the Embassy of the Netherlands, World Press Photo Foundation, United Nations and Pakistan National Council of Arts. The exhibition showcased 150 high quality professional photos touching upon the issues of universal human rights, equal rights for all, women and children rights, freedom of expression, effects of extreme violence on human lives, plight of migration, climate

change and more. One of the awarded stories is by a Pakistani Journalist, Jamal Tarakai. These 150 showcased photos were selected from 80,000 entries submitted by 5,000 photojournalists worldwide. One of the main shared goals of the idea of the World Press Photo exhibition was to increase awareness of the Sustainable Development Goals and human rights among Pakistani audience through the lens of photojournalism. The exhibition was inaugurated by Ardi Stoios-Braken, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Dr Hassan Mohtashami, Resident Coordinator a.i. and Country Representative, United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), Babette Warendorf, Curator and Exhibition Manager, World

Press Photo and Jamal Taraqai, World Press Photo Award Winner. Several debates and special tours were organized for the students from public and private universities in the context of the World Press Photo exhibition. The debates focused on areas such as women empowerment, climate change and wildlife, migration, human trafficking, the current human rights situation in country, access to justice, and the death penalty. Experts from government, member states, civil society activists, and human right defenders joined us for the debates with students from different universities. The exhibition stayed at the PNCA for four weeks and was open to the public.

As the Ambassador of the Netherlands I am proud the embassy has been able to bring this unique photo exhibition to Pakistan. It is the first time that we can show this worldwide acclaimed exhibition to you, and I am grateful for the collaboration with our partners of the World Press Photo Foundation and the United Nations Information Centre to make this possible. All the images are very best examples of top quality photo journalism. Some pictures are just plain beautiful, others are shocking; all images affect us through the important stories they tell us about our world. The exhibition shows many themes and stories that are important to us all: freedom of expression, the beauty of nature, travel, spirituality, the excesses of violence and both the diversities and similarities of different people. Ardi Stoios-Braken Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands

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special feature

human rights and sdgs

The World Press Photo Awards shows how diverse a world we live in. It shows the suffering caused by wars. It shows the happiness that people can make in the widest variety of circumstances, including the inspiration and beauty of athletes. The photos show the beauty of nature and the damage done to it by people. But the exhibition also shows that the worst and the best of humanity and of nature can be found everywhere, that joy and pain, exhilaration and sadness are not limited to one country. That they are universal. What we share as people around the world and the common threats we face from climate change should unite us in dealing with them. That is one reason the Sustainable Development Goals are universal goals. They are important for everyone’s’ well-being today, and to enable people to have better lives and sustainable development tomorrow, the Goals have to be met together. That is why we have linked the photos to the Sustainable Development Goals. The photos remind us of progress being made to meet those goals in many places, and of the great difficulties people face all over the world to meet them. They show why the work of people working together, including through the United Nations, is important and why, whether we are working in Pakistan or other places we must draw inspiration from both the worst and the best in the world, so that no one is left behind and so there is sustainable development that includes everyone. If that happens the World Press Photo exhibition in 2030 will have fewer photos of despair, and more of joy. Neil Buhne Resident Coordinator, United Nations Pakistan, and Acting Director, UN Information Centre

Pakistan National Council of the Arts is very pleased to host the World Press Photo Exhibition 2017 in Islamabad. Photography is a specialized form of art. Photojournalists capture stories from our daily life to reflect the state of affairs in any society. Art has the ability of making a person aware about his/her surroundings and help appreciate diversity, respect fellow human beings and act as an agent of change. All the World Press Photo winners being displayed at PNCA have unique messages. They tell stories from all over the world. It is a great opportunity for the people of Pakistan to learn about these issues and I hope you thoroughly enjoy the exhibition. Syed Jamal Shah Director General , Pakistan National Council of Arts, Islamabad

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Debating migration and human trafficking Human trafficking and smuggling of migrants represent great challenges and are an obstacle to development, to the rule of law and a serious threat to human security, as both crimes affect directly the lives of human beings. The United Nations Information Centre and the Embassy of the Netherlands organized an interactive discussion on migration and human trafficking and the human rights approaches to the two issues in the context of the World Press Photo Exhibition at PNCA Islamabad.

The world-famous photo journalism exhibition focused on the issues of universal human rights, equal rights for all, women and children rights, freedom of expression, effects of extreme violence on human lives, the plight of migration, climate change and connects the world to the lives and stories that matters. Neil Buhne, Resident Coordinator UN and Acting Director UNIC, Davide Terzi, Country Director IOM, Shahida Gilani and Ahsan Gilanai from Human Trafficking and Migrant Smuggling department of the UNODC participated in the panel discussion. The discussion was moderated by Asif Jah, Lead Consultant UNODC, where he brought the students of MY University into the discussion. The debate was followed by a guided tour of the exhibition to the students.

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special feature

The exhibition was held at the Pakistan National Council of Arts for four weeks and was open to the public. The exhibition was visited by the students from different universities, human rights defenders, government, civil society activists and member states during the length of the exhibit. The debate session was also part of the awareness raising campaign about human rights in connection with the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Deceleration of Human Rights (UDHR) commemorated through WPP exhibition in Pakistan from 6-31 March 2018.

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human rights and sdgs

Women Empowerment is essential to achieve sustainable development About 80 students from the social sciences department of the International Islamic University joined us for the tour of the World Press Photo Exhibition and an interactive discussion on the issues related to women and girls empowerment and the challenges that they face in daily life. Jointly organized by the Embassy of the Netherlands, World Press Photo Foundation, United Nations and Pakistan National Council of Arts, the exhibition depicts the stories that connect the world to the lives that matters. Moderated by Nadja Wuensche, Rights-based Development Advisor UN RCO, Jamshed M. Kazi, Country Representative UN Women, Chaudhry Shafique, National Commissioner, National Commission of Human Rights, Prof. Farkhanda, Senior Consultant, NCHR and Uzma Zarrin, Gender and Priority Areas Manager, Trust for Democratic Education and Accountability participated in the discussion and answered audience questions. The debate was organized in the context of the World Press Photo Exhibition. The exhibition was held at the Pakistan National Council of Arts for four weeks and was open to the public.

Climate change and wildlife Climate change and protecting wildlife is everybody’s business, we all have to work together to create a sustainable future, said Aman Ullah Khan, Assistant Country Director UNDP Pakistan in an interactive discussion held by UN Information Centre and the Embassy of the Netherlands at PNCA. The debate was part of the World Press Photo exhibition – the exhibition was jointly organized by the Embassy of the Netherlands, World Press Photo Foundation, United Nations and Pakistan National Council of Arts and aims at promoting human rights and sustainable Development Goals through the lens of photojournalism. Amanullah Khan, Assistant Country Director Environment and Climate Change Unit UNDP, Josephine Frantzen, Deputy Head of Mission, Embassy of the Netherlands, Dr. Masood Arshad, Director Climate change and Water, WWFP participated in the panel discussion. Moderated by Mehr Hassan, Young Professional Officer UNDP, the debate was followed by a guided tour of the exhibition to the students of Bahria University.

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special feature

human rights and sdgs

Justice and Human Rights

A group of young students from the law department of the International Islamic University joined us for the tour of the World Press Photo Exhibition followed by an interactive discussion on ‘Justice and Human Rights’ in the context of the World Press Photo exhibition. Moderated by Martijn Beerthuizen, First Secretary Political Affairs and Human Rights, Embassy of the Netherlands, the debate discussed issues related to rule of law and human rights violations all around the world including extra judicial killings, rights of prisoners, missing persons, capital punishment and access to justice. Malik Kamran Azam Khan Rojar, DG Development, Ministry of Human Rights, Tahira Abdullah, Human Rights Activist, Zainab Mahboob from Justice Project Pakistan, Chaudhry Shafique, National Commissioner, NCHR and Mirza Shehzad Akbar, Director, Foundation for Fundamental Rights participated in the panel discussion and shared their views with young law students.

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news and events

industrial development

Trainings on market potential and business opportunities for renewable energy and energy efficiency conducted

UNIDO under its ongoing GEF funded project titled ‘Sustainable Energy Initiative for Industries in Pakistan’ successfully conducted two back-to-back training sessions on Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy Efficiency (EE) at Lahore. The first training session was held at the Lahore Chamber of Commerce and Industry for vendors and suppliers on market potential and business opportunities for EE and RE Technologies. The second training session was held at a local hotel, and focused on providing awareness to the top management of the industrial sector on technology and business retrospect and future opportunities. The trainings were attended by more than a hundred professionals, including a number of female participants from various industrial sectors and technol-

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ogy solution providers, top managers from industry, consultants and equipment suppliers for energy efficiency and renewable energy, along with public and private sector organizations. The goal was to build the capacity of top management on technologies, by highlighting the business cases that could enable the managers to make knowledge-based decisions, as well as enabling vendors and technology manufacturers (VTMs) to understand Energy System Optimization (ESO) opportunities and strategies that can be broadened into value-added services to offer an ESO approach. UNIDO Country representative, Ms. Nadia Aftab expressed her delight on the active participation of high -level delegates from industry. She elaborated upon the goal and mission of UNIDO, while highlighting contribution

by UNIDO on Sustainable Development Goal 9 (SDG-9) under the policy of Inclusive and Sustainable Industrial Development (ISID). Ms Anila Hayat, a woman professional from Green Building Council, greatly applauded the efforts of GEF and UNIDO in helping to motivate women participation and shared that this training would help her in diversifying her work on energy. Mr. Faraz Ahmed, Senior Vice President of Shakarganj Foods, showed his delight in having getting learned some new things and assured UNIDO about the implementation of the Energy initiative in his company. The participants were awarded the certificates on the last day of the Vendors Training, marking the conclusion of the training session.


