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undergrad ISSUE 1

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UNDERGRAD CONTACT UNDERGRADZINE@OUTLOOK.COM INSTAGRAM | @undergradzine FACEBOOK | @undergradzine TWITTER | @undergrad_zine

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UNDERGRAD

A LETTER FROM OUR EDITOR

Fashion has always seemed to be at the forefront of everything I do. Even from a young age, I knew that I would be involved in the industry, one way or another. But when I came to university, I did not realise how vast the industry was and just how complicated it could be. But this complexity is what intrigues me so much. Fashion is not just one thing, it is a chasm of ever-evolving entities that will continue to stand the test of time. But my interpretation is different. I don't care for the latest trends, or who's wearing what now. I care for those who are making things differently and for those who aren't following traditions. And thanks to Falmouth, I can express this love for fashion, in a way I never thought possible. So this is where UNDERGRAD comes in. UNDERGRAD isn't a typical fashion magazine, as there is nothing typical about fashion at Falmouth. UNDERGRAD is a platform for young creatives, who wish to see the world in a different light and say "Screw it!" to conformities. At UNDERGRAD, we aim to celebrate all of those young art students who have a voice and who have something to show. We want to showcase to the world that Falmouth is the place to be to find upcoming artists, designers and makers. In this first issue of UNDERGRAD, we celebrate all of those who have a real talent and those who make Falmouth what it is, because without them, there would be no us. This first issue is the ultimate celebration of Falmouth students, both past and present and would not have been possible without the support of friends and family. This issue would not exist without the contributions of the amazing students at Falmouth and those who have supported UNDERGRAD since the beginning. Thank you to all of our photographers, writers, designers and supporters. This issue is dedicated to you and with all of your help, I am eternally grateful for each and every one of you. For those who helped to make UNDERGRAD financially possible, I send out an even bigger thank you, as this would not have been possible without you all. So thank you to Nick Hill, Sam Ruddick, Nicola Ajayi, Hannah Czemerda, Elzbieta Antosiewicz, Olatayo Akinfe, Sandra Adams, Joanne WaiChung, Hazel Adams, Peter Ashenhurst, Megan Screeton, Arvinda Gray, James Adedeji and Olamide Olabode. I hope that all of you reading this first issue love what has been created by the students at Falmouth and become inspired too. Enjoy the issue and I'll see you on the next one.

Kemi Ajayi


UNDERGRAD

CONTRIBUTORS

SARAH BUTTON OLIVER RADFORD OLIVER COLE ARABELLE ZHUANG YURU S H A N N O N D A R B Y- J O N E S INGRID REIGSTAD JACK JOSEPH B E E

J A Y N E

C E C I L I A

R A N C E

ESMÉ MOORE CAITLIN DAVIS PETER ASHENHURST JONATHAN WILSON JORDAN WOODS IMOGEN REYNOLDS CHARLOTTE ANSTEE ESMEE JOINSON EVANS JAKE MCBRIDE

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INSPIRATION

THE FALMOUTH TOUCH BY K E M I A JAY I

In a small area of Cornwall, located at the very tip of this lonely island, is a peaceful town called Falmouth. Now, anyone who has lived in Falmouth, knows that peaceful is just one way to describe it. Quiet, tranquil and special are just a few other words that come to mind when I think of this town. It is a town like no other and holds treasures that need to be discovered. No other town can support scenery like Falmouth does and no other town can host such an array of culture within a ten-minute walk. Falmouth has been my home for the past three years, since I packed up my belongings and made the journey down south. Three years ago, I accepted my placement at Falmouth University and made the unbelievably long car drive from Hertfordshire to this great town. After six painful and nerve racking hours, I had made it to the campus and was shortly greeted by my new Falmouth family. The next three years were to shape the person I have become today and would prepare me for the career of my choosing. But I did not realise how much Falmouth would impact my life. Before I came here, I had a general idea of who I was and what I believed in. I knew I had a strong calling towards the fashion industry, but like so many of my peers, I was still completely clueless. But then along came Falmouth and my whole outlook changed.

I was suddenly surrounded by people who could think beyond themselves as I was immersed into a culture that had no pressures or expectations. Falmouth became a place that I could totally relax and create, without fear of judgement or ridicule. This level of acceptance is extremely hard to find in new places. Often, newcomers are met with unease and little understanding, but not in Falmouth. Never have I come across prejudice or negativity, something that can be rife in larger towns or cities, or have I been exposed to unsafe circumstances. It seems that Falmouth has created a calming bubble that surrounds this beautiful landscape and protects all those who wish to enter. Of course, I am completely and honestly biased to this town. It has stolen my heart and made me feel welcome. But it seems that I’m not the only one who feels this way. Being a part of a large arts university, I come across many creative and talented students who have also called Falmouth home. When I came to write this article, my initial thought was; what do the students truly think about Falmouth? What is it about this small coastal town that keeps bringing people back and enticing newcomers in? So of course, I had to find out the answer to these questions.

