Issuu on Google+


. A+.

- --p^-/ -\f"

A

Most communes are NOT hippy dope scenes or gurus exploiting innocent babies. That's just the media trying to sell papers to bored suburbia. There are a t least 100 communities in ritain already - why don't you live in one? Someday most people will live in communes -why are you waiting?

become part of the future join the culture of the future you don't have to live in a bedsit you don't have t o get married 'co get lots of friends and work for your own leave the fossiled culture of the past All you have to lose are your chains stop worrying about your security learn to make friends instead So what, you make mistakes those who don't take ri so what, you're shy so what, you're scared ---who's running your li if you know it all already, go back t o sleep if you wish to grow find out about comm -

.

-

why lock yourself in a house with one person, whe you could join a commune?

Worried about the standards of the local school? Why not join a commune and run your own school? Stop thinking about communes - join one S t o p being put off by problems - solve them :f y^So what, the first one collapses - learn from it and make ^-d @ sure t h e next one is better else you'll always be trapped by fear Alternative Communities Moument 18 Garth Road Hanger N Wales(>W9 you only live once

1

-

,'' .,


In the Dnhe Test toxic in- are not washed out. Damage aredients of weedkillers, to the weball. whtehja often ovensoravs. mascaras flG savers 1s amkmmd after no sprayti, ticides, paint& to 3dhy. Noi-WlcX etc. are rimed into rabbits' alvn at çn¥too* Over 13.00& such wperidomed in e%arabbits have inefficient men& were tear ducts, the Substances Britain In 1 9 8 0

. - -Laboratory - - - - -Animals - - - -Nead - - -Your Help

0 Pleas* send Informationabout Animal Aid'sactivecampalOhtohelp litiontocy animals, including a free copy of the society's magaxine

%%%to Name

support Animal k

s cam&mwlth a donation of i

AddrÃ

¥gainsthe opprçÑ)of lion-human being# 111 High Street, Tonbridge, Kent TN9 1 DL

-

I

*

NORTHUMBRIAN ENERGY WORKSHOP UK leaders in WIND & WATER POWER for largest range of: Generators, Controllers, Towers, Turbines, Wind Measurement, etc. System design and installation available. Send £1.7 for our range of brochures to: NEW Ltd, UC4S, Tanners Yard, Hexham, ,, Northumberland, NE46 3N3.

Jenkina

Babies in NHs

Poverty trap

5 million b b k

WO**"

-ffL laid off

I Tighter asbestos

i

c d for d i i p ~ i n e tor drugs misuse

~~noWood,Coil.OrorCt

COSTS NOTHING TO RUN


ÈEOPL OR PROFITS? t's a pity t o have to fault lonathan Barzdo's otherwise excellent piece 'The Trouble uith Zoos' (UC 66/66) but lecemary. The destruction of xopical forest and other iabitats is not 'largely because if ow burgeoning populaton'. It is overwhelmingly ,omake money for multiiational corporatiom and heir client-elitea in gome .hird-woridcountrii. Also .o fuel our over-coiumnption >f protein, paper and other roodiw in the d l e d western world. Baizdo's fatee concluton is am ly exploded in imem o f articlw in UNDERCURRENTS and other ournals such u 'New Inter lationalist' as well as in the i f f M rtatiaticB of the FAO. 3nly correct identification if cauaei will enable effective battle against the effects. Sidney J. Holt International League for the Protection of Cetaceans,, Cachelot, Willow Wren Wharf, Hayes Road, Southall.

PIXIES Vhen constructing Hinkley B' the .National Nuclear iorporation was well aware if the local pixies and the w d to please them (see iddies, Undercurrents 63). Your readers and the likley 'B'operators can rest osured. The control room ran designed by an experineed Welsh Warlock - Bob ngham of Llangollen and Cnutsford. All over the plant are nany symbols which the ~ixiesrecognise. I sections, T ections, Hexagonal graphite ricks - and deep in the oundation concrete raft, use ras made of the 'witches NOVEMBER

'82

circle' on all TNPG Stations. These symbols were incorporated in Latina, Dungeness 'A', Oldbury-upon-Sevem, Hinkley 'B' and Huntereton 'B' - all recognised in the Nuclear Industry as very successful stations - and they ue in Heysham 'B' and Tomess AGRf too. The Nuclear Industry is 30 years old - we are programmed well into the next Century -there exists a fund of folklore as in any other human endeavour - long may it continue. Bob Ingham Senior Systems Engineer National Nuclear Corporation Limited Knutsford.

ful, remember? So thankg also to my old Friend Alexei Clarke for the info on electric bike*,also in UC 66/66. Well, as for Petra Kelly's article in the same issue, 'Women and the Future'. 'Only woman' says Petra Kelly (why only woman?) 'can go back to her womb, her intuition, her roots, her natural rhythms'. Well women can do these things, yes, but so actually can men -though they can't bear children if that's what Petra means. But how many women do actually display 'co-operation, gentleness, non-possessivenessand soft energy'? Men are actually usually much less possessive than women -this is usually interpreted t o mean that they don't care as much. An MISTER SOFTY awful lot of women are I've got a degree too and I competitive, bitchy, pettyappreciate the letter born self-centred, cruel, Nick in Undercurrent* 66/66 minded, mean, shrill, deceitful, 'the Fact* Matter'. greedy jealous envious, etc Yeçlet's leave that while being pretty-'softyduff eco fedduu 'feminine'. & for goodneu md all that (and I'm a sake let's (top calling 'wholewoman and not a 'ma*culine* ness, balance, harmony' and woman, Pete*.~e Wow) to those wonderful thing! theortot*' (ma Andrew all 'feminine'. I think weihould Tyler'* Qrwn Wotk to UC call them 6divin*'and let ua, 56/U). men and women, rediscover Ireallyappreciatedtoo te 'divine' in o w natureçor Dave Elliott's article 'Sizing the 9moral*if you like as Up Sizewell B '. I wun't at the Pure Energy Fair a* I bad mmçthingeteto do, but I hope they had mme pure enon ihow. I am aide of green theorute, I'm dck of lo-caUed 'dire& action' which seenu to mean standing around outside some nuclear installation slapping ourselves on the back. Practically every 'alternative group' you can think of mounts conference after conference t o work out convincing theories - they may them 'policies' or 'strategies' even But I would like tosay to Dave Elliott that it is not so much 'a convincing, well-worked out strategy at a pro AT campaign' that we need as some AT that can be seen t o work. As one of my favourite green groups, Green Deserts, say 'Let's develop the technology and the politics will follow'. And you don't need, really need a government grant or the sort of things that green Deserts have in mind (write to them at Rougham, Suffolk, for further details.) We don't need or even want iant windmills, giant solar co ectors. We need human scale and human priced alternative technology. Small is beauti-

b

-

Petra uses the term 'ecological immorality'. To reinforce the point we might say 'Nuclear families no thanks' 'Natural energy groups, yes please.' Well, altogether a pretty stimulating issue of Undercurrents - thanks. Yours Penny Ne-e 21 South St, Osney Oxford.

1 BLACK LIST

1

Fran De'Ath, whose letter was published in the last issue, has asked me to point out that her letter is now five months out of date, (she was evicted from Greenham in July) but that the is working on a new project. She is listing companies involved in preparing the Greenham silos and persuading councils in nuclear-free zones to blacklist the firms. 'Hopefully the chance of losing long term contracts with council* would help the firms reconsider offering a tender to work at the bue.' Those interested in lobbying their council* on this b u l l ihould contact Fran at 1 4 Richmond Avenue, Montpelier, Briitol.

W E MAKE THE BEST JOINTS

If

I


the individual doan't fit the

FEMINIST OR PROGRESSIVE?

rtwotyf.

the coitterrativeone< divigion of role dong ~exu*l I entirely agree with Petra linen; one is the modern Kelly in her article (UC 661 56) in that our culture should 'liberated' one of mud athleticurn and one, twiy, is give greater r e to feminine trait* such as feeling, the 'pro@endve8 one which wants to reduce the differyielding to and accepting ences between men and reality (the Yin side of women. human nature) rather than Peter Spurrim for women to reject t h e n in West Gun C o w , Christ's favour of the areertieneaa Hospital, H c d m ~ ~ . and rationalism IKI favoured in nations with Judaic, .. Christian or Idamic cultural root*. I am rather puzzled, POWER FOR PEOPLE therefore, when she menu ehewhere to want men and LIKE Thatchen Government. Prwident Reagan has cut by women to try to lose all but the most baeic difference*in two thirds the comervation terms of abilities and and solar programme in the activities. Most men and United States. A 8300 million women do have different cut in wlar develo~ment. abilities and u> are best auited along with a "shift-away from for different activities:We are near term development, demonstration and conunercomplementary. Thb would cialisatimn into long terra be far more obvious in a labour-intensive economy. research". Like the situation Surely it should be up to . in Britain, these cuts lead individual* to divide work eventually to unemployment among thenuelves in whatand bankruptcy. ever way is most practical, Our own 3 million rather than t o have cultural unemployed could be ~tereotypest o strive towards, drastically reduced by the causing feelings of frustration, development of energy saving guilt and inadequacy when industries. Rather late in the

1

1

day, official Qovwnmeqt

nfula*o*nukeft-

.I

-

dato to menÑi wO,&f and i&. ¥tU leaven million* of h # & g k undemuulated, and the  in new dwellings ( still well below Smdidi standards. Improvement of insulation to all the hornwin Scotland would cut fuel coçt by 26%, save the building of the Tornea nuclear reactor and give the benefit of three timea as many job*. The British Homes and Oveiwas market could benefit from our highly developed knowledge in heat pumps. The device that makes energy go uphill was invented by Lord Kelvin early in the 19th century. Apart from some industrial application*, the device was developed in the United States. Now Salford Univenrity leads the world in developing machines that will grm the energy equivalent of 10 gallon* of oil for the input of one gallon. Well, it did lead the w o r i d d the piewttt Tory admidstration cut the Univereity budget. Along with wind generation, wave and water power, heat

2001

hduw and ownea* nuufceto. RÑolution on Nbrthnn Inland,Petninumand'the Tebbit Bill are important, hut so k the -tion of jobs through a Rwwabto.Energy prognunme. ththere should be m<jtt dçbata t Annul Conference's on 'Energy Job* Or a New Energy Poor', foBo^M by action a t community, local, regional and national lev1 If we do not act now. our skills will fade away. We shall -me a nation of serrice indurtrie* selling under nice English names American, Brazilian, Japanese, French, Italian, German and Koreukequipment. The idem are of our invention. It is time that we ftopped felling o w heritage, and began an era of power for the people, by the people. Bill Holtkworth 26 VaUeydde, Warnem End, Heme1 Hempstead, Herts.

pzzizT=

Rudolf Bahro

SOCIALISM AND SURVIVAL With an Introduction by E.P. Thompson

43.50

a moving appeal for all forces of survival to unite in the struggle against nuclear war and eco-catastrophe

rnOmH^uck¥MS¥n

More Than WÃ Can OMW:Tic Cmzy World of Food

ktuath

and tactory-condition*.(UO

m-

Tic Hum lid Ami-Hunt


EDDIES

where over two-thirds of Britain's butterfly species bave been recorded. The threat t o Oxfordshi is wide] than this, however - the M40's construction will lead to greater pressures for development around interchanges and for expansion of housing for London-bound commuters. All this for a relief road for the Ml, which is already falling to bits. The tactics of objectors has differed sharply. One group has prepared the alternative plan and are arguing for it. Friends of the Earth have decided to withEven so, the M40 battle is draw from the whole show and are petitioning the being fiercely fought. At stake is the future of Otmoor, European Court of Human Rights for a fair inquiry. For the last bit of unspoilt wetthis they bave been criticised land in the area and the inspiration of the chessboard by John Tyme, returned Agricola-like from fanning fields in "Alice Through the to take up the cudgels again Looking Glaas". The motoragainst motorways. Tyme is way would plough across a veteran of many previous Otmoor, parts of which are anti-motorway battles, and listed as Sites of Special believe in fighting the cage u Scientific Interest. on an embankment, creating noise, the arena provided, even if increased risk of flooding and you don't play the game the of motorway spillages, and same way as the lion. It pollution from oil and should be noted, though, that even the inquiry is only chemicals in the drainage system. Other SSSI are under advisory, and can be overruled by the Tra~port threat, including some forming Bernwood Forest Secretary.

that alternative options are presented is supposed to have been adopted, an 'improve existing roads' option was given only five paragraphs in the Department's statement, and has clearly not been seriously discussed. Not surprising, really, since objectors have already been told that the Transport Secretary !'is satisfied that there is a traffic demand which justifies building the new motorway" and that "the environmental disadvantages are outweighed by the relief the road will afford".

The public inquiry into what's been called "the last motorway" opened in September, with the Denartment of Transport be&g beaten by its own technology. Opponents to the M40 Oxford-Warwick motorway ran an alternative plan through the Department's computer using its own traffic model and discovered their plan was less environmentally damaging, cheaper and handled the traffic better. Use of this damaging fact was being made t o good effect as the inquiry progressed, notably in whittling away the backing for the "M40 Support Group". This group, believed to be one road lobbyist and a dog, has gathered support by promising cuts in through traffic t o Oxfordshire villages if the M40 is built. Mark Sullivan, for the opponents, made short work of this, pointing out that the alternative plan produced more cuts in traffic than the Government's scheme. But wen before this, the

I'

-

excellent own goal*. It* 'low m w t h ' traff-i fwecagta produced in j u s t i i t i o n convinced many, notably Oxford City and South Oxfordshi District Councils, that a motorway waspti& factneeded. Although the Leitch

Committee'arecommendation desperately looking for a "with onebound he was tree" solution to one little problem the last Archway inquiry ended when they were ordered t o produce supporting documents, forecasts etc. These remain invisible, and objectors continue to demand them. Local MP Hugh Roaai and othem have been covering up by alleging that the inquiry was stopped by hooliganism from objectors. The cage continues, or, as our theatre critic says, 'this one will run andrun' ... Southampton, too, is haunted by a spectre - the ~ortewoodLink, also known as the Itchen Valley motorway, is coming up for a fourth time, revived by the Tory City Council. Previiously two public inquiries have rejected the scheme, which would cut through residential areas and has already blighted and caused demolition of many hundreds of houses.

-

Away from the M40 (see above), worthy citizens are wearily gilding up their loins and aiming themtelves with crosses and garlic to ward off yet more attack! by undead road schemes. The Archway Road in North London, former home of Undercurrents, is again (fourth time round) proposed for widening by Creatures that Time Forgot (Department of Transport civil servants). A radically new scheme (a slip road has been changed) has been produced, and a new public inquiry promised for the Spring. This time the Department faces opposition from all the local authorities. including the GLC and Torycontrolled Barnet Council (which covers Mrs. T s constituency). Civil servants are still

1 1


-

-

The

-

-

-

--

-m-

indurtry b planning to damp G

-

-

h luttoactiv~

I

wart* at aea next year from a new (hip which they think Gnenpwce will find It hudia to hinder (mUC 66/66). I Lewis Roberti told an

6.

Atomic Energy Authority pro^ conference in London that the new (hip would be deigned ¥pacificallw that cttgoa can be diiomd of through the hull. It will replace the 3,000 tonne Brit* coaster Gem, which w u vulnerable to ' d h tkn by protesters Ininflate e rubber boat* below. Dr. Robert*.Director of Harwell and chaitpenon of

8-

hoped the (hip would be ins operation next year. He idded "we would expect the mount we will be dbpoiing a t next yew will be about 10%larger than the wagte didxxed of t h b ear" (leveral @&mud drumaof lo&lwel w u t e are already dumped in the Atlantic each year. 600 nilea off Land's End)..

-

Acorn Lab poll OAKLEAF BOOKS, a co-op bookahop in Milton Keynea, huadopted wme i n t e r c t i newrula*. Only employeet o the commny are able to be member* ofthe company's Worker*Collective (oquinlent to the Board of Director! hut a wider group of mp porter* and aympathiMn an able to become meof the c o m w . ao that ultlnut ownenhip ofthe bookahop, and the opportunity to diacum its direction, am in the hand* of a wider ITOUD of

pmont collative, cia be obtain-] on request (plww endrnpandue)t o o d d d Boob, 109 Church Strett, Wohnton, Milton Keynes M K 1 2 6LD.

A NATIONAL Opinion Poll commialoned by tin Britiih Union for the Abolition of VhriMctbn (how* c k l y the dam bublic macon about &un of aalmali In

-

will co-ordinateplan* for the management and d i d of low and2tel-medite lweJ vafte,and from next year takes over rapomibility for the aea dumping. The tnuwport and land burial of wafte will a h be controlled by NIREX, which will be baud at Harwell. The hard staff the high level wastes will remain in the hand* of its producers, at least for the time beiox.

- -

medical improvement* which load to better health. Animal welfare group* hare nixed on the poll to demand legidation which prohibit* the procedure! diÑppfOTq of by the majority of the population. The QoTçmmuirecently refumd

Committee for Animal Protection (GECCAP) hu beon formed to bring the hues into the next election. ~eanwhilkas BUAV u y , the support for laboratory break-ina will continue to mow. GECCAP can be contacted c/o 143 Charing Cron Road, London WCSH OEE.

w i n on October 22. flexible than nuclear plant. Incredibly, the planned But they also argued that dosure include lome of the oil-fired plant might be newest oil-fired power needed to respond to a itationa 600 MW at Ince B national emergency such as m Meraeyside, 660 MW at disruption ofcoal supplies or Littlebrook on the Thames railways. This seemi to b e i i ind 660 MW at the famous hint-hint, nudge-wink way of ble of Grain in Kent, where saying that some power ndurtrial troubles caused a station workers would be :ertain amount of delay .. . available to fight, ahoulder to Maybe the workers who shoulder with the employers, iidn't want to build the against a strike by railway iloody thing in the first place workers or miners! So Mrs. vere more on the ball than Thatcher, weking nuclear he CEGB's ton h n power as a way of avoiding The unions er&w t d i i p t i o n by a mining or ,he proposals and argued transport strike, is now In with the words doubtless effect being told (bat (he mad ticking in the throat* of made a mutake: iiutead of ome of them) that the oiluranium as a strike breaker, 'ired stations were net- she ought t o h a y gone for oil. David Rom &use they were more - - -

,

TRADE UNIONS nipporting the new capacity will total nuclear energy are fighting to 4,600 MW (cap*)and even save 2,100 j o b from a mom redundancie* may threaten the nuclear admirers. nuclear threat. The job* are The CEGB plan is to shut liable to disappear because the CEGB want* to cut its down 2,200 MW of capacity manning and shut, mothball and in addition wholly decommimimn a further 1,500 or partially (hut 18 power MW which have already been rtatiom. One reason being given i* itagnation in demand mothballed. The main job Biftft* CEGB is also taking losses will hit Frank Chapple's usoaHHh@ the 3,600 mega- EEPTU and John Lyons' watts ffÇ^dnuclea power Engineers and Managers coming on llnuu in the next Association. The unions, 18 months and t k atations inaide the National Joint Coordinating Council for the need fewer human beinga Electricity Supply Industry, Indeed. if the ensineon can ~ ~ like Dungenem a B~ are f i i b- t i m - d >ctuaUy generate a little juice, will be meeting the CEGB

-

~

1

tho^ polled k r i o pond tothewofdinthe twtiog of weapon*, cOmU¥ti r~egich,tobacco and alcohol rwearch u w d as in poboning f t a . Despite the fact k t b ~ i minto l m h e4tablbhment.a and taking mimda ila CrimIMl offeke, 86%~ D W O Tof ~mcb actlon. Only & the i me of animda In mçdlc*r ~ a r c w hu thà a majority in favour: BUAV b e h e it& point* to the n d for ducation, puticululy about the enrironment.mther than

Jobs nuked

--

*The new bod? l ~ p o n ribla for radloactfee wuto, b the Nuclear Induatry Radioactive W u t e Executive or NIREX. NIREX, a& up by BNFL, CEGB. SSEB and the -A the major nuclear

~

-

;-*---.

*>-

-

2

.--....-"

UNDERCURRENTS 57 .


strong policy against any further nuclear power stations, and indeed for phasing out existing ones. The SDP is split - the Energy Group has produced an anti-Sizewdl discussion document, masterminded by exFriends of the Earth Director Tom Burke. But David Owen, Dickson Mabon and others are strongly pro-nuclear. The SDP in fact seems t o be going decidedly green, what with an agriculture group demanding organic fanning. A nasty case of green infiltration, I'd say.

Confab THE TUC voted to ban lead in petrol at its conference in September. The Labour and Liberal parties followed suit, making the ' Conservatives now the only political party stii supporting it. It was notable that full page ads from Associated Octel, the company that puts lead into petrol, appeared on the day of the Liberal debate. The ads, which seemed to claim that lead in petrol had won the Battle of Britain, took the line that 'the experts know best'. Evidently Octel's PR experts don't. ' 0

YOU CAN always teU when Tory Ministers are on the way out by the nasty placings they get at their bloodlett . . . conference (sorry, touch of the Tebbits there). Transport Secretary David Howell, widely tipped as victim of the next reshuffle (Sir KJoseph possible replacement), was given heavy lorries t o defend, instead of Ken ~ i v i n g s t ~ and ne ASLEF to attack. Heavy lorries are not too ~ o ~ u l a r

LABOUR'S conference saw the launch of the Socialist Countryside Group. This is an alliance, of groups and people interested in extending socialist thinking to land reform and the countryside - SERA (Socialist Environment & Resources Association)are one group, and the Agricultural Working Union (NUAAW) is also involved Papers setting out policy on particular issues are being drawn up. Contact SERA at 9 Poland Street, London Wl, for more

... ..

as usual theTories thought their Ministers were too moderate why not have 50,60,80 t o k e lorries? Why only 40? Even so, Howell stopped short from announcing an inctease in permitted lorry weights it was in his press release but not in hi speech. NUCLEARP.OWE~ t o be shaping as the big policy split in the mouldbreaking SDP/Uberal Alliance. The Liberals have

AS THE United Nations

Environment Programme celebrated its tenth anniversary, radical ecologidts from 55 countries met in Nairobi (UNEP's base) and attacked the anumptions on which UNEP's programme is based. While UNEP goes for 'consensus', the radical* take a holistic approach - they call for social and political change, including 'organic NOVEMBER '82

11 4.