news and events

industrial development

Pakistani startups snag UN environment sustainability grants As winners of the Asia Pacific Low Carbon Lifestyles Challenge in the Energy Efficiency and Low Carbon Mobility categories, respectively, Mohammed Saquib and Hassam Ud-din will also receive business and marketing training from global experts, and pitch to win an additional US$10,000 prize to further augment their ideas. UN Environment’s Director for the Asia-Pacific region, Dechen Tsering, said that Young innovators like Mohammed and Hassam are examples of the ingenuity needed to tackle some of the world’s biggest problems. Saquib’s business, Modulus Tech, produces energy efficient, low-cost modular flat-pack housing built from recycled materials. Pakistan’s housing shortage is up to 10 million units, and there is a large market for low-cost housing, including in refugee and displaced persons camps. Saquib’s houses come with all electrical and plumbing utilities built-in and can be assembled in as little as 3 hours. Built from recyclable materials such as fibre cement composites and wood plastic composites, components have a 30-year lifespan and a carbon footprint up to 52 times lower than traditional concrete homes. The isolative material also makes the houses energy efficient. Saquib estimates they are 3 times more energy efficient than

alternatives on the market. Hassam Ud-din is aiming to fix a different scarcity: affordable, efficient transport infrastructure. Despite only 17 percent car ownership, Pakistan’s cities often face acute traffic jams and congestion, generating enormous amounts of pollution. While higher vehicle ownership is not sustainable, many areas without a high volume of passengers and goods are bypassed altogether by transit lines. At the same time, most cars and trucks on the road operate at 30 percent capacity, leaving 70 percent capacity up for grabs. Ud-din’s solution comes in the form of an app called RASAI, which allows for peer-to-peer sharing of a vehicle’s extra space and seats, offering inter-city ridesharing and freight-shipping capabilities. Meanwhile, freight transport vehicles can use the app to provide spare cargo space at low cost, enabling small businesses like farmers to bring their goods to market at lower cost and higher convenience.

About Mohammed Saquib Mohammed Saquib is the Chief Technical Officer of Modulus Tech, with a background in civil engineering and a specialization in Construction Management. He is the structural and architectural designer of the company’s flat-pack house. With expertise in Autocad Revit, Robot Structural Analysis and BIM (Building Information Modeling), he is responsible for product improvement and performance simulation.

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About the Asia Pacific Sustainable Lifestyles Challenge

About Hassam Ud-Din Hassam is a civil (transportation) engineer and a Silicon Valley-trained tech entrepreneur. He is a self-taught programmer who loves working with maps. Hassam was the youngest speaker at the Vienna Energy Forum, and has had extensive experience working with UNIDO and the startup ecosystem in Pakistan. He also mentors young Startups and is enthusiastic about working to improve the socio-economic condition of the developing world through leveraging technology.

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The Asia-Pacific Low-Carbon Lifestyles Challenge aims to mobilize and support young people with business ideas on how to foster energy-efficient, low-waste and low-carbon lifestyles. 12 winners each receive a US$10,000 to support their business venture focusing on one of three different categories: mobility, plastic waste and energy. This is an initiative funded by the Ministry of Environment Japan, as part of SWITCH-Asia’s Regional Sustainable Consumption and Production Policy Advocacy Component, the Asia-Pacific Regional Roadmap on Sustainable Consumption and Production and One Planet. This initiative is carried out together with the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, The Thai National Science and Technology Development Agency and Sasin Entrepreneurship Center.


news and events

industrial development

UNIDO trained over 100 professionals on financing of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency projects UNIDO under its ongoing GEF funded project titled ‘Sustainable Energy Initiative for Industries in Pakistan’ successfully conducted a two-day training on ‘Financing of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technology-based projects in Industry.’ The training was conducted by an international expert, in collaboration with Bahria University Karachi and the Rawalpindi Chamber of Commerce and Industry (RCCI). The training on financing of RE and EE projects was attended by more than 100 professionals including 20 women from various industrial sectors, energy service companies, academia and banking sectors of Pakistan. The major focus of the training was to build capacity on the development and appraisal of bankable EE and RE projects, using the lessons learned from international case studies. An interactive session was held on the second day of the training through the practical demonstration of a financial modeling software used globally for devising the financial models of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Projects. On this occasion, RCCI president Mr. Zahid Latif Khan highlighted the continuous collaboration of UNIDO and RCCI for such initiatives, which supports the increase of investment into low-carbon power generation by enhancing the capacity of Pa-

kistani industries and financing institutions. He added that RCCI is always ready to partner with UNIDO to join forces to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy in the industrial sector and hopes that more of such efforts will be organized in future as they significantly contribute to the sustainable economic development of Pakistan. Moreover, the National Project Manager REEE Mr. Masroor Ahmad Khan reiterated the importance of bridging the gap between academia, financial institutions and industry. He added that the main reason for the gap is the low level of awareness of RE and EE technologies in the financial sector and the financial requirements for bankable project proposals in the industrial sector. Ms Fatima Annila –a woman entrepreneur– applauded the efforts of GEF and UNIDO to increase women participation, and shared that this training will help her in making

efficient financial models for her startup. Mr. Wasif Azhar from Energy Management sector highlighted that this training was successful in linking technology and economics and will help to bring innovations into real world applications. With this capacity building activities on energy and environment, UNIDO promotes sustainable patterns of industrial consumption and production through cleaner technologies and processes in order to de-link the processes of economic growth and environmental degradation. UNIDO is a leading provider of services for improved industrial energy efficiency, enhanced use of renewable sources of energy and promotion of cleaner technologies.

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news and events

industrial development

Stakeholder consultation on agribusinesses in Gilgit-Baltistan

UNIDO with the collaboration of Department of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries of Gilgit Baltistan organized a stakeholder consultation under the project ‘Agribusiness and Agro-Industries Department Assistance to Pakistan – Initiative for Gilgit and Baltistan’, with support from the One UN Fund on 28 March 2018 in Islamabad. The workshop was opened by H.E. Barbar Aman Barbar, Secretary of Planning and Development, Government of Gilgit Baltistan, who said that the government of Gilgit Baltistan is very keen on developing the local agriculture sector through the technical assistance of UNIDO. Participants from the Departments

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of Agriculture and Fisheries mobilized local farmers, traders and exporters to review the current situation in these sectors. The participants, including the progressive trout, cherry and apple farmers from Gilgit Baltistan, were very committed to develop their value chain based on a holistic approach, which will be developed by UNIDO. The interactive discussion and the participation of different stakeholders provided a deep insight to the contemporary problems faced by local farmers and traders. They indicated the need for both short-term and long-term corrective measures, particularly related to productivity, pack-

aging, branding and market linkages. Female farmers also made their voice heard by requesting UNIDO for further assistance in developing their productive and compliant capacities. Ms. Nadia Aftab, UNIDO Country Representative highlighted the importance of UNIDO assistance to uplift the local agribusinesses in Gilgit-Baltistan through improving their productive capacities, compliance with requirements and linking them to markets. The initiative will reinforce sustainable livelihoods in Gilgit Baltistan, also contributing towards the government’s commitment to achieve the various SDGs including SDG1, SDG2 and SDG9. The workshop concluded with the agreement to set a road map for the selected value chains in Gilgit Baltistan which UNIDO will work on in collaboration with the Department of Agriculture, Planning and Development of Gilgit-Baltistan as well as stakeholders and women representative organizations.


news and events

labour

& decent work

World Day for Safety and Health at Work This year, the World Day for Safety and Health at Work (Safe Day) and the World Day Against Child Labour (WDACL) are coming together in a joint campaign to improve the safety and health of young workers, and end child labour. The campaign aims to accelerate action to achieve Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 8.8 of safe and secure working environments for all workers by 2030, and SDG target 8.7 of ending all forms of child labour by 2025. Achieving these goals for the benefit of the next generation of the global workforce requires a concerted and integrated approach to eliminating child labour and promoting a culture of prevention on occupational safety health (OSH). The 541 million young workers aged 15-24 – a figure which includes 37 million children in hazardous child labour - account for more than 15 per cent of the world’s labour force and suffer up to a 40 per cent higher rate of non-fatal occupational injuries than adult workers older than 25. Many factors can increase youth vulnerability to OSH risks, such as their physical and psychological stage of development, lack of work experience and lack of training, limited awareness of work-related hazards and a lack of bargaining power, that can lead young workers to accept dangerous tasks or jobs with poor working conditions. The 2018 Safe Day campaign highlights the critical importance of addressing these challenges and improving safety and health for young workers, not only to promote decent youth employment,

but also to link these efforts to combat hazardous – and all other forms of child labour.

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Youth safety and health at work: Early education equals early protection By Ms Tomoko Nishimoto, Assistant Director-General of the International Labour Organization and Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific.

In the Asia-Pacific region, more people than anywhere else start working from an early age. As youth, they often work in hazardous and exploitative jobs to earn income for their families. Some of this work also constitutes child labour. This year, for World Day for Safety and Health at Work, the ILO is focusing on improving the working conditions of young workers as well as bringing an end to child labour.

Young workers in the Asia-Pacific In the Asia-Pacific region, there are about 300 million workers aged between 15 and 24. These workers comprise 20 per cent of the region’s workforce. Often it is poverty that pushes young people to start working from an early age. They enter the workforce with virtually no knowledge about occupational hazards and risks, nor any awareness about their occupational safety and health (OSH) rights.

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Some young people start working from an even earlier age. There are about 62 million children aged between 5 and 17 who are engaged in child labour. Of these, 28 million are in hazardous work. For these children, exploitative labour is a serious threat to their health and their physical and mental development. Many young workers in the Asia-Pacific region are in the informal economy and are engaged in agricultural, industrial and artisanal work. These workplaces tend to be out of the reach of OSH laws and are otherwise difficult to inspect. In addition, workers frequently lack an understanding of the importance of OSH. Poor working conditions and a lack of OSH training often translates to higher rates of injury amongst workers who would otherwise have had a long working career ahead of them. They are also at risk of contracting occupational diseases with harmful long-term effects. For example, exposure to hazardous agents such as asbestos, pesticides and other chemicals can ultimately lead to serious diseases and potentially death.