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INSPIRATION

“I like that it's a small close knit area. Although sometimes it feels restricted I like that I can walk down the street and see someone I know. Not forgetting the fact Falmouth is stunning, I think it's really under rated but so many people come here every year so there must be a reason for it. We have beautiful scenery, charming local businesses and a cultural history to match.�

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INSPIRATION

Asking around brought back interesting answers, with most people agreeing with my sentiments. The main reason for loving Falmouth seemed to be its location. Falmouth is famous for its beaches and outstanding coastline with Gyllyngvase Beach, the most popular beach in Falmouth, boasting a Blue Flag status and an award-winning café. With surroundings that take your breath away and scenery that is unparalleled, it’s no wonder that the students at Falmouth love it so much, with some opting to spend an extra year after graduating soaking up everything this town has to offer. Not only does Falmouth boast a beautiful location, but it somehow creates a chilled and relaxed atmosphere that immediately becomes infectious. Despite the stresses of student life, nearly everyone who attends this university is placed in a tiny bubble, full of calming noises and tranquil settings and you suddenly become oblivious to the mad world in which you live. Even at the height of exam and deadline season, you will still see a horde of students drinking artisan coffee or strolling along the beach with a camera at hand, living a carefree existence. Many of those asked what they loved about Falmouth noted that the laid-back lifestyle of this seaside town was in fact a positive. Once you go from the hustle and bustle of a city to a somewhat ‘slow’ little town, it’s hard to go back. It’s hard to get back into rush hour once you have you realised that no one has no real urge to be anywhere, and that’s okay.

Despite being 100 hundred miles from any major city and despite the fact that it takes three hours just to get out of Cornwall, Falmouth is a place that is like no other. Nowhere else can you get such outstanding scenery, amazing food and an unprecedented night life. The cobbled roads, colourful houses and hills that require pure stamina and strength are a part of what makes this town unique and one that will bring people back time and time again. Yes, you can walk through Falmouth in approximately ten minutes, but during those ten minutes you are greeted by friendly neighbours, quirky independent cafés and bars and locals who are proud to call this place home. Well done Falmouth, you have truly stolen our hearts.

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INSPIRATION

“I like Falmouth because I know where I stand. I know that when I walk into town I know what to expect. I expect to see people I know, I expect to see tourists wondering around, I expect to see the homeless outside of Tesco, I expect to see a load of old smokers outside the pubs. I expect to see the people I work with, a family member, a smiling face. I expect to see the beautiful scenery, the bustling street and the wonderful place I’m glad to call home.”

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C U LT U R E

FALMOUTH, CORNWALL

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C U LT U R E

BY OLIVER COLE

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CHOOSE LIFE. CHOOSE YOUR COURSE. CHOOSE GETTING DRUNK ON THE WEEKENDS. CHOOSE GETTING FUCKED EVERY OTHER DAY OF THE WEEK. CHOOSE KETAMINE, VALIUM, COCAINE. CHOOSE ECSTASY AND GETTING TURNED AWAY FROM CLUB I WONDERING WHERE IT ALL WENT WRONG. CHOOSE MARIJUANA, SKATE 3 AND A WHOLE HEAP OF GRUNGE TO GET YOU THROUGH THE DAY. CHOOSE LONG WALKS TO THE FRIDGE AT NIGHT. GET A JOB WALKING HORSES AND CLEANING OTHERS KITCHENS EVEN THOUGH YOURS IS RANCID.

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CHOOSE BAGGY CLOTHES AND EVEN BAGGIER EYES. CHOOSE YOUR BAGHEAD FRIENDS. HANG UP TAPESTRIES ACROSS YOUR ROOM LIKE EVERYONE ELSE. PICK YOUR NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS AND BREAK THEM WITHIN THE 3RD WEEK OF THE NEW YEAR.

CHOOSE LIFE.

CHOOSE FALMOUTH.

*****

ANONYMOUS

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PHOTOGRAPHY

OLIVER RADFORD “KNUCKLES THAT BEEN CRACKED�

HAVE

NEVER

Knuckles That Have Never Been Cracked is a body of work studying the in-between state of adolescent boys on the verge of adulthood and at the edge of their environment; it is an insight into the culture, behaviour, placement, style and the uniform worn by these people. The work explores a familiarity I seek out within all of my work, a nod to home and the people that adorn it, an outward looking indirect exploration of myself. Within the work I am interested in creating portraits of the boys and their surroundings, showing the tough exterior and prominent stature they project when confronted with the camera, pushing the tension between the sitter and the photographer and breaking through it, creating a seemingly true image of the subject. I hope to display the boys in a way which they are denied due to their stereotyping and neglect from society, in a new and softening light. The work is a movement toward and an attempt at changing outlooks toward a misunderstood and beautifully innocent age and culture.

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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TEXTILES

B R I O N Y

C H I L D

I N T E R V I E W BY E S M E E J O I N S O N E VA N S

Meeting with Briony Child, a second year Textile student at Falmouth University, I spoke to Briony about her inspirations behind the work that she curates and how she feels as a designer studying in Falmouth. Briony is currently working on an industry specific brief for the Bradford Textile Society Competition.

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TEXTILES

Was studying in Falmouth always something that appealed to you? Yes, my first choice was always going to be Falmouth, with De Monfort, Buckinghamshire and Nottingham Trent being close considerations. The environment of Falmouth and the facilities that they offer being similar to that of industry appealed to me massively, with the other university’s I applied for not seeming as technical or professional. The employment scheme was also a massive benefit to me when applying here with help in my portfolio building for possible internships.

Have you always had a background in textile design? I was always interested in the customisation of my own clothes from a young age, leading to me taking textiles at GCSE level. In college I was initially going to choose sociology, but I think I fell in love with textiles all over again because designing and drawing was always a constant thought, and I knew having that background helps as a designer. I also fell in love with printing and knew it was something that I would be fascinated by after doing a print focused project.

