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Alumni Review Fal l 2009

Universit y of Nor th Dakota A lumni A ssoc iat ion

Nor t h Dakot a Energ y


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ALUMNI REVIEW • Vol. 92 No. 3 • Fall 2009

F E ATUR E S

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Big Oil

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Wind Energy

Horizontal drilling increases the power of  the Bakken Formation oil reserves.

Making the most of one of   North Dakota’s most prevalent resources.

12 Igniting the Power of   Lignite With single‐largest deposit of   lignite coal in the world, North Dakota’s energy industry is on the rise.

D EPA RTM E N TS

2 Message from the Executive Vice President

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UND Proud

18 A Letter from the President New Faces

19 What’s New

News from Around Campus

28 Foundation News

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Donors Positioning Students for Energy Leadership

32 Alumni Class News

Who’s Doing What: News About your Classmates

44 In Memoriam On the cover: An abstract picture of an oil pump against the wide open sky reflects the landscape of North Dakota.

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UND PROUD

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dear alumni & friends,

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As the world’s economy dominated the news headlines over the last 18 months, central to the storyline[s] has been the tremendous volatility within the energy industry. Like other disciplines that span commerce, medicine, law, industry, creative works, to name a few, the energy sector is impacted every day by UND alumni and friends who are providing leadership and entrepreneurial spirit in everything from research and training to production and policy. The state of   North Dakota has become a dominant player in the energy industry with significant opportunities in wind, oil, gas and coal. Along with agriculture and commerce, the growth of  the sector has become a huge factor in the ability of our state to thrive. This edition of  the Review will highlight some of  the major contributions of our alumni, magnifying the impact their UND educations have had on their professional lives. You will hear from engineers, a meteorologist, business owners, lobbyists, lawyers, entrepreneurs, and more. The industry is one of great magnitude, and we hope that the ensuing stories inform and interest you! We always welcome your feedback. Along with the more beautiful summer weather we’ve seen in years, we noted the first anniversary of   Bob & Marcia Kelley as our President and First Lady. It’s been an extremely active first year, highlighted by a successful legislative session and the replacement of  several key leadership positions on campus due to retirements. President Kelley makes note of  those

Alumni Review Fal l 2009

announcements on page 18. The leadership team is a talented, vibrant group. As they enter their first year as a team for UND, we see an exciting agenda on the horizon. Time goes by way too fast, especially in the short North Dakota summer. We are only a few short weeks from the start of the fall semester. For an especially outstanding Homecoming this fall, Sept. 28 ‐ Oct. 3, the Sioux Award recipients court superior credentials: astronaut Karen Nyberg, former governor and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Ed Schafer, entrepreneur and Hall of  Fame athlete Dan Martinsen, founder of   UND’s R.A.I.N. program and nursing professor LaVonne Russell Hootman, who will also be helping fellow nursing colleagues and alumni celebrate 100 years of  College of   Nursing excellence. Young Alumni Achievement Award recipients are Fernanda Philbrick, an accomplished engineer; and Chris Semrau, whose entrepreneurial skills as one of the original four Ralph Engelstad Arena employees has contributed immensely to the success of  the arena. More details on these alumni award recipients are highlighted in the Homecoming insert on page 24. Take a look as there’s something for everyone and we’re anxious for you to come home and see your UND. You’ll be very pleased and proud at what you see, and I promise some “big news” announcements that week. If  you can’t visit us “live and in person,” make a regular stop at www.undalumni.org. You will find daily campus, community and state news, along with opportunities to acquire information on virtually everything and anything you might want to know about UND, the Alumni Association, and the Foundation. In fact, the most efficient and quickest way to contribute to the cause you want to support is through the Web site, and we’re delighted to see the growth in this regard. I hope to see you all soon, on campus or at one of the events we’re involved with around the country. In the meantime, enjoy the late summer and early fall, and make those plans to attend Homecoming 2009. Sincerely,

Tim O’Keefe, ’71

Executive Vice President and CEO UND Alumni Association and UND Foundation E‐mail: timo@undfoundation.org