Concerted tripartite efforts Providing young workers with decent and safe employment opportunities is indispensable for future social and economic development. Governments, employers and workers need

to build, implement and continuously strengthen a culture of prevention. Indeed, many governments are currently engaging in regular tripartite dialogues to set standards and develop national OSH policies. It is crucial that these national policies are in line with international labour standards. In particular, there should be full compliance with the ILO Promotional Framework for Occupational Safety and Health Convention, 2006 (No. 187). Encouragingly, there have been increased ratifications of the Convention in the region.

Educating for a safer future of work While efforts to improve the current state of workplaces are critical, there must also be efforts to educate future generations in OSH. By one estimate, 65 per cent of children in primary school today will work in jobs that currently do not exist. To ensure that these jobs do not jeopardize the health and safety of future generations, it is crucial that children are educated from a young age. Educating young people in the importance of OSH is necessary for a safe future of work. We must do all we can to ensure that young people are aware of, and protected by, OSH principles so that they too are given the chance to work in a safe and healthy workplace.


news and events

labour

& decent work

Sialkot sports goods sector promotes a level playing field ILO in collaboration with the Employers’ Federation of Pakistan (EFP) and Baidarie organized a sports gala on 28 March in Sialkot under the theme ‘Promoting a level playing field’. The event was part of the Japan-funded project on ‘More and Better Jobs in the Sports Goods Industry’, under implementation since August 2015. Over 400 participants including ILO’s constituents, Embassy of Japan, Pakistan Olympic Association, social partners and key stakeholders participated. The event raised awareness on the importance of sports activities for decent work and better working conditions in line with principles of the Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE) Declaration which seeks to maximize the positive contribution that multinational enterprises can make to economic and social development. Chief Guest, Mr. Shinichi Honda, First Secretary, Deputy Head, Economic and Development Section, Embassy of Japan stated that the Government of Japan would continue its support in the promotion of decent work and sports activities in Pakistan. Mr. Majyd Aziz, President, EFP stated that decent work would not be achieved in the absence of a healthy society and that this could be facilitated through the promotion of the sports goods sector which has also proven to increase employment opportunities and productivity.

Mr. Fasihul Karim Siddiqi, Secretary General, EFP requested the Government of Japan to provide further support for the continuity and expansion of the project to other industrial hubs in Pakistan such as Karachi, Hyderabad, Lahore and Faisalabad. Ms. Ingrid Christensen, Director of the ILO, emphasized on the importance of teamwork to achieve decent work in Pakistan and improve working conditions. She also highlighted the importance of gender equality and occupational safety and health at the workplace. Mr. Sho Sudo, Chief Technical Advisor and Overall Coordinator, ILO/Japan Multi-Bilateral Programme, ILO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific said that workers of sports goods industry in Sialkot contribute to leisure activities worldwide and collaborative and consistent efforts were required to promote decent work.

for all, decent work for all’ comprising Dr. Muhammad Suhail Shahzad-Additional Secretary, Labour and Human Resources Department, Mr. Haji Muhammad Javaid- Board Member and Former President of EFP, Mr. Muhammad Jahangir- Associate Secretary, Pakistan Olympic Association, Mr. Ijaz Ahmad Khokhar-Chairman, Pakistan Readymade Garments Manufacturers and Exporters Association (PRGMEA) and Mr. Arshid Mehmood Mirza-Executive Director, Baidarie, Sialkot. Mr. Fasihul Karim Siddiqi, Secretary General EFP facilitated the panel discussion and concluded the panelists’ recommendations, remarks and proposals for the way forward of the project among which included: the need for MNEs in the sports goods sector to work together to promote a culture of sports in the country; enhanced capacity of technical and vocational training institutes in Sialkot to produce a skilled workforce to meet the advanced technical requirements of the industry; and a comprehensive plan of action based on need of the industry and workers should be developed to promote decent work in line with the principles of the MNE Declaration.

An interactive panel discussion formed part of the gala under the theme ‘Sport

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Thirteenth batch of national labour inspectors’ training program completed

The thirteenth batch of the National Labour Inspectors’ Training Program was completed on 29 March in Lahore, in collaboration with the Department of Labour, Punjab. A total of 27 participants attended the training, which aimed at improving theoretical and practical competencies of the labour inspectors on regulatory frameworks, Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work (FPRW), and contemporary labour inspection methodologies and skills. Mr. Farooq Hameed Sheikh, Director General Labour Welfare Punjab, addressing the concluding ceremony thanked the International Labour Organisation (ILO) for its technical assistance, and the Netherlands Government for financial support focused on the much sought-after capacity building of inspection staff. Mr. Sheikh, urged the inspecting staff to

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maximize the application of knowledge and motivation gained from the training program as this would serve to enhance labour law compliance. Whilst concluding his address, he strongly urged the ILO continue its ongoing technical support to the Labour Inspectorates, especially in areas of Labour Inspection of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH). On the occasion, Mr. Zishan Ahmad Siddiqi, National Project Coordinator for the Project on Strengthening Labour Inspection System in Pakistan (SLISP) stated that the ILO’s capacity-building support was designed to augment the government’s departmental training endeavours. He further added that it is in this larger interest that SLISP had produced a technical content-based toolkit for Labour Inspectors that should be a good resource for government induc-

tion training of labour inspectors. The ILO’s Dutch funded project on SLISP is implementing a nationwide training program for labour inspection staff. The training program so far has successfully completed 13 cohorts in which a total of 358 inspecting staff (343 men and 15 women) from Balochistan, Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, AJK, ICT, GB and Punjab have received a three days orientation training on ‘Effective Labour Inspection’.


news and events

labour

& decent work

Collective bargaining and effective negotiation skills to promote decent work in Pakistan

The ILO project ‘Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains (LSGSC)’ organized a four-day workshop on ‘Organizing and Collective Bargaining for workers and Trade Unions’ at Faisalabad from 26-29 March 2018. 42 workers representatives attended the workshop from Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, and Sindh, and had an opportunity to enhance their knowledge on effective tools for collective bargaining. The training helped to identify some of the challenges faced by trade unions in organizing and Collective Bargaining (CB) and sought consensus on how these can be countered effectively. The workshop also highlighted how the ILO’s supervisory mechanisms on Freedom of Association (FOA) promotes an “enabling environment” for trade union organizing by proposing improved strategies for organizing, targeting in particular the workers in private sector and in informal econo-

my. The workshop was facilitated by Mr. Karuppiah Somasundram, Assistant Secretary Education, and Malaysian Trades Union Congress (MTUC) Malaysia. Mr Zahoor Awan General Secretary Pakistan Workers Federation (PWF) highlighted the importance of Social Dialogue in the process of collective bargaining. He further explained the elements of collective bargaining, and how these are being used during the bipartite dialogues between employers and workers as well as how workers can present a charter of demand to the employers. He added that the devolution had transferred the responsibility of federal government towards the provinces to provide a regulatory framework and mechanism to regulate workplace relations through Industrial Relations Act (IRA). The role of trade unions at provincial level has become more distinctive in this process to ensure decent working conditions, reasonable wages and job security for the workers.

Ms. Ingrid Christensen Country Director ILO Pakistan in her welcoming remarks highlighted the importance of collective bargaining in achieving decent work for all. The ILO is implementing a number of projects across the Asia Pacific Region aimed at promoting fundamental principles and rights at work, through increasing the capacity of partners in areas such as labour dispute management, collective bargaining and social dialogue, in efforts to enhance sound industrial relations in various sectors. The event was organized by Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains Project financed by the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the programme is a part of a renewed partnership between the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) and the International Labour Organization (ILO).

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news and events

labour & decent work

Effective collective bargaining and negotiation skills for industrial harmony ILO under its ‘Labour Standards in Global Supply Chains’ Project (LSGSC) organized a four-day workshop on ‘Collective Bargaining and Negotiation Skills’ for its tripartite constituents; Government, Employers and Workers representatives from 5-8 March in Islamabad. The workshop provided participants from KPK, Punjab, GB, ICT and State of Pakistan Administered Kashmir (PAK) an opportunity to discuss effective negotiation techniques that allow mutual gains and strengthen relationships. The workshop was co-facilitated by the ILO Senior Programme Officer, Mr. Fernando Fonseca from ITC Turin and Mr. William Thomson in collaboration with the LSGSC project team. Ms. Belinda Chanda, Programme Analyst, ILO Pakistan in her closing remarks emphasized on principles of effective negotiation based on good faith, full consultation and fair representation. She also emphasized that the ILO facilitates constituents in promoting social dialogue and facilitating the implementation of ILO Standards by providing technical assistance for developing legislative frameworks, institutional strengthening, train-

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ing, education and research. The subject of industrial relations is regulated by the Industrial Relations Act (IRA). After devolution, the provinces have promulgated IRAs that provide a regulatory framework and mechanism to regulate workplace relations. The objective of these IRAs is to promote harmonious industrial relations, efficiency, productivity, and decent work. Employers’ and workers’ organizations are the key players in an industrial relations system. However, the role of trade unions is unique in addressing the core issues of wages, working conditions, and job security. Indeed, an enabling environment is the outcome of government policies duly endorsed by the social partners – the employers and the workers. The ILO advances collective bargaining and negotiation structures and processes as a means to resolve important economic and social issues, encourage good governance, advance social and industrial peace and stability, and boost economic progress. The ILO is implementing a number of projects across the Asia Pacific Region aimed at promoting fundamental principles and rights at work, through increasing the ca-

pacity of partners in areas such as labour dispute management, collective bargaining and social dialogue, in efforts to enhance sound industrial relations in various sectors.


news and events

refugees

UNHCR and the Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund launch new livelihoods programme