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Tell me about the project you are working on at the moment. I am currently working on an external brief for the Bradford Textile Society Competition which has given me a great opportunity to tailor my work for industry. It’s quite an open brief so I’ve been able to approach it quite independently. I’ve produced work that showcases my printing abilities as well as investigating in colour palettes and repeated patterns. My work has been quite lucid this time and I’ve experimented quite a lot with geometric shapes and how they can be visualised onto products. Photoshop and digital formats have been a staple in my approach this time, which allows me to scan my original sketches and edit the colourways digitally. My Photoshop skills have definitely improved since being at uni!

Do you have any particular inspirations when approaching projects? We are always encouraged to think as individuals and show innovation. I tend to have a collective of inspirations and try not to follow the trends as much. I’ve always been interested in marine biology and natural forms, stemming from college and childhood memories. Living in Falmouth has allowed me to be constantly inspired, but it can sometimes be easy to use the nautical themes as motivation so I always try to put my own spin on things. Living in Bristol before moving to Falmouth also allows me to draw inspiration from the bigger cities, and seeing the juxtaposition of a busier lifestyle compared to Falmouth.

In terms of your course, how much time do you spend with your lecturers and other colleagues? I see my tutor every week, and my lecturers are very approachable so they never hesitate to speak to me about my work and the ideas I have. We are encouraged to collaborate, so we have regular group meetings which is great for gaining any feedback of my work.

You are currently completing a term in Fashion Marketing. How are you finding it so far? Yeah, I am completing a term in Global Fashion marketing, which has already given me an insight into the market in which I can inevitably position my fabrics into. I am becoming more aware of the nature of trends and how quickly they can come and go, being particularly helpful when researching for my current textiles project and my use of geometrics. A big part of textiles in general is time management and being prepared and organised so it is useful to be in that state of mind when marketing too.

You mentioned you are in the process of looking for possible internships. Does location play a big part in this?

I originally come from Bristol, and will be spending the majority of my summer there so it will be less expensive in the long run to find some local experience as I will have little contribution to living costs. Like anything though, London seems to be the main hub for any companies offering experience, and I haven’t really found anything that appeals to me in Bristol yet.

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P H O T O G R A P H E R A R A B E L L E Z H U A N G Y U R U M O D E L B E N W I N T E R

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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TALKING POINT

T H E G E N D E R I S S U E

Gender has forever played an integral role within society and fashion. Gender has, for many centuries, defined who we are and separated us from each other. Gender acts as a categorising system that places each individual into his or her rightful place. But this is all changing. As the world develops and grows, so do the beliefs and rules set down by generations before us. Laws change, religions die out and society becomes ever more liberal and care-free. Because of this, there is an ever-growing movement towards a change in societal attitudes, with the move towards an undefined, equal minded and “gender neutral” society.

Gender within fashion seems to be a topic on everyone’s mind, but here at UNDERGRAD, we want to discuss the whys and the hows.

But what does it mean to be “gender neutral”? Over the past few decades, we have seen examples of changes towards gender, with the development of job titles to include “gender neutral” terms, such as flight attendant or police officer, which came about due to the influx of more women to the workforce. Job titles had to change to become more inclusive and less centred towards the male population. This somewhat minute change has now consequently translated itself into fashion, which just so happens to be the main focus of this feature.

This feature will explore the changing of genders within fashion, touching on the industry’s response to this movement as well as looking into what is happening right here in Falmouth. The “Gender Issue” is our way of touching on such a thought-provoking and remarkable subject that, in one way or another, has an effect on every individual and every individual to come.

How has gender neutrality been translated into what trends we buy into? Why aren’t more designers and brands accepting this new division of society? How is the next generation of creators and thinkers incorporating this fluidity of the sexes?

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PHOTOGRAPHY P H O T O G R A P H E R J A C K J O S E P H M O D E L A I D A N B A K E R

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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ARTICLE

21ST CENTURY FEMINISM AND FASHION WORDS BY CHARLOTTE ANSTEE

This season, fashion has been lending us all a hand in being vocal about women’s issues. Fashion’s purpose used to simply be to make people look good, however this is no longer the case, shown through political and social messages over many collections. At the recent Dior Spring/Summer 17 show Maria Grazia Chiuri (Dior’s first female designer in its 70-year history, about time right?) was applauded for her ‘WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS’ t-shirt, a quote taken from writer Chimanda Ngozi Adichie and it quickly became the most Instagramed look from Paris fashion week; with celebrities such as Natalie Portman adorning the t-shirt. High street brands like ASOS have now followed this trend by selling political and feminist slogans on t-shirts. When women on protest marches and models on catwalks are wearing the same t-shirts, it can be pretty special to see. The CFDA (Council of Fashion Designers of America) started a ‘fashion stands with planned parenthood’ campaign to raise awareness of Planned Parenthood which is currently at risk of being de-funded by the American government. The Business of Fashion also took a stand against the rising political angst with a ‘#tiedtogether’ movement, encouraging people in the global fashion community to wear a white bandana showing a clear statement in support of solidarity, human unity and inclusiveness. But with all of these brands sticking a middle finger up to politics, are they truly showing their support for feminism, or are they strategically cashing in on a hot topic trend? When it became unclear as to how feminist the marketing of the fashion industry was, asking companies whether they genuinely believed in feminism or not, has now become a reality. However, it is the nature of a business to quickly move on to the next big trend, but the fashion industry has been talking about feminism for over 4 years now so it must be more than a fad, right?