.."..

agriculture, wable sources of energy, new forms of public transport and recycling of materials'. They also deplore the fact that UNEP referred only once in its official 10th anniversary document to the environmental threat from multinational corporations. The radicals, redredoing the balance, demand - an immediae fi : :& : pdicides and other dangerous products banned in the home country;

2

Apocalypse,then., AT would also be useful it the subsequent 'recovery' phase, he argues, because of the 'decentralition of techniques' which it implies, for he admits that "on of the major flaws in our present peacetime manufacturing system is that self-imposed fragility due to centralisation in trying to achieve specialised production". But alternative energy enthusiasts should not expect that windmill rotors or solar panels will soon sprout discreetly from the ventilition shafts of their local Bunkers. Stealey believes that "The uses of alternative energy production schemes such as solar power and wind generators are still in their infancy and cannot be considered as useful resources" [perhapshe is angling for 1lob as head of the oostI apocalypse ~ecentralised Electricity Generating Board?). I Organic fanners can, I however, take heart from the fact that Stealey envisages the post-Holocaust reintroduction of the "smaller I mixed farms". with clover and manure providing a natural supply of fertiiliser, since the production of artificial fertilisers "requires the facilities of a very complex and sophisticated chemical industry." But what would fanners do for tractors? Stealey has the answer: taking a leaf out of the 3rd Wodd AT Handbooks, he proposes "pedal power to drive a winch pulling simple farm tools across the soil". This in turn suggests a new role for the local Smithy in the era after Armageddon: ". . . the village blacksmith, with t h e necessary raw materials, may - over-exploitationof be an adequate producer of natural resources both in simplified farm tools." developed and developUnfortunately, enmeshed ing countries; in their doomsday fantasy - relocation of polluting act world, the Home Office ivities in developing boffins have failed to perceivi countries to circumvent an even more obvious asset Oi environmental constraints alternative technology namely that by enabling - suppression of developcountries to decentralise theb ment and appropriate economies and encouraging te&nology strategie local self-reliance in energy, - production and export to food and materials, it could developing countries of help to prevent nuclear War8 p r o a w i t h builbin breaking out in the first place. But then, that would obsolescence. involve adopting it now . . . (Source: IYF)

IF YOU'RE concerned about the Government cutting back on alternative technologies and spending too much on nuclear weapons, don't worry. Government scientists do see a bright future for AT - after the holocause. According to a secret internal newsletter, the Home Office has asked its Scientific Advisory Branch (SAB).to investigate the possible use of "small scale technologies which might aid recovery after attack". Writing in the March and April 1980 issues of Fission Fragments, the house journal of the SAB (a copy of which recently found its way to the Undercurrents office), one John Stealey suggests that, after the Bomb has dropped, "Alternative, simple technology may be viewed as a means of salvation which can identify scarce resources and offer means of saving or replacing such resources, possibly with the large-scale introduction of labour as a useful energy input." In an article so unspeakably tortuous and long-winded that the Home Office is doing the public a service by restricting its circulation, Stealey looks at the possible role of alternative technolorn in the 'survival*phase which would immediately follow a nuclear attack, and in the 'recovery' phase which woul6 come later. Alternative Technologies for 'survival' would, in Stealey 's view, include "the use of improvised methods and materials to repair blastdamaged houses", "the construction of insulated cor rooms in habitable dwellings' and -- "haybox cooking of met and whole erain stews".-

1

1

7


NOfund the beginning of a fight to defendBritain'8 coaitllne and , countryida The date of the lift i* unknown, but Sizewell PWR inquiry in the other dtà an knownto Spring of next year. ABPÇ~~à hare been considered dnce ently the Miniiter believe* it* comollxtion. A* a recult the fight will be quite fair of thte Urt andof prerioua enough. Pnuun hu built ' inter& by tlw CBGB, up for funding from a Northumberland Country number of quarter*, inch& ing çom ciril (errant*and the cbuncil may well If time ented at Sixewdl to join In Generating Boud (CEOB), . liming waiart the who wanted to avoid cria = ! a of 'foul' afterwards. ObjectFACT: The inount'oT o n are now conaidering radioactive fallout in the their position; though it it atmaphere trebled in 1981 expected that mcat group* compared to the previous will decide to take put, year, according to a UKAEA çommay well have to p r m relwithdraw. Meanwhile, one of the 'No More Nuclear Power' main objector*, the Council &Y against Sizet@ B for Protection of Rural Saturday 6 Novern ber, England hu n k u e d a Central Hall. Westminster confidential lift of propowd 11-4, organHed by the nuclear -power atation dtea , Anti-Nuclear Campaign.

Energy Secretary N i i Lawson hu ruled out funding for objector at the

CONVERSION of d h m d

1

bawd group, converted 8kmà raiiways to cycleway is being near Bath in 1979 and other urged on local authoritha by . scheme* have followed. In cycle campaigner!, including Edinburgh, the 'Innocent' Friends of the Earth. cyclepath opened in August followinga Governmentand other railway convçrslon iponaored study of the in the area are planned. The potential. Around 5,000kms Peak District Natipgal-@k of d i i m d railway is avdabh ha* tGniTcyclepatht, with much of it through beautiful bikes hired out. countryaide, and It offers "Study of Disused Raileasily graded ride*. Some way* in England and Walei: line* have already been con- Potential Cycle Routed' verted: Cyclebag, a Bristol(HMSO)

-

HONG KONG: A ahup hi

-

1'

further local oppodtion can

be expected. A 1979 petition

umfaut the picdwt collected 100,000 , the bife hn&g#llKTe been

boycotted indzwIdiUhdd thekownprotwthÑringi

attmch# om 10,000 Pçopl and a lot of riot polio*.

wlâ€

power itatlonnow being ~tudiedby the Peking ladorÂ¥UpThe mot likely dte for the p h t !ÂIn Ouanfdon proyinct, about 86 mila north-wd of Hong Kong.

itruction The dte orOfMonju the b queftlomble, and the d m p m of the FBR u* w d l known to mident* In the city, who will continue to campaign agatnit the dabion. (Source: PRIES New#)

(-1

WEST GERMANY: 20,000

JAPAN:Toho zinc company hu been ordered t o pay

damage* to farmer* and other* afflicted by d l pollution. The cornpiny 1 found to have continued &kc* of dulfierouf :b*mlcal> while knowing

Kalkar, near tfe* Dutch txsider, on October 2. Thà Sçrmaparliament ç die io vote on whether the Ktllur FBR ihould operate a mid-October.

dmlolutratod gffllnita mate storage dte at Gorleben, who* a n roeadag plant like the Winon* & planned. Othçdemonatratiou agalnit reproceuing planprojected took place in Rfiuburg, Frankenberg and K a i à ‘ r u ~ h

(WISE) U.S.A. 18 people'a r r ~ t e dduring a Uoclude of a Trident ~bmuine nç Banw, Wuhinaton in Augurt. The US c o u t guard* turned wa* cannoni on the deck* of the protut h i p 'Liau-d of Woz' and #wept dx people off the deck. An Auatralianahi wu abo in the blockade (WISE) 1

UNDERCURRENTS 57


*$*

E

,

Note* born the September meeting of the British AiÈoci ation for the Advancement of Science.

TIDAL POWER was looked at by Profenor Eric Wilson What sounded visionary 20 years ago is now, according to Profeuor, accepted u standard He condemned the vacillation of Government* and the procrastination of bureaucrat!.

D

D

A COLLECTIVE pre~ented "The New Paradigm Research Manifesto', which starts from the bdis that mgearch can never beneutral The idea is that scientific research should be done collaborativdy, with people rather than on people. The New Paradigm ny that beyond one-eided objectivity there is 'a new kind of right and rigorous synthesis of subjectivity and objectivity. It seek to develop a new rigour of softneu'.

TWO STAFF from the Memeylide Development WAVE ENERGY waa rwCorporation stood up to support the controv-+%l iewed by Dr. Robert Valentine Cha lin, who garden femtival planned for looked at the xifferent type@ Liverpool Community of convertem being developgardens and urban nature cd. He hoped that despite conservation will have the drastic reduction in place* in this festival but government funding, wave the a p e a h did not of r ~ e a r c hwill continue to be course acknowledge the aup~ortedby industry or O D D O & ~ Oto ~ the festival goiGrnment. 1 idea as a whole.

-

OTEChnology ONE FORM of 'alternative technology' which meam# to get more o f f i d bleÑin than moat If the OTEC or Ocean Thermal Energy Converter. Thlà If a large device Including a pipe or duct bringing up cold water from a w n d h b l e depth in the ocean. A working fluid u c h a* Freon if contained in a circuit wham pre~ureIf adjulied m that the fluid will juot condom to a liquid at turn of the cold the water. hioliquid ~f then ~umpeduptoahigher pi-~idi**t which eliquid win iurt boa *t the tinmrat u n o f thÃlurtfee* w a h which is hutod by tho u n . Once it h u boiled,abmrbini theiirface energy; It if ex- panded back to condewation procure through a turbine, driving an electric generator. Expandon of the gai, of eoune, relwe* more energy than If needed to pump up the liquid over the n m e p n u u i e difference. Practid embodiment of thie idea tend t o be large concrete rtructurea containing huge heatexchangem bundle* of tubem through which the MB water is pumped and turbine* workingatsnail preuum difference#,hence requiring very big machinea relative to

tmP

-

~

NOVEMBER '82

their energy output. The bade energy umd If 'FWin the iençthat the sun warms the water locally and ocean current! bring in cold water from distant MU. Thf power generated and available edits quite a lot of money however, to pay for the large atructuree and mmive machinery. Comptzed with wind or wave power, OTEC economics do not look particularly attractive, certainly mfar a* the UK If concerned More over, ecologists f e u that OTECt wffl damage the environment by uputthg the tomperaturel on which mnaitive e c ~ y s t e mdepend s and by the need for poliona to kill off the marine growth which would otherwin foul up the heat exchanger tuba Why, then, are governmen@ particular the US pvenunent, loo ng with Favour on thIf particular 'Alternative Technology'? A recent report of mooarch work to be undertaken jointly by the unipdties of Mancheftor and W o r d gives Idue. T ~ à bright young people are looking at the proipect* for uaing OTEC inergy for extracting uranium 'rom the sea. Undercurrents waden wffl know already what uranium is umd for.

I

E

?

Tending tress, North Africa Marry

THE WOOD shortage waa dealt with by John Brazier of the Building Ramarch E*tabluhment 8bn people will face a shortage of fuel wood by the year 2000, by which time the world's need for industrial wood is expected to double. Mr. Brazier called tor effective management of nditinf rwourcw and urgent investment in the formot.

Hsrt/Lorette Quarterly)

TWO SPEAKERSshowed that some plants evolve to cope with pollution and other diturbance* inflicted by men. Mikeal Roose from Liverpool Univemity showed that within Liverpool we gran had become more tolerant to SO2 than it waa eliewhere. Richard Law ahowed how meadow gnu* wu succeuful in coloniiing wuteland.

Battery charged DURING 1982, the Animal Liberation Front ham atepped up it* action a g a i ~all t form* of animal abun. One area which hm long been neglected is the area of factory fanning. Howwu, for . the tint time ever, the factory f i r m m are under amtained attack, particularly battarn hen fannm in the wwt country. During the l u t thrm month*, there have been about twelve raid* on battory farm*by ALF activiet* and wme 200-800 hens hive been rwcued. On the night of Saturday, Auguft '7th igroup of Animal Rifht* cam~aianene n t w d the battery u h t at Waldciu Farm, near Trowbrldge, Wiltihh.Thoy bqpn to mmov the hen*. but unfortunately they W& dliturhed by UIbate farmer. Following a ear ohaw, the group Moped with 80 hen*. Th- were taken to good free tinge condition* where they am beginning to w feathm and relearn their natural liutinctl. The next day Sandra Springall, an East London Animal Right* campaigner, waa arretted, held overnight it the Police Station, and then charged with burglary.

Donations to cover cost* should be lent to: Sandra S ringall, c/o ALF, Box 0 , Peace New*, 8 Elm Avenue, Nottingham. Offem for good homes for liberated animal* are al*o needed at the u m e addreu. An ALFmpportem group hai been formed -detail# also from that addreu.

w H f i n # w indfmonitwl igilmt tfie trade. A fur co M M burnsdçthe fur fashion ihow, which w ~ pert s of LIVfi wol idwl Home Exhibition. 'Some: PCAP)

fur


You will know that cosmetic and beauty 83b contain a p h i ingredients and are tested U? h h g animals. You will know that farm animate suffer bfdd& and cruelty during transDort. both f& overseas slaughter and further fattening. You will know of the treatment and sufferingof horses at the unsupervised auction sates and d* the journey to thisla~ghterhomfathe growing export of horsemeat to the Continent. You will know that on Factory Farms,battery hens, calves and pigs are imprisoned in small cages for life. ¥

animals, said for a free copy of the Annual Pictorial Beview of: THE SCOTTISH SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF VIVISECTION 10 Clueensferry Street, Edinburgh EH2 4PG

Pleaae send me a free copy of your Annual pictorial wew: Name.

...:...............................

.................................. ............................ Code..." ......-

Address

FARMING! The modern taim animal Ibwtedbdlhd d d door*. An you a w n of the {lorrora if tbelnttoy cue, Ole dry low rtdl md the ved crate? Only Ole action from public opinion wO end t h ~ e

1

itrocitii.

It vou want to hdo to our

.,< .. . : ' % ' . ~ . ..........:...... . . ........ . . . +: ct.i..3,.. . ................... . . . ... * ' : . . . .. . . . . . .. 2 ' . Address: .................... .. ,,, . .~. * .. ...,,, ....... ....' ......: ........ ...p-. ," ,

Name:.

?,. .,

,:.

,

. . . . . .

. !.

.

.:c

.

.

,

. Â

. . '.,, ,


BEAST NEWS

m

ce more the Animal Liberation Front hit the headlines with nemng accuracy. Their mink arm raidstories triggered offcaorash of news which nfi

that this netwo* of activists are not going t o go away. Various hit lists have appeared in various papers but none give the full details. So here is ALF 1982 style for the record:

Febmary 7 Rabbits rescued from Safep h a m Labs at Shardlow, Derbyshire, where toxicological testing takes place. Caretaker slightly injured. $5000 damage caused. Eight people arrested and charged with burglary. 14 Same 100 demonstrators marched on building owned by Life Science Research a t Stock, nr Chelmsford, Essex. Between 6-15 beagle dogs rescued, some later recovered by police (figures vary). 64 arrests and 24 charged with conspiracy to cause criminal damage. 20 ALF members claim they damaged house under construcb ion a t A.E. Beckett & Sons a t WythaU, nr. Birmingham, who are poultry specialists. This follows a similar raid last May. 24 Paintapraying raid on Shippains chickenpxessing plant at Crediton, Devon. 28 Member of theTickham Foxhunt in North Kent has his house s p d d , the f i t of a number of actions against the Hunt. March 4 Seven ALF members given nuspended sentences at Hereford sown Court for their part in an early morning raid on the Hare wood Park kennels, near Ross-onWye in April 1981. The ten beaglbs taken, worth $1000, are now in safe homes. 20 ALF in Dalston makes a weekend attack with superglue on the locks of butcher's shops in the Dalston,area. 28 Two lomes belonging t o ritual slaughter firm Lewis & Co. of Hackney, East London, damaged by ALF. 28 Front of Xenon's, new multimillion pound nightclub in Picadilly, daubed with slogans by ALF because of the presence of a tiger and a panther at the club on opening night. UNDERCURRENTS 57

April 5 $150 damages caused to White's fur shop in ?avershama Kent by ALF. 7 ALF raid Lee& University Farm, West Yorkshiie and take six dogs and a cat. 15 Laurence Bromfield, a Newton Abbott mouse breeder, has his 12-year old Ivlini covered with paint stripper and his premises -Triangle Mousery - damaged. Four people are charged with burglary and criminal damage. 22 A 71-year old pensioner was among 29 people remanded on bail a t Chelmsford, Essex, accused of conspiracy to cause damage a t the Life Science Research Lab (Feb. 14th) 24 The March on Porton Down. Demonstrators, including many ALF members, hurled fireworks and smoke bombs at the 400 police and broke down the outer perimeter of the chemical warfare research unit. 29 arrests. Most were charged with trespassing on MOD vmvertv and fined £20Woman fined $80 for hit-. ing a policeman with a placard. 29 ALF spray-painting raid on Chessington Zoo, an almost annual occurence. &Y 7 Three fur and leather shops in South-East Essex are glued and sprayed by ALF. 10 Professor R. Baker, who conducts animal ex~erimentsat Sheffield University, has his car and house sprayed. 20 Nine ALF activists convicted of burglary at a cat breeding unit on Hill Grove Farm in Sept. 1981. Each given six month jail sentences suspended for two years at Oxford h w n Court. Fines range fmm $50-$200. 25 The Mayor of Pooje, Counc. Mrs Edna Adam, has her Canford Magma poultry houses - where 40,000 battery hens are kept - raided by the ALF. 27 ALF member Steve Boulding fined for damaging British Raii property by spraying "Cows milk's for calves3*in foot high letters on a bridge in London Rd. Wimbledon. 29 Factory of Analytical Supplies, Derby who provide equipment for use in animal ex~eriments

-

- spray-painted by ALF. dune 3 Golden Lay Eggs a t Headcorn, Kent, an egg packing plant, sprayed by ALF. 4 Butcher's shops in Stratford's shopping centre daubed with red paint by ALF. 5 h g firm May & Baker have their Dagenham kcto-s spray-painted by ALF. 6 ALF members join other activists in raid on Buckley Farm, Droysden, Greater hfanchester. Hens were freed, $120 damage caused, several arrests made. 20 Eleven beagle dogs taken from Boots Experimental Station kernels in Thurgarton, Nottingbiun6hire.

Auwt

21 Hundreds of mink released

from rearing unit in central Scotland and from a farm near Rochford, Essex. 28 Two ALF members fined £10 each a t Exeter Crown h u r t plus joint compensation of $120 in connection with Newton Abbott raid (April 15th) Readers are left to draw their own conclusions.

THE BEASTS OF BERLIN ews has reached The Beast from Berlin of some extraordinary antivivisection actipns. They are called Verein Kampf der Tierfolter (Union Against Animal Torture) and, according t o their com8pondent Gundula, "Our activitiis are to shake people up from their unknowledgment." She writes: "Our grouph planning forceless actions in the streets of Berlin. one exception wan a fire attempt on the 24.4.82 at the central animal laboratories in Berlin. With stones and molotov cocktails, oil containers and spray tins (in our language), we visited this big House, what looks like a slaughter ship (really, big tubes like gunbarrels one is seeing from every side). 4 o'clock in the morning. First we made slogans on the wall, then we threw stones in the windoh and put fire in the entrance door.'Floor and ceiling burned. I t was sure that no animal or man is inside and in danger". She and three men were caught by the police when they returned to the


should she dare intrude." The captivity and depemalisation of animals, he believes, is a reflection of our arrogant attitude toward the natural world which lies at the root of the environmental problems facing the industrialised world.

BEAST CULTURE

thii autumn. Gundula records a catalogue of ALF. style tactics - spraying doctor's houses and the liie but arson as a tactic has now been abandoned. (The or' mal ALF members in Britain gave i up many years ago after some stiff jail sentences). In August they held a street demonstration on o m of the main tourist drags in Berlin, with a dead cat fiied in an "experimentation instrument" on a hospital table, accompanied by twelve people wearing bloody white coats. The cat was stuffed. In September they carried out a symbolic burial of the cat in a glass coffin "together with singing and s p b o i i c for animal liberatiin and the h d o m between animal and humans. White pigeons shall fly out from boxes!

'f

T r n HUMAN zoo A fascinating new winkle on the a m m n t against zoos (eloquently covered by Jon Baizdo in the last issue) is a paper titled: "Reflection on Captive Animals: Zoos as Emblems of

"most zoos ought to be abolished; just because they dm-% -Isbut also because they demean humans.'

He begins by establishing the fact that zoos are a reflection of a process of alienation between man gd animal which began with the blightenment and which has accelerated with the Industrial Revolution. Animals were viewed as persons for most of human history and thus considered members o X e Kumin moral comm~nity. The mdanistic view of the 17th century allowed &entist&t o view animals as "organic machiis" which could be experimented on without compunction. If the Ehkghtenment depmnalise the animal, Jamiemn says, the Industri~ Revolutiin reduced the animal t o the role of pet, curiousity and renewable resource. "Most children f i i encounter an animal between two slices of bread. A they develop. .they begin to experience animals in their natural state: wrapped in plastic," writes Jamieson. On zoos, he counters the argument that they are valuable as an education experience: "No doubt viewing captive animals is educational, but what does it teach us? It teaches us a fake sense of our place in the natural order. It produces people who believe that they can live s u c c ~ f u l l yin a human community and a human world, appmpriating animals only t o satiiQ their needs if they bother with them at all, and who are willing to banish the rest of nature

.

In the latter stages of the Beast's independent existence I gave a lot of thought to the idea of Beast culture -.the use of animal symbols in popular forms, on the one hand, music and fashion based on animals sounds and markings on the other. Shortly afterwards I noticed in h a b y Stmet, windows full of zebrastriped jumpers and jaguar sweat shirts a n m a l l has not sbpped rolling since. In music it appears to be getting stmnger as a choke of imagery, style and sound. Animal Nightlife is one example, South Coast bandThe Jungle another. Moat noticeable of all was a recent NME advert for Animal Records, featuring a tiger's head wearing punk wraparound shades above album covers for Iggy Pop (the nearest thing to a panther in human form), Walter Steding and Gun Club all above the slogan 'The Beast Goes On'. Of course one shouldn't draw too many c w M o n s from this. I once phoned up Zoo Records in Liverpool who launched Echo and the Bunnymen, convinced they'd recognise the links with The Beast. The guy on the other end took me for a mad anti-vivisection loony and put the phone down sharpish. If you see Beast Culture rearing its head and growling, let me know.

-

Finally, your truly will be off round the country at the end of October, pmmoting two animal books pmduced by the Beast team (& others) -entitled Weird & Wonderful Wildlife and The Book of

Beasts. It pmmises t o be A n i d Liberation fortnight around that time. The screening of The Animals Film on Channel Four will be accompanied by an illustrated book about the backgmund tQ the making of the film, and a further Animal Liberation tome is t o be expected from the pen of Richard North ex Vole editor) to be publiihed by Penguin. Get the message. It's Kke a jungle sometimes it makes me wonder how I keep from going under.

JOHN MAY NOVEMBER '82


NATTA NEW< -

THIS year's NATTA AGM was a two day event held in Westonwper-We. The firat day was given over to a conference on the proposed Severn tidal barrage. There is a lot of local interest in the scheme and over 70 local people braved the weather to join ua on Bimbeck pier for the day.

A wide range of speakem covered the hiitory, construction and impact of the barrage and plenty of t i i was given over to sometimes heated dew.As well as the environmental aspects, concern was voiced about the future of shipping in the estuary as many of the local ports are vulnerable to closum A further I d concern was that should the h e m e go ahead, the south west might still lose out on the employment front as many of the j o b would be offered elsewhere which h a happened before when power stations were built in the area. The whole issue was diiussed in the wntext ofrenewables and much interest was shown in the NATI'A slides on wind and wave power. This led to a much wider discussion on the alternatives to nuclear power in general including the option to build several smaller barrages around Britain which could better exploit the different times of the tides and provide a more consistent source of power. From the diicwions afterwards it was clear that the high level of local interest even at thii early stage was starting to focus itself and the formation of some form of local poup seems likely in the near future. Several local group such as the Mendip Society, the Civil Society and FOE are already bewming active on the hue and it's to be hoped that they will initiite further public debate locally. The pre-feasibility study committee under Sir H ~ ~ MBondi M has recommended that a full feasibility study should be undertaken. This would take four y e m and cost £2 million. iTdG%lon is-expectd soon and-104 people have io &5ide3ow they see the Koney sgnt. would likeSimon Mays con-: LONDON N A l T A 27 Clerkenwell Close, London, ECl OAT. 01-2% 7303. NATTA NETWORK ATG. Facultv of Technolow, Open lJnive&ity, walton Hall, Milton Keynes, Bucks.

There am important advantages in vertide axb wind ma-.my accept wind from any direction and the power is em& transmitted down to ground level. Previously known machines include the Savoniw and D m i m types. The first h a slow speed machine with a poor specific power ratio. The latter is much more efficient or cateffective but ban intrinsic characteristic which can lead to selfdestmctive over+eedhg. Neither is readiiy controll-

ableinhighwindauuitheDaueiuais definitely not suhbb for low4ach home manufacture.