The UN refugee agency and the Pakistan Poverty Alleviation Fund (PPAF) launched a pilot programme to help provide sustainable livelihood opportunities to both Afghan refugees and Pakistani nationals. The poverty graduation programme is an approach that targets families living in extreme poverty on less than USD 1.25 a day and having no access to basic services. This approach brings innovative and market-based methods together to help people become independent, by providing them with sustainable livelihoods opportunities. The signing ceremony was attended by the UNHCR Representative for Pakistan, Ms. Ruvendrini Menikdiwela and the Chief Executive Officer of PPAF, Mr. Qazi Azmat Isa, along with other government officials. The 18-month project – worth USD1.2

million – will benefit 2,000 households. Seventy per cent of the people will be Afghan refugees and 30 per cent Pakistani host communities in Swabi, Khyber Pakhtukhwa and Pishin, Balochistan. The poverty graduation project focuses on vocational training skills development, enterprise development and agriculture initiatives. The trainees will be given toolkits to start an economic activity and will be assisted to create their own business plans. Ms. Ruvendrini Menikdiwela said poverty graduation was a practical approach, with the potential to contribute towards the creation of durable and sustainable livelihood solutions for refugees who live in Pakistan. Ms. Menikdiwela said such projects will focus on skills and enterprise development and assist refugees in

seeking employment and help provide sustainable reintegration if they decide to return to Afghanistan. UNHCR aims to expand and replicate the project in other priority districts where Afghan refugees are living after an evaluation has been carried out. Pakistan continues to host 1.4 million Afghan refugees. In recognition of the support provided by the government and people of Pakistan for nearly four decades, UNHCR’s budget to support refugees in the country has increased in each of the past four years. The budget approved by UNHCR’s Executive Committee for Pakistan to support Afghan refugees in 2018 is USD 57,725,000. In 2015, this budget stood at USD 44,568,000. UNHCR also implements the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas (RAHA) Programme to support Afghan refugees and their host communities. Since its launch in 2009, the RAHA programme has provided assistance to over 10.6 million people through 4,100 projects worth USD 200 million in Pakistan in the sectors of education, health, livelihood, water, sanitation, infrastructure and social protection.

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news and events

refugees

UNHCR provides high-tech medical equipment worth Rs.710 million to Peshawar hospital

UNHCR has procured high-tech machines worth Rs.710 million (USD 6.2million) for Peshawar’s Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, to support free-of-cost treatment to thousands of needy cancer patients in Pakistan, including Afghan refugees. UNHCR will provide radiotherapy machines, software and training for the technicians to operate the equipment. Radiotherapy uses high-energy radiation to break down cancer cells and treat tumors in the body. The machines will be installed in the newly constructed hospital rooms by mid-summer 2018. UNHCR representative for Pakistan, Ms. Ruvendrini Menikdiwela and the chief executive officer of the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer hospital, Dr. Faisal Sultan signed a Memorandum of Understanding in Peshawar. Officials from the provincial govern-

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ment also attended the event. The new cancer equipment will benefit over 30,000 cancer patients yearly, and an estimated 1,500 new patients will be added every year. In addition to Pakistani patients, Afghans refugees will benefit from state-of-the-art treatment for cancer. The UNHCR Representative lauded the work of the hospital as a symbol of hope for thousands of underprivileged cancer patients in Pakistan, including Afghan refugees. Ms. Menikdiwela appreciated the people and government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa for hosting Afghan refugees in the spirit of Islamic values of hospitality and generosity for decades. UNHCR has previously constructed the emergency assessment room and provided medical equipment to the Peshawar Shaukat Khanum hospital in 2015. In recognition of the support provided

by the government and people of Pakistan, UNHCR’s budget to support refugees in the country has increased over recent years. UNHCR also implements the Refugee Affected and Hosting Areas (RAHA) Programme to support Afghan refugees and their host communities. Since its launch in 2009, the RAHA programme has provided assistance to over 10.6 million people through 4,100 projects worth USD200 million in Pakistan in the sectors of education, health, livelihood, water, sanitation, infrastructure and social protection. Pakistan continues to host 1.4 million Afghan refugees. Around 4.3 million Afghans have returned to Afghanistan under the UNHCR-facilitated voluntary repatriation programme since 2002.


news and events

refugees

UNHCR supports Pakistan and Afghanistan to secure sustainable solutions for Afghan refugees

UNHCR reaffirmed its commitment to work with the Governments of Pakistan and Afghanistan on long-term solutions for the 1.4 million registered Afghan refugees in Pakistan. UNHCR lauds the decision of the Pakistani government to extend Proof of Registration (PoR) cards to Afghan refugees until 30 June 2018 as a temporary relief amid growing uncertainty and anxiety, but remains concerned that the Government’s timeframe for voluntary, safe and dignified return appears limited and that alternative solutions have yet to be sought. The UNHCR Representative for Pakistan, Ms. Ruvendrini Menikdiwela, acknowledged and applauded the

people and the Government of Pakistan for having hosted and cared for Afghan refugees for almost four decades. She also reiterated her call to the international community to continue its fullest support to Afghan refugees and their host communities. Ms. Menikdiwela underscored the need for creating conditions that will lead to a sustainable return to Afghanistan and making sure that every return is well-informed, voluntary, safe and dignified. She said that while voluntary repatriation is a preferred solution for the majority of Afghan refugees, it needs to be undertaken in a phased manner that supports refugees’ sustainable

reintegration back home in Afghanistan. Ms. Menikdiwela said UNHCR will continue to work with the Government of Pakistan in-line with their Comprehensive Policy on Voluntary Repatriation and Management of Afghan Nationals; and assist both Governments within a Tripartite Framework and agreed Solutions Strategy for Afghan Refugees (SSAR). Since 2002, around 4.3 million Afghan refugees have voluntarily returned to Afghanistan under the Tripartite Framework and UNHCR-facilitated voluntary repatriation programme.

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special feature:

TOWARDS UNIVERSAL HEALTH COVERAGE

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special feature

towards universal health coverage

“Join me in calling for Health for All” By António Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General Today, we mark World Health Day – and the 70th anniversary of the World Health Organization. WHO was founded on the principle that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being.” Since then, average global life expectancy has expanded by 23 years. Smallpox has disappeared, and

polio will soon be gone. Millions more children live to celebrate their fifth birthdays.But still, people around the world lack vital health services. Today, we join WHO in recommitting to ensure that everyone, everywhere, gets the health services they need. Join me in calling for Health For All

World Health Day’s history and efforts towards Universal Health Coverage

World Health Day is celebrated every year on 7 April: a date decided in 1948, during WHO’s First World Health Assembly. World Health Day marks WHO’s founding, and is seen as an opportunity to draw worldwide attention to a subject of major importance to global health each year. WHO organizes international, regional and local events on the Day related to a

particular theme. WHO was founded on the principle that all people should be able to realize their right to the highest possible level of health.“Health for all” has therefore been the guiding vision for more than seven decades. It’s also the impetus behind the current organization-wide drive to support countries in moving towards Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Some countries have already made significant progress towards UHC. But half the world’s population is still unable to obtain the health services they need. If countries are to achieve the SDG target, one billion more people need to benefit from UHC by 2023. World Health Day will shine a spotlight on the need for UHC - and the advantages it can bring. WHO and its partners will share examples of steps to take to get there through a series

of events and conversations held at multiple levels. Throughout 2018, WHO aims to inspire, motivate and guide UHC stakeholders to make commitments towards UHC. Inspire—by highlighting policy-makers’ power to transform the health of their nation, framing the challenge as exciting and ambitious, and inviting them to be part of the change; motivate—by sharing examples of how countries are already progressing towards UHC and encourage others to find their own path; and guide—by providing tools for structured policy dialogue on how to advance UHC domestically or supporting such efforts in other countries (e.g. expanding service coverage, improving quality of services, reducing out-of-pocket payments).

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special feature

towards universal health coverage

Developing a Pakistan-specific World Health Day Poster 2018 Under the guidance of Dr. Assai Ardakani, Head of Office WHO, a poster was developed specifically for Pakistan. The design shows an umbrella, symbolizing the Health sector, along with three slogans for delivering the services, emphasizing on Transparency, Responsibility and Equality. A map of the country represents coverage of health care for all people living in Pakistan regardless of gender, age, social-economic status and geographical location. This design conveys the meaning of the World Health Day theme: Universal health coverage: everyone, everywhere. WHO advocates for Health For All, leaving no one behind. WHO strives to strengthen the healthcare system of Pakistan by providing the unconditional and continued support to the Ministry of National Health Services Regulations and Coordination.

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special feature

towards universal health coverage

H.E Shahid Khaqan Abbasi , Prime Minister of Pakistan attends World Health Day special Event

His Excellency Prime Minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi attended a special event organized to commemorate World Health Day at the Prime Minister Secretariat on 13 April 2018. The event was organized by the Ministry of National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination (MoNHSR&C) in collaboration with the WHO. Mrs. Saira Afzal Tarar, Federal Minister of Health along with Mr. Naveed Kamran Baloch, Secretary of Health, Mr. Assad Hafeez, Director General of Health, Dr, Assai Ardakani, WHO Head of Office, Mr. Neil Buhne, UN Resident Coordinator, Brigadier Dr. Aamer Ikram, executive director National Institute of Health, UN Heads of Agencies, partners and senior government health officials grace with your presence the event. Dr. Assai Ardakani said the right to health for all people and universal health coverage were two sides of the same coin, the impetus of WHO’s work since its foundation 70 years ago. He quoted Dr. Tedros, WHO Director General’s message from a gathering in august, who commended

the Government of Pakistan for introducing the National Health Insurance Program, which covers 23 districts in its first phase. The WHO Director General mentioned his appreciation that the Government of Pakistan had made polio eradication one of its top priorities, and that the Prime Minister himself was leading the charge. This high level commitment has resulted in a drop in the number of polio cases from 306 in 2014 to only 8 in 2017 and so far only one polio case in 2018. Another major challenge for Pakistan is to reduce the burden of Tuberculosis. One of the major obstacles to ending TB is finding missing cases. WHO is launching a 3-year strategic initiative on ‘Missing TB Cases’. Noting that Pakistan constitutes 10 per cent of the total missing TB cases in the world. His Excellency the Prime Minister was requested to engage all development sectors, provincial health authorities, private sectors and Civil Society for an active case finding movement. Pakistan, as a signatory to Interna-

tional Health Regulations is the first country in the region to conduct the Joint External Evaluation in 2016 for assessing the required capacities to prevent, detect and respond to public health emergencies. In this regard, the National Action Plan for Health Security requires adequate domestic funding to ensure its sustainable implementation. Mrs. Saira Afzal Tarar, Federal Minister of Health, gave an overall review of the achievements of the Ministry of Health during the last five years. While addressing the gathering, the Prime Minister acknowledged the support by the partners and UN agencies while appreciating the work carried out by the Ministry of Health. H.E. Mr. Abbasi reiterated the support of the government of Pakistan for improving the health of the people of Pakistan.