This then leads us to ask if there is a pressure to talk about politics even if it back fires for a company. A perfect example of this is New Balance, whose US sales have dropped after they publicly announced they were in favour of Donald Trump. Bloggers are also getting called out for not using their voice and platform to talk about these issues to educate their younger audiences on crisis’ such as the issue with Planned Parenthood. However, is it really their place to share political opinions? Can they not just continue to delight their followers with content that distracts them from the horrors of Donald Trumps’ totalitarian regime? So what do we actually want from these brands and bloggers and why do we expect them to be vocal about these issues and then criticise them if they offer the wrong opinion? At Raf Simons’ first show for Calvin Klein, David Bowie’s ‘This is not America’ was played to open and close the show. Simons said ‘When you have a voice you should use it’, with model Lauren Hutton praising his show saying ‘I think that what all art is for fashion, if it’s good, always has something to say about society’ therefore fashion as an art form should always be political and some form of social commentary. But is this the case for business and marketing? It’s clear there is still a way to go, but as brands use their marketing for change and spreading awareness, we hope fashion can continue this part in pushing the current feminist movement forward.

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ARTICLE

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FASHION

E M I L Y

E L L I S O N

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"QUEER STYLE IS ONE OF THE MOST FASHIONABLE FORMS OF RESISTANCE"

WO R D S BY E S M E E J O I N S O N E VA N S

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ARTICLE

2017 is upon us. The uncertain world is looming. 2016 was heavy and gave us a dislocated outlook on what we all once thought was a strong(ish) society, with values and attitudes that tended to let people sleep with a little bit of ease at night. And now, in an uncertain post-Brexit, Trump led disorder we can all see ourselves being thrown back in time 100 years. For most, popular culture has been a thing of indulgence; an escape from everyday life and a chance to break away from the expectations of society. Look at the cultivation of Britain in the 1960’s; the underground hero of the Skinhead, the island with left wing politics and anarchy that follows. Although, as the name suggests, it was the shine of the Brighton sun bouncing off the cleanly shaven heads that defined many of the men and women alike, this iconic sub-culture was defined by fashion. The 16-hole black patent Doc Marten boots, bold checked shirts and classic bomber jackets dominated the scenes, giving the ‘rebels’ of society a look that screamed! Fast forward 30 years and although the looks of the 60’s might not be as prevalent in today’s modern society, the strong-willed and defying attitudes amongst the people have stood the test of time. Fashion continues to create trends that need to be followed, as well as some that need to be dismissed completely, arguably becoming trends in their own, ironic, right. From men’s wigs in the 1700’s, to the late greats of David Bowie and Prince (RIP), fashion has long toyed with gender boundaries. In the ultra-connected world that we have been submerged into, where news can instantly become a worldwide topic on various social platforms, it has become impossible for designers and media alike to ignore the impact of society’s values. Fashion has often had a tricky relationship with aspects of identity and the body and the constraints that gender has had on mainstream collections. Rebellion against the norms of authority is what drives the human evolution, the countless trends that appear on catwalks and in the windows of every high street retailer have stemmed from the challenges of mainstream acceptances.

But as 2017 continues to play itself out, we are faced with a new reality. Welcome to the world of gender-neutral fashion. Posing the question; does anyone actually care? 2014; Russian music collective Pussy Riot, a practise of youth protest that considers educated debate for social change. Compelling voices of radicalism, and quite possibly the most influential group of girls to have ever conveyed fears to a range of audiences. They reinforced the path for justice and possibly created one of the most important chapters in modern history. Setting the pace for change, and a nation of androgynous protagonists. When it comes to style in the brand spanking new year we have been thrown into, it seems clearer than ever that the question seems not to be “why bend the gender rules?”, it’s “why not?”. With department stores and runway shows embracing the almost organic blur of the sexes, the cross-pollination of designers are now challenging conventions restrictions, creating a vision of gender fluid eccentricity that calls for attention. Take Hari Nef for example, a transgender woman who has become a style icon in her own right is now championing the androgynous and becoming a vocal advocate for femme aesthetics. Her resistance conventional means of gender representation have altered the outlooks of women everywhere, let alone the trans community. Gary Thompson, AKA ‘The Plastic Boy’, became the firstever male makeup campaigner, signing for L’Oréal in August 2016. 17 year-old James Charles, who made his viral debut on Facebook feeds last September, became the first ever male spokesperson and ‘CoverBoy’ for the ultra-feminine magazine, CoverGirl. The future is looking positively unfiltered, with millennials and younger icons already dictating a world where no one will be held back by gender expectations. When a person strives for change, people follow. Societal values shift and boundaries are crossed and replaced by new obstacles to overcome. Fashion has long been a reaction to self-expressions and self-discoveries, with this championing of the LGBTQ+ community being nothing out of the ordinary.

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I L L U S T R A T I O N S

B Y

E S M E E

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J O I N S O N

E V A N S


C HA RLOTTE

H OWA R D

" P H A L LO P H O B I A" P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y S H A N N O N D A R B Y- J O N E S


Charlotte Howard is a fashion designer from Falmouth University, who has just finished her graduate collection. Her collection is based on bringing together art and fashion, to create a collection that is both highly impactful and beautifully made. Charlotte has always had a love for the art world and has successfully translated that into her final collection, drawing on inspirations from Jeff Koons and Grayson Perry. I spoke to Charlotte about her collection, her time at Falmouth and how she sees her collection progressing into life after university.