-

is pivoted on a vertical axis, 4, downwind of i k centre of effort. The rotation of the aerofoil on its pivots is comtrained in one d i i i o n by contact with the arm and in the other direction by a reefing line or rope, 5, led from the leading edge of the foil, through a guide pulley on the arm, down t h u g h the drive tube and adjustably secured mar ground level. The aerofoil will thus have two W l e positions relative to the support arms and the angle behveen these can be adjusted h m ground level. In the position shown by the full l i i s , the foll has been at its outer or counterclockwise position and ha8 driven the arms a certain diitance in a dockwise direction by the force of the wind on the foil. Any further clockwise rotation of the assembly will bring the wind on to the f a side of the foil. This will

The ''Odltatbg EoU' &J&O

Rg.1 isashpUfiedplanviewor sectfon in which the wind direction is shown horizontally from right to left. The asaembly is supported by a vertical tube, 1,runnlng inside a tubular mast and able to rotate through 360° An aerofoil, 2, having a vertical axis, is supported on arms, 3, from the upper, ex~osed,wrt of the tube. The aerofoil

In thii way the arm and the support tube will be driven alternatively back and forth t h u g h an angle slightly greater than that set by the slacknesn of the reefing lime. If the line is pulled tiiht, the foil will be heId at a constant angle to the ems and the system will simply weathercock. h w e r is taken off from a chnh wheel at the base of the support t h e via a freewheel mechanism. Owen Dumpleton


GREEN NEWS political round-up

between mme rani eventa 6 the Federal l d d a t u r e whkh raulted. without t6e benefit of a national ' election, in a n w rightbt government. you *lave wad, the G-

o m old &n go to th& p a v a daom for the world Fenna Why, who at d y 94 can't far removed h h d f , rataim an 11 par old'# i d d b m , Ha got h U y 0Ilh t h bbOW C 0 l l f m ~ 8 e-0 k t mdk &I t b h that ~ the anti-nuclear argument would ba won; that he would 8eOitinhiaW~ Such rntimenta weml't out qf place in a momentous m i. At Blackpool, Brockway ~~y got hb two thir& majority that p u b unlhbmlinn on the next Party manifedo and ne mat* thnt Michael Foot u t granib faced wMe the -bIy roared or that tha Mtbdexecutive had swung right-

Bimultaneow to ~ k p o ocame l a &@temant from NATTY*-e allied dnmander, G e n d Rogeq deehuing tbhdmtegy +d b-n dweloped to

how much the top bmu a e b g l t d q to in their bunkera. The m m e .. wrhde ..-of the%h i8 not hard to find. E h r 8ime the Anarkam announced Peahi- and c m i u m M l a were to be good friend ax-&mmI Oeri Butlan, #he i n m & to ba back on tho 18 b u r &nloud in the Eurowan theatre b a n a kkiiG and stamping in a e ntab that Im hocked holea in the litid htu8 quo. Old&' b b Ill& 8 t d h & h e of w6St (3wmany epkenke of an antkipatd a c w k ~e the third politkd f m e called die Gmnen have finally arrived. After the next general election the party could e c l i p ~ the U k a b and hold the bdance of pow=. Die G n w n b amavwick political p a r Q n w d a s a n ~ o f ~ parliamentary &ion group that combat the German #tab's b & w

-

UNDERCURRENTS


Do you know what the state's ~~~~~~s hme on file about you? ~~em's~un~mwi~dab~of*-midomtion.mu&of~ is inaccurate. l4hat's mom, there's no way you can f kd out Patricia Hew&, of the National Council fur the Protection of Ciiil Libertii, investigates the situation.

m-d----. --.

-

Greem Ether that or come to an u n d s r & n d i i with the new party i M ia~teadof m i n g them M politiil b i i cased, or near-terrmh Die Grunen for their part say they me prepared to come to an arrange ment with the SPD should both &c+& well after the next election But accordii to executive board manebex b l a n d Vogt the Gmm prefer &at the two par tie^ "live togdmr aad not getnurrid". I n ~ h e ~ u 8 the Green13would be m@a the weeke lmher and could get b & k d No vow8 meam keer mflexea In return for coopem€the SPD h a to give mound on two fin&mentab which for die G m e n are 'non c o m ~ b 1 e ' . ?'he%e, Wgt, d a t e to nuclear powesmnWa cruise and Pmhing. 'Wa lmve to be clear,'' he nays, "that cerMn projects are given up." He inta to the proposed K d h r fast d e r plant which over the weekend w a 6cene ~ ~ of a violent proteet. Kalknr and vojecta like it have d t e d in &ate security meanurea Vogt calk "i~idutzialfascism -very d i f f m t *om the old kind, very subtle but very effectiie." ia iotjust a ~ uvogt t w-?mi danger in Germany. It is werywhere them u an atomic industry and werywhere the state is a major employer." Die Grunen's vhion is of a 'soft republic'. Through pernuasion in and out of the legislature it hopeti to rmd thii path The broad @Iann t o entiie people to reconstruct their lives and imtitutiom from the local l e d up. And it's on thb amd level they are strongest. At Federal level they have a muddled leaderahip a# no seats. At *ta and parish, 1,000. And ao die Grunm soon have to make up their minds what to do with the pow= that might accumulate for them at the centre. htra %Uy ad& her Greenn 'the anti party party'. She imp she wouldn't care for them to nnd a mini8tez to Bonn. Her preferred stanca b e i i one of 'pure opposition'. It might wen be dieadvantageous, she says, to get too lnrge an electoral success since thin might interfere with purity of purpone. Other members take a harder line - grab what you can get. Die Grunen, in a seme, sum up the ambkdence of a couple of generatiom of young and y o u q k h Europeans repulsed by the old style politics but uncertain now that power is upon them whether to drop in or out of the w l i t k d mahutream. An incredible &mpect n o n e t h e h Andrew Wler

r'

I

N.0. In the recant Bavarian elections, the Libernk did wen wow at 3.4%, white the GfEef~W t slightly under 6% 6amrie is noted for k i n g one of the most d-~y w w w a t i w amas of Germany.

-

-

-

you; you, the data~ubject,can't see it, but almost anyone else who might be

thougbt to have an interest in the matter, can. .Those three central pmblems are very well illustrated by the case of Jan you give that & f o m t i o n t o , on what , Wrth, which some of you may have terms, and how it i6 subsequently used seen on a p m p m m e that Panaroma The pmblems that we would television did U t year. Jan was the identify, in terms of breaching information p-y, are fimt of dl 8e~1ecy- perfect answer to the common question "Surely, if you've nothing to hide, then that infomation may be held on you you've n w m g t o fear h m data and used to make decisions about you banks?" Jan had nothing to hide until without your even knowing that the recards exist, or that you're the subject she applied for a job. She was 0ffem.d one at a private film company, which of an mfomathgathering exe-. madb t r a i i g films for private induskria Secondly, that the information may dients. Subsequently, her employer, a s h p i y be wrong, iu&vant or out of former BBC television pmducer, was date, and therefore may be wed telephoned by one of his industrial un-, again, to make a decbion clients who mid: "We understand that about y w , Abd thMly,tbaugb this may appear paradoxical, that the infor- you're thinking of hiring Ms. Martin. - or if you do,don't let her a n r ~ ~ n o t i n f a c t b e k e p t ~ Don't wheze n* our premises because she fidenw. 43 too often we find won't be allowed in." So the producer when eivil servanb in particular-my that a p e d M a r d &I 'Con~eElW', said: *What on earth &I wrong with h n they mean that it is cmfidential against W i n ? She seems a very competent


fil&aker."

matton recorded should indeed be actuate, relevant and up-to-date, and that one &auld be able to make certali that that Is Indeed the cue.And third^ and perhapt mort Importantly,the WhitePape~propow*thatdatasubjecb should lure a right of çcce*to their own penoul nconb. And that Is Dedlaw the moet crucial an* in which the Home Office and the p i e ~ n t govenuaent hive got It rifbt and the Undrop Committee got it wiring. The Undrop Corninittee did not ptopoae data subjects gmnt of accau, Â¥athe White Paper h Ãdone thb and we welcome this. Having fid that, let me turn to whid I* wrong with the White Piper; and there's quite a lot wrong with It. Buenttafly, the White Paper IMVW out I very large number of the lyrtenu which cmue the problems. The White Paper (tart* off (and the Minister keep* in repenting this) by laying that the fee noblem Is cornputem; the threat to the ndlvlduil'i privacy cornea &om the çdon which computer tochaubgy -It podbb to hold pemond ofonnaUon, and the #peed by which

~ n ofdCOUIM they nid,

"WU,we cut ndly t*a yÈ" It'# a

very wy hulh-huh.MCMt But we CM ghre you a due; we h*ve h e w ftom Scotland Yard that die h u a very dubknu tcckgtound mething to do with ternitan." So what the producer did wu to Immediately p~ this on to Jan Martin. fflut he and the indintitalkt dknt didn't know w u that Jm'i father via a recently retired Scotland Yud police officer, who did what retired Scotland Yard police offlcem are not s u p p d tc do, he rang up a mate at Scotland Yard and nid, "Just find out what your ncoidi, your computer, have on my daughter, became they're accming her of behg a terrorist." So hi* mat* uld "111 do you a favour," and found out that when Jan and her husband had been on a driving holiday on the continent, and had been coming back exhiurted after a longdrive, through Holland, they had @toppedoff at a cafe for a cup of tea before they got on the ferry. The cafe owner hid looked at hn'i huaband, thought he looked rather like the BMder-Meinhoff niapect whom picture* bad bÑ all over Dutch TV the oreviou~ Wt, ad-8 the local police &Ing 'The mm ma want for the bombliw attack is s h g ln my cafe." The didn't take any notice of thin became they'd already caught the p e h n they --wanted. But, they noted the lighting and the identification of thto alleged

-

I

hatcubemadean&abletopeopleall Nbw lt'8 quite true

ICNMthe courtly.

know-ItmipÑledo tot& IndurtrW flHMit. who then tritd to

block JIB Mutin'# Now tt r d m i d * W d quite rightly lay 'That'i ridlculow. It could wm happenn. But It did haopan. It happened to a woman and hnhuband who ham no conirctloo with lay terroritt organintion, no crlmlnd record whatsoever, and a completely blunder employment record. And It wu only becmm of the ftlriy extraordinary coincidence that Jan Mutln'i father ça former police officer tlut they MtuiHy found out what had happened. So there you had secret Olfomutlon gathering, of information that w u both inaccmateand Irrelevant, that w u not kept confldinttel to the only people, the police, who could hirttttebly have claimed any right to keep iL There Is a Home Office icheme which h u been put forward In the recent White Paper to deal wI@ thIs mrt, of problem, which i u g ( ~ t *a hti Protection Reglitiu, an independent penon who will have the i~pondbfllty it regtrterlng computer data binkt holding pnonal Information. Secondly, the law wfll hcoipomte the principle* if the new European Convention on Data Protection, namely that the Infor-

hat computer ~ o l o cwh g m the cde of UIOproblem, but ttr bade i m b b I mentioned wrong inforirtton, teck of coafkbatUlty, etc ~~hutucommon,paaIbly evenmore :ominon, unoaçmanual mtom*. 'lltagcabinet* ill acror the country vhteh hold record* on every ichodchBd n thte country, every (octal work c h n t n thlà country, (cnppy bit* of piper in every doctor's patient -mart of the Mlly nuitire infomution I8 not in fwl iept on computer. There Is no doubt itill thatIfwegetahwwhich b Mbrtetod to computer dita thon mott if the problem that people bring to iiginlutiom Uke the NCCL wffl not be ledt with at dl. And at the other end of the idle, ven though the govemnuiit my It'a the tee and the apÑ of the computer pention* that they're w d e d about, hey then go on to p r o p total xmptton forçonof the b l u n t and utott computer lyttomt In toll ountry :that Is to a blanlut x~~ptionftoro hr

-

v&am

attondMeurifar*y*teai,andtome xonption* tor any (yitomdÑUn with iw enfoicment primuUy of mune oHce -.The White Paper It a Me ragg~daround the edgi,It ihnply ly* that there will be "appropriate

-

rmnption~for data banki holding


information for law enforcement puiposes". The Minister has been in the business of rewriting the Paper subsequently, saying "No, we don't need t exempt police systems as they will be i the registration system." But since the police do not want t o be in the registration system, and since the Minister has not specified which systems ale actually going to be exempt, we will be pushing very hard for no exemptions whatsoever on the grounds that shouldn't be any systems whose very existence is secret. A different question is which systems should be exempt from the data subject's access. And cleariv n o w e in their right minds would argue that, if the Inland Revenui were in the middle of a tax fraud investigation, they should hand over the files to the suspect half way thmud the investigation. But there's every reason why, for instance, criminal conviction records should be open to the person whom they purport t o be about. Because over and over again, we have people coming up in court on a fairly minor motoring offence who, when they're asked 'Have they got any form?' the police say 'Well, there was that conviction for sexual assault of a small boy'; and the man says 'Excuse me, I never, I never'; but by the time he's cottoned on to what's happened he's already been sentenced. Criminal records are very often wrong; they appear in face to have got more inaccurate since the index of the system has been computerised. So people should be able to look at them and challenge their accuracy. The second thing that is wrongwith the government's proposal is the ommiss ion of codes of practice. Lindop, quite rightly in our view, proposed a series of detailed codes of practice which would tell data users exactly what was expected of them. The White Paper says we can have voluntary codes of practice (which we don't regard as adequate), and also says that there will be regulations dealing with the very sensitive data - medical data, criminal convictions, that sort of thing. Regulations we assume means statutory instruments non-amendable byParliament and drawn up by the Home Office, not by the independent Data Protection Registrar, and we want to change that as well. Essentially, to summarise the system which we will be pressing for, and on which we're drafting our own Bill, it will cover manual as well as computerised systems, with the very obvious exemption for one's own personal

records - the acknowledge that they will have to exempt the home computer enthusiast who keeps his address book on the computer, and clearly any system which deals with manual records will have t o exempt the manual address book. We endorse the proposals for the independent Registrar. We endorse the use of the European Convention principles. But we want to strengthen the right of access for the data subject by reducing the exemptions which are proposed in the White Paper. And we want t o tighten up the remedies which are proposed in the White Paper so that if you know, or have reason to suspect, that information is being used about you, in bleach of the law on the Conventon principles, then you can go to the Registrar who would have a big enough staff and sufficient powers to be able to investigate your complaint, and if necessary take action against the data user. We hope that the government is going to come up with a Bill in the next Parliamentary session, which will almos&e@nly be thelast Periiamenary session before the next election. It they don't, we will have our own model Bill available and I hope that that will be on board by someone who comes

taken

up in the ballot for private member'sp Bills. Let me end on this, we are not placing all our faith in legislation. Increasingly we are finding it possible t o persuade local councils, employers, schools, education authorities, even police authorities, to adopt models of good practice for themselves, to adopt their own codes of practice on data protection and t o come to organisations like NCCL t o tell them what is t o go in those codes of practice. And I'd like to plug a book that we've published called Whose File is it Anyway whoa author is Ruth Cohen of the National Consumers Council. What she has done is a study of different kinds of recordkeeping systems - school, medical, employment -which are open to the data subject. And the conclusion we must come to, is that opening up your record keepingsystemsto the individual who is concerned, respecting individual privacy, actually leads to a better quality of record-keeping systems and therefore, in the end, we will be actually improving the social administration of a very large part of welfare benefit, education, and so on by taking on board the issues of data protection and individual privacy.

Patricia Hewjtt

DR. DON ARNOTT (former consultant to International Atomic Energy Agency-now ANC Scientific Advisor) KEN CAMERON (General SeCWtaW. Fire Brigades Union) PAUL EKINS (Ecology Party) D A V I D ENNALS (MP for Norwich North) I A N QIBSON (ASTMS National Executive) B I L L PITT MP [Liberal Party) D I A N A QUICK ARTHUR SCARQILL (President MUM) COLIN SWEET (Director. Centre for Energy Studies and author of 'The Costs of Nuclear Power') and npnnntatlvms of tho East Angllin umwlgns. CHAIR: ANDREW ELLIS (ANC and Liberal Party Vice-chairman)

-.----

------------..-------

-----

................................................... Address (for programme, etc) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Name

.......................................................

0 ,ljWe mndosm registration fea of

..

₠( E l In advance/ElSO on day:party rates on rwest) Ptwse notify me of coaches from my ini. I o n d o n sAE m i r k x l ' A m Coach' ¥4EQug PAYABLE T o : ANc, PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM T o : AN= National o ~ m , Room PN. m box 216, shmtflrid S1 ISD ~ 1 0742-754691 : (24 On.)


Over two-thirds of the energy from Britain's power stations is lost. CHP (Combined Heat and Power) is a system whereby most of this waste can be used - and is another reason to question the 'necessity' for nuclear power. Adrian Atkinson spills the beans.

-L-E---

presuppose*inftitutiooal stnlctuies which an at present nowhere on the horizon. True to British energy-institutional style, the committee concluded that only very b& svstemg would be 'e&noiic' and it would be -n to CHP systems coiutniction presents ombined Heat and Power ("CHP") set up a National Heat Board to implean excellent opportunity for pnentiag is the system whereby die waste ment the schemes and market heçIn eat boa electricity power stations employment, parttcultriy amon@ the competition with the existing fuel semi-skilled and unskilled in h e r dties, (which amounts to some 60 per industries. The Government rejected the nte* are highest. when unemployment cent of the fuel energy entering the Heat Board notion but went on to look The Installation of bullding inmulation station) b salvaged by pumping it for the ideal city upon which to inflict and central heating system*, the laying around town in District Heating the first dinosaur CHP/DH system:The of pipe* under the street* and the Systems ('¥CHP/DH")For decades winner, according to the recently constniction of power stations, many Cohtinental urban areas have been released first daft of the consultant's kept warm in winter by obtaining cbap pumping stations and sun* related report, is Belfast,with another five of equipment would provide jobs for coowaste heat from their fdendfy ndgtathe nine cities studied showing themstruction workers and engineering bourhood power station but in BdUdn selves to be, within the criteria chcuen, workels and then the income of these the technology never took off. The 'economic'. Whilst it is nice to see the worken would incream the economic reasons lie in a whole my of thinking ~ovemment contludlng that saving lots within the an. The money activity but more specifically In the complex of of energy can abo be very economic, ¥am by those getting the cheaperheat political and institutional arrangements. it would be even nicer if this had been would ¥l* help stimulate the local The formation of ourmajor energy done in the context of mme slightly economy. I institutions in the 1950s and 1960s morer relevant quections about what we are trying to achieve mdally. took place in the context of falling But if developed by private initiative There b a long liut of reasons why fuel prices. Conservation was unheard or a Heat Board,leu attention might be CHP is a good thing socially, but each of and economic dogma prevailed: pald to buulation (after all, they will be item comes appended with an 'if autonomous fuel industries competing relating to the form in which CHP keen for comumen to mute as much for business would ensure cheapest energy as pocdble) and aHeat Board systems are implemented in pmctice. energy prices to the consumer. Almost would ahnoct certainly rely upon large The Government looked at dties (and ten years after the 'OPEC Crisis' gave power stations outside the ana and pipe not tuburbs) and puticuariy inner the lie to dl (hat, little has changed, the heat long dtetances. The whole lo@c cities because they contain higher Illustrating the rohurtness of tee densities less pipework for a given of Mfnhall'iproposals aims towards institutional conjuncture and the nuclei CHP and tbà plevtom Chairhumber of dwellings and thus more dogma. Tentative beginnings at a colt-effective. Inner cities ham a h m Government insulation programme usd peoon of the CEGB,Glyn England, d r d v ex~mmedenflmduu for this concbntntion of underheated -.---. hhtlvrtv 'renewable energy technology' research . --idea.fhe &ployme# e m @of the . .Ip&)peopbwho could do with a cheap in the late 1970s came under s e w coiutnictipn of nuclear pbwr station* heat loarce, particularly as fuel prices attack in the 1980s- notably in tni upaa tl~enuklem~amh in wbkh they riae in the f u b . CHP systems like recent ACORD recommendation to . any central heating &ld help reduce tend to be located was qelled out by slash funding for Alternatives research hynedd Co~ntyCouncil: Initially Ihv~othemh~~infltthefedandthe (UC 54, p.18). death rate amonfrtbabies;it would ¥l* &-eztended by the Influx of a 6m15 per cent of fuel consumed in p o w constaicttoo woAtow,the tool improw the quality of the building Britain ends up as waste heat from sconomy collapsed upon completion of power stations, ejected into rivers, the the stations concerned. A rimlu sea or vented up cooling towels. As it pattern is being played out in North would only accrue to consumers if run* counter to the laws of physics to Bartern &cotlandau Consequence of control of the system remains local. If use much more of t h b t o generate the North Sea oil bonanza. 'l'hui control developed by private interests, high electricity, it might be thought that the would need to be exerted from the out- prices could be charged and proflto Central Electricity Generating Board let by coMunrre in inner city centres invested elsewhere; if developed by a (CEGB), as a public corporation, would f the employment benefits of CHP are Heat Board, the Government could take a responsible attitude and seek a be realised in full. cream off profits for building highways ways of utilising the waste heat. And it could go much further than Buooing faithfully its central purpose or making armaments. In some respects the problems are - to generate and distribute electricity hat. If loctfly contdkd, efforts could m made to ensure that equipment for global but in detail, there are lesions to economically - it has shown itself to he construction of the system is locally be leamed from the experience of be somewhat resiatmt to this notion. mduced. Then industries which can others. In the case of CHP,Scandinavia However, in the wake of the OPEC nake use of cheap process heat might has much to teach. Then CHP systems crisis, the Government did establish a m attracted to the area or started up: have pown up from small be$nnings committee, under the cluirpersonship and In large town. mch as Stockholm, of Walter ManshaB (whom the moderate ach heat could be seen as a hidden uMdy. All this wouldgenerate mom. form federations rather than dinosaurs. New Scientist referred to as a 'nuclear t e h r obi and in general regen75 In Denmark they are run on a cofanatic'), to investigate possible use of u-ban economies. Howwr, all tht* operative bad8 with consumen buying power ÇtaUo waste heat for CHP/DH.

c

I

-

.

-

-

1

18

NOVEMBER '82


in and nu~intninhgsome cmWl OW' operation&But then in Denmark the natlond @vernment ha6 a C-M energy pdky and much of thin is worked out in detall at the I d level in hlllls ~f hl@gMbd&el Urn. &USUUlm are inbmted in &ng as lWe energy as p d b l e 04. wing money) whem as energy supply organimtions are interested in g a n g rid of as much energy as they CM. Thus consumercontdbd supply o ~ t i o nme s the only q t e to real conservation maSUms

.,

,*

9 .

'

,

~

~

~

Wb.&

t

l

~ STATION

In Brlghbn a d IpMch p u p 8 have

main power s t a h and subsidiary units. Althoug%subddiary unita, particularĂ&#x201A;Âśddiigthe build-up pexiod, m. might use gas in equipment known as "combined qdk* (gas turbines using er stem heat eff the eshuust), in the end there. t h e ~ ~ w i l l m & o n c o d + - o f w h k l i E r & t a f n h a s ~ a 3 ~year ~ U Pa Pm ~ % @ te & ~ Q P ~AltemWss.U t b b d - Wpower broke out in the I d power &&ion s W o m would *$ &equate pollution within days of the p p sting, COWA(Buto$% ntk~rbanones bringing forward the@xomd&oning see UC 64 p,@)Whl~ cau in large Wemd~nthQ u@esmMngCi@ m~zeb~thxoughrnodern posibilitks; the which tt& could b e wit&$& proxhity of the astute Sbmefl aan ha&& UC mwkr. t W h under development. Unlike Thus, w are 1~~ for local with nucleu, there are no fundamental Wtutim to tedtni~~mpblems. but theq in a need n~ f o t ~ q ~ . devebpmemt a o ~ c * c w ~ ~ ~ ~ Adrian a Atkhson few houms or a d d o ~~~ f#nped bM h t e efforts to make urn of 1 4 power ~WtionsforCHP In the f o case ~ o u t b e

. The situation in by w hopeless (even @@ fbW in high phws d m breathe + wW.&untt decenhbing the electricity mduskies). A caucus of activbb work-mg to change Labour PWty and TUC policy to oust nuclear power and introduce C m inevitably this will lead to change8 in instltutiond structures. The sobs for Warmth Campaign was initiabd ~ c a l l to y pmmota CHP whilst challenging the appmach of the central Government. Formed from a coalition of various local ANC and SEXtA gmum the Tmde Union Studies and Infonnatiin Unit in Newcastle, sf2RAlbi in Edinbwgll and 6 0 on, it has broadened out to link up with the Popular Plannb movement,helping trades coundki and community groups to inmtignb We reasons forthe& enem pmblems and devise solutions.