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special feature

towards universal health coverage

World Health Day-2018: key messages • Universal health coverage is about ensuring all people can get quality health services, where and when they need them, without suffering financial hardship. • No one should have to choose between good health and other life necessities. • UHC is key to people’s and nations’ health and well-being. • UHC is feasible. Some countries have made great progress. Their challenge is to maintain coverage to meet people’s expectations. • All countries will approach UHC in different ways: there is no one size fits all. But every country can do something to advance UHC. • Making health services truly universal requires a shift from designing health systems around diseases and institutions towards health services designed around and for people. • Everyone can play a part in the path to UHC, by taking part in a UHC conversation.

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special feature

towards universal health coverage

World Health Day walk A walk to commemorate World Health Day (WHD) was organized on 13 April 2018. The walk began from the offices of the WHO and ended outside the building of Health Services Academy (HSA). Led by Dr. Assad Hafeez, Director General of Health, Dr. Assai Ardakani, WHO Head of Office, and Brigadier Dr. Aamer Ikram, Executive Director National Institute of Health (NIH), a large

number of participants took part in the walk. They held placards and posters under the theme of WHD, along with a number of World Health Day messages. A large banner, bearing the theme of the WHD, was developed especially for the event and was also carried by participants. Towards the end of the walk, dignitaries addressed the participants and highlighted the importance of the theme of the WHD,

Universal Health coverage: everyone, everywhere, Health For All.

Commemorating World Health Day at the provincial level

A number of activities to commemorate World Health Day were carried out in Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan and in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa In Punjab, the Secretary of the Primary and Secondary Healthcare Department (P&SHD) prepared UHC messages in local language and awareness materials were disseminated to the 36 districts. Across the province, awareness sessions, a walk and media sessions were

conducted. At the district level the local political representatives expressed their commitment to support the continuous provision of quality healthcare facilities to the communities. Academic institutions also participated in WHD celebrations: Nounehal Assembly took place in the Hamdard Auditorium Lahore with schoolteachers, students and parents. The children performed short skits, speeches and paintings around the theme of the UHC. An awareness session on UHC for medical graduates also took place in Lahore Medical and Dental College, Lahore. The administration of the Government Manawa Hospital hosted a campaign for their faculty, nursing

staff, para-medics, and community representatives. The Members of the National Assembly inaugurated the campaign on behalf of the P&SHD and expressed the commitment of the Government of Punjab toward UHC. In Sindh Province activities were arranged at Karachi, Hyderabad and other districts by the Provincial Department of Health, academia and partners working in the health sector, in collaboration with WHO. In Karachi, the Hamdard Foundation organized the 27th International Children’s Health Conference. Dr. Assai Ardakani, Head of WHO office Pakistan emphasized the need to scale up health insurance across the country to reduce out of pocket health expenditure.

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special feature

The Advance Educational Institute and Research Centre-AEIRC of the University of Karachi organized the 6th International Conference on Endorsing Health Science Research-(ICEHSR-18) with the theme “Towards SDGs; Exploring the healthy Possibilities”. WHO was invited as a guest speaker in the inaugural ceremony as well as a panelist of the SDG Panel session. WHD was celebrated by Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences (LUMHS), at Rahmore Village in District Umerkot where more than 300 villagers were vaccinated against Hepatitis-B. Water samples were tested by LUMHS water Testing Laboratory and an event was covered by LUMHS FM RADIO 96.6. The Directorate General Health Services Sindh, DHO office Hyderabad in collaboration with WHO organized a seminar at Sir CJ Institute of Psychiatry Hyderabad. The Medical Superintendent, Sindh Government Hospital Ibrahim Hyderi (Dr. Kishore Kumar Khatri) in collaboration with WHO Karachi and HANDS organized an awareness seminar for awareness of Health Workers, attended by more than 100 participants. Different speakers emphasized the roles and responsibilities of various health care providers towards achievement of UHC and SDGs. In Balochistan too, WHD was commemorated throughout the province. Major activities were carried out at the office of Director General Health Services (DGHS). Provincial Directors, Program Members, representatives from CSOs and UN Development Partners attended the

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towards universal health coverage

event. Another event was conducted at the College of Nursing, Bolan Medical College, Quetta. Nursing students and instructors took part, and the ceremony was chaired by Director Nursing Balochistan and Principal College of Nursing. A letter from DGHS Balochistan was issued to districts for World Health Day commemoration at respective districts. In Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, the Department of Health and Institute of Public Health, Khyber Medical University, and major players of the Health Insurance industry in Pakistan joined hands to lead the march towards UHC. Social Health Protection Initiative (SHPI) is the flagship project of KP Government to revamp the existing healthcare financing mechanism brought in the insurance industry. Senior managers from State Life Insurance Corporation, New Jubilee Insurance and ICI General Insurance, flanked by Government officials and academics had a panel discussion on mainstreaming insurance industry as a major player in reducing out of pocket expenditure at point of service and ensuring UHC through a pre-pooling mechanism. Another seminar was organized by the Department of Health Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in collaboration with WHO’s province sub office under the theme in the Provincial Health Services Academy Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. The current Government is strongly committed to achieving UHC and has started a comprehensive health insurance program for the province under which 70 per cent of the population has been registered, and is

entitled to get expensive health services free of cost. It was recommended by the forum that these initiatives be replicated to the districts level. It should not be a one-day activity rather than be a sustained process.


special feature

WORLD TB DAY – 2018

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special feature

world tb day 2018

Accelerating efforts to reduce communicable disease burden is a critical strategy towards UHC By Ren Mighui, WHO Assistant Director-General for Communicable Diseases

2018 marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of WHO, and it happens to be a historic year for the global fight against TB. The upcoming UN General Assembly High-level Meeting on TB in September is generating an unprecedented degree of political momentum and public awareness of TB. As you know, the UN meeting follows a very successful TB ministerial conference in Moscow in November 2017, which resulted in a high-level commitment from more than 100 countries and over 800 partners to accelerate efforts. TB, HIV, malaria, viral hepatitis and neglected tropical diseases have a significant impact on people’s health throughout the life-course, and still cause over 4 million preventable deaths each year. Their impact on societies and economies is devastating. As countries move towards universal health coverage, accelerating efforts to reduce the communicable disease burden is a critical strategy to achieve that goal. Countries with a high disease burden will struggle to achieve UHC without investing significantly more in the fight against communicable diseases. The theme of this year’s World TB Day is leadership. We are raising awareness of the fact that commitment is needed not only at the level of Heads of State, ministers, mayors and parliamentarians, but also at the level of community leaders, civil society advocates, health

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workers, and people affected with TB and their families. Everyone can be a leader in their own field. The first is strong partnerships and multi-sectoral engagement. New models of private-public partnership and the active engagement of NGOs would reduce the current fragmentation between the public and private sectors and – as a result – significantly enhance case detection rates and improve treatment outcomes. The second issue is case finding. Through passive case finding approaches, only about 70 percent of all cases are identified each year in this country. Case finding needs to be further strengthened, and one solution for the future could be for Pakistan to consider moving towards more active case finding strategies. WHO and partners stand ready to provide technical support to scale up these approaches. The third issue is the need to increase the integration of HIV and TB services in order to better serve the needs of people with co-infections. This is a major challenge around the world, and an estimated 40 percent of all HIV deaths are due to TB. The fourth issue is access to quality-assured medicines. As the country moves towards local manufacturing of TB medicines, it is important to ensure that local manufacturers meet international safety and effcacy standards and achieve WHO pre-qualification for their products.The fifth and final issue is sustainable financing for TB. Publicly financed health care is an important way to mitigate the economic and social impacts of TB. Studies have consistently shown that TB interventions are highly cost-effective and TB is one of the ‘best buys’ in public health. Increasing domestic financing for TB should be considered as a core strategy in the national TB response and an essential element of achieving universal

health coverage as the country graduates from Global Fund funding. WHO is working with the Stop TB Partnership to create an immediate push to translate existing TB commitments into action and find the 4 million missing TB cases by 2023. On this World TB Day, national monuments were lit up around the world – for the third year in a row – to express solidarity and raise awareness around TB. More and more people hear about the human suffering and devastation this disease leaves in its path. On this occasion, we remember those who have lost their lives and those who are struggling with the disease today. We also celebrate the potential of changing the future. The potential of how much we can achieve within a generation. The challenge is clear: without decisive action on TB, we will not be able to prevent unnecessary deaths, lift people out of poverty, and make progress towards universal health coverage. We all must work together to expand efforts to reach the most vulnerable populations and make sure that ‘leaving noone behind’ does not remain an empty slogan. The UN General Assembly High-level Meeting on TB provides us with a unique opportunity to secure the highest-level commitment to end TB – commitment by heads of state and government – and to hear the views of civil society and patient advocates. Finally, I would like to convey greetings and best regards from the WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros, and assure you of WHO’s firm and continuing commitment to help Pakistan on its journey to end TB. This is an enemy we can defeat and ultimately, our success will depend on the strength of our partnerships. Let’s work together for a TB-free world.