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DESIGN

Can you briefly describe what your graduate collection is about? My graduate collection is based on an art exhibition I went to see by Jeff Koons. There were balloon animal sculptures that were made out of cast aluminium and then polished. The scale and surface texture is what initially drew me to go and see the exhibition and the fact that the balloon animals have phallic-like connotations! The other sculpture in the exhibition that really stood out was the ‘Play-Doh’, the child-like playful quality to the sculpture resonates with children and adults alike. The sculpture itself was held together purely from its own weight and this is what has helped form my colour pallet for the entire collection. From this exhibition it made me start thinking about the gallery space and how white walled galleries have changed the way we view art. With Jeff Koons’ artwork being shown in different environments, it allows for the pieces to take on the context around it, changing the visual impact. The collection is for the artist, as it grows and develops it turns into art installations and art pieces. Is it Wearable Art or is it Fashion? You decide. Where has the inspiration come from? My biggest inspiration for art is Grayson Perry and Marc Quin (I LOVE his blood head sculptures), the freedom and statement they both make are bold and strong, challenging what we perceive as art along with challenging the media in which it is created. Along with Damien Hurst, his gallery ‘Newport Street Gallery’ is one of my favourites in London, the wide variety of media used makes for an intriguing collection of work. You mention that your collection is based heavily on art, does that change who you see wearing your collection? My customer is very much someone that enjoys art and wants to show off their experimental side. This person wants to become one with art and they see fashion and art as one entity. How do you go about designing conceptual menswear? Has it been difficult combining functionality with art? I always start with an art base, whether it starts with expressive drawing or experimental collage or just simply looking and consuming art- it can be anything. From there I look at shapes and lines. This then leads into design and then into a fully realised collection. Combining functionality along with conceptual fashion has been very difficult, but it is the dress codes that have helped make my collection believable and therefore makes it understandable to everyone else.

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DESIGN

How has your time at Falmouth influenced your final collection? Before coming to Falmouth I never thought that I would love doing knitwear as much as I do, this has had a massive impact as my knitwear pieces are the ones I am most excited about people seeing! The complete understanding that we are all individual designers has allowed me to be more experimental and bolder than what I would have envisioned my graduate collection to be at the start of my degree. What about your dissertation? I know that a research project such as this can have a great impact on a final collection. My dissertation explores the relationship between art and fashion through analysis of their historical similarities and differences. By researching and writing my dissertation on this it made me think about how we view and consume fashion and art, the forever merging lines of the two disciplines are the key driving points with my collection. Understanding how knitwear has become more popularised through fetishism and art is what gives my collection solidarity. Obviously your collection is supposed to encompass fashion and design, so how do you go about creating a functional collection that is phallic in nature? I didn’t ever think I would create the collection that I have! As it is a bit of a taboo subject I didn’t want it to be obvious. The whole idea is that you understand my collection but you don’t really know why you understand it until you look deeper and you see all of the sexual connotations, when a child would view it as something more fun and tactile in nature. The collection theme has definitely been one that raised eyebrows, but the development and exploration has lead it away from the obvious topic. I would therefore hope that people appreciate it even if they don’t understand the concepts and ideas. In a way I’m more flattered if someone doesn’t completely understand it as I want them to have their own interpretation of the ideas. Where do you see yourself and this collection in the future? What is the plan after university? I see it being stocked in Dover Street Market, that would be my dream. But really any concept store would be amazing. But the dream is to be head designer of a contemporary knitwear brand (whether it be for myself or a pre-existing company, I don’t know yet). But definitely working in a place that challenges me creatively and wants to explore different mediums and surfaces. However, the plan is to take a year out to intern, experience new cultures, travel and look at a ton of blooming beautiful art. After that I am planning on going to study knitwear design for my MA.

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DESIGN

Talking to Charlotte Howard and having the opportunity to see her collection first-hand gives me an insight into the world of design and just how amazing it is. It is a commendable profession that requires complete dedication and imagination. Each garment is made with precious skills and experience, tools that can only be harnessed by those who have a love for the industry. Charlotte’s collection is both imaginative and bold and aims to break down the boundaries of art and fashion, whilst simultaneously redesigning menswear. This is no typical collection that has the traditional buttondown suit and fitted work shirt, but it is a collection that sparks up nostalgia and fun. Here at UNDERGRAD, we are all for celebrating talent that is out of the ordinary and sparks up a conversation. This may be the end of Charlotte’s journey at Falmouth, but it is nowhere near the end of her designing career. We look forward to seeing where Charlotte takes her love for art next.

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F L O R I A N

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S A R A H

B U T T O N

Florian is an editorial based upon the concept of female empowerment; this has been represented in the visual language via the choice of colour, model, props and styling. Being one out of six editorials, which will be presented in my final portfolio fashion magazine named ‘Ms.’ there is a running theme of female empowerment throughout.

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F L O R I A N

I particularly love this editorial because of the power of red, contrasted with the elegance of blooming flowers being held as a representation of beauty and a blooming confidence throughout young females with their body and position in the world with gender.

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P H O T O G R A P H E R I N G R I D R E I G S T A D M O D E L K I M B E R LY W I L L I A M S @ O X Y G E N M O D E L S

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INTERVIEW

C O L E

B U X T O N

Cole Buxton is a former performance sportswear design student at Falmouth University and is now heading up his own menswear brand, creating a bond between sportswear and high quality tailoring. The brand itself is understated and calm, it does not call for loud branding or ‘in your face’ tag lines, but relies simply on its design and manufacturing. Cole Buxton talks to undergrad about his journey from student to designer and remarks on where his path as a self-employed designer will take him.