~~

&

$.


Much of the debate about the compaign to stop cruise missiles has centred on tactics - spesificelly, should the actions at Greenham Common, where the first of these new missiles are to be sited be 'women-Id? Ann Wit, one of the founders of the Peace Camp them last year, shatters some chauvinist misconceptions.

have jwt returned from the 'Green Gatherh~g'whem there wan a great deal of dkwuimionabout the que8ti01 ofamixed~pasdua women's a m p atUme&mn COIIUIIO& and a b a-t w & h r the Initiabn el large*& p m b t actiom at the baw in the caning y a should be left up to the women's camp or whether CND should idtiate such action. There wm much heated discussion about what wm meapt by a 'women-led' or 'Women's' action. Many people seem to assume that mch an action mUM8 that men have no pprt to play. Thorn who spoke on behalf of the women's camp were at p a h to point out that thia wm not so,and the blackade~that have been held them in the past have shown very clearly that men am in fact vital in a supportive role M d m am many women not a c W y takiug part in direct =lion themselves. You might my that for every one person riaking meat, them haa to be a t . l e ~ t two or three mnnina around with CUDS of tea (don't snort),hneras, CB radi68, blankets, bicycles, leaflets, mandng tekphoues, Easing with p m and public and not l e d of dl changing nappie8 and w k l n g food. Women who had taken part in mixed direct action pointed out what I believe is ine8cauabl~true that the nolice will ao f& the men 1

I

-

-

the authoritleswith farmom P&RW than the u m d mixed or numericfdly maledombated action8. I h * women p m m t no physicd khmt to our chietly mala police tom, who ate a b l y m o d and ~ ~ r t at . & having to drag off md iand old ladies fainw reminkent of their own grandmothem; women's- mastable actions are more likely to remain largely peaceful. It would seem a p a t pity to 1these vduabk lemm, 8114tCkign~W the trust and confidence b U t up the variousactiom by = m e n & GW b e elsewhem. If =meon6 has l&d foundationsof a house, it Would seem sensible to buUd on those foundation^ rather than import a pmfabrkated structum with no foundations to put b d d e it. One day, anybody who haa had anytbgmuch to do with the movement in the paat ten or twenty y e w - men and worn@is going to g( to Greenham to register their o p p i t . ion to the deployment of 'Cruise' mimiles. Current estimates are that that time wUl come in December nexl year. Thia may d b r . When the missile do h U y arriw, there is nothing anyone not the government, nor myon - can do to s b p people regisbrhg their ~ r o b e kIn the sim~lestand m& obvioiw mv. h ttm m d l m e . I #In1

-

and how, at Gmenham. But if the peace camp calla for a women-froW actian, itlwtomakeitcleuwhat+!eit hm in mind for the men, b e c a m m o n e whatevertheirsex- barifittamgiater th& p ~ ~C N ~Sd-ht ~ , ion win qukkly demomlim UX The question hiiges on what people do and the sitution I am s u e the m 4 m e n t is united in its d d r e to avoid is:the oldfashioned punch-up with the police of Q&days of maledominated demonstrat bnu (we always lost). .Pbvdmade a start towards a nonw d c o n W n a l way of meeting the r#pmtmmhtives of state power let's c u p t h e , it might be inte-g. It k not cowardly to want to avoid violand to plan ways to make it lew IikeIy it'# the only way we'll ever get really mm & i t action; and it's w#ll ever succeed. the only a@y Of CQW the women's peace camp can? 6 p q p i e having any &yle of de&o they like at Gm&am, nor can they stop-otherpeace c m p being set UD there. But all ofus wbo wem involved with the action which conceived the peaceatup can appeal for the spirit of that action to be mqecbd. This is a otyle of pmbst which is uttedy peaceful becaw it aims to communicate wlth everyone, including the 'opposition'; it is led and organised by women, with men as inmlved in the beckground support work (perhaps background is the wrong word I don't mean out-of4ght) M women have been in politks formany y m . It did not exclude men -it included them in our womananked, if you like, way of doing things It was a new way. It worked, it WM thoroughly welcomed and supported by a mixed movement dl along the route that led to Greenham. We have just recently had reports of another women-led action breaking down barriers inside the Soviet Union. Next summer 'Women For Life on Earth' hope4 to o q p h many dmarches b amverge on h n h a mCommonwhiih may lead on to further developments. I k l that CND and the movement which mpporta it may be in danwr of ~ m i n agt cros8-purpo6es. The kind of unity we and we are a diieme movement, that is our strength

-

-

-

-

-

-

UNDERCURRENTS 57


you can forget it until someone h a Med i t out to me what happens. h e times I think there & a brain behind thb programme that mems to be cooked up for us each year that looks at the cdendermd nap 'Right, there9sEmter to fill up with mine mrt of aclivity, then there's Whitsun, we'd better have a mam rally for them then, and that means that they can't do anything the1L or it'd clash, then after w v e m t e d for a bit they can do something a bit direct a&o& inthe autumn, put the pdnce-of-pace arguments at Chdsbnas and that brings us back to Easter again., Now I know there isn't any one mind redly and everyone who identifh withI the CND central organisation works vey hard, of that I've no doubt, but when you s b p back and look at the deciabns that are made, the 'campaigm ' 'launched' with press and m on (never to be heard of @n) it does meal a rather wooden kind of thiukt n g , ~ b the f thinkingwillbe ~ woodm whenW8 the cart hying to Wnkmd not the livinghome. So kt's have the home In kont of the CND cart whlch means that the cart ha$ to trust the home to know whete it's goa. I think that the movement does act like a kind of organism, with a brain and a shifting a n t r e of leademhip, able to decide for i W f what are the most appropriate fonns of aclion a t what time. We are respmding canstan& ly to changing events a6 well as thhking m d planning dl the time. &heren=, unlty di very desirable, but heavy-handed attempts to channel or control the dived@ WW only delay the growth of red solidarity with each other. Of c a m e there b a q l e for a CND office, for full-thb workem even. ~ n for informg ~ ~ We need a c ation, we need to keep c m h t l y In toucb with eacb other in dlfhent b b of our body poliliq we need a kind of giant awlkhboard, but we d,including the nwttch-boardoperator, think up andsend thememges.There isevery r e m n why the CND executive should prepare the organbation t o mrvice and support in every p d b l e way a large& pmtest against 'Cruise' Involving direct action of various kinds; but there is a h evey m m n why the decision as to when that action is to take place, and also where and how, should be left up to the people in the movement that are going to be doing it.

-

-

from the b o b up, b i d of us who motiuate.oumlveiz reaching out and pining hands, when we feel it is appropdate. It cannot be constructed from a 'omlre' according to the 'stepbystep' theoy of political action which has ensured that the 'left institutions' have themelves been part and parcel of the drift towards catastrope. People are funny: they take hundreds of years to go one step forward, then they go sideways, then they go backwards, them they get in an aeroplane. It seems silly for 'CND' to cany on like a steamroller a6 if we out here in the ac*e p u b didn't have ideas of our own indeed, our very own little pmgramme NOVEMBER '82

seem te be the notion

-

who's notion I've no idea of 'launching a mass campaign against Cruise'. The very idea makes the heart nint but anyway I w s under the distinct impression that such a campaign had already been launched some time ago by E.P. Thompson, Newbury Campaign Against Cmise, Women For Ufe On Earth and just about 100% of the rest of the movemnt. I would have thought that the experience of 'Peace Week' would have shown that cenWy-inspited initiab i v a i m p h but few in a decentralised movement with b a p of initiative of its m.It daem't matter how pod

-

Ann Pettit t


the nuclear a m s race. In the event of a p ladioactivjty sma a

b

rekm ~ df

msome 80,W

we can reach out to ordinary, uneondtted people. The S h w e l l Inquiry's full opes ou 11 January. The OWare

mmkm accident. The FBU 0-=

22

wpm

-

STOP P R E m I t now looks li2e fjte

to


Many people in CND are starting t o see the escalation of nuclear weapons as more than a single issue, as a symptom of deeper malaises in society. Linda Churnside reports on Green CND. retirement of 41 ~ n - ~ ~ u cpower leu SWIOW - e l 4 to make way for the PWR! The main themes of the ANC'a s k w e u ampaign am w t , 'needS, e m p l v n t , danger, the plutonium w n n w and the polltid mothatlon for the PWR progmnme. These themsa are expanded upon in the ANC'~~bafbt and amp&n brleflng document. To h n c h formally what will be the largest and broadest based campaign emr aeen in this country againat any nuclear power development, tbe ANC is orgenMng a Nationd and Conference in @ntmI Hall, W e s t m h b ~ from l l a m to 4pm om 6 Nowmber. The event ha# been eponmred by -MI anthudear alliances, m y ~OUI ~ I I ~ U group, C ~ I CND, Uberal P&y, Party, NUPE, NUM a d the Fire Brigadd Union. S p a h # will include Dr Don h o t t (former consultant to the Internationat Atomic Energy Agency, and now ANC Scientific Adviser), Ken Cameron (Fire Brigades' Union), Paul Ekins (Ecology Pam), David En& MP,Bill Fltt MP (Liberal Party), Diana Quick, Arthur SmrgU, Colin Sweet (author of the ANC pamphlet !l'he Costs of Nudear Powex) and representatives of the Enat AngUen amp&tW. The campaign qmnst SmweU B can - d d - b e won, butonlywith your active support! Join us on 6 November! Pall hmlm

w,

-

-

SIZEWELL CAMPAIQN MATERIALS A d I W frun: ANC National Office, PO BOI 216, Skffbld Sl 1BD. Tel: 0742-764691. P m 'Stop Szwall B No PWR in Britain'. A2 size, pdnmd in rod, vellow and black, and depicts e nucbar power smtion am fim. P r i m

-

linc.p&pl: lIWp, 51E1.60,101EZ.W,

-

LnfW The ANC lnafW%tcwt b PWR Nowl' deals with the economics, the emplov m t impiications, tho danger, th@ 'mc?and the militow implicetiom of e PWR proranme. This A5 b k k and whim me18 din& 8ution keflet is priced ai follow. Prices: 1W/E1.50,5W/E4, l , ~ I E 6 . 6 0(inc.p&p). B o b : The ANC s h w a nuclear p&r station with t h i letters PWR M i n d it. reads STOP NOW! This 1%inch The st-n

nuclear p o w r station?' Show existing and powor stations. Pricn: 5 E b and 1OlEl iinc. v & d . Pamphk "he C a t s of NUCI& ~ovwr'bv Colin Sweat. Prim E l .25 linc. p&p) from Undercurrents. propoNd s i m for nu*

(60% ofthe profit# to i d grows), standard letter to MPs, petition form, campaign briiing. Send SAE for &miis. NOVEMBER '82

-

A

many of the p a c e camp which have world at war with itself mined, .been set up outside military bases and pollutad, de-foliated and under has been producing 'Peafe Talk' for threat of destruction by nu&u war or accident. This la a picture of m y months. 'Peace Talk' la a means of communication between the camps, the world w i t IB now. It la t o tq and -ping ideas, advice and words of achiive a better future (or even any warning about latest police tactics, aa future) that Green CND la working. for poetry and Gmen CND is a speddLst w t i o n of well a8 pmvidiig a f 0 ~ m CND, set up in 1981to work for W c e thou@ts about p m in gened. Expodug the limb between nuclear within bmadly 'green' groups such Friends of the Jkth,the Conmrvatlon m w m s and nudear power is one of the main ob tlves of Green CND and Society, and SERA (the Sodnllst Environment & Re8oumes Association). the SizeweI&U e has been a ma@ Just asTnde Union CND works to get c a m p m g ama withii the laat few month k a l e unbns to affUlate to CND and John MWm is repreenting CND pemuale their members to join, Green on the Sizewell ~ ~ ~ i n a tbody i n and g CND worka among ecologld a d m m m e n t a l groups. o m of Green CND hna been instrumental in pemudmg CND to take P& in the k t groups to respond to Green the f s h d l h u b ' . But Green CND CND's reque~tto atfill& to CND and o & e r m n group b b g w d e d launched the Shewell Action F u d jointly with Greenpace and the Green CND hsd a membemhip to nh funds for Emlow scheme until recently and membem came from a variety of political parties, activities oufskfe the h u b ' , and m a y an active thou* h d qa varying gmen-nes. Not Green CND P P ~ are *g p& in the &wen Mamh for a Safe surprisingly, many members a from Future, in September. the Emlogy P u t y but inmasing Green CND is also trying to numbers of Labour Party greens are attending meethap and becoming active e n m w e p m activists to take a wider view when camp*@ for p w e - to within Gmen CND and there are some see udataral dhemament as a 5 n t SDP and Liberal CND greena There may even be mme closet Conservatives! step, not a h a l god. T o this end, they are p r e p e ~ i ~&pmphlet, g which will be As a wcidbt d o n Green CND haa a repremntative on CND's National published early next year and will examine thb 'green view of p e w ' in Council a p& held for the laat year detaiL Meanwhiie, there in a biDavid Taylor and for the next year monthly n&tter which &eep by John IWjomn~ Green CND hold^ quarterly meetings subscribera up to d a b on Green CND on in differnut p u b of the countq m that news. This hea xegulumctio~~ pa? camps, Sizewell and CND as tunny people w p d b l e can attend and through its nixteen reglond contacts Nahonal Camcil meetings, w well w articles on current bpb of conoem. it ia -big to org& more l d s e d Green CNVs aims WUnot be easy to nctlvitiea in the future. It is a h fulfil In a world de-stabhd by pow* cumen@ setting u@campaign project and w e d it CM seem h o p h s to t q to p u p s to continue and broaden the pem& p p k that pace is even valuable work c d e d out in the last podbh, let alone pemuade them that eighteen m o n t h b~g w up our nuclear weapns we Green CND wea non-violent direct can begin to achieve it. Yet we must action a8 a m p r weapon in the succeed, for if we do not them will be desperate s t n & for peace wbich activists must undertake in the next few no world left to Mve. Linda Churnside years. Last October they organid a 1 If you w i d iika to mcaiw the Gmen CND CiIy s ~ c c e ~NVDA ~ h l conference

m,

-

Green CND hw actively supported


'You an blow out a candle but you cant blow out a fire when the ftamw begin tocatch, thewindwiUblowthtm higher' -PetwGabrielfrom t&tong'Bfto

-

T

i - source of strenith thi&Xei within the w a ~ ~movement; ' f the elective power of women, Â¥cttnMwomen. Thia will be 8 key f l à ‘ d a lent in the evolution of Politics. Lee obvious, but eq- imxaJuMoitant, li Un liberation

I

here is l revolution going on. It l a not like revolutioworthe put' mn 6 , hMbagunwithiodMdudand

a thepolitic*!(toucture.'It doe*-

to I ^, o~a,ttoM fold,

rtiugri*oftboMme&whoare beghmlm to temu irith &ke of dooiiiint 'tough,that leap to man'* tchoolboy lmç(taation n InBritilnÑ&&,thnai

upect of our soctal,-omic and political liws. Socially, we are tournlog to unctontandand overcome out lexiam bMlanlagto d- Mul'oo-oDixt* more fully and teaching out children¥bou real freedom. In the realm of ecoaomica we ue building structuresthat u* not bued on hienfchy, exceeive cornpetition and the deitmcthc%liuionof indiMriminate and perpetual ecooomic growth. We work collective .but take penoul responsibility for e world around us. Politically, we gee that nudeu weapon* (for example) are not a narty mistake in an otherwlae healthy world. They are the logical r&t of the colturn we live In,a culture globally hued on the distorted nu~uUnevalues of economic growth, techno-mania, centniion and militarism. Despite the changing the domliunt culture reinftfen ita hold ewy d*y. An hlenurchiol¥othozttis centalto t e w h o l e ~ ~ ~ ~ m i i

-

8

"

~~

i

without m a y undentMufingthe prioeiplfÇÇfitt directdemocracy or i.Kifftbeniiorç,*kà bctoÈi the emer@u&of DMGtmen It- been Ur Input of ahtehly poltticteed youth. & a country whom State repression if more dearly risible and where social Issue*(e.g. homelettnea aid aqu&i@ are conriderably more prwiinf, young people ham been reipoiidtaflrapidly to t

b

~

,%

~

.

DifferentcilcuiiutanoetfQube different solution*.Then tena w e , Wpoliticalpwrtyh

a

usually Mmulomrthfngltatiihdd OTBI others, owr other HieÑ cultuita,

nxclaaudreligions.Itplace*tfaÃ

çotddbato hippm Won@ united

~ o f ~ , w e d t h M d # e politic*! fixe* tctadly e m o M ' FlMtly,Orwry natureefour ~OUMCJ I* mvolutlonuy beauw central recruit (oldten or amus enonnous to our approach is penonal reaponalmounts of wealth. Instead we took for bfflty. Thla meani that we change our n source of power in oumlves and in own Ihc*as well as Joining national the Earth, a power bued on a froh campaigns. As far as possible we do not undentanding of the value of each elect othen to take our decision! for us. Imttviduiland of the environment. Thh Green solidarity wilt not grow because Is thepower of nonviolent training and a ~ a 0 CdO l i U d t k ----Mtio& It is more genuinely n d i d than dm it herthis apDfOTal. We anrnot my tired thçoi of revolutionary .a-m-. such a delegate. Solidarity can only be ~urwofirommkcoloured developed through group conieiuus and by the metal thenu O f m uniillv p e n o d commitment. A unitv hmd on nwdated with femiainitÇ&mmhnce. fimple majority votfne is 1m effective weaklier, prettinea ¥a doamtielty. . than c o m e n i ~ so~darttybecame lome We have yet to really feel the vim of the people will not have nude that me&. To tackle that power ¥w do not need to mtabllih o w own hierarchy,

effectsof a deep-rooted wliditrtty,

blth@~~ local peace groupa, women's

group*,community action groups, .communes, quatten and ecolo@atetogether with the radical bookshop, wholefood shop, textile co-op and local alternative paper developing a common vblon and rtrategy to bring about change in their area. This kind of local solidarity could lead to the setting up of community centres and to a sharing of skills and reçouiceiIt could eventually lead to something of a common position on local political Issues and the leverage to with which to do somethingabout jk. Secondly, then nuut be alound mutual undentandlnfl of ideas and aspirations. Thus.environmentalists would oodtbely want to learn from feminiiti and vice mm. The Women For Life Os Both network is forging an undentauidldg of theUnks between (eniinteni,peace and ecology,both through action and writing. Their peace camp it Greenham Conation has been an Implratlon to us ill.Networks exist for green CND members, co-ops, whole-

-

violent over the gentle, the micfllliie overthe feminine, theutificteloverthe apnkidthecentnhxedoverthe

local.RnrorI*MiltotildeInthe

Tha 'Graan' movmmt in thi many other piacn in Europt exmiasthe reason)

UNDERCURRENTS 57

,


ce& not a special phenomenon, septate from otber armed activities. Instead it is a part of the general buildup of weaponry, especially by the superpowers. They need space for a number of thine, for all of which it can provide cheaper, more securely or technically better solutions ti+ Earthbased systems. The list of whatcan be done in space is long but huniltar. Most of the items on it were perceived by clever generals, admittedly a select body, before the first satellite went into space. The difference now is that, at least in principle, the machinery is there to make their ambitions real. Most satellites put into space are there for one of two purposes: communications or espionage. Jasani's work shows a total of315 military communications satellites between 1958 and 1976, and 821 spy satellites. Since then the Dace has auickened witt 360 satellites for military surveillance and 180 for military communications. These total far outweigh in numbers weapons trials, military navigation satellites and other military launches, andlUcivilianlaun&~~itaiy activity (pace a a u t reality wit decadesot history behind it: it is also a

CommonvlAce.

T

he final military frontier, or just another way of encouraging the hard-pressed shareholders in aerospace and electronics companies? As Patrick Moore says, "We just don't know." In this case, we just don't know whether war in space is a horrific danger or a horrific waste of money. Over the last few months, the American right bas produced a space war plan and seen it thoroughly rubbished: the Frencl have cancelled a spy satellite system because it was likely to cost more than it was worth: and the ability of the US military to makes its ambitious military space plans work has looked less achievable than ever. The military of virtually every country in the world

26

is interested in space, and at least a dozen nations are spending money on it, but none of them know if they will* ever see a useful military return. Someone who knows more than h is fair share about military plans in space is Dr Bhupendra Jasani of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, SIPRI. His book Outer Space -Battlefield of the Future? predicted much of what is now happening in 1978. flow he has edited, and written large expanses of Outer Space -A New Dimension of the A m Race, (Taylor and Francis, Ă&#x201A;ÂŁ18.5 - time to join the library) which updates his earlier work and places it into the military context of the 1980s.