special feature

world tb day 2018

Wanted: leaders for a Tuberculosis-free world Every year World TB Day is commemorated on 24 March to raise awareness on the devastating health, social, and economic effects of Tuberculosis (TB) in public and to step up efforts to end the global TB epidemic. Despite significant progress over the last few decades, TB continues to be ranked, along with HIV, as the leading cause of death and top infectious killer worldwide, claiming over 4,500

there were an estimated 766,000 cases and 82,000 deaths. TB is responsible for 5.1 per cent of the current national disease burden in Pakistan. Pakistan is ranked 5th among high burden countries globally and 6th among Multi Drug Resistance in TB prevalent countries. 63 percent of TB burden of WHO Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR) resides in Pakistan alone. 518,000

as use of tobacco and alcohol and diabetes, increase the chances of getting TB. In addition to this, lack of access to health care is a major factor, which results in increased and untreated cases of TB. Furthermore, this access to health care is often hindered by increased costs in treating TB, seeking and staying in hospital care in financially not affordable for a majority of public, which increases

lives a day. The emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) poses a major threat to health security and could jeopardize achievements made in the fight against TB. World TB Day provides an opportunity to shine the spotlight on the disease and mobilize political and social commitment to accelerate progress to end TB. The estimated number of TB cases globally in 2016 was 10.4 million with 1.8 million deaths. In the same year, in the Eastern Mediterranean Region,

people get infected with TB every year and around 44000 patients died of Tuberculosis in 2016 (WHO report 2017). 366,000 TB cases were notified in 2016, with 93 per cent treated successfully. Based on current case notification of 69 per cent, it is estimated that there are 160,000 Missing TB cases in the country which is an alarmingly high figure. Multiple factors such as malnutrition, poor housing and sanitation, compounded by other risk factors such

the number of patients suffering from TB. In addition to this, the issue of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) further worsens the situation while treating patients suffering from TB. The situation is a stark reminder that tuberculosis continues to retain its status as a grave public health threat and much more is needed to achieve the End TB Strategy and targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS).

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world tb day 2018

Government strongly commits to global efforts towards eliminating tuberculosis By Mrs. Saira Afzal Tarar, Federal Minister for National Health Services, Regulations & Coordination

NGO health centers, 2,000 Pharmacies,

able development era.

35 private hospitals and 45 Para-statal

We are hosting a high level regional

hospitals in 88 districts are engaged in

conference on TB in May this year and

TB control. It is noteworthy that private

our Health and Population Think Tank

sector is contributing towards 28 per

with national and international experts is

cent of total TB case notification in the

meeting tomorrow in Islamabad to delib-

country. Moreover, we are working close-

erate the way forward in meeting remain-

ly with the Pakistan Pediatric Association

ing challenges in TB Control. World TB

to control childhood TB in the country.

Day aims to raise the public’s awareness

We express our strongest commitment

Cognizant of the risk of TB-HIV co-infec-

about the devastating health, social and

to prevent tuberculosis and contribute

tion, 40 Sentinel Sites have been estab-

economic consequences of TB and to

to the global efort of eliminating the dis-

lished for screening and early diagnosis

step up efforts to end the global TB epi-

ease. Let me reiterate there has been

of TB-HIV co-infection in geographical

demic. The heaviest burden is carried by

significant effort made by the Federal

areas having documented concentrated

vulnerable groups such as women, chil-

Government with support of the Provin-

HIV epidemics.I would like to share that

dren, older people, migrants, refugees,

cial Governments to stop TB in the last

for MDR TB Pakistan has treatment suc-

prisoners, ethnic minorities, miners and

few years.

cess rate of 65 per cent, which is higher

people working and living in risk-prone

Today, the TB Control Program is one of

than average global success rate. It was

settings. The current situation warrants

the best performing public health pro-

in this context that in 2016, Pakistan was

an urgent action by gearing up the ef-

grams in the country. Free TB diagno-

recognized with TB Champion Award.

forts to find missing TB cases. We are

sis and treatment services are available

Major strides have been made in im-

advocating strongly for enhancing do-

in more than 1,700 public and private

proving access and quality of TB care.

mestic investment. We must expand

sector facilities across Pakistan. In 2016,

However there is more work to be done.

public private partnerships and adopt a

around 69 per cent of the estimated in-

Factors such as malnutrition, poor hous-

multi-sectoral approach involving Edu-

cident TB cases were notified and put

ing and sanitation, compounded by oth-

cation, agriculture, housing, and social

on treatment. More than 90 percent of

er risk factors such as tobacco and al-

welfare. The role of the Media for aware-

the TB patients notified are successfully

cohol use and diabetes contribute to the

ness, addressing stigma, information

treated. More than 120 advanced diag-

problem. Pakistan stands with the Glob-

about available free services is also crit-

nostic facilities and 32 specialized treat-

al community in the fight against TB and

ical. The world community will be meet-

ment facilities have been established

is fully committed to end the TB epidem-

ing at the UN general Assembly in Sep-

across the country for free of cost early

ic by 2030 as envisaged in the Agenda

tember 2018 and a special meeting on

diagnosis and treatment for MDR TB pa-

2030 for Sustainable Development and

TB has been scheduled to address this

tients.

its Sustainable Development Goals, and

formidable challenge at to achieve SDG

In 2016 alone, 366,000 TB cases were

the World Health Organization’s End TB

goals. TB will be controlled when we all

notified and enrolled on treatment. We

Strategy and Stop TB Partnership Global

make joint efforts in line with the theme

have a strong cooperation and partner-

Plan to End TB. Pakistan is also a sig-

of World TB Day ‘Wanted: leaders for a

ship with the private sector. Today more

natory to the WHO Moscow declaration,

TB-free world’.

than 3,500 General Practitioners, 125

and has agreed to end TB in the sustain-

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special feature

world tb day 2018

National TB Control Programme highlights progress and the need for cooperation towards defeating TB By Dr. Nasir Mehmood, National Programme Manager, National TB Control Programme World TB day, celebrated all around the World yearly on 24 March, is the day on which Robert Koch discovered the Myco bacterium Tubercullus bacterium. Everyone thought that this debilitating disease would now be under control, as the organism had been identified. Then came the invention of anti-TB drugs in 1940, along with renewed optimism about controlling the disease, but as we know, the disease is still sadly one of the top 10 biggest causes of death for humans. World TB Day aims to raise the public’s awareness about the devastating health, social and economic consequences of TB and to step up efforts to end the global TB epidemic. About 10.4 million cases of TB occur each year all around the World; 1.8 Million die from the disease. Now a new challenge has arisen: resistant TB is the new menace of the present day. Pakistan is home to about half a million cases of drug sensitive cases and 27,000 cases of drug resistance every year.Pakistan also shares 62 percent of the disease burden in the Eastern Mediterranean region of WHO. The disease kills almost 44,000 Pakistanis every year and causes considerable economic loss. Pakistan with estimated disease caseload of 518,000 new sensitive TB cases annually ranks 5th among high burden countries. In order to

meet these challenges improved domestic funding, inter-sectoral collaboration, provincial coordination, and implementation of compulsory legislation are needed. Our Progress to date is: national and provincial strategic plans have been made for next three years; start of new drugs for the DRTB i.e. Badaquelin and Delaminate; introduction of Short term Treatment Regimen for the DRTB (24 months treatment course reduced to 9 months); Medical Officers of 144 districts allowed to diagnose and treat childhood TB (TWG); Scale up of Gene-Xpert from 54 to 412; introduction of Digital X-rays with CAD4 TB for screening of drug Sensitive TB; upgrade of PMDT sites for diagnosis and treatment of DR TB (34); introduction of new sentinel sites for TB-

HIV 28 to 40; engagement of Lady Health Workers; mandatory notification of TB; digital M&E and Supervision- DHIS-2; research capacity building e.g. SORT IT (Strategic Operational); successful completion of previous grant with burn rate of 98.5 per cent; successful approval of NFR for 2018-2020; engagement over 5000 GPs and Specialists; engagement of NGOs, Armed forces, and other public institutions; active case finding – X-Ray loaded Mobile vans for TB care; mass media campaigns; zero TB cities- Urban DOTS (inaugurated by the President of Pakistan. We need to join hands with private partners, all the sections of society, PTP’s and regions in order to defeat this menace.

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Engagement of civil society organizations crucial in fight to end TB By Dr. Jacob Creswell, Team Leader of Stop TB Partnership

Dr. Jacob Creswell, the team leader innovations and grants, Stop TB Partnership thanked the Government of Pakistan and Stop TB Partnership Pakistan and emphasized upon the enhanced engagement of civil society organizations to End TB. He referred to

the government’s efforts and the strong advocacy of STP with the provinces to commit domestic funding. He said awareness needs to be increased and active participation of local communities enhanced in the fight against TB: building capabilities of members of local communities, and empowering individuals to express their rights and assume their responsibilities. He also said that bringing together different organizations and grant holders to exchange best practices in mobilizing communities and managing projects will be very beneficial.Civil society organizations should join existing or promote national part-

nerships where they do not exist. He stated a platform for all partners interested and working for TB prevention, care, and control was needed, along with the involvement of different sectors: state (NTP) and non-state (civil society organizations and private/business sector); a mapping of partners and responsibilities; a shared plan based on the national TB plan according to competences and comparative advantages of each partner; and that a resource mobilization plan should be jointly developed (including in-kind resources, local donors, external donors).