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P H O T O G R A P H E R T H R D S S T U D I O M O D E L S R E I H A N B R U T I M I G U E L H A R I C H I

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INTERVIEW

Since graduating from Falmouth University, what has life been like for you? Since graduating life has been great. It’s been cool to see the paths of all my classmates…. Most are travelling and seem to be loving life. What was the process for getting Cole Buxton up off the ground? Getting Cole Buxton up and running has been a long process. It pretty much started during my time at Falmouth where I was hand-making and selling backpacks, I ended up making about 30 bags and reinvested all that cash back into the brand etc etc. It’s been a slow process and I’m constantly changing things and always compromising but that is the way of the apparel industry, things often go wrong and you’ve just gotta roll with it. How did your time at Falmouth sculpt your career? Falmouth didn’t really shape my career as I always was going to go down this route with my career however the sportswear design course was exactly what I needed to figure out all the tech side of the industry. My lecturers were great, both bought backpacks from me back in the day. They always advised against anyone starting their own company right out of uni and they are dead right, but for me I couldn’t possibly work for anyone else. On your website, you mention that there is a family family play a big role in your brand?

history of tailoring. Does your

My whole family has been part of this industry at some point in their life, my dads’ side is retail and my mums’ side is on the design category. Growing up surrounded by this is definitely what inspired me to follow. You also mention that you always knew that you would be a part of this industry, but did you have any other career goals? Haha good question, I actually had a short lived goal of wanting to be a fish farmer (I was really into carp fishing) but when I realised you had to be up at 4am up to your neck in a slimy pond I soon changed my mind… How has it been incorporating minimalism into active wear? Has it been difficult bringing the two together? “Clutter Kills Minimalism” was something my grandpa always used to say to me growing up and it wasn’t until I started designing that I really understood what it meant, this has become my exact design philosophy. The main challenge I have found and will continue to do so is that all my branding is understated, in a logo obsessed world.

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Where do you get your style inspiration from? My style inspiration is pretty much a mix of Canadian sportswear and British Heritage… For example tailored wool trousers with a proper Canadian-made sweatshirt. How do you go about creating each piece of a collection? I don’t really design full collections I just release single pieces as and when I feel they are ready. I think collections are always based on trends and I want to stay as far away from that as possible. The whole brand is just me. What was the decision to produce in Canada? Has this changed your brand ethos or the design process? The reason all my product is made in Canada is because Canadians make the best knitted jersey sportswear in the world, it’s solely based on quality… If for example I wanted to release a shoe, I would go after Italian factories as they are the best in my opinion. Where do you see Cole Buxton in the future? In 5 years time I want to be in a select number of carefully chosen retailers around the world whilst still running everything from my online platform. It’s all about control for me and I want everything to grow properly and slowly. Follow Cole Buxton's journey on Instagram @cole_buxton and shop online at colebuxton.com.

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ADVICE

ADVICE FROM ADIDAS INTERN SIMONE THOMPSON-SMITH I N T E R V I E W BY K E M I A JAY I

As creative art based students, we have all been drawn in by that reoccurring and often misleading word; ‘internship’. Whether you are studying a fashion course or a business course, once in your lifetime you have heard the word ‘internship’ and how important it is to your very survival. But is it? Is it a crucial factor that will help you secure that dream job? Do we actually have to scrimp and save and take on the crappy tasks that no one else wants to? Well, maybe we have the answers to these terrifying questions. Simone Thompson-Smith was once a foundation student at Falmouth University but has since gone on to study Fashion Design at Kingston University in London. Now taking a year out of her course to work as an Adidas Intern, she gives us the answers to those all important questions and kindly offers sound advice that can put us all at ease.

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Describe briefly what your job is about. I’m an Apparel Design Intern in Originals, so I assist the whole team with their different tasks and have supported with the upcoming season from start to finish. What is your day to day job routine? Each day is so different! Most of my jobs are CAD based so that takes up most of my time. But I’ll also be going to fittings, liaising with fabric and trim developers as well as researching for the next season. How did you get into Adidas? I simply applied online! I was aware of the internship programme for some time, and always had my eye on it, so I made sure I did plenty of research around the company. I think what helped my application the most was that my portfolio catered to their aesthetic. I hadn’t done a project specifically for them, but the projects I included had a sporty vibe which I think they liked. I then had a chilled interview with my boss, and she offered me the position then and there! What is it like working for such an infamous sportswear brand such as Adidas? It’s mental! I’ve tried my best not to brag too much on Instagram, but no matter where you are in the business you are surrounded by amazing things. Whether its new technologies or big name collaborations, everywhere in the brand there is cool stuff going on. It’s also great because there is a pretty big intern community so it’s pretty great socially too. Has it been easy moving away from home? For me yes, I don’t find the distance too bad when you have Skype and stuff. It’s hard at first to get yourself sorted out with accommodation, bank accounts etc. but you are surrounded by people in the same boat as you… kind of like freshers! I do miss my friends and family, but I know this is just temporary and I’ll see everyone again soon. You end up missing the weirdest things like Hellmans mayo and Jeremy Kyle.