~hese-shlliteshave already made space a part of military planning, on an everyday basis in the superpowers. Satellite photography, given a start in lifeafter the U2 incident had shown that a more secure system than aircraft was needed for getting intelligence about the USSR, is now a regular tool for military planning. No respectable war could be fought without satellite pictures to locate the enemy at land and sea, without satellite navigation systems t o enable ships to find their locations and weapons to be targeted, satellite meteorology to keep air forces flying, electronic spy satellites to dissect enemy telecommunications and radar, and otber services like those of the Vela satellites, orbited by the USA to detect nuclear explosions. The surprise is that the space age has so far not brought any radical new directions to war-fighting. Better information is always valuable, and better information is what satellite systems have so far brought to the military. But space systems have so far offered little more than a gradual acceleration of the rapid, often self-defeating, and always expensive technical progress which is characteristic of modem military

I

UNDERCURRENTS 57


1 1

(global positioning system) nowbeing put into place by the US military. This was thought up as a deluxe navigation system for US (and some allies') ships, aircraft and vehicles. The Navstar system Is hid] technology at its highest (appropriately enough, a good description k iv High Technology magazine for July/August. 1982).It uses a system of satellitesand atomic clocks. and the delay in receivingsignals from the different satellites gives positions to within a few metres. At the m e time. mffltay are trying t o save money and &crease their techhcal ontions bv muscline in on apparently civilian space systems. An example is Inmarsat, an ambitious satellite system, internationally owned (partly by British Telecom) and used by operators of ships, oil platfonns and the like for communicationswith these objects afloat. Inmarsat's main attraction for journalists is the long list of its land stations,which are places with names like Eik and Thermopylae. The Inmarsat system is billed as a civilian setup, but is now being actively marketed t o the world's navies. This means that even small

NOVEMBER '82

the

satellit& over &ific, Atlantic and Indian oceans. Interestingly enough, Inmarsat uses European Space Agency Marecs satellites and buys launches on ESA's Ariane launcher. The ESA charter specifically precludes it from any military involvement. The importinee of being flexible is that military users want infallible systems in wartime and seenre, reliable ones in peacetime. So the incentive is to have military access to all satellites, including commercial systems for communications, remote sensing and the like, and t o improve the economics of military systems by getting in wellheeled corporate userg. It is turning into a space edition of the AT&T follies in the USA, where the only (and successful) opponent of breaking up the telephone monopoly was the Pentagon. The US military is the phone company's biggest user, and regards the Bell system as a major strategic asset whose breakup would plunge the USA into an Afghan-type situation overnight. The problem is that the same wellheeled customers are already being bombarded with offers of space corn-

munications systems, plus commercial (although government-run) remote sensing services and other goodies.. RCA, Western Union, SBS (partowned by IBM) and others are launching scones of satellites, so many that they may be driven t o offer cheap communications t o the military to stay in business rather than the other way round But all this corporate euphoria is based upon one technology: that of the Space Shuttle. The Shuttle took many more years to develop than it should have and cost billions of bucks more. Even now it is still puttmg much less into space than one-shot US rockets like Titan. But in time it will change the face of the US space effort. And the changes will reflect that fact that the Shuttle is designed around military needs. For the civilian user, a reusable rocket for puttmg modest satellites into high orbits would be fine. ESA has the right idea with its planned developments ofAriane. But the Shuttle is W i e d instead to allow massive manned platfonns to be assembled in low Earth orbit, and to put spy and other satellites there. The shuttle load manifest - stretching out t o launch 20 - is heavy with spy satellites, experimental devices for spotting rocket launches, with military communicationssatellites including development packages for 500111 diameter battlefield communications systems, and all manner of unmentionable classified devices. But even here, with aB the money asked for, and the full resources of the whole of US technology, the Shuttle is in trouble. Unlike Ariane it has not yet finished at the bottom of the Atlantic. But there have been flights cut short, problem launches and landings, and equipment failures. And ID the last Shuttle bunch thereusable booster rockets, whoa reuse Is a key part of the Shuttle's economics, sank instead of floating when they hit the ocean. Worse, the growing Shuttle support industry, intended t o sustain a fleet of four or five Shuttles, is having problems reusing just one while getting another into use. Hence the US military's enthusiasm for reusable spacecraft flying off conventional runways into space, dreamt up because it is now unlikely that the Shuttle will ever be quick or flexible enough for wartime use. Thus the reality of the military uses of space, although it does provide a new twist t o the arms race and is the


focus of much military enthusiasm, may turn out to be far less of a revolution in military practice than its devotees insist. For another instance, this time involving the most widely advertised militmy space technology of recent years, take the case of the laser weapon that didn't fire in the night. One prestigious body on the Reagan right in the USA, the Heritage Foundation, has joined military lobbyists and aerospace companies in demandinga massive array of satellites, armed with laser weapons, to wipe Soviet missiles out of the sky in case of a madive nuclear strike on the USA. The problem appears to be that the whole idea ignores the laws of physics. The aerospace firms have been able to carry out the piece of arithmetic demonstrating that scores of satellites would be needed for the task. This is because they have to be in low orbits, and so very fast-moving, to hit the targets, so that large numbers are needed to ensure having one in the right place when needed. After this, the calculus deserts the system's enthusiasts. First, every satellite would need a laser. Not such a problem. Note, however that it does store up a problem for later - the laser beam has to hit the target and stay with it long enough to do damage, unlike an explosive weapon which might hope t o cripple a nuclear warhead with a comparatively inaccurate

'WEIR

shot. Next, it needs a pointing system. Here the fun does start. The satellites would be in orbits about 100km above the Earth's surface. The one that was in position above the Soviet launching sites at the crucial moment would have to be able to wipe out maybe 1000 missiles during their boost stage, which lasts about eight minutes. The Russians, knowing that the laser weapon system is there, naturally launch all their missiles at once in the hope of overwhelming it. So the system can give about half a second to each warhead. Better try something else. How about melting the skin of the missile? Possible but difficult, because the missile's aluminium skin would reflect away 90% of the heat falling on it. Even a huge 100MW (one modest power station turbine) laser would take 100 seconds t o do the damage far too long. The only way round this is t o give the laser a huge focussing mirror over four metres across. Making even one of these would be quite beyond the US optical industry, since even the tiniest flawinit would absorb energy and cause the mirror to explode. Making 50 - forget it. And, even though a 100MW laser does not exist and there is no apparent way of making one with present technology, it is possible to say that if one were made, it would need no small amount of fuel If it were a 100% '

-

In April, raided Roeleveld's house in response to complaint, and were astounded to find a rabbit warren of concrete bomb shelters which he had built in the back-yard of his shabby home. In the shelters were an estimated 250,000stuffed animals and birds, including crocodiles, ostriches, kangaroos, panthers, apes, a bear, an elephant skull and a camel. Some had been stuffed in the last century, but most were the work of Roeleveld I I himself. A great many belonged to protected species, and it was not clear how they had come into his possession. , The collection also included thousands b h n Ro&veld, a h k h m a n of= of eggshells, bones and insects preserved living in the village of Eerbeeck, 55 in formaldehyde. miles east of Amsterdam said that Roeleveld wasn't upset when 40 God had instructed him to collect and police and firemen began to remove his mount two of every species in prepmat. ion for the end of the world, which was collection. 'They will return to me of their own accord," he said. "Let them imminent. God had promised more take the animals. For each one they ago that his collection than forty ywould rise up and live again after ~~d~~ take 1 will get a hundred back." The Lincoln, Nebraska, Journal nent Day, and that the scrap iron (17April 1982)informs us that the ' w e n @ and old furnjturethat litterpolice are investigating a number of !d his garden would also be made new.

,

S T U F F

efficient (!) hydrogen fluoride laser, for example, it would use 0.66 tonnes of fuel per missile shot down, making a total of 20 space shuttle loads per spacecraft or 1000 for the whole constellation of 50 spacecraft. Lasers are now a few percent efficient, although they will presumably improve. Lastly, such a system, if it worked, would not help against any nuclear weapons deployed in nuclear submariys or bombers, and simple antisatellite weapons could destroy the spacecraft in place. That technology does seem to work. The realition that it is difficult to do things in space with fancy technology like lasers is sinking in. The US military has cut spending on spacebased laser communications experiments. The laser anti-ballisticmissile system seems to- be based in fantasy: existing military systems in space are not immune to budget cuts, technical failure and inefficiency: and if they were, they would provide a turn of the screw in military technology rather than a death-blow. Nobody wants to look up at the night sky and know that almost every moving light they can see is destructive in intent, as is now the case. Space is a disarmament battleground like any other. But this means that it is a place where the outcome of the struggles does not necessarily favour the military and its allies.

possible charges including possession of unlicensed firearms, danger to the public heath, unlicensed taxidermy and hunting of protected species. And an Eerbeek municipal officer said the t o w council would consider building a special museum to house the collection if sufficient examples could be rescued from the ravages of mould and rot. Also in April, we heard of another remarkable old man, Luo Shijun of Jingxi Province in Southern China, who celebrated his hundredth birthday on 12 December last year. The Shanghai newspaper Wenhu Bao (6 April 1982) reported that old Luo had F w n 27 new teeth from his toothless gums. An official in his village, who muld not believe his eyes, gave him a piece of dried meat which the peasant ;hewed with gusto We picked up the ;tory from the Malaysian Star the following day. This is not an isolated :ase - we have several in our files of ;cry old people sprouting new teeth. Paul Sieveking Thanks to Joe Swatek and Ion Will. 1 UNDERCURRENTS 57


Many people feel the use of highly-intelligentbeings like whales in experiments is immoral. And to use them for military purposes even worse. Last year, the freeing of such a whale created headlines throughout the world. What really happened? As exclusively told to Undercurrents -the story of Why I free the White Whale' the activistconcerned prefers to remain anonymous.

I

-

w

hen I read in the paper around the end of May 1981 that the US Navy was bringing two beluga whales t o Vancouver Island, I was immediately interested. These beautiful, intelligentfi. taken gregariouswhite whites prisoner by the US Navy in August 1977 near the mouth of the Churchiil River in Hudson Bay, Canada. They were then shipped by aircraft to San Diego where they remained until October 1980, being trained to retrieve torpedoes born the ocean floor. In October 1980, they were shipped t o Dabob Bay In the Hood Canal near the Navy Undersea Warfare Engineering

Unit at Keyport, Washington. The reason for this move and the later move to Vancouver Island was twofold. First, each place had more work for the belugas t o d o than the last and each site was much deeper than the previous one. They wanted to see how deep belugas could or would dive. The whales were an eight-year-old male, llOOlbs. and a six-year-old female, 9001bs. Joel Meriwether of the Naval Oceans System Center, San Diego, which actually runs the naval operation in Dabob Bay and Vancouver Island, said at the time, "We are well pleased

the navy base showed me otherwise. The square pens were only twice the length of the belugas and only about quite vocal about condemning the use 30 feet deep (see photo) - a far cry in of cetaceans by the military although size from the Hudson Bay of their most thought they were being wellearlier life. treated. I immediately questioned this Also the whales followed a repetitive since after almost four years in breathing pattern which is usually taken captivity, they still didn't even have as a way for captive creatures to overnames. come stress. The belugas were moved to Nanoose The trainer of the belugas, dark Bay on the east coast of Vancouver Island by a special barge and were t o be Gower, was in San Digo (where he spends half his time) on the day of the kept in fish net cages in the protection open house. Consequently questions of a group of islands called the that myself and other visitors concerned Winchelseas. These islands are the site about the whales wanted to ask could of the largest and most sophisticated not be answered. torpedo testing range in the Western After the open house I set to work world, according to the Department of finding out as much as I could about the National Defence. base and the whales. Both studies proved very interesting. The first thing I wanted to determine was whether there was a danger t o the captive belugas from orcas (killer whales). Michael Biggs of the Government Research Lab, Nanairno, 20 miles from Nanoose, said that the only danger might be from a transient orca since resident ~rcasanywhere in the inside passage of Vancouver Island would have more than enough fish to eat and that it was unusual for them t o attack other sea mammals he? for that reason. As far as I could r i d out there were no resident orcas for 50 miles up or down the coast and only one transient had been seen in two years. Reassured that the belugas were not in danger from o m s , I studied their diet and learned that they have the widest range of food of any cetacean. 150 different kinds of food have been found I was no stranger to the Nanoose Bay in the stomaccof these whales. My next question was whether the TorpedoTeltig Range. In 1973 I belugas could survive on their own after helped organize a protest there against the visits of US Navy nuclear submarines being penned up for four years. Their cages were made of net and I felt sure for the purpose of testing for radiation that they still caught and ate any fish leakage. It seemed natural that because that strayed inside. Also the smells and of this I should be the Greenpeace person chosen to "check out the white tastes of the wild remained around them whales". them. Various sea birds visited the After a few phone calls, they cages. The whales weren't totally inspected them and announced they separated from the wild and at least one were 'humanely treated'. According to of them confronted the open sea when the Department of Fisheries, "they did diving for torpedoes even though he was recalled by underwater acoustic devices. not appear to be under stress". A visit I therefore felt confident that they to the pens during an 'open house' at

with theft progress."

Many environmental groups were


Hopeful libs'rstor on the southe~~ktand,

Uudw*fnr(A*W~n.MWtfoffw tunwt m he could fmthe wfiala.

,

.c . .

.. .

~ . . .

. !... .

..

. <

.

..

. ,

1 Raneer would be accomouiledbv ten ce It woaMJ- too imill-er tttip a

T'EEGateBtldfe,it

Uftottunder

kÇVtoaqehorbl~~dtehB8Y

under the d v e anchor and to prevent itsurtnl torulonffuDoniblc.The

It would create Hurt tucb mfS&klh. Itseemodlikeagoodideatomç. , AbwwwksliterIdmvtoa * deserted beach to launch myinflÈtÈb raft. L w s weariasmv weteatt-md was ,,@-pf&d up tohitto. botchpo WtnclMtaf bland. I had OBished;

t, most of whkh had

could still remember how tofetch tha& own food. In fonnçUzlnthe pb18 for the project, one of the thin@ Giwnpeace wanted to hifftti- wu the belugaf' iegull food supply to we jurt what chanfcab w m being add& Of eoune the nmy couldn't (tve out nich top secret inftfBDations. One thing I soonÇallze wu teat therewwa b&pofdblli¥that tic whales wouldn't evon b e the c*g*È*

dl,orIftheybft,m&Jgt~&ytothe (tetelty and return <w getuught.They had to be ftventhe modmum mount of getaway time befon the open cage ms ducOTled. Tbi* mMnt treeing than is~>onafterdarkmpooiMe.If they did not attain fwd Aà çomreÑon the bMie tvetwouldÇÑinthatMin wcud¥tti'thçywemthent eholCB. NwmIcftmhatUnone-DUde ~directactionprotntlftatthe* nillhq for %a& we of maaunnmb~ dosedtlu'uge. à to my knowledge,tha UK of lay ather animal either. 6if8Bthehaiftour,ISawthrtvm . Itseemsmmelegstometouvethe ¥lulÈ tedÑd.titt.ttaÑ n tcoe lolphins and whales from extinction by U X & W C taut~toon aÈçafoce xxiuneice while allowing them to be on lied in waiter. Suchuse could lead to I quick decimation of their populations thelMytoODMW1gthet*-ri The<t6çi~ofrnraiB6 when to lo It? Patrick Moon at Greenpeace, Vmcouw 01%Out In&fewweb time,the USSlWger, a nuelear-

I intlted the b@¥ftqulckt u poiible andflflixiitwithriltlwgtarexceptthe heavy lÈtt<ay bmb.0t Its weight, I didn'frputthe-$@%boat until ltwwinlUMÈd*q>waterpltç(çte aboutaOBÈs,umucbuçviythteaç -put tooeth^ Sfodtae**the d,& ÇÇ lw9bççnMimy Imç~flbltsa anek(IOm b the wodd.JsUuçitaaeçIcouldieet HAtoof aYideitlMttoa. I luttpçin lowered,~Udea'çHaçd*tenftm gBdnwd¥a~çrtoÇid(l*hwt*f would becomingtoVancowerona MfMktewliiditoumthemotor.1 'good-wiDpVldt duitiif, of aB tbaeb the didn't bç'motor-gtoanb~cuueI worldwide IMfnnaiBent Wwk.The koeç tWatlout once.1 would have to

-

enemble*" Out of the USA.b It w

-

UNDERCURRENTS 57


Oos9-u~ of undwtizmlpens showing OM &a/#. Rofn itntcfwd diffonally ¥cnnthe wrfsw wm loosened to o ~ the n curtaimlike door so whiles wen free to IWM.

lift the motor clear of the water to avoid rocla. Having no mount meant that I would have to hold themotor with one band on the shaft and me the other tot the throttle and steering. To get to Winchelsea Island and the whales, I had to go between two smaller islands. Here,due to sudden actions of the tides, wbds and cunents, I was washed to within five feet of the waves clashing on the rocky shore. The motor beganhitting on the bottom. Somehow I began moving slowly away after lifting the motor so the propeUer blades wemi within a foot of the surface and pointing the boat at right angles to the shore. Then I was caught in a cuirent which took my in the direction I wanted to go. There waaone more small island before I reached the whales. I decided to re# here because the lumd Iused tahdd themotorwasnumban

possible to swim across to their island at the edge of the illumination and then until move along the Iwasonlyabou cafef, I teached the observation point the closest Icould get without getting wet oxbeingseen-by Sum. LuckDy,this hadbeen planned as a practice run for It was too lateto free fte Whales anyway. My plan was on the mutbeamost -during the coming dcy and free the whales as soon a& ~Oççib after dark the next evening. (The southern island was not militaly but privately owned and desertedwithloteof~inwhichto bide-out). where I could decide But now I on a route t& follow when I returned in sixteen how. I looked and Waited for d g u a r d to patrol d u ~ n the g next two bow. la id that time only one

-

and evety once in a while it would turn on a (potlight illuminating e r o l y n g in Its path. Once it shined the light directly at me and I hid. It illuminated the shore of the other island along which I would swim. When theship finally left, I quickly entered the water and swam to the other side. Swimmingalong the shore was enjoyable, but I was soon near the cagef.This wçthe moment for which I'd worked. I knew that there was a poaflbifity.$batir.a few minutes I wouli be dead.Ifsomeone yelled "Halt", I Was j&t going to continue to open the m u and ride the whale closest to me out of its pen and out of the hubour and into the nitfht. Once in the darkness, my mouthhnflated vest would help me swim to the beach twoand-a-half miles v y . I did not Intend to simender. kdidn't know their orders but hoped that }f I stayed dose to the wouldn't shoot for

@gm the surface ftom which a person could comfortably observe the belugas up close. There were two comM4.vmpuate cages, with about a foot of open water between. They were [olned by two ropek. The other ropes that were used to raise and lower the 'curtainexit' had only to be untied and then, supposedly, the whiles would be bee. Usually when I am around cetaceans

bigger and the wi$& was picking up.1 was a little exhausted all around. In the leeof the island I got out and stretched a few times, but for the most part I just çiin the boat and rested, u ' ' the oux to keep (Com drifting. When I gnr that the weather conditiou were not going to improve, I decided to chance the but section anyway, since it was only about a half mile away. As I left the protection of the island, I could lee the oxmge @ow of the lights of Vancouver about 60 miles away. As I made ay way to the obserration point, 1stumbled, slipped and fell a h e n times and considered myself ucky to have no broken bones. I lotlced that light illuminated every msible approach to the whales except from the island itself. It would be

sea gull screeched 0.mmy head and I

noticed that the &&a sky da8 getting light. Time to head back! By the time I had stumbled back,rowed over to where I had left therest of the equipment, hid everything out of sight and dry clothes, exchanged the wet thefunwasupandIwasready totake

doesn't hippen around any other eieatuiÈ.Butfoundthçwith these

MVW, (here ins nothing; they didn't my presence. I didn't r& -I inspecting the openingbemum I knew tint If I did 80, :hemilitary would later say that they boat when the bdie& c i i y i n g the wereforced(rom th&caça.IWtha workers to and from the cental they must leave on their o m If they building pased owdiead. lidn't want to Iewe, it manose of my None too soon the sun went down ~usineu;I did my job to opening the and darkness came. I rowed over to the ioor. other island and again safely hid the shore, I waited boqt and wux. As the harbour came into if the whales view, I saw a large vessel was at the dock time 1


1

I

repeatedly used the ultrasonic dog At the viotest the next dav. the US! whistle and the eskimo whale call. (This Ranger W& prevented from dropping it is done by blowing Intoa dosed fist and anchor for an hour and a half by then quickly opening the flogNS.1 G n e n p ~ c notÑto e p w n g themNeithat method worked. They didn't ¥elvein Inflated boats under the ancho come out. By this time I was&khg which d e e d the rubber boats by its colder by the minute.It was wanner massivesize. The protest ended when a being immersed in the water than en the police boat came due to a Greenpeece rocks.I went back and reiiuoected the Inflatableandpunctureditwithaspear ap iuie that &e exit waà One (MB oftbçboawent wider the opening! to m still unobstructed..Lfdtmi&llte water and the occupants were anested. entering the cages, a#at the one I'd That ended the protest. seenopen on thepreviousvisit,Jix WhenIgotbaqktotheshon,I t o h & t 4 ~ ~ ~ o u t . W I k n -e.~le8rnedthattheRwdCbmdh ~t%~ they didn't 'have it G t b e r to leave the Mounted ~olice,,alehd by the US cage, they couldn't SUVrtfaoutekte it Navy,wasaskingaUvwsel*Wbeontbe over atperiod of time. 80 I lookout for a white whale. Apparently retrained. It wasat that moment, cold, only one whale finally decided to tarn. tired and hungiy, that I felt that these wm the one that they whales had been b+washed. They were out. That eveninf it made not much mole than robots. T6 have done this to mint sow scieattots lay are the most nitcetaceansvf -to my mind a c 6 fqual to homicide. It was 1o'dotk Fridirvmornine when I finally made it backto thethat shore. I found the energy to rJng 00Satu GreenpeaceandMid that I wouldw g a r e t u -, them at the protest against the aircraft tu@&&ndlwateracoustic devi& carrier in a few hours. difrh-. What& fiat seemed mÈ ~

-

-

1

~

~

~

sad outcome might eventually prove beneficial for all belugu. It was the first time m mu& attention waÃfocused on them. It *lie showed the inhumane treatment of the other whale since it was obvioudy too brainwashed to leave its pen. And lastly, this project won't be the hot attack on the military for its misuse of cetaceans; it just showed the tion going on it is even legal for the US Navy to use cebcean* at all since they are protected under the Marine Mammal Protection Act Aside from the behigas, theproject exposed the operations of the United States at this Canadian base. Most residents of British Columbia didn't even know it was there. Hopefully,it might not be at sane time in the future, Coinciding the event with the a m i d of Ranger helped publicize the nce of the United States in

zi

1

REMEMBER THE BABY SEALS THIS CHRISTMAS BY PURCHASING YOUR CHRISTMAS GIFTSFRThe InternationalFundFor Animal Welfare ( campaigning for the past 14 years to stop the Seals. Your warmest wishes this Christmas by purchasing IFAWs merchandise

-

BABY

EACH

SWEDISH GLASS CRYSTAL OF A SEAL HANDMADEmq "IT'S MY WORLD TOO" SWEAT-SHIRTSADULTS S , M, L & Ex/L £7, EACH "LET THEM LIVE-T-SHIRTS ADULTS £3.1 EACH.CHILDRENPS£2.4 lttata size) "SAVE THE BABY SEALS" SHOPPING BAGS (heaianl£1.8 EACH 10 NEW MIXED CHRISTMAS CARDS -WHALE. DOG, SEAL ETC; WITH ENVELOPESE~.~~ IFAWSTOP THE SEAL HUNT BADGES£0.7 EACH "IT'S MY WORLD TOO" BEAUTIFUL FULL COLOUR SEAL POSTER £0.8 EACH NEW EXCLUSIVE TO IFAW SEAL TEA COSY £3.4 EACH

All prices i n c l u d e p&p and VAT. FREE colour leaflet sent with every order detailing o t h e r IFAW items for sale, ideal as Christmas gifts for those who care about t h e seals. Please h e l p IFAW in their fight to stop this massacre. Tick box for further details of IFAW's work. Your chequeP.0. should be made payable to -Animal Kingdom Artwear, 13 Hartfield Road, Forest Row,East Sussex. RH18 5DW (all orders rushed by return) . .A

.................................................... Address ................................................. ...............................................

Name

1

32

Â

Animal Kingdom Artwur in association with THE INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR ANIMAL WELFARE I I L I

UNDERCURRENTS 57


Permacultura is the latest buzz-word to be heard on the lips of radical agriculturalists. But what does it all mean, we ask ourselves?

to the permaculture e level of skills and knowto establlib a pennaulture landscape depend, naturally, in the complexity of the project Aany schemes will require specially rained consultants. However. sholer leslgns can often be undertaken by others who have studied petmaculture from the books or have taken a training course. The philot@~y, summed up by Bill Mollison, is one "of work with, rather than against nature; of protracted and thoughtful obiew¥tlo rattier than protracted and thoughUws labour and of looklni a t olanta and animals In all their f u k t i k , rather than treating any ana as a h g l e product #@em". Although dariaed in Australia, permaculture concepts hare recently been Introduced to several teglons in the United Statei. Then am sevral Permacultum Associations organbed in both countries. Them group provide informaton to their members and facilitate the exchange of experience and ideas. In some cases the Associations arrange training courses and assist In the provision of material*. In Europe these activitlw are just beginning. A Permaculture Duignen' Course was held in Berlin In July 1982. In the United Kingdom, a Permaculture Asnociation has been formed which intend* to provide similar services and to facilitate the formation of local g r o t ~ pIts~ addrem is given below. This aaaociation will maintain liaison with the various organisations concealed with good fanning and forestry practices, land reclamation and contewation. Permaculture UK held a 6-day Introductory Training course this October. This is Intended as an introduction to Permaculture. The books Permaculture I and Pennaculture lit, written by Bill Mollison and David Hofangren and Bill Mollhn reipectively, will give a further undemtandhg of principles and methods. If difficult to obtain, please write to Pennaculture UK who will be able to supply them.

II

T

he word Permaculture wag coined by the Australian Bill MolUson to describe a radical approach to agricultural design. Permacultum is the coniclous UK of ecological principles in designing self~ustalningfood, fibre and energy producing ecosyston. Landçcapelements including mkroclimate, annual and p e mnnlal plant*, animal', water, soils and human needs are woven together Into mitalnable and intricately connected communltic*. Pennatultum alma at .. high levels of efficiency and relies to a gnat extent on udng bblogical and iolu rwounea to meet conrowative human needs. It doçthb without damaging landçcapor caudng soil poverty anrlpollution. There have been several innovative moroaches to them ~roblemi.for &bple, biodynamk agriculture, organk fuming and fontt fanning. Pennaculture combines these approaches and draws on available examples of integrated approaches which have been used In the p& (and In some ewe atill are). However. it by applying advances in g o further ~ scientific undentanding in other ~ h e r e sand , b i l e ddn principle* have been derived from modern scientific research. Succeuftil permtculture requires careful and Imaginative design. Good design In turn is based on a deep understanding and appreciation of site

W I WUUI

m ASK...