Raising awareness among youth and community and addressing stigma attached with TB

A series of awareness events were organized in connection with World TB Day, in Fazaia Medical College, COMSATS University and the SOS Village. Around 150 students attended an awareness session at the Fazaia Medical College, and 75 students attended the session at COMSATS University. Vibrant discussions were held on TB

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modes of transmission, prevention and testing, and students and faculty participated in a question-answer session. Students of the second year of Fazaia Medical College also presented an informative role-play on TB. The objectives of the sessions were to talk about TB and most importantly to address the stigma attached to people living with TB. The sessions also provided evidence-based information to students, clearing the misconceptions and myths associated with factors, such as how the virus can be contracted and prevented, and how it can be treated. TB young volunteers were also identified among the students and got registered with NTP. Similarily, at the session organized at SOS Village, more than 60 children at-

tended the session at SOS Village to address stigma and discrimination. The aim was to increase awareness regarding TB and also to promote best practices among the general public to avoid emergence spread of disease. During the seminar, Dr. Razia and Dr. Fakhra, senior officers from National TB Control Program, highlighted the current situation of TB in Pakistan. They also said that TB is a major public health threat. They shared awareness regarding TB control and its prevention practices. EDITED AND MERGED two articles: 3. Print and electronic media, TB Awareness walk, City branding, TB Messages on high rise buildings with laser lights, Free TB messages on all celular companies networks


special feature

world tb day 2018

Media plays vital role in scaling up awareness about TB

As part of World TB Day efforts, print and electronic media were engaged in the World TB Day Campaign. All major TV and Radio Channels broadcasted the talk shows/ interviews on TB to create awareness. It was said that World TB Day is a reminder to policymakers, health professionals and the public that advancements in TB prevention testing and treatment have enabled communities to lead healthy lives. The wide gap between accessing TB treatment, as well as preventive and support services, calls for increased resource mobilization, focus on addressing the myths and

fighting stigma and discrimination associated with TB. All major areas of the Federal capital city were branded with streamers and banners comprising TB messages. The diverse streamers all around the city broadened the voice of the National TB Control Program “Wanted: Leaders for TB free Pakistan”. You can Make history End TB! In addition, awareness message regarding TB were displayed on highrise prominent buildings through LED technology. Some of the key TB

messages ( End TB, Cure TB, Stop TB, Treat TB, Treatment of TB is Free) were displayed at Safa Mall and Jinnah Super F-7, Islamabad. Likewise, public health text messages have the potential to reach large populations and shows high levels of engagement among users. SMS messages regarding TB were sent to general public through all national Telecommunication network (Ufone/ Mobilink/Telenor) with the support of PTA.

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world tb day 2018

Call for concentrated efforts to work together and save millions from the consequences of TB

The main event of World TB Day was observed on 26 March at the Marriott Hotel, Islamabad with more than 200 attendees. The Government of Pakistan pledged to increase awareness about TB, how to prevent it and how to set aside the prejudices that come with this disease. Each year, this fatal disease claims lives of a large number of people globally. Pakistan also faces a challenge in combating it. Remarks were given by Honorable Federal Minister, Ministry of National Health Services, Regulation and Coordination and she assured the full determination by the Government, health practitioners NGOs and the people to prevent TB infections and

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ensure access to safe, effective, and affordable quality medicines and diagnostics and related health commodities as well as healthcare services for all people. Speeches were also given by Additional Director General WHO, NTP Programme Manager, Team leader Stop TB Partnership, and WHO Country Representative. It was stressed that effectively combating TB requires that everyone should have equal access to information about preventive measures and the available treatment programs. This calls for concerted efforts involving the parents, teachers, religious scholars, media and indeed every segment of society to work

together and thereby save millions from the consequences of the disease. After speeches from guest speakers, the declaration on TB was signed by all four Provincial Managers on behalf of Provincial Governments. Vote of thanks was given to conclude the seminar.


special feature

world tb day 2018

Playing on the football field to raise awareness on TB

The National TB Control Program, in collaboration with Leisure Leagues organized a football match on April 10 at the Total Football Ground, to commemorate World TB day under the theme ‘Wanted: Leaders for a TB-free world’- focusing on building commitment to end TB, not only at the political level, but at all levels. It is not enough to treat TB as a medical problem– it must be viewed as a social and public health problem that affects us all. As part of broader health initiatives, linking sports with TB awareness has positive outcomes, as physical activity leads to a better quality of life and also ensures the speedy recovery of people with TB. The main objectives of the football match were to: create awareness among the general public regarding TB, promote a healthy lifestyle

through sports reducing the chances of diseases including TB, signing an MoU with Leisure Leagues to work together in the future, inviting students from nearby colleges and universities to create young volunteers and TB advocates.

from different backgrounds, such as media, diplomats, the former vice-captain of the Pakistan Football Team, and kept the whole audience on their toes. TB messages were broadcasted from time to time through speakers, and a TB song along with other national songs was played in the background. The winning team was given medals by the Chief Guest. The match concluded with both partners thanking everyone for coming and for being a part of the fight against TB.

The Chief Guest, Dr. Baseer Achakzai DNC AIDS and Malaria Control Program said that World TB Day aims to raise the public’s awareness about the devastating health, social and economic consequences of TB and to step up efforts to end the global TB epidemic. He said that this kind of initiative ensures that the general public is made aware about TB and we need to join hands with partners like Leisure Leagues, schools and colleges, the private sector etc. in order to defeat this menace. The match started with players

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world tb day 2018

Signing of TB Declaration

Mrs. Saira Afzal Tarar, Honorable Federal Minister, Ministry of National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination had already signed the declaration during the WHO Global Ministerial Conference held in Moscow in November, 2017. During World TB Day Seminar on March 26, 2018, Dr. Assad Hafeez, Director General Health services, Ministry of National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination and all the four Provincial Program Managers for TB Control Program (on behalf of Provincial Government) signed the declaration. The event was attended by United Nations agencies, government representatives, people living with TB, key populations and media. The declaration states:

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“We commit ourselves to ending TB, which is a political priority deďŹ ned in the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development Goals and as a contribution to achieving universal health coverage, within national legislative and policy frameworks, and to implement the actions through approaches protecting and promoting equity, ethics, gender equality, and human rights in addressing TB, and based on sound, evidence-based, public health principles. We urge the WHO, STOP TB Partnership and call upon other UN organizations and all partners, to provide the necessary support for success. We commit to: advancing the TB response within the SDG agenda; ensuring sufficient and sustainable

financing; pursuing science, research and innovation; and developing a multi-sectoral accountability framework. We conclude with our commitment to act immediately on the First WHO Global Ministerial Conference Declaration held in Moscow 2017 in coordination with the National TB Control Program (NTP), WHO, partners, and to engage with leaders and all relevant sectors of Government, UN agencies, bilateral and multilateral funding agencies and donors, academia, research organizations, scientiďŹ c community, civil society and the private sector to prepare for and follow-up on the UNGA High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis in 2018 in New York.


guest in town

United Nations Assistant Secretaryˇ General for Political Affairs Miroslav Jenca completes visit to Pakistan ing countries, and thanked Pakistan for its close cooperation with UN Country Team. He appreciated Pakistan’s support for the UN reform initiatives launched by the Secretary-General. During the visit, Mr. Jenča also participated at a medal parade of the UN Military Observation Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP). The ceremony recognized the service of UN peacekeepers deployed to UNMOGIP.

The United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs Miroslav Jenča completed his visit to Pakistan on 13 April. He held meetings with Foreign Secretary Ms. Tehmina Janjua and Special Secretary Ms. Tasnim Aslam, in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on 12 April. He also met with representatives of the diplomatic community and members of the United Nations Country Team (UNCT). č Mr. Jenča underlined that Pakistan’s commitment to fostering multilateralism and cooperation is important for peace and stability in the region and beyond. He welcomed the decision of Pakistan and Afghanistan to increase cooperation through the implementation of the Afghanistan-Pakistan Action Plan for Peace and Solidarity (APAPPS). Mr.

Jenča underscored the importance of this positive momentum for the further advancement of the Afghan-led and Afghan-owned peace and reconciliation process. He also commended Pakistan’s generosity in hosting refugees from Afghanistan and other countries. Mr. Jenča reiterated that the Secretary-General is concerned about the heightening tensions along the Line of Control between India and Pakistan. He echoed the Secretary General’s calls for maximum restraint and efforts to de-escalate the situation. Any outstanding issues between the two countries should be addressed through peaceful means. Mr. Jenča welcomed Pakistan’s contribution to UN peacekeeping as one of leading troop-contribut-

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guest in town

The Chairman of the Independent Council of the FAO, Mr. Khalid Mehboob visits Islamabad

The Chairman of the Independent Council of the FAO, Mr. Khalid Mehboob in his meeting with Mr. Sikandar Hayat Khan Bosan, Federal Minister for National Food Security and Research appreciated the Government’s efforts to formulate policies that will be instrumental in achieving zero hunger, improving food security and nutrition in Pakistan. He also acknowledged Pakistan’s national agenda that prominently features Climate Change. Mr. Nasar Hayat, Assistant FAO Representative, also present during the meeting, briefed participants on recent initiatives of FAO focusing on Climate Resilient Agriculture and

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Climate Smart Water Management. Mr. Khalid Mehboob also met with Deputy Chairman Planning Commission of Pakistan, Mr. Sartaj Aziz and exchanged views on matters of interest to both FAO and the Government of Pakistan. Mr. Khalid Mehboob participated in a one-day seminar to exchange knowledge on innovative climate change adaptation and mitigation practices that rural communities and smallholder farmers can adopt to increase production and improve household incomes. The role of South-South and Triangular Cooperation (SSTC) in furthering the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable De-

velopment was also discussed. Mr. Khalid Mehboob accompanied by his wife Ms. Giulietta also visited the FAO Representation office in Islamabad and met with staff members. His visit to FAO Pakistan coincides with the 40 year celebrations of the Representation office in the country. He told staff on the occasion that he was happy to be visiting FAO Pakistan for the second time and that their work in the country was an example of the great strides that FAO program had made the world over.


special feature

WFP Executive Director, Mr. David Beasley visits Pakistan Honorable Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, Prime Minister of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan appreciated the role of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) in Pakistan in being the leading humanitarian organization fighting hunger, providing food assistance, working with the communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. The Prime Minister expressed these views while talking to Mr. David Beasley, WFP’s Executive Director, who was visiting Pakistan in April this year. Honorable Murad Ali Shah, the Chief Minister of Sindh, lauded WFP for its initiatives especially those addressing nutrition issues in the province. Honorable Marvi Memon, Chairperson Benazir Income support Programme - BISP, Mr. David Kaatrud, WFP Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific, Mr. Finbarr Curran, WFP Pakistan Country Director, Ms. Katrien Ghoos, Deputy Country Director, and Capt. Khalid Mahmood, Political Agent- Khyber accompanied the Executive Director to visit WFP project areas in Khyber Agency of FATA and Thatta district of Sindh province. A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Benazir Income Support Programme (BISP) was signed by WFP Executive Director, to address malnutrition in the country under 1000 days partnership against malnutrition.’