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What was your experience like at university? What did you study? I have really enjoyed my time at uni, studying Fashion Design at Kingston. Overall my uni experience has been great, but it’s hard sometimes to get the most out of it when you’re on such a demanding course! The course itself has been great because we have done a lot of briefs for industry placements, in which you learn what employers want to see. Things do get a bit over competitive, but I’ve just learnt to ignore it and focus on my own work. How is life now that you have taken a year out? Has it been easy transitioning from university life to a working life? The hardest part has been the early mornings! It’s about an hours commute by coach which is a shock to the system after the 5 minute walk I had last year at uni. Also, at uni I am usually drawing and making a lot and being super creative, whereas now I’m sat at a desk or in meetings for most of the day! But one thing I love about working life is that when you leave, there isn’t anymore coursework waiting for you at home so the evening is all yours! Also its pretty great to get paid. Did you apply for any other internships whilst at university? Yeah I applied for loads after my first year, to do over summer. I literally sent out 50 applications and barely any even replied! I looked on sites such as Fashion Workie for open positions, but I also just applied to companies and labels whose work I admired. I think most companies wanted people for a longer term and a candidate with more experience. What advice would you give to someone wanting to apply to Adidas? Go for it! It’s an incredible experience and you learn loads. My advice would be that when applying to any company, research who they are as a brand, where they come from and what their ethics are. If you have time, do a quick project specifically for Adidas because they love to see portfolios which are tailored to their own aesthetic. Do you have any internship do’s and don’ts’? My first one would be, don’t be a diva! You might be asked to do some pretty mindless tasks like sorting boxes or moving boards but jobs like these still help out the team. And when you do get a task which is more creative, give it your all because these are your best chances to impress. Also be proactive, don’t wait around for jobs to be assigned, if you see something which needs doing, do it. What is your ultimate career goal and how do you see yourself getting there? The ultimate dream is to have my own company, which I know is a bit ridiculous. When I asked one of my old bosses for advice on starting a label she said just don’t. But if not, working for a company like Adidas would be a close second.

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ADVICE

Speaking to Simone about her experience with internships, put things into perspective. They really are what you make of them. Yes you may end up becoming the resident tea-maker and yes you may have to run errands for people who can't even remember your name, but it's all good experience. Working in the industry gives you such valuable insights into what you want to achieve with your life. So don't become disheartened if it's not what you thought it was going to be, learn from it and embrace it.

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TEXTILES

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INTERVIEW BY IMOGEN REYNOLDS

Bethan Bullock is a second-year BA Textile Design student, currently studying at Falmouth University. Bethan was born in London and moved to Cheddar, Somerset, with her parents and three sisters when she was 7 years old. One of her three sisters also studies BA Drawing at Falmouth University which is based on the Woodlane Campus.

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Looking at your website I gathered that you’re interested in the interior design elements of textile design, what sparked this interest? You looked at my website! I’ve always been passionate about fabric, and in terms of interior design I’ve always loved it. When I was younger I would help my mum redecorate the house, she seemed to always want my opinions. But I did consider doing interior design, but I found that I was more interested in learning about the fabrics and the processes beforehand, rather than going straight into it. I wanted to know how the rooms come together with different fabrics and learn about their properties rather than just the designing, and develop it after that hopefully.

I chose optical, my project was based around optical illusions and considering the fabrics and light transfer, and the properties they contain. We then developed our next project from there, changing and developing the concepts behind our original designs but still using the same ideas from the previous project. So, I decided to focus on interiors, changing the colour concept, where the fabrics manufactured and how it’s used. Is there a reason you chose Falmouth over a more central university?

Yeah, so it's interior furnishes. Everything from upholstery, to fabric, to furniture and curtains. Everything in the room, so it can include wallpaper and paint. Stuff like that.

Originally, for four years I had my heart set on Nottingham Trent, and to be honest I chose Falmouth on a complete whim. I needed five choices and I’d considered Falmouth, the course had good reviews and the deadline was coming and even though I knew I wanted to go to Nottingham I put it down. I got an interview so I came down, it was my final interview out of my previous choices and I came into the design centre and I just couldn’t imagine not being here. It’s one of those places. I knew from that moment that I wanted to study at Falmouth, it just felt right.

Could you explain a bit about your current project, and the inspirations and concept behind it?

Do you feel that being in Cornwall has effected your opportunities for placements and experience?

We’ve just had a hand in for our project, it was called Processes. We had to develop it from our previous project, it was client based for a company called Steven Waters who specialise in silk weaving. So even though I specialise in print they wanted printers and weavers to work with them, to get two different concepts and viewpoints. They gave us two themes, optical illusions and Moroccan themes.

It can sometimes, especially with placements, but I think it’s more of a case of knowing the right people. Even with places like London, I feel like you’ve still got to have contacts in order to get a placement. It’s not too bad, we get a lot of opportunities to work with industry professionals. It’s just finding the placements, it’s a challenge.

So, do you design fabrics used for curtains and furnishing?

To look at more examples of Bethan’s work, take a look at her website bethanjade.com and her Instagram account @b3thanjad3bullock.

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The form of the female body, is an everchanging ideal. Influenced by the body shapes of film actresses such as Audrey Hepburn and the female silhouette that is celebrated in Dior’s ‘New Look’, I began to question how a body type very different to the masculine-feminine ideal of today, would be viewed and accepted within modern society. I wanted to create a series of images that, at first appeared, to have no difference in terms of the subjects proportions, until at closer glance the viewer comes to question her physique. Would a body shape that is seen to exaggerate the ‘long legs, small waist and long neck’ image of the past, still be accepted and celebrated by an contemporary audience? Or has it become no more than an unrealistic image that has no relevance to the women of today?