IW

nm

1

l I

Pemnecultum UK. 5 Market Street, Hey-on-We, Hereford HR3 6AF,,

I

1

33


they are schools whore eveiyoot b teaching wwybody. So why the&, why not phmga in and be part of it all Pain and festivalsare rehemals for attenutive way* of life. They hare provedthat laqe numbers of people cu come together to celebrate and to practise mutual aid, a sense of togetherIWI and caring.Joy of life Instead of dark despair and depteoloa. Music and poetry instead of devotion to the machine. I only managed to get to Rougham

1

TreeFairthksummer,andIamsoglad I went. On a gloriousweekend early . September-well over ten thousand people congregated on a fann in Suffoll which below to people aaoclated witt the "Green Deserts" Group. The centra avenue of thk Instant tent town wasa low of huge lime trees, several hundred vms old Ftem the crownsof these k a balloon model of the earth was suspended. "Mind that planetn said the nuuionrtDtetohbmateastheywalke< along underneath It and they were careful not to knock their hea& a@t& it. Mind that pbnet that couldbare beel

-

the motto of the fa& Sometimes at night one could not be sure which century one was in, with torches lighting circular tents in which bearded Europeans were doing their version of African drumming And South American flutes were being played a f a tents away.. incense.,joints and candle light. Rougham Tree Fate was like the gathering of a temporary tribe.People had came from all over to exchange tunef, derigM, ideas and knowledge. Hare Krhnna or walking around in the nude. How to make chapatis or how to resbupen dtepogable razors.How to set up more peace camps at military installations or how to grow trees in the desert. How to practise baby massage 01 how to turn outdated copies of Undercuirents into nappies. (Mole about this in the next issue.) Rougham was like a giant open air school But no curriculum, no assurance about what you might or might not learn. You can stumble into an early morning Tal Chi dax or into a late night sci-fimime show in which you find yourself transported Into planets on the other side of the universe. Rural resettlen from West Wale chant beautiful red Indian peace chants and an African (hummer with Us band keeps the audience dancing till fhre in the morning. In the past there used to be a resident stomach bug at most festivals. After a few days more and mole people

.

the next and m&

and more people-& to be summer nomads, going around in converted buses or van*. t m d h crafts or food. perfornhg, teaching. A n festivals simply cap^out &do they mike

a

a real contribution to change? Herbert ~ h r d bime$tigates. t

around the fastinl dte,part bookitaDs and ben tents, dong the main road of the viOafe, inmnue of ancient trees to the middle of a field Everybody to an actor for the weekend, acting out phntadm and fern, dreams and h o p all day and late into the night. 0yea, and there are discussions among the laughter, about peace and

Ur ~ a cbeÑ . cuny, Mintedfacetof UdÈonnoadabouts hdtw skdten and teflctaMM.lmgl&g md jumping. Hones and eats f o r e trip

ecology, about alternative ways and means, about new communities and nei age schools. But then, festivalsare communities, as long as they last, and

-

UNDERCURRENTS 57..


went -were scattered about the place like everybody else, taking part in what ever was going o n DIY and co-operativi efforts, often spontaneously initiated, that is what made the fair tick, or rather, what made it flow. Sounds a bit too perfect? Lacks the flavour of Undercurrents acid? And didn't Beirut bum that weekend, that weekend of the tab? Yes.But I cannot accept the view that fairs are simply a fool'spaiadiae. They are much more than tha& They recharge people's imagination, they give us a glimpse of a community utopla. They also provide a link between the "straight" and "alternative" worlds (in inverted commas). Here people can me and hear that there is entertainment outside television, that They woe busy climbing the trees and lire shows can be a lot more fun than to be a k l hang-up. But these times playing with dogs, they were riding canned shows.That vegetable curries seem to be over. At Rougham there around the place on hone carts with were dozens and dozens of tidy little their faces painted all the colours of the can taste nicer than McDonald's. That there ate dimensions beyond pure caravan cafes and tent restaurans, sellrainbow. ing pizzas and salads,nut burgers and Horse carts and Kirlian ohotoeraohy, reason That you can form deep friend&ips with people who you meet only hambunfers, wholemeal cokes and cam- high technology windmillsand &portoaw to your life. paign coffee. And all the food ended up ing toileta, elocfaric bicyclesandneb* Not every festival to like Rougham in h u e pits. the organic fertilizer for T b m k of *pmus'hdmmb nettyaT'tciopofwhottandbtrieyat gies thatcouldbewenatRugh~~~ii Tree Fair was thkyear. Not everybody whoWastheiBfdtthemmewayas1do ~ F a m . F a b m m ~ famHteç~0ugbtoUndercurrent ~ t leftdei&ABd~theretheiielf-Otfultaitk)n But festlvb and fairs ate here to stay wofimportingorgankfertiliserb Britain's farm i: there yyour link which~~pnrettedatthefatr.Every and they ate getting better. By and largi they are getting leu commercial,or between fairs andrecycling of organic activity wMOfgabkedby thowwho not? And there ate more of them every matter. It all makes sense. participated to It There w o e no loud..And on the otherdde of the "town" speaker announcementsby the people year. The people who go to them will never quite be the same again. 1 fewboys flying kites high up in thein the head o h members of Green blue sky, floating gently in &e breeze. I Deserts-the~eoniewhobadmadethe , Herbert Gifardel law very few kids crying at Roughaip. who had prepared the

..

. .

11

IT ALL BEGAN IN THE SIXTIES

.NEXT uflONTH 0.

NOVEMBER '82

.

CONSCIOUSNESS RAISING

Â¥LO..^


BRIEFING

CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS

afternoon seminar on 'will takeAnptace on Nonmbw 2 Â

vetween 2.00 end 4.1Bpm. The aim of the semlnar it to enable members of oroanisatiora interested in dtveiopmmt education to study the links between the two içuesand to discuss how this link should be brought to the attention of the general public. The venw ls E f x Hall, 1 9 Euex St, The Strand, London WC2.

f e r e n c e f ~h  £ 4 ( ~ 2 u m n g f d and the vwiua is ConÑ Hill, Red Lion Squire, London WC1. Further details and tican available from Alison Pritchud, Spring Cottage. 9 New Rd. ironbridge, ~hrop.hire,ml. 1096246)

2224.

..-.

--

helitofaserinof OnNommbw27-=there seminars dealing with the pretsn. 0 tation of xience and tachnolow wiil be a conference in Edinburgh on RÑurchin the State. <in the media will take place on Novmbu 10. The them for t h i ~ The organisem intend the confarmce to set asa forum whom o m is MMIcimend the Wi*, and Ann Kmpf la journalin and the methodology of renarching broedcnfr) will spmk and lead the State will take precedence over the formal pnwnmion of the diiussion. The n m i w will mearch, but ideal, information start at 7 . 3 0 ~ and 1 will take . and shWqiM mil atw be place in the Botany Common exdnnged. The provisional lit of Room, Bait Hall, Imperial topia indudn the police, civil College, Prince Consort Rd, London SW7. Further details we defence, bunker spotting, NATO, the armed force*,nuclear power available from the Iof and others. Mom details can be Science end Progr~s collectiw, Department of S o c i i and Econ- obtained by sending an SAE to Technical Author* Group (Scotomic Studin, Imperial Collage, land), 100 Findhorn Place, 53 Prince* Gate, London SW7, Edinburgh. tel. 01-569 5111 ext. 1019. 0

0 BeyondtheWibHntisa conference organiwd by the British S o c W for Soctel Rewonslbillty In Science which will also tako plot* on NomnlMr 27-28. The conferanca will consist of a grand debeta entitled Taking on Right Wing ViÑ of Sclgncf and discussion groups which indude, emonm othm, TV inugnof science; environmental pollution; chemicals; food adulteration; DMticidu; public health; man media end propagenda; new technology; science education. The venue is the Mfnchnter Business School, Booth St West, 0 The annual Turning Point Manchuter 13, end it starts at 10.30 on the Saturday morning. conference will take place on November 27 in London, darting The cost is £ (£unwged). For further details contact BBSRS. at loam. This year the theme is 9 PolandSt, London W1, &I. The Future of Health how to create healthier ways of living in 01-437 2728;or 140 Epping Walk, Hulme, Manchenu 13, B healthier society. Speakers, tel. (0611 2266877. includinga writer/broadcaster/ councillor, a representative of the World H a k h Organisation in Copenhagen end a community physician from Liverpool, will be 0 The annual ceremonies for followedby workshop* on thow who want t o quietly Jnemployment end health, mttln; renumber those who hue died1 JP a self-help group and ire dying as a result of war and ipproaches to health. The conwho want to reaffirm their

There will be a one-day conference for women to dixua lminiftion on NovÑRb 13. Topics to b e discuued indude organising to come to Britain, mottling end making a living, and claiming the rights to which they ere entitled. It I* designed mainly for Black and immigrant woman. The venue is the Cander Centre in Camden Town Hall. BidboroughSt. London WC1. Other deuils are milable from Houwwivu in Dialogue, PO Box 287, London NWB 5QU. Td. 01-837 7809.

commitment to work for pewe mko place over Remembrance Wwkend. On Nonmbw 13 there will be vigils outside the Rowl Albert Hill, Kornlngcon Gore, London SW7 from 1.30-2.30 and 5.30-7.16 at the audience arrlw for the two military Fntfvril of Rwnmnbren~.On Nowmbw 14 thmm wiil be a procenion leaving St Wm-in-the-Field& Trafalgar Square, London WC2 at 1.45pm. heading for the Cenottph in Whitehall to lay a wreath of white ~oopiwbearing a peace inscription. All the vigils will be silent. Thne actiom are being organded by London Peace Action. Thewomen from 3rÑnlu Common peaqe camp

would like women from all over irlmin lend abroad1 to gather at Smnhmn on Daanba 12 for on^ form of women's action. iring vmm clothes, food and Jrink, and anything rotated t o ml' life such at pictures, bennen, aotters, mppleirr clothes. Thç warn to link up around the bÑ an the day, using and wool if necMiary to fill the \ cnch* will be operating. More letails inavaitebte by phoning he London off ice on 01-274 6656 Mtwwn 4.30 and 6.30, or direct rom the Women's Pwce Camp, Ktain Gate, USAF Gmnham :otntnon, nr Newbury, Berks.

Pam and Nick Rodway, Welcombe Barton, Welcombe. Bideford, N. Devon.Tel. (028883 482.

FUN I f you misted weing The 0 Animals Film in London or on Channel 4 (it's on during their first week of trençmiamn)i t is currently touring.the country, courtesy of Slick Pin. The November dates are:2 Arts Lab, Birmingham (4 showings). Nonmibw 7 Theatre Gwynedd, Bansor, North Wales. Novnnber 17 Warwick University November 21 Film Theatre, Leads. Contact the relevant cinema for tiof screenings.

-

0

-

-

.

A weekend courw at L o w r S h m Farm from Uovnnbw 12-14 will look at the winections between conflict on in internationalscale, batwen FOUW and individuate and within ~ i ~ ~ land vn will , explore w a y if dealing with conflict and w w s i o n in respect to seeking world own.The con is £21 lookingsshould be sent to Lomr ihaw Farm, Shaw, Swindon, , Miltshireutoon at poaibie. tore information is available by honing (0793) 771080. Â

 A weekend course covering bpmch of Nonvblenw will be leld at Welcombe Barton in h n , from Nowmbw 26-28. 'articipants will explore the ~onibilities of lifsttyles and livlimda which am I ~exploitative à ind mom in tune with nature and bur fellow humans It will include I talkby Wish Kumaron Gandhi, in introductionto organic hustandry, and nonviolence in hildcare and education. Cost is 32. For more details contact

 Wildlife magazine and the hervation Foundation have ointly orgnniwd en exhibition, :ocus on Wildlife, devoted to the vork of amateur wildlife photoirephers. At lean 100 ihotogrephs wiil be on view, ell if which haw won commenlations in the 1982 Wildlife 'hotographer of the Year commitiom. The exhibition opened t the end of October at the b n t n Gallery, cnr Piccadilly and )Id Bond St, London W1 and will un until Novmnbor 12 (closed undays). The top 25 photorapb will then be transferred to he Kodak Gallery in High lolborn, where they can be seen rom Nowmbar 23-Dwwnbw 10.

1 An exhibition of EM tenmwation hardware end Khnology will be running at the lesign Centre, Haymarket, .ondon WC2 until Nowmbw 27. lore than 60 exhibitors will take art, displaying a wide range of roducts and services designed to se energy efficiently.

UNDERCURRENTS 57


'

Country Bazaar is aquarter, ly countryside magazine which gets closer to the poetic roots of that British obsession than any other current publication, and also provides a much-needed antidote to the establishedlment country magazines aimed at the upper bracket. It cowers controversial issues such as blo~dtports and ecology alongside lavender growing and cat* in legand and lore. lt is also well illuttrated, with engraving*, wood cuts and photo reports. Single cop* con 9511 + 32p pottage; subscription costs £5/yand is available from Bizarre Acres Publications, 33 Worcester Rd, Chipping Norton, Oxon. 0

PUBLICATIONS 0 Energy end Development in the Third World is a pamphlet producedby the Socialist Environment and Rnourws Association which shows hbw enemy is concentrated in the urban areas of the Third World while the main problemsof falling living standards occur in rural areas. It argues for low-key decentralized energy ¥ystemwhich will wpport local market! and avoid debt commitmints. The booklet costs WP and is available from Third World F&D, c/o SERA, 9 Poland St, London W1.

The Anti-Nuclear Campaign has produced a 204-page, photocopied, Index to Parliamentary Questions on nuclear power. It identifies sources of information that should help writers, researchers and campaigning groups to refute the glossy misinformation from the nuclear industry and to locate herd information on nuclear power. It i s available for £6.0 from ANC Mail Order, PO Box 216, Sheffield. Hurtle Book* is an exciting new publishing house for books of a mdical/wcialistl ecological permactive. Their first book is Socialism and Survival by Rudolf Blhro. Future books, coming out next wring, will be on alternative defence, the problems of radial change in affluent society, the effects of imperialism, end sexuality. Look out for them.

0 Voice of Solidarnosc is a weakly newsletter produced by the Polish Solidarity trade union working group in the UK. It publicises and reports on the actions of Solidarity, and also gives interviewsand reportsonthe attitudes of the military and what life is really like for Polish people. Subscription costs £ for 3 months. Send to Solidaritytrade union working group in the UK, Acorn House, 3141320 Greys Inn Rd, London WC1.

Initiatim Is a new journal providing information, n e w a.nd practical account! of the wide variety of current action* t o combat unemployment. I t is published by the Centre for Employmant Initiative! and contains a six-page roundup of news, review and information as wall a* feature articles. Its con KlOIyr for 4 issues) probably takes it out of the price range for unemployed people, but if interested, subscriptions may be a n t to 5 Tavltock Placa, London WC1H 9SS.

0

WOMEN 0 Id* is an international wonun's informmion and cornmunication lervic* band in Geneva and Rom*. Over tha yam they h m built up a network of 10,000 contacts In 130 countries and 50,000 periodiih, nmoletters, books, etc. From this wealth of information they can provide many sewices the quarterly I& Women's international Bulletin (in English, Spaniih and Italian); monthly Isis n e w service; documentation packets and bibliographies prepared on request; support for women persecutedon the grounds of their sex; direct information services in answer to written and telephone requests: an exchange programme for women wanting to live for a while in another culture; and conference omisation. They also need financial support, and in particular they'd like woman to subscribe to their bulletins or buy their resource guidas. Subscription datailsl further information can be obtained from them etPO Box 50 ~Cornavin),1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland or from Vie S. Maria dell'Anima, 00186 Rome, Italy.

-

Dark Star Press have reprintedthe classic feminist/ nwrchlst text The Tyranny of ~ t m c 0 1 m l a s ~ nThia ~ a . booklet Joscribes the problems that nubiders haw in participating in political groups, and the sower relationships that happen because quiet members are intimidated by more dominant jroup members. Alternative nructures are also briefly dis:uxed. It is available for 46p nc. pap from Dark Star Distribti on, c/o 6 Caledonian Rd, London N1. l

Some people at H u d d w field Polytechnic ham recently f d a QrÑ Socity there, and Intend to nfbllsh a regular newsletter for the Huddersfield arm in general. The newsletter will cover ecological and social IUUW and will cowr national n ~ and w mob a well as local inuw. People who want to receive the newsletter or become involved The West YoriohiCMC* (it is not j u t for student*) should à contact the Green Society, towriMUr deserves wider rmderHuddflfield Polytechnic, ihip than just West "dtshire Huddenfield. ictivists. The current issue. no.19. 0

f o r u m on cruise missilw and possible forms of direct action to be taken to prevent their arrival. OM wction of the namlotfr consists of news1 mt*in the o t e L : l ? am*,and ofc&w there is information on activitiwin Wwt Yorkshim too. It b producedby en independmt collective. Subscription eof £ for 6 issues. and should ba sent to WYPN, 2 Lncellw Road, Leads 8.

Tha WommMonHorin NMwoik, which monlton i m a m of women portreyd by the written mill*, hw produced 3 report!w far a 8 mult of 'blitz d*y<'focussing on certain lour. The report! are Women w Sex Object*, Violence Ageimt Woman, and Stereotypingof Women. They are dl&for 50p n c h + largm SAE from Woman* Monl0

toring Network, d o WMAG, A Woman'8 Ptoc*, 48 William I V St. London WC2.

CAMPAIGNS 0 WonmnmdLihOnEMh am a grouplnetwork of wormo who link the exploitation id brutelintion of the nnh with the phylctl, economic end ptychoiogkal violence which WOnriii fb"e day. Thrir hope for thi. future la b w d on a feminist penpwtiw, a growing understandingof racial, nxuri. and ecological divorelty, md m and to militarUm. coupled with living in dBcentrallcd cornmunitiw bawd on inmrdw¥ndfcft self reliance and other ecological principle*. If thk interests you, writs to Women ana'LJf* on Earth, 2 St EdrnundiCorn, Bow Town, Glwtonburv, Somenet for mom infornution and mmbarshb dnall8.

TheNidr~~~~Solktority Cmnpabnhavencdvedpmorrl requests for itam not à ‘ l l obuimbi*there from p*optà working in Ntemgu* In the fMd> of EMUçtenguwnd lluncy

¥chMiMi,hwMiid<*fwy work, medicine and ¥ppropfit tachnologv. Books, a m a w , tubscriptiom to maguim and item* such M induwial n o k meters era ~peciallywalcom*. If you foal you can help, contact the Nicaraguan Solidarity Campaign, 20Compton Twrrec*, London N1. Td. 01-226 6747. ~tthteywr'sGmn Gathering, a s e w of worlahopt mure onmiad bv and for youw G m n S , , W w w t w wouM like to continw r n ~ t l n md g ~~~utn local gm group! to at up for ditcwions, WUWlng discuning action md tOcMMn& l f you'd like mom Info conttct Fenny Nmvonw, 21 South St, Oiney, 0xteÇl,Td OBBB722584. 'VoUl$WWdefiledm under about 19, but th*y

*

w i t the tupport of W i n g

GNHN who might tm i n a d .

The people who o r g ~ ~ ~ b e d the Green Gathering arliu thb year are looking for anothw lit* to hold it next year. It mum tm a lent 20 acre* In dm, xxnfwhw in centmlish England and milable for un duringthe nimnw. If youcm http,cÑnac Richard Oldfkld ~t David Taylor at 4 Bridge House, St lvç Huntingdon, Carntx. Tal. (0480) 63054.


REVIEWS L-.

.

JUNGK REVISITED Brighter Than A Thousand Suns (195611982) Pelican £1.9 The Nuclear State (1979) John Older £2.96 Tomorrow I s Already Hare Rupert Hart-Davis (Out of Print) All by RobertJungk.

1

the States as a correspondent for the Swiss press, and It was during this period that he produced another extraordinary book (shamefully out of print for many years) entitled Tommow 1s Already Here. h n g k was looking for the roots of the ftltuie, visiting Las VeW and Los Alamos, interviewing robot builders and weather makers, hanging out with test pilots and uranium hunters. In New Mexico he saw the site of the first atomic test at Almogordo; he foresaw the birth of factory fanning in his essay entitled The Animal As Machine, Two important strands of all hi later work are to be found here his rejection of the materialist direction of modern society and his fascination with futurology. The one path led him to become Professor of Futurology at West Berlin's Technical Institute and w-founder of the city's Futurology Research Centre. The other, to get involved with many of the new social and political movements in Europe.

(m

THE republication of Brighter Than A

I I

1

ThousandSuns. Robert Jungk's personal history of the atomic scientists, after a gap of twelve years is cause for celebration and an opportunity to look closer at the life, thoughts and t i e s of the journalist of the nuclear age. This extraordinary book began life as a novel until Jungk realis'ed - after a series of midnight conversations in Berne University Laboratory that "no novel could be as r e d i n g , aspenetrating, or as exciting as a factual account of the atomic scientists' tragedy based on their own storiesandon documents. " The result is riveting and disturbhe and A d s as one of thegreatest works-of popular science. Researching such a book was a mammoth endeavour, taking Jungk acmm continents and time zones, and writing it must have been an equal labour. Yet he carries it off with such brilliant style that you can only sit and wonder how it is poidble to be so eloquent and full of Insight. As one reader put it in a letter to Jungk; "If Shakeapeare had written Hamlet in our decade he would not have made him aprince but a nuclear scientist." Them characters an larger than life and engaged in a strange and deadly writes: "From Cambridge, ~ u m i i tJunak . ~utherford;led like a sharp-tongued . and easilv irritated monarch that kined i m of the smallestpossible dimehi& he had been the first to reveal" We meet Diiac, the 'mystic of the used to atom' - the other sav of him that he onlv uttered an enti& sentence once every light year - and Franck who is quoted as saying "The only may I am tell that a new idea is realty important is the feeling me." of terror that Robert Jungk was a 19 year old student in Berlin when Hitler came to power. He spent the war years evading the Nazisin various countries and spreading anti-Nazi progaganda. He ended up

-

This resulted in another underratedtook. The Nuclear State which contains the best portrait of workers inside a nuclear plant ever written. It investigates nuclear terrorism, proliferation and the secrecy and daneers that result. In a concluding chapter he looks t o the alternatives and to the wideçMove ment which he terns The New International. He says of this: "Among the highest aspirations of the new-internatinnal aiv. to discouer and activate the imagination present in every human being. In this international there will be no dominating leaders and makers of opinion whose authority can stifle theoriginality and creativity of others. The idea is to liberate a constant stream of e n e w from'many heads and hearts; to employ the energy of human creatb i& instead of atomic energy." In the archives I turned up a 1974 Newsweek profile in which he says: 'Tam highly encouraged by the unorthodox thinking of many youngpeople who are searchingfor alternative lifestyles". This far-from-definite piece is a small attempt to return that encouragement. John M ~ J

1

2

UNDERCURRENTS 57


-

BIOA* -

accessible terms and with a glossary at the back. At the moment these a& -

Against Biological Determinism. The Dialeçticof Biology Group. Allison & Busby. £4.50 Towardsn Liberatory Biology. The Dialecticsof Biology Group. Allison & Bush/. £4.50 ctionary, and a books. Armed with these, you can then g your way through these two startvolume plough They are companion books which resulted from a ~ial&ctics of Bioloirv conference held in Bressanone --.-two y%rs.ag~? ~ s s e n t i a lthey l ~ are a ' given at the confercollection of ence. albeit modifi d since then in the lightof criticism. In theory both books ihould be bought and lead consecutively, ABD being a prelude to TLB. However, ABD contains mainly papers on the philosophy, ideology and politics of biological deteimintsm, while TLB $? more of an 'altemttip' biology textbook which focuses &I genetics, : evolution and behaviour. Reading these-books is ft laborious process, mainly became of b e language used but also because it takes time to understand/accept new theories of biology which are contrary to what we are normally taught. Some of the authors are still essentially detenninmtic though, probably because of their training, and there were a number of basic ideological differences at the conference between some of the researchers. Certain papers stretched my mind to mcompass ideas I hadn't previously thought of (especially in TLB) but others I found totally uninteresting. For nstance, do you think you could be riveted by phrases such as (on p.81, l~ FLB) ". o u r p a ~ f o s s i teleonomic md actually tautological evolutionary statements constitute a fundament01 'law in our approach to any problem chere the diachrony formspart of the system under study." Allison & Busby have published ,hese as part of their Motive series of looks. According to them, the books :hart the terrain for the scientific issault on the ideology of the New Slight, and will form an important part if that debate. Well, they have already ¥seereviewed in Peace News. Science 'or People and New Scientist so at least iome people know of their existence, iut if they are to become an important .ooTWl"irwhi to fight the New Right ;hey should be rewritten in more

1

*** DATA

* '

Whose File is it Anyway? Ffbth N. Cohen. NCCL. £2.2 THERE is something niwrong with a system that allows the collection and storage of information about an individual, but does not allow the individual to know what the information is or how it was obtained. One of the most worrying aspects of the problem is Hut once the information has found its way on t o a file at a school, hospital or local authority, it tends to acquire a legiti facts may not merit.