WFP Executive Director planted a tree and placed a bench, in country office Islamabad, in the memory of WFP colleagues who lost their lives serving the vulnerable people of the country.

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guest in town


guest in town

WFP Executive Director’s exclusive interview with the PTV World

United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Executive Director Mr. David M. Beasley was interviewed by the Pakistan Television (PTV World) during his visit to Pakistan. Focus of the interview was on WFP’s move into the development/ humanitarian nexus after a decade of successful emergency assistance. Mr. Beasley also spoke about WFP’s presence in Pakistan

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for 50 years, working closely with the Government to address humanitarian and development needs. Under its new five-year Country Strategic Plan (2018 –2022), WFP will shift its focus from relief to nutrition, social protection, emergency preparedness, climate change, resilience and government supply chain system strengthening, while retaining its humanitarian response capacity.

Click the link below to watch the complete interview: h t t p s : / / w w w. y o u t u b e . c o m / watch?v=JMTprekVNdU


messages from antĂłnio guterres, secretary-general of the united nations

International Day of Solidarity With Detained and Missing Staff Members 25 March 2018 The International Day of Solidarity with Detained and Missing Staff Members reminds us of the perils United Nations personnel often face while serving the peoples of the world. Today, 29 United Nations civilian personnel are in detention. Eight are being held without known or clear charges or without the Organization being given any reasons for their arrests. We will continue to monitor these cases and pursue the release of our colleagues. I call on all countries to support the

1994 Convention on the Safety of United Nations and Associated Personnel as well as the 2005 Optional Protocol to the Convention, which extends protection to personnel delivering humanitarian, political or development assistance. Only 92 States are party to the 1994 Convention and only 32 are party to the Protocol. I urge all countries that have not joined these instruments to promptly do so. Whether in their countries of origin or far from their families and homes, United Nations personnel work tire-

lessly to help the world’s most vulnerable. The safety they need to carry out this vital mission should be our priority. On this International Day, let us strengthen our resolve and our means to protect United Nations staff as they work tirelessly for peace, sustainable development and human rights for all.

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messages from antรณnio guterres, secretary-general of the united nations

International Day International Day of Reflection on the of Remembrance 1994 Genocide Against the Tutsi In of the Victims of Rwanda 7 April 2018 Slavery and the ration of Human Rights and of the years ago, more than Transatlantic Slave Twenty-four Convention on the Prevention and 800,000 people were systematically Punishment of the Crime of Genokilled in the 1994 genocide in RwanTrade cide. Today, I call on the UN Member da. The victims were overwhelming25 March 2018

The epically shameful transatlantic slave trade was the largest forced and legally sanctioned movement of people in human history. More than 15 million men, women and children from Africa were enslaved. This Day of Remembrance was established to acknowledge a brutal chapter in human history, and to raise awareness of the dangers of racism and prejudice today. As we mark the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights this year, let us honour those who perished or suffered under slavery. Let us celebrate the gains of people of African descent. And let us press, every day and everywhere, to defend the dignity of every human being.

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ly Tutsi, but also included Hutu, Twa and others. Today we remember all those who were murdered and reflect on the suffering of the survivors, who have shown that reconciliation is possible, even after a tragedy of such monumental proportions. Rwanda has learned from its tragedy; so must the international community. States have a fundamental responsibility to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. It is imperative that we unite to prevent such atrocities from occurring, and that the international community sends a strong message to perpetrators that they will be held accountable. I am deeply concerned about the rise of racism, hate speech and xenophobia around the world. These base manifestations of human cruelty provide the breeding ground for far more evil acts. People are still being killed, displaced and their human rights abused in many parts of the world because of their faith or ethnicity. I am particularly troubled by the plight of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. Members of this religious and ethnic minority have been systematically killed, tortured, raped, burnt alive and humiliated, and more than 671,000 have fled in search of safety in neighbouring Bangladesh. This year, we are marking the 70th anniversary of the Universal Decla-

States that have not yet joined to become parties to the Convention, and I call on all States to back their commitments with action. To save people at risk, we must go beyond words. We must nurture the courage to care and the resolve to act. Only by meeting these challenges can we honour the victims and survivors of genocide and ensure that what happened in Rwanda is never repeated, anywhere, ever again.


video corner

Refugees to study at universities and colleges in their host country The Albert Einstein German Academic Refugee Initiative Programme (DAFI) is a global scholarship financed by the Government of Germany. Established in 1992, DAFI provides scholarships for young refugees to study at universities and colleges in their host country. UNHCR’s DAFI programme has pioneered a holistic approach, empowering over 9,300 young refugees globally so far, to contribute knowledge, skills and leadership to their communities. In Pakistan, DAFI scholarships have supported hundreds of students since its start. The video is shot in Lahore, Quetta and Kabul.

Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) Led by ILO, UN Women and the OECD, the Equal Pay International Coalition (EPIC) is a multi-stakeholder coalition to contribute to the achievement of SDG target 8.5 focusing on equal pay between women and men for work of equal value. “By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work.

Once a Cleantech entrepreneur, always a Cleantech entrepreneur - UNIDO/GEF GCIP Pakistan With the global economy facing pressing climate challenges, the countries are under increasing pressure to produce and consumer more efficiently, this pressure is creating innovation and opportunity in Clean Technology just as it has done in Information Technology revolution. A large share of the disruptive innovations required would come from entrepreneurial community, having recognized this United Nations Industrial Development Organization – UNIDO, with funding from Global Environment Facility –GEF and Cleantech Open- CTO as knowledge partner have joined hands to de-risk Cleantech innovations.

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video corner

UNIDO and Pakistan to jointly develop Country Programme - UNIDO Inception mission to Pakistan The Government of Pakistan, under the leadership of the Ministry of Industry and Production, and in collaboration with other line ministries and local governments, expressed interest in strengthening its cooperation with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) through the development of a Country Programme for Pakistan.

UNRC Pakistan Mr. Neil Buhne, shared how SDGs are important for Pakistan to adopt Biomass UNIDO is providing technical assistance for the development of concrete policy recommendations for policies and regulations relevant to the promotion of modern biomass technologies for both existing and future policy regimes with particular focus on utilization of biomass energy in industries. Deriving lessons from international best practices – listen to the importance of Biomass Gasification’s from Our Resident Coordinator Mr. Neil Buhne.

Project Manager - Mr. Alois Mhlanga speaking at GCIP Awards Ceremony 2017 and Investor Connect The GCIP Project Manager from UNIDO HQ Mr. Alois Mhlanga acknowledged that GCIP Pakistan due to the high level of success of GCIP, the programme is expected to be implemented appreciated the achievements of GCIP in Pakistan. He deeply emphasized the prospects and need of sustainability of this programme through national partners. kNow more about UNIDO’s efforts to promote cleantech Innovations and organizing investor connect in this video.

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Afghan refugee girls and Boys at the primary school located in Khazana refugee village near Peshawa

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www.un.org.pk www.facebook.com/UnitedNationsPakistan

The United Nations Pakistan Newsletter is produced by the United Nations Communications Group

Editor in Chief: Neil Buhne, Resident Coordinator, United Nations Pakistan and Acting Director, UNIC Deputy Editor and Content Producer: Ishrat Rizvi, National Information Officer, UNIC Sub Editor: Chiara Hartmann, Consultant, UNIC Photos Producer: Umair Khaliq, IT Assistant, UNIC Graphic Designer: Mirko Neri, Consultant, UNIC Contributors: Anam Abbas, Mahira Afzal, Qaiser Afridi, Rizwana Asad, Blinda Chanda, Shaheryar Fazil, Camila Ferro, Saad Gilani, Razi Mujtaba Haider, Shuja Hakim, Mehr Hassan, Fatima Inayet, Humaira Karim, Imran Khan, Samad Khan, Adresh Laghari, Sameer Luqman, Abdul Sami Malik, Waqas Rafique, Ishrat Rizvi, Maliha Shah, Zikrea Saleh, Asif Shahzad, Maryam Younus.

The United Nations has a long-standing partnership with the people of Pakistan in support of national development goals. The United Nations has also been providing humanitarian assistance in case of natural disasters and crises. Led by the Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator, United Nations works in all eight administrative areas of Pakistan through 19 resident organizations. Straddling humanitarian assistance and sustainable development, the work of the United Nations in Pakistan includes key areas such as education, health, water and sanitation, nutrition, economic growth, employment and livelihoods, resilience against disaster, governance, gender equality and social justice. The One UN Programme for Pakistan, United Nations focuses on accelerating progress towards achievement of Millennium Development Goals, reducing poverty, promoting opportunities for youth as well as advancing gender equality and human rights both at national and sub-national levels. United Nations encourages economic growth in Pakistan through supporting policies and programmes that link small farmers to markets, improving working conditions for women and supporting home-based and domestic workers. It will also assist the Government in strengthening democratic processes and institutions at the federal, provincial and local levels. Tackling the effects of climate change and reducing Pakistan’s vulnerabilities to natural disasters features especially prominently in the work of the United Nations in Pakistan.

For subscription please send us an email at: unic.islamabad@unic.org

UN Pakistan Magazine - Issue 2 / 2018  
UN Pakistan Magazine - Issue 2 / 2018  
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