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“A R A B E L L E ” P H O T O G R A P H E R C A I T L I N D A V I S M O D E L A R A B E L L E

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SHORT STORY

THE GENTLEMAN AND THE THINKING CAP A

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He sits there, the wind whistles his age and the tall trees express their philosophy of growth. He’s almost ninety years old. A small red cap rests upon his thin, wiry hair. His name’s Gregory, although those close to him call him Greg because that’s what friends do; they bestow a sense of comfort in abbreviating your name, apparently. Greg is semi-retired. He knew he could never be fully retired because he has something he wants to share with the world, an invention he believes will change the lives of everybody, and he’ll share it until the world can no longer accommodate him. He fumbles a little with the peak of his cap as he sits in this somewhat-desolate forested area. He seems to be alone although he can’t be sure; his memory often falters with the years under his skin. He watches intently as a blackbird soars between trees. He decides, almost instantaneously, that he’ll name this bird Derek. He smiles at the thought. He also proposes to give the bird a position of hierarchy; so henceforth names him Sir Derek: appointed recently as Guardian of the Skies by The Blackbird Committee. Greg reaches into his pocket; he is much slower than he used to be and finds it rather frustrating watching his hands move in slow-motion towards his cotton pocket. He closes his eyes and hopes to fast-forward time a little. Greg isn’t particularly patient with things like this. His touch softly waltzes between pieces of string and marbles before conclusively drawing out a small netted bag of bird seed. He delicately releases it in little raindrops onto the ground before him. He places the seed bag back in his pocket and a smile crosses his wrinkled cheeks. He remembers the purpose of the marbles. Greg’s granddaughter, whose name isn’t currently available to him, had given him them to ensure that ‘he never lost his marbles’. He enjoyed that joke, and has since always carried them with him. Sir Derek, Guardian of the Skies, tilts his feathered head eagerly towards Greg. Greg tilts his in return and gestures with his hand towards the bird seed at his feet. “Go on, Derek. It’s for you, Sir.” Greg speaks softly, although a slight crackle seems to resonate from each word; another sign of the years under his skin.

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Sir Derek spreads his oily black wings before descending to ground level, metres from Greg’s feet. Greg then notices something which takes him both by surprise and comfort. He is wearing slippers. Slippers in a forest. Who knew? He feels sudden appreciation for the warmth of his toes, and moves them happily in the confines of his left slipper, then remembers that he does, in fact, have two feet and marvels in the sensation within his right slipper. Whilst this is happening, Sir Derek has consumed the entirety of the bird seed and has returned to gracefully soaring. Greg releases a sigh, he had anticipated a short exhale but it sounded more like a loud snore. Greg whistles, admittedly quite badly, to attract Sir Derek’s attention once more. Instead, a woman appears from behind a nearby bush and smiles at Greg. “All OK, Gregory?” She speaks at Greg with a forced charisma. Well, she can’t be a good friend or she’d call me Greg, thinks Greg. Instead of replying, Greg tips the peak of his cap to her and pretends to be asleep. He feels it’s one of his growing talents. “Come on, Mary asked me to pick you up,” says the strange, falsely charismatic woman. There’s only so long a man can pretend to be asleep, Greg gingerly gives up and opens his eyes, then replies: “Sorry, I was sleeping.” Greg releases a slight snigger at the end of the sentence, knowing he’d undoubtedly tricked the poor woman into thinking he was asleep. There is no question, she’d been truly fooled. “Yep, sure. Well, now you’re awake shall we head back to the car?” She still maintains an underlying falseness. Greg decides his brain is feeling a little weary; he doesn’t know how long he’s been here, or, for that matter, where here is. In a peculiar sort of way, he likes being confused. It means that he finds greater satisfaction in the things he’s forgotten about earlier that day, like his slippers for instance. Anyway, his brain feels a little like a washing machine with no washing in it, so he decides to let this passively aggressive, undoubtedly fooled woman take him to a car which may or may not exist. As Greg is lifted, reasonably problematically, from his seated position, he waves to Sir Derek. He also throws a little more bird seed from his pocket to solidify their friendship. Sir Derek swoops down, tilts his head and begins pecking at the seeds. Greg humorously tilts his head in return and smiles with an authenticity that seems quite rare in the modern world. I think Sir Derek would call me Greg, he ponders.

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' S A I N C H E A P T H A ' B E S P O K E M E N S W E A R C O L L E C T I O N B Y S H A N N O N H A W K I N S

P H O T O G R A P H E R J O N A T H A N W I L S O N M O D E L S P E T E R A S H E N H U R S T J O S H U A S Q U I R E S

Saincheaptha means 'custom made' in Irish. Based on the traditions of tailoring and shifting techniques. Looking at her heritage, Irish family background and abstract art, Shannon Hawkins takes inspiration from all of this as well as the infamous and gritty Peaky Blinders. It is an experimentation, combining the aesthetics and aspects of tradition with modernism.

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My main inspiration for this editorial came from the idea of romanticism as there is a lot of complexity to the subject, which reflects in the choice of fabric and the use of smoke to create an atmosphere. I tend to shoot designs that have movement and texture, so I collaborated with designer Charlie Wilson who created a very dreamlike series of garments. I wanted to make the material dance so that it emulates the way that clothes start to form around the body and make it look as if the body is being created by the smoke.

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UNDERGRAD ISSUE 1 | £6

UNDERGRAD Magazine  
UNDERGRAD Magazine  

ISSUE 1 - UNDERGRAD is a new fashion and art magazine designed to showcase the work of Falmouth University students

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