-

..

-

'

of h b!s a1 my malicious-and untrue b other ~eoole.The bureaucrats win compile files ought to know tint, and therefore reject infonnatton Art cannot besubbtiated. But Ruth Cohen found, in her years as assistant t o the Local Ombudsman, that many files contained infomation that was irrelevant, inaccurate or out-of-date. The remedy for this, she argues, is to allow individuals a t c tq~ files about themselves. Through case Studies, Cohen shows that where pebple are allowed to fee their files the system tends to work mote harmoniously, and hence more efficiently. It is Couched in the dry language of the professional social worker. Individualsare "subjects"; privacy is "the claim of individuals, groups or institutions to determine for themselves when, how, and to what extent information about them is to others." C o o n wmmut+ted -points out that in only one of her

seven c& studies did the demand for access t o files come from the individuals themselves. And while her book provides ammunition for those who already agree with her argument, it win do little to stimulate popular demand for improved access to personal data. Until that happens her worthy attempt to compile a record of successful cases will be of little use. Nick Rosen

The Father Figure. Lorna McKee and Margaret O'Brien (eds). ~avistockPublications. £4.95 SHOULD single parent mothers stay at home? 86 per cent of people questioned in a 1972 surveysaid yes. In comparison, 78 per cent thought that a single parent father ought to go out to work. The Father Figure is an edited collection of papers written by social hisMans, sociologists, psychologists, lawyers and social workers. I t has the ¥ne and the liabilities of any such collection. It beb coherence - the only c&mon thread is ti@ all the chapters are about fatherhood In some shape or form. It is written in the style of academics. That said, alot of it is interesting. It's a lucky dip, open it at random and you may find a stimulating theoretical discussion or a revealing piece of empirical research. For instance, there is a chapter by Trevor Lummis on the historical dimension of fatherhood which concentrates on East Anglian -ishermen before the First World War. His findings undermine stereotypes about working class sex roles; "There was little chance of boys growing up with the idea that domestic labour was exclustvel~a female ~reserve."Comparing hisfindings 4 t h later kudies he concludes that "The EasiA@kn fishermen of pre-1914 were much more home-centisd in their leisure timi than either the fishermen of Hull in the 1960s or the minen of the 1950s". One could go on and give a taster from each chapter fathers in the delivery room, the legal status of fathers, step-fathers, lone fathers, involuntarily childless men (non-fathers), in addition to the theoretical and methodological considerations of the study of fathers. If the edit- have a particular view they hide it fery well except that they are clearly feminists and are trying ,$o carve out an academic niche for the study of fathers. I do not think they will succeed. Dave Barker

-


4

R

E

V

I

E

W

S

PSYCHO PA

f

Psycho-politics. Peter Sedgwick. Pluto Press. Ă&#x201A;ÂŁ4.95 IF you've ever wondered what happened to the radical anti-psychiatric fervour of the sixties and what's happening in (fie politics of psychiatry today, then Psycho-Politics offem an informative, thorough and Incisively critical review. The book reviews the work of four of the most Influential writers of the anti-psychiatry e n ErvIng Goffman, R.D. Laing, Michael FouCault and Thomas Szasz. Peter Sedgwtek's critiques Of these prophets of anti-psychiatryreveal an implicit conservatism Intheir work which he suggests has actually served to damage the campaign otrefom Jn the mental health services:% trying to remove and reduce the concept of mental Ulneu, the revisionist theorists have nude it that bit harder for a p o f ~ r f ucampaign l of reform to @t off the ground. They can expose the hypocrisies and annofate the tragedies of officialpsychlatry, but the concepls which they have developed enable them to engage in no public ZXon grander Kan that of wringing their hands". To allow the possibility that some Individuals (eg. drug addicts, suicides, alcoholics), may display a psychopathology that justifies a compulsory psychiatric intervention is to open the door which leads to coercive Institutional case. Yet as Peter Sedgwick points out, then ha6 been an indination for the left to den the very existence denial of mental of mental lllneu. Illness has also been reinforced by the work of R.D. Lifting,for example in his role as the mystic In the Politics of Experience, In which schizophrenia I* Been ~wnttallyu a voyage towards an exIstonttiJ re-bw. In fact, anyone with dose hand experience of whizophmnia (rill know that Laing ichizophrenic cue itudies with their pattern of one acute psychotic e p b d e followed by.a permanent remission are unnpnsentative of the majority of caws. In 1971 the Conservative government umounced that within 15years all m t a l hospitals were to be closed down, and a similar policy Is being m m d In the States. "The reduction in !he ryWtf: fattents resident in nentalh,,..& been achieved h u g h the cW&mof a rhetoric of community care fac@ttft9whine nfluence over policy l&<np(tal idmission and discharge has been mrticularly remarkable when one *

-

.

wissders that they donot, in the actual Bori~ exist". ~ l l h r o o & e n tofs radical antip ~ y pychiatly have participated in a process which, by encouraging community based psychiatry, hm given the psychiatric right &k opportunity to.push patients out of hospitals Into frequently vulnerabte and exploitSd situations, as well as reinforcing them in the passive patient role through the regular administration of drugs rather than offering

-

ordindy example of the tOWnQf &?el h Belgium. Since the thirteenth ~ @ l y this town has maintained a sy&h of family care for the mentally afficted, whereby patients are boarded out In host families with financi&d$tance from the state. "Viepersonal tie between patient and family nnot be broken without serious .M e -

d..

I

6,.'

&

fc

ioclal and Interpenond thmp,h. The problem with the provision of more intensive therapeutic work I* that It requlre~adequate funding,u does idequate community car. In California many psychiatric wards and some complete hoip1tab have been closed town, "appwsing (be taxpayer at the ixpense of the needy", whilst In the mmalnin hospital* there le taiufflcient handing adequate itafflngor pxogcumes of rehabilitation. Peter Sedgwick conclude! hte book vlth an useument of community based ilternatives to the present 4bIns', such af mail hostels, group hornet, amulti)urpose psychiatric homing :ommunity, -. and finally the extra-

/

the town are not instructed hi proceases of therapy, nor In any theoretical framework of psychiatry; but perhaps a greater significance lies in its assumption of collective nspoiuibllity for the mentally disabled. Peter Sedgwick b inclined to overttate his cage against the implicit tmnwgatism evident in much sixties antl-ptychiatry, to the extent that he risks making us forget how innovative and Important many of their ideas wen at the time. Their Influence h i in fact led to a wide range of podtive changes in Health Service Psychiatty, not least in the mas of the creative therapies, family therapy, and the Increasing tendency among doctors to limit the --.-

--

-

UNDERCURRENTS 57


R E V I E W S its roots in the consciousness raising groups which turned to the like of gestalt, transactional analysis, psychodrama and assertion training to generate emotional &angee. But the incorrigible nature of women's feelings of insecurity made them constantly return to the various interpNtotioas of the workings of the unconscious. Therapists who had monitoted and contributed to the new research on Outside In, Inside Out child development became convinced Luke Eichenbaum that i t wasnot biology which deterand Susie Orbach. Penguin. £1.95 mined female psychology. The key area *seen as conditioning from birth, SUSIE Orbach and Luise E i c h e n b v long before the phase presumed to founded London's Women's Therapy establish gender (the oedipal phase). Centre in 1976 after working in a The work of tee object-relations feminist oriented therapeutic practice in the States. From 1978 the centre had theorists also saw the early months as crucial, but still did not take into a waiting list, so they embarked on a postgraduate training scheme fd'outside account the mother's position in society. Inevitably women developed therapists. This book is the scheme's their own accounts and this is one of lectures refined in* print. Its prothem. gramme has resulted in a demystiflcA recurrent theme in feminist ation of analysis which is reflectedh writing and research is the motherthe readability of the book, yet it still daughter relationship and here we find leaves a question mark. Can the workit again stripped to m y painful ing~of tee human imagination be essentials. Women, it explains, unreduced to such stark mechanisms? They explain how the women's move- consciously teach their daughters to ment, so Initially anti-Freudian, weaved defer to others and have emotional antennae. The bookdemonffarateB how its way back in and out of psychothe therapists can become surrogate analysis. Feminist psychotherapy has

use of drugs. Laing in particular deserves more credit than he is given, though he is allowed some positive acknowledgement. &spite this reservation PsychoPolittcs'is an impressively researched, complex and timely book and one that should tie widely read, particularly by those in the psychiatric profession. John Ford

-

1

mothers to the women they are treating and guide them to a more complete feeling about themselves. There is even advice on how the therapist to find her own support! The qualities women team well - how to listen and empathise and give emotional support are ironically put to good use in this nurturing psychotherapy. The exposure of various recurring patterns in the mother daughter relationship cuts very deep if you are a daughter (and also have a small daughter). Its chapters are convincing, even gripping, because it talks about real interactions while discussing the psyche. But its conception of the unconscious is very minimal and they have little time for the ideas of id, ego and superego. There q e chapters on workshop groups, symptoms and phobias, couples and counselling (heterosexual and lesbian couples inclusive), each carrying the assumptions surrounding the mother daughter relationship. The most frustrating aspect of the book is not to be found within its pragmatic approach, but in the centre's waiting list W o m m who have no notion of this kind of therapy are still at the mercy of mchology and drug treatments. ?dog Johnstone

GRASS

ROOTS

-

BOOKS, BADGES, POSTERS, STICKERS, BOOKSTALL SERVICE TOGROUPS and

books by post

send s.a.e. for Disarmament booklist 1newton street piccadilly, manchester mllhw to1061 236 3112

NEW TITLES

Comedia 9 Poland Street London W1V 3DG 01-439 2059-

WHAT'S THIS CHANNEL FOUR? An Alternative Report

Edited by Simon Bluchud and Dave ~ o & y £3.5 paper Will Chmd 4 Uw up to the expectations of Innovadon and fx~rimontation-not simply providing an ITV27

IT AINT HALF RACIST, MUM F' ting racism in the media

2'

E ted by Phil Cohen £2.5 paper A sompmhedw analysis of mist attltudu and practices in the media, includingfate~~&m with black joumalIsts and broadcastem.


American wunter-culture coupled with dm& Orwellian wounameg and the inability of the President of the Galaxy to approach a meaningful relationship, speak to our condition? How much is he just cashing in? When, in short,an the politics in hyperspace through which alone. ah sod it, just mad the thing. As the man at the longeft running party says,'Do what you do. Do it Çel Do it badly. Who cures? Who gives a shit?' Stephen Jowph

ÑÑÑÑ

..

Life, the Universe and everything. insulting every being in the Universe) Douglas Adarns. Pan Books. £1.5 he b rescued by 'eddie* in the space- time continuuma(bhe? says Arthur, TSE GAME you know as cricket is just conchirively provinghis non-readership of Undercurrents), and precipitated one of those euriow freaks of racial memory which can keep image*attle in into an attempt to (top the release of the planet KrikHt born the Sto-Time the mind aeons after their true llgnfft-

ouncehasbeen hutin themWsof lime. Of all Vie races in the Galaxy,only the English could posdbly reclue Vie memory of the most horrific aim ever to sunder the Untoem aniftransform it into what I'm afraid is generally r&&d wan ineomprehemively dull

u

The Godmothers.

Envelope. The importance of this if that the inhahltants of KriUit ue devoted

Sandi Hall. Women's Press. £3.50 PERHAPS I should doubt my @tv -

to "peace, justice, morality, culture, sport, family life and the obliteration of all other life-forms'. There, that's quite enough of the plot revealed suffice it tosaythatinthecourseofallthiswe meet again Zaphod Beeblebrox, the and pointless gome.' If I tell you that these remarks, at President of theGalaxy, Marvin the first sight more extreme wen than those Paranoid Android (W ' hy stop now juat made by unfortunate cbsrical musicians when I'm hating it?'), Trilltan (the forced to retune to VHP for Radio 3's other nmrhor of the Earth's

Slartibirtfast, you will not perhaps be much wfaer - unless you are acquainted with that whofly remarkable book The Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy and it* successor The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. If you are so acquainted - with the books, the radio series, the TV series, the stage show, or the records - you will be aware that Arthur ~ e nhaving t survived the destruction of the Earth to make way for a hyperspace bypass, finished up, after many weird adventures, marooned, is the p m n t book begins, in a damp and smelly cave in the middle of prehistoric hl&gbn 'and there wasn't a bus due for two million years'. After five y e m of this predicament [broken only by the appeiance of Wowbag@r the Infinitely Prolonged, life vho k spending his everlait*

to review a book whoee onlymale characters apart from the odd policeman or bystander are two or three thoroughly unpleasant villains who end up getting knocked out or kicked in the crotch. '! When I wnsider all the offence done to female characters by male storytellers over the years, I welcome a lesbian reveoge fantasy. On the other hand, if I riaifn,ÇHm> Pnrri Pr0f.d Â¥n A h feel if s a bad book and say so in print, am I helping to suppress the book and so effectively contributing another brick tothewallofmaleobduracy tothe women's movement? Perhaps in that cue I should let it go unreviewed. By which token The Godmothen, Sandi HÈU' f i a t novel,can't be a bad book, became hen I am reviewing it. Ib main plot is a thriller set in the present; the if element is added by a second plot that takes place in a future society of achieved equality, and by glimpses of a kind of overworld, home of the Godmothers themselves, female superbeings with power over life and time. The Godmother Ydeen b in tome way incarnate as all the protagonists in the strugglesof women back through history@the Salem Witch Triali. This mhkeÃleant difference to our reading ---- r-----at the alternatingstories, a* Yaleen's rtanmint a.Ofthenewconnevu emerges in the nuthi', a &met bued on the fact pme& plot or the future one either, wbich, despite lome convincing that 'number*, written on restaurant :haractersand observations (such as bilk with!n the con/he* of restawwta how intolerant a future feminist do not follow the wane mathematical mtegrated community could be of a bum as numbfn written on any other less s o d @ h member), seemsa bit thin pieces of paper in any other parts of itoo. Thto might be becwe it supposes the Untoem',a proposition I saw in. 1 the nattoni of 081th voting before the action within a week of having read tmil of ftb century to pull back from the book. Iibebdnk o* 8rmageddon and let the Therein lies Aduns' essential women's movement run things from attraction; be uses science fiction m a m m s o f s a ~ a n d ~1; low d on: what futurologists might call life, today, from outride, and bending a low-probability scenaho. Not large but small-scale interactions our minds round it. This volume, if a are what Hall is best at, and women little more rambling than its prether is what fascinates her dececois,continues to perform this essential task with aplomb, and literacy- most. Clear yher real interest in this book is in Time-Stream One', the But how far does Adams' view of the piwenbday Story of an extremely univene asan extension of Anglo-

-

A

1

toge

UNDERCURRENTS 57


1

efficient Canadian feminist undergrounc coming to the notice of an industrial çpand'having to fight big business. The main characters are well described and attractively depicted. Darlene and Shirley, telepathic twins,and their lover Lillian come to share the house of a woman called Minnie, a painter, an instinctive type with a lot of heart and little political analysis until they introduce her to their organisation, which collates hot information on industry and politics. In no time Minnie is taking phone calls and attending groups with the best of them. Later Suzanne, not a feminist but* hostage of the organisation, drifts uncomplainingly, almost passively, toward* their viewpoint.

imagination, utopian or otherwir, li part of that function. It b aho a rhetorical device: Hall ISto ma re4dera a c r i t i a and r e v h e m lib there is a feminist conipiiac; it is secret and silent and super-effldei ¥a any day now it's going to kick yo in the balls. She is saying It on behalf all her female readers (and non-reader and sa'çlnit to inspire them. Her book ends abruptly, before either story is finished, with a return t the plane of the Godmothers and a promise that the Goddess abides and will provide for her daughters. This is presumably iiupiratiod writing too. Two hurried and awkward little references suggest that each of the timestreamed plots will turn out for the be but again, by transcending the struggli and affirming divine providence, it seems to me that Hall is muddling her audience and muffling after all the t~ that these ideate have to be worked fo; here and now a ~ without d ceasing. Colin Greenlu

sheer hard work of consciousnessraising; nor is there much sign that these are daily chores, which they surely must be, in the life of the movement. Concord is loving and supreme, commitment is total. The network operates as smoothly and neatly as MissionImpossible. Of couisÃI MB unable to know. but I doubtif thia laflecte contemporary - in T-to or anywhew else. feminism

Femkism is a s-truggle for articulate

~he6isacuilout'dmiBflatlonhen organisation by people who have never feminism is presented as natural, been allowed it. I would (I hope) be delighted to see it work so well. This is inevitable, automatic once you stop to think. Hall s h a m none of the inertia and resistance that continually beset any individualachieving political enlightenment, none of the conflict and

not necessarily a defect in the novel, of course. Feminist fiction exists, apart from anything else, to teed and support the feminist ideal, and idealistic

largest prinon population in Western Europe; and the number of working days lost through work-related Ulneis we tbp ortour times those lost biougbrtri^& Thto hook hu It* problems: eonferenee papers do not unially makt tor g u y reading. But it has a wealth of data, ancfiome btoteiting eumplei 01 ilternatives tor the serious student). A book to get out of the library. Alan BoUu

Perhaps the most poignant is the chapter on Poland: at the ~ i n time e as incomes and conumptionhave dten thehealthofsocietyhassufferedbadly. For example Initltutional mmtal Illness is twice u common IN Inthe UK,Wd the sulclde ate I6 a horrific ten ten1

The Poverty of Progren: Chanaina Ways of Life in ~ndu&ial&ietie* Ian Miles and John Iwine (eds). Pergamon Press. £18.7 (hb) £7.5 (pbl. THIS book looks at a ptessing subject: the problems that 'development' has ~assedby, and the problems that it has actuallv b a t e d . The conclusion that btinga its own poverty is something that we all knew anyway, but it is something which needs restating. This collection of papers from two conferences on 'Alternative Ways of We' contains contributions from a number of countries, some of themoffering examples of alternatives, but most of them concentrating on the 'Dominant Way of Life'. The authors raise the old piece of cake argument: most of us are eating more than our share, and we are suffering from indigestion or constipation. They point out, however, that our gluttony should not over-shadow some other vital questions: who decides on the ingredients for the cake, where did the recipe come from, and most important of all, who owns the bakery? The different contributions reflect different national pie-occupations. NOVEMBER '82

ashQhasin@eUK-andallthis before the SoMuity criiei! And leit we feel m u g about Britlth lift .style, Irvlne and MUM have their own home-pwn honor itorles: Britain has almost the

Kids at work on the taH of an al#gator at ISIIP at nay m a , London.Allowing kids to have a part in crwtinfltheir own play areas makes more sense than importing 'sculpture' by 'artists' in an official attempt to improve urban landscapes. Inspiring ideas abound in Concrete Sculpture in the Community by Elizabeth Leyh. (Inter Action, £2.95) --

,


PEACE" R

m

PAGES

harming Europe. I. Kaldor & D. Smith (eds.). lerlin Press. £3.60 -bate on Disarmament 1. Clarke & M. Mowlam (eds.). outledge & Kegan Paul. £3.95

-

The M i a and the onib*. ;tispin Aubrey (ed.).

media. £2.50 :idDefence is No Defence. eace Data Association. £1 Disarming Europe contains a Section of papers on European Isaimament fiat dieaped at the END much conference in Amrterdam in 981, together with a few papers &ten sin? then. Most of the authors re academics, many of them also being ivolwd with establishment peace d i e s such as the UN, SIPRI and

E

V

I

E

W

S

The book is in two parts. The first describes the doctrines of NATO and the Soviets. nuclear stratem and the role of nudear weapons i n ~ u r o p eThe . second half proposes alternative, nonnuclear defence policies, which include the use of certain existing weapons. Their proposed alternative defence policies annoyed me to the extreme. A number were put forward, most of which called for an increase in defence expenditure (!) which would be channelled towards conventional wartare. One strategist has even included the use of a few Cruise missiles in his Proposed policy. Debate on Disarmament is another book with a number of contributors. This book originated from a series of lectures given at Newcastle University as a response to the 1981 BBC Reith lectures on armed force in the modem world. The topics covered in this book are varied. There is a chapter questioning the Soviet military threat, by Mary Kaldor; another alternative strategy for Western Europe (Johann G w n g ) ; the responsibilities of scientists towards nuclear war (Mike Pentz); a Christian response to the aims race (John Robinson); the media and defence

(Jonathan Dimbleby); and a critique of Professor Laurence Martin, whogave the Reith lectures and who also comes from the University of Newcastle (E.P. Thompson). On the whole, the chapters are clearly written, informativi and interesting, though some sections of the book are a bit wooly. Thompson and Penk also appear in Nukespeak -The Media and the Bomb along with Crispin Aubrey, Paul Chiiton, Ian Connell, Hilary James, Richard Keeble, Ruth Sabey, Michael Tracey and Andrew Wilson. Nukespeak is the language coined by the military (and thus the media) to by and make nuclear weapons/war more acceptable t o the general public (see the article by Paul Chilton in UC48). Some examples taken from the glossary at the end of the book, include 'flexible response political excuse for more, and varied, nuclear weapons' and 'strategic sufficiency)- destruction of military targets as well as large areas of population'. Paul Chilton's analysis of the glossy booklet given to every resident living near Molesworth and Greenham Common is especially interesting, though I found the first section of his chapter (on religious connotations of war words) a little too far-fetched. The

In the November issue:George Melly "I'd do the Aldermaston march

again, if it weren't for the varicose veins. " Fenner Brockway The long march. John Kenneth Galbraith "In the ashes, Communism and Capitalism will be indistinguishable."

Annual ÇubÇcri~tlrate* U.K. £6.00~uppoiingsubscription: £10.0 (2 years: £20.00 U.K. institutions: £11.0 0surface mall: £9.0 Alrrnail (Europe):£13.5 Airmail (ouslde Europe): £18.5 US. Airmail: $35.00

-

Plus: Labour Party Conference victory?; Israel and nuclear weapons; Roger Woddls; G.l.'s for peace; dirty tricks; national and international news, reviews and the facts you need in the fight against nuclear madness.

i

tMielOÑ

i

.......~ M H M I M x ~ ~ ~ B ~ I M U M O ~ S A N I T Y I.

I

.. . . . , . . . , , . , , , . . , . , . . . , , , , . , . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . I I ;ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . I

(NAME

,,

I


sntributions by Ruth Sabey, Hilary unesapd Richard Keeble would also e useful and interest'ing to peace ctivists. However, I felt that the book gave DO much emphasis to the detoiis 01 ow The War Game,Mike Pentz' xture, the Dimbleby lecture and the chools Against the Bomb film were limned, and also that too many pages rere devoted to analysis of how the Ictober 1981 CND demonstration was eported by the media. This dates it omewhat - but the book is still worth ~uying. The above three books are all similar n that they are all collections of papers, ill rather academic and theoretical, and ill are written from a unilaterailst rather han an anti-militarist viewpoint. Antinilitarist/CND activists, on the other land, would probably find Civil

Introduction to Solar Technology Marion Jacobs Fisk and H.C.William Anderson. Addison-Wesley. £16.10 THE EXPERIENCES of architects, builders and do-it-yourselfershave shown that solar projects which are not carefully thought out from the beginning have a great chance of (1) not working, (2) not selling or (3) being fai too expensive. In froduction to Solar Technology sets out to encourage the reader to think things out carefully from the beginning. It is becoming increasingly apparent that good use of solar heat depends to a large extent on heat storage devices. The ideal is to save summer heat for winter use although even a week's worth of heat capacity would be quite useful. One option is to have large hot-water tanks, usually below the building. This is probably the most popular solution in the UK at present. An altertiative, needing more volume but probably easier to manage, is to have a bed of uniformly-sized pebbles or coarse sand in an insulated and air-tight box, provided with air ductin; and good tight shut-off dampers and valves. In place of pebbles, it is possible to use a number of bottles containing w a G r à ‘ 3 h a s done for many rears in North African houses -and if I sufficiently large number of recycled rottles can be found at low cost, this would be an attractive alternative. Apart from pebble beds or hot water

Defence ft No Defence more to their

liking. Subtitled Region 2 Direct Action Handbook, this is a cheaply-produced booklet which gives the locations and functions of the nudear bunkers in the Yorkshire and Humberside regions, and the personnel who would be allowed in them. Most of the information is on the civilian headquarters rather than those of the military, but the authors hope t o remedy this situation in the supplement to the handbook (included in the £ cost). This is real activist stuff, especially if the Home Office still plan to go ahead with the Hard Rock exercise (originally set for October). Other useful information covered in the booklet includes the role of voluntary organisations, the health service in wart'lme, the Square Leg and Hard Rock milltmhhg merckes, storage, there are many other techniaues under development Concentrated sulphuric add; f w example,gives off heat whenOdilutedand can be re-concentrated again by wing solar heat when available. Other and less

- --

dangero- i.i.i.u..Zeolite group are bring developed and may become available soon. Most of the book is concerned with ordinary flat-plate *lector systems for space heating. The newer weuum tube collectors, which can produce much higher temperatures and so drdcally reduce the cost of storage, are mentioned only briefly, as are photocells, biomass, power towers, wind power etc. A wide variety of information is presented, mostly previously published but here collected and well referenced. It spans a considerable range of technical levels, from the really elementary and not quite accurate ('liquid pipes are tubes for carrying , Ñ

and possibilities for direct action against' civil defence measures. All of which makes for a very informative, useful booklet -especially for those living in the Yorkshire/Humbeiside area. It is now up to people living elsewhere in the country to produce their own versions of the booklet. Go to it, people. Lowana Veal

The Hilarity of Nuclearity. Tom Davis. Published by Woody Books, 84Wolverly Court, Telford, Salop. £1.20 THERE IS little t o be said about The Warity of Nuclearity, other than it is a clever, zany, satirical piece of verse about weapons, nuclear war and lnmm-flavoured crisps. Read it if you can. liquid') to some highly mathematical

treatment of theoretical losses and

involved payback calculations, including prediction of fuel price and taxationpolicyover the expected life of the installation. OeKpitethe involved mathematics there are Wne surprising gaps. Heat low due to draughts, which is usually the major loç in British homes, is treated merely on the basis of an arbitrary 50%volume change per hour. Some units are wrongly used insulation is given in 'Watts per hour' instead of simply 'Watts' and other units used in the text, such as Pascals, are neitherindexed nor defined. Although advertised by a British publisher and priced in Sterling, this very American book is mainly concerned with applications under US conditions of taxes and subsidies. There is a full listing of US legislation on solar power and a directory of American solar agencies. A list of acronyms includes ANSI, ASME and UL,even SMACNA (Sheet Metal and Airconditioning Contractors National Association) but not ISES (International Solar Energy Society). The indexis brief and only moderately useful. This is in no sense a do-it-yourselfers' book and it constantly refers t o (American) commercially available equipment but without giving makers' names. For academic or technically advanced readers requiring a comprehensive introduction to flat-plate collector systems technology, this could be a useful basic book, but for the average enquirer £1worth of smaller books from, say, the NCAT (National Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys, Wales) would be a much better bargain. Owen


THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

*

.. <.

,

b

AGRONOMIST An agriculturalist or horticulturailst is needed to join a Pariah loci01 promotion project in rural Honduru. Tho agronomist will be training local agricultural promoter*; dtvioping now my: to improve agricultural production & grain s t o r e ; and supporting other work In education, animal health and cooperative dovelopmont. Aoollant* should have HND or BSc In Aarlcultura or Horticuiture, and experiencedIn mini i a vegetable production. The project needs an agronomist with broad rather than hloh Ifwlskills. to sham them with loo1poopla, working and living in their communities. The contract Is for two yean on a salary related to local incom~.Return alr-farn, insuranca, rçMttIemen and Other grant* are provided; also languege and other training. For further details p l ~ writ* n to CIIR with full details of your experience, enclosing a large (AS) SAE end quoting rof UI1. * CIIR O W à ‘ Progremma, 22 Colanimn FlÈlds London N1 7AF

commuaIty^MMd~~t>//~nof insulation and drau&tproofing. A non-profit making company supplying individual customers, insulation projects and community groups, our services include:

*

Low cost DIY insulation iddnuçhtproofinb a i l ordçr Bulk discounts Advice on choice of material*, imtallation and finance Survey and installation Talks, slide show and displays on domestic heat loss

'

Our materials include: loft insulation, draught excluders, tank jackets, pipe insulation, radiator reflector sheet and books. FOR FREE CATALOGUE, WRITETO: . --

.,

CONSERVACTION FREEPOST NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE NE1 1BR (NOSTAMP REQUIRED) TEL: (0632) 615555

TAKE POSITIVE STEPS TO CONTROL YOUR ENERGY USE


.

-

..

~

up when we discovered that the old rate was losing us money! Box numbers are Mill £1.2 extra.

CLASSIFIED ANTI-SEXIST Men's Workshop. Under the auspices of Pellin Centre, London. N w . 26.27.28. Traditional male roles will be explored using Gestalt Therapy and Contribution Training methods. Workshops for men's Gest't Therapy and

London to foster increased tails Larry Kanig,

WANTED: Material for my thesis which is on 'Ecological Projects in NOT Christmas Cards, Pagan Great Britain'. Iam interested in Cardsl Each has a traditional carol information on practical groups1 restored t o pre-Thristian wordsindividualslprojects who earn 10 for £1.50 Or in book form. their living through e primarily with sources, reasoning, £350 conscious dealing with nature's From Norman lks, 381 Marine resources. Does anybody know of Rd, Morecambe. any literature which looks into the impact of existing projects on . WOULD you like t o subscribe t o the 'straight society' or would like One Earth, the exciting bit o let me know hislher own. monthly magazine of the Findhorn Foundation? Send now for a free evaluation? Write t o Sebine Bahnemann, Hartmmnstr 1 I, copy of the current issue on D-3000 Hannover 1, West MasculineIFeminine balance and . Germany, before ~ e c I. . see howyou like it. One Earth Subscriptions, Findhom PubliTWO people, late 20~130s.seek cations, The Perk, Forres, n -i rural co~lectiveor communc --..-- .~.-. IV36 OTZ. commitment, useful skills and IMAGES Of War. An anti-war capital. Contact Pam and Kevin, anthology of poetry, 50p (plus 12 Briery Street, Lancaster postage) from Kawabata Press, LA1 5RD. Knill Cross House, Nr Anderton Road, Millbrook, Torpoint, Cornwall.

PUBLICATIONS

COURSES

olm

m5,,

NEWLY formed community needs more people with commitment t o alternative education, group living and with various skills, especially practical. We have the buildings and resources of a former progressive boanding school with workshops, farmI and garden. Also short-term help needed with building restoretion. If interested please write t o IJS at: Monkton Wyld Court,Charm outh. Dorset. I

~~

HEAVY Horses and Woodland Practice. Get t o grips with both activities in the Lake District. Good food, quiet horses, beautiful woodland. Next course: Weeknd 19-20-21 November. £4 including full board. Information from Cat Crag, Graythwaite, Ulverston, Cumbrii. 0488 31384. CARDIFF City Farm are holding a series of workshops on Saturdays, the next baing on Keeping Poultry, Oct. 16th. followed by Fish Farming, N w . mth, and Spinning, Dec. 1l t h . Workshop notes will be available. For further details 'phone (0222) 384360. SHORT residential courses on a wide range of A T subjects and skills, starting in November. Courses include both theory and practice. Please write for further details and booking forms t o the Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Pows. Course! include Blacksmithing, Small woodland management, Saving energy in the home, Solar energy (including workshop on building 8 solar panel), Philosophy of alternatives. Passive solar buildings, Wholefood vegetarian cooking, Self-build, Windpower, Waterpower, Natural gardening, Herbs, Birds of woodland, hill and estuary.

PROPERTY IN COUNTRY community of 20 adults and children, self-contained mortgageable, 4-bed family unit, leasehold; 50-acre smellholding cooperatively run. Enquiries: Windflower Housing Association, Canon Frome Court, Ledbury, Herefordshire, HR8 2TD. Phone Trumpet 574 or 534, evenings. WEST of Ireland. Secluded hill3ide cottage, Co. Sligo for long term let. Picturesque views, 2 acres, 3 rooms and loft.electricity Low rent but substantial bond ¥equired01-854 1657.

BETTER BADGE

WORK SUPERV.ISOR required for Community Insulation Schemes (CEP). Building skills, interest (and experience?) of co-ops and alternative technology essential. Salary £6.40 ma.. clean driving

(

AUTUMN INTRODUCTORY & SHORT COURSES

Introductory Evenings in Psychosynthesis Wednesdays 8-lOpm. Oct. 6, Nw. 3, Dec. 1. No charge

BREAKTHROUGH t o country living1 Acquire rural skills with W O O F . Send s.a.e. t o Working Weekends on Organic Farms, 19 Bradford Road, Lewes. Sussex.

Introductory Evening for those involved in the Heeling Professions Thursday Nov. 11,S-10pm. No charge Introductory Weekendsand Six-Week Course These courses are designed t o help individualsacquire skills and understanding relevant t o their own development, and provide a basic introduction t o Psychosynthesis from the perspective of synthesis and Good will.

ALTERNATIVE lifestyleljob with animals. Socialist preferred. Write: The Monkey Sanctuary, Looe, Cornwall.

CONTACTS

Introductory Weekends SaturdayISunday, 10.5.30pm 'Nw. 617 'Dec. 1 1/12 Fee 130 N o t e revised dates Introductory Six-Week Course Wednesdays 7.30-10.30prn, Oct. 13-Nov. 17:Fee £3

DORSET rural resettlement initiative in early stages of formation is looking for members. The intention is t o start small but work toward employment and housing for a village community with common ownership of land and buildings. Employment must be both agricultural end small scale industrylcrafts. The project needs people with dedication, skills and some capital, who are prepared t o forego much. John Comben, 3 Greville Road, London NW6.

Short Courses Cognitive & Creative 1. ThursdayIFriday 9.30-4.30pm. N w 415. Fee £34.5 This course, one of a series of 3, is designed t o help participants expand their own capacities t o think creatively.

Come into a place and rest awhile SaturdayISunday 10.5.30pm, Nov. 20121, Fee £3 A twc-day workshop towardsan understanding of our relationship t o loneliness and aloneness.

WOMAN, with horticultural training and some capital, would like t o hear from other women interested in setting up a market garden in thecountry. Eleanor Clegg, 48 Amhurst Road, Kenilworth, Warwicks.

Professional Clinic WednesdayiThursday 9.304.30, Nov 17/18, Fee £4 The process of Spiritual Awakening and Psychological Disturbances: Existential Crisis and Crisis of Duality

-

I

I FROMANYSIZE ARTWCJX.

r

Courses are held at locations in North and Central London. Further detailsand full brochure available from the Institute.


Windmills on the Palace?Organic Gardening parties? Muesli before a day out hunting in the Shires? Yes, the Royals are turning 'green'. In fact, a note has arrived from Prince Charles to the Conservation Society, the gist of which was that the ConSoc should really be more radical. Charles opines that "we are deluding ourselves if we cheap fossil fuels believe that a technology based on can continue we ibould adapt technology to minimise the use of non-renewableresources'. Schumacher and ITDG get name-checks. Our future king may well believe most of thk, but who actually wrote the letter (Answers on a post-card, please) Meanwhile the Duke of Edinburgh, in an address to CoEnCo blamed the Dooulation explosion for the 'direct threat to much of the natural environment*. The Duke of Edinburgh at the last count had four children.. We know you like hearing about the Royals. Socialist p~blishersPluto Press are producing a book on L They will also be publishing detective stories with t ties like 'Murder in the Central Committee'. Whet next? Virago publishing Doctor a@ Nune romance stories?. Ialways thought R e j n ~ Bagwash h wai quite a nice chip M long a* you'kcpt him off the subject of religion, but now the old fraud ~ e n to u have conriplately l o ~his t marbles. He's appealing for £2million to build a huge o r a m nuclear (helm in O r m n for all his dilciples (NB IJndercurrent* only nÑd (bout £6,00 sendell cheques in a plain brown envelope atc) Someone who hunt adjusted to the reality of Thatcher, it8 economic* is Stwe Bilcliffe at Friends Of The Earth, who reportedly recently aked for a £2,00 raise on top of his current salary of about £7,000 This at a time when FOEhave Justlacked half a dozen staffers. Iunderstand he WM given e short sharp monetarist antwer. Norman Tebbin is likely to mçka vislt to the FOEemporium at City Road

.. .

. ..

.. .. .. .. . . , . . .. ... ... ... ... ... .. ... .... . , ... ... ... ... .'. .. . .. ..

I

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. -

2;

,12, IIti I

9

(a-

,

-1

I.

t3 #

r :1 I

...

.

.

.. .

soon..

-

.

Tom Shaw at the NATTA conference spoke eloquently in favour of the Severn Barrage project. The environmental effect* w r e minimal, said Shaw, who introduced himself as from Briitol Unlvertlty. Whet he didn't mention was that he ado work* for MacAlpines, who ere trying to get the contract for the barrage, worth an inflationary £ billion Entreprenwr of the month award goes to the Survivalist wine club, who ere leafletting people with nuclear shelters, suggdng they make urn of their bunkers for storing fine vintages. Rumour has It the first 60 members get free memberahip to the SDP. The only problem is likely to be anguished decision making when the four minute warning goes. The Mouton Rothichild '53 or the cat? The Madeira or the next door naighbour? Finally, watch out for the 'Partizan Nightclub' opening in Covent Garden. It's supposed to be a political nightclub, where activitts can get down and boogie LOONY DOOMSTEP

...

..

. .. .. .


SPECIAL OFFER!!

Radical Technology

Radical Technology is widely recognised as the standard comprehensive work in the field. But don't take our word for it. As Alvin Toffler, author of best-sellers F U ~ E sw md ~hW W . W put it: 'For people who still think of the future in terms of mega-machines and all-~owerful bureaucracies, ~adical Technology will be an eyeopener. It proves what many futurists, ecologies and philosophers have been saying: There is an alternative. Radical Technology offers a fresh way to think about tomorrow. Nothing could be more useful."

BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT with the ~ u b lishers, Wildwood House, we are now able to offer our book Radical Technology to Undercurrents readers at less than half price only £1.95 postpaid.

-

".. . .. .

this book is different. It has sharp criticisms of society and just about everything else you might think of coupledwith the best presentationof 'Visions'of what may be done that I've seen. . The only book in this part of the culture that Ihave personally found exciting and excited." J. Baldwin in The Next Whole Earth Catalog. ". . a tightly packed compendium of information covering subjects like organic gardening, indirect solar inergy, phone phreaking and how to make your own ;hoes.. .Radical Technology is packed with sustained - Michael outbursts of sanity about the way we live. White in The Guardian.

.

.

(

1

'

. ."

radical Technology has 304 big pages and includes more than 40 naior articles, only a couple of which haw ever appeared in Undercurrents, spanning such topics as Food, Energy, Shelter, "4 Materials, % Community, Autonomy and Other Panpoctiws.

1

:lND OUT what you've been missing ana neip is clear some space in the office by taking dvantage of our cut price back numbers offer. ~yten of the issues listed below cost just .50. Or, even better, all thirty-two plus a e cow of the index of the first nine vears onlyk10.50, surface mail, worldwide. tor Emotional plague,FindhonsCompost& communhm (2kWater power Oz community radio:Punk: Thailand; positiveaabotaffe.

1 27

26

AT & the PoItugueue molution; The Russians mm't coming; Boat repairs; New Age Access; Orkuey crafting; Growing dope. Soft energy; hard politics;Fast breeders; Toolsfor small fauns; Brookhouae Ampersand co-op; The Shakers, DIY Woodstove. windscale. Tvind; Mondmgon, AT & the State; Cmadhn AT; Behavio&'~od;Bicycle planuiw; Urban wasteland. Women & Enem; New Cleax Enenty; Feminists ufainstnukes; Women & Science; Womanthought; Alice & ATman.

ORDER YOUR COPY NOW1 Send just £1.9 (which indudn UK and overseas surface mail costs) t o Undercurrents. 27 Clerkenwell dose, London EC1R OAT.

3'7

Third worn energy; FA0 food conference; Street fightin: man; DIY b l o w ; Ecotopoly ; Environmental education

33

Anti-nuclear Campaigns; Denmark;Seabrook;Guerilla tactics; Gartfaquake;The Russians and Nicola Teda. The En-

39

Communes: Co-operative work; Christians; Communes & anarchism. Peawe's polemics; US Windpower Inc.

'O 41

42

43 44

1 31

e Eeopolitics, Bxitidi road to Ecotopia, fiaxzac; Nukes & and

1 -- unions; Workers' plans D N VHF tranamitten Shotton;Micros. 1 33 plmuing; Garden cities; Urban wasteland; National parks-, I

35

COMTEK79;Wave power; Teamwork TiainingTtust;C-pai<n for the North; D N Woodstove dedgn; DecentraUrint AT. Childsen & the Environment; Future perfect; City jungles: Flyaeet camps, Ma GCommunity schools k mIViwa

ProtOpia,Convivial computing; Manlfeito tot the 80s; END; NATTA, Teda; Darrieus wmdmffl deafen: Finite Radio.

- no

Bombs into windmflls, Atoms for peace; Land inform

ihimkr: Gwentfmn: W e without TV-EST- Prowrtarianfl. council; Open Media Special: Pen p u ~ g 4;t i wuud;

radio cam-

D ~ m Juuun k intervitw Ruff Tuff Cream Puff.

Law 'n Anarchy: Red Buriiters; Wetmlnster Zoo; Tribal , Justice; Prostitutes; We& Anontote; Community Law.

46

Women In Co-ops: Their Experiences and Roles; Chfldaaw in Co-ops; Building without Men; S American Collecti+ereport.

47

Special Issue on Foraft>: Why Forests Matter, Definetafion: Carbon Dioxide Levels. Medical Effect8 of Nuclear War. Women against miÑDei Free Sexuality; Nukeoead; Edward d o n d on Dernouacv: Wiltlam B u u o u d u inkview; CB M-

AQ

50 51

59

Shetland; Country life, WWOOFing; At workshop.

1

Co-operatorsFaii: Sums;Winds of change;Wol-kingc ~ l l e ~ t i ~ e l ~ Orgasmic labour; Macho nations; Capitalism and Co-ops.

AQ

Windscale; Ecofeminism; Solarcal, AT & the British State; Muscle powered revolutionary samadhi;Greening socialism. Food politics; Factory farming. Additives;Wholefood co-ops; co-dw c - p w common ~ O ~ C Y .

Fusion: Wave pow=; Viewdata; DeprogramminC Ecoropa; ThM Wodd Rip-0% Can*; Jobs & Social Change.

CJ

55/56

Alternative defence; DIY Super 8 films; OMcb on aexiam; The new Wrt Coot; Co-op impact on the labour movement. ~hinking; manning tot led; Tenth Birth blue: ~imming Chein/Blologi<^Wçrià AT Re* 10yeais ofEcwActlon

Pirate TV,Socialist Radio; Animal Lib; Nuclear Pawn guide; Wave Power: Timothy L e n ; the new Alternative London. CartoonSilt Against the Bomb; Feminist Radio; S t W Hood

on TV, Technology In Nepal; Beyond the Beat.

Citizen* Intelligence; Nuclear D i m w ; Homopathr, iMlitim T a n k Tan* Sex; Eut-Wmt Peau Ezehmw. K a v i x o m n m à Spççta Add BçlBlÑ B*ftÈmSif* l Savaged; Global Underclar, FÑthrJa Bectdc bllu<, Zoo Greçnçoik 2.U-T; Acupuncture; +.A P à §Ktd y on Eco-feminira.

-.


FREE BOOK OFF1 FREE BOOK OFFER t o new Undercurrents subscribers. A choice o f ' t w o books from Pluto Presfef.~$ -either Sheila Durie and Rob Edwards Fuelling the Nuclear Arms Race (worth £2.95 o r .'y' Erik Eckholm's Down to Earth (worth £3.95are yours if y o u take o u t a years subscription t o Undercurrents. That's a years supply ( I 0 issues) o f the magazine o f grMn p o l i t i s plus a choice d , t w o of the best books t o emerge from the environmental and anti-nuclear movement for years. . * Fuelling the Nuclear Arms Race sheds new light on the real connections between nuclear power , 6% and the nuclear arms race. Down to Earth is an analysis o f the state o f the environment globally; " . covering pollution and toxic wastes, population growth, desertification, biological diversity, health . : a n d energy. Both books are important additions t o the environmental debate. Send just £8.5 t o ... * Subscription dept, Undercurrents, 27 Clerkenwell Close, London E C I (further details o n page 48). I

'i

..

-

,.

..

,

*

,' - ,

.

'Â¥?Â¥.".

.

.,

bursting wit; ! .,.- . . factual information and studied with , striking tones of phrase. The organisation "' :.,' ?""? and subject matter of the book reflect ' .v : : the metamorphosis of the environmental issue in ten years." New Scientist

.

%

,.

On Fuelling the Nuclear Arms Race: "This book is a must for activists wanting to convey some incontrovertible evidence against all things nuclear"

,

..

. .

,


Undercurrents 57 November 1982 3 Letters 5 Eddies 11 Beast News 13 NATTA News 14 Green News - Andrew Tyler 15 Book Now for 1984 - Patricia Hewitt 18 Heat Treatment - Adrian Atkinson 20 Women Only at Greenham? - Ann Pettit 22 Winning Sizewell - Paul Rowntree 23 Green Peace - Linda Churnside 24 Green Breakthrough? - David Tyler & Richard Whitfield 26 The Final Frontier - Martin Ince 28 Weird Stuff - Paul Sieveking 29 Why I Freed The White Whale - the Activist’s Story 33 Funny Farm - Permaculture UK 34 Roughing It - Herbert Girardet 36 Briefing 38 Reviews 46 Classified 48 Subscriptions & Froth __________________________________________________________________________ Editorial: This issue is somewhat late - as usual our finances are not wonderful - if you have taken out a subscription for ten issues you will still get ten issues - even though it may be over a period of slightly over a year. And we are producing issues with more pages than earlier in the year. So we hope you’ll bear with us. Some things are looking up - subscriptions are up 25 %, there’s a possibility of some funding for promotion (our main problem is that we’re one of the best kept secrets in publishing), and suddenly the national media seems to have discovered the ‘green movement’ (at least in Europe). Our advertised Petra Kelly interview was called off after she collapsed from overwork, We’re glad to say she seems to have recovered and the interview is being re-scheduled. __________________________________________________________________________



UC57 November 1982