Universit y of Nor th Dakota A lumni A ssoc iat ion Vol . 92 No. 3 • Fal l 2009

Executive Vice President and CEO Tim O’Keefe, ’71 Director of Alumni Relations Amanda Hvidsten, ’01 Editor Leanna Ihry, ’02 Designer Kirsten Gunnarson Contributing Writers University Relations Wendy Honrath Contributing Photography Chuck Kimmerle/University Relations www.istockphoto.com

Board of Directors UND Alumni Association President Jim Williams, ’62 Vice President Carolyn (Howland) Becraft, ’66 UND Foundation President Linda Pancratz, ’76 Vice President Rick Burgum, ’68 Directors: Alice Brekke, ’79, ’87; Kristine (Hefta) Brindle, ’78; Jill (LaGrave) Burchill, ’76; Kris Compton, ’77; Patrick Dirk, ’71, ’72; Robert Erickson, ’71, ’74; Mark Fliginger, ’74; William Guy III, ’68, ’76; Tim Haas, ’68; Bart Holaday; Robert O. Kelley; Chuck Kluenker; Paul LeBel; Erwin Martens, ’83, ’85; Ken Mellem, ’66, ’68; Lauris Molbert, ’79, ’83; Jennifer Neppel, ’86; Diane Odegard, ’86; Tim O’Keefe, ’71; Keith Reimer, ’73; Al Royse, ’72, ’73, ’76; Robert Solberg, ’69; and Lisa Wheeler, ’75, ’82. The University of North Dakota Alumni Review (USPS 018089: ISSN 0895-5409) is published Aug., Nov., Feb., and May by the University of North Dakota Alumni Association, 3100 University Avenue, Stop 8157, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8157. Periodical postage paid at Grand Forks, ND 58201 and other offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Alumni Review, 3100 University Avenue, Stop 8157, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8157. For inquiries about advertising, additional copies, reprints, submissions, or general comments, contact Leanna Ihry, editor, at 800.543.8764, 701.777.0831 or alumnireview@undalumni.net.


The following articles are a glimpse at the tremendous energy business booming across the state of North Dakota. From fossils to renewables, North Dakota is leading the way. Stories written by Amanda Hvidsten

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“For our state, the energy industry is number one. We have 800 years of lignite and we also have the number one status of wind potential in the U.S. We are the fifth largest oil and gas producer. That’s promising for jobs, both bluecollar and white-collar. There’s a lot of work out there generated by the energy industry – it really touches all ends of campus in terms of prospective graduates from UND or graduates looking to get into a new industry.” – Ryan Rauschenberger, ’06, North Dakota deputy tax commissioner

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often in the hot seat, oil companies get a lot of attention. Prices, production levels, environmental issues, dependence, independence…they all make headlines. But, when we think of oil, do we think North Dakota? We should. Oil production is big business for the state, economically, environmentally, and otherwise. Robert Harms, ’80, is president of Northern Alliance of Independent Producers, which represents oil and gas producers, and companies aligned with those interests in the Dakotas and Montana for matters of  public policy, environmental concerns, and the like. “It’s an important industry for North Dakota and the country,” said Harms. “Economically it provides enormous benefit for the people who live in North Dakota. Nationally it is a key part of our energy mix and will be for decades to come.” North Dakota is the fifth largest oil‐producing state in the U.S., and most of  the supply is drawn from the Bakken Formation near Stanley, N.D. While there’s no way to tell exactly how much oil is in the Bakken, a 2008 U.S. Geological Survey report estimated that recoverable oil could be about 4.3 billion barrels. Extracting oil from the Bakken has had its ups and downs since it was first discovered in 1951. Ryan Kopseng, ’99, has followed in the footsteps of his father, Loren Kopseng, who attended UND in the late 1960s. Their business, Missouri River Royalty Corporation, was founded in 1984 by Loren and his longtime business partner Don Russell with one oil well. It is now a fully diversified energy company called United Energy Corporation. But, the great opportunity of the Bakken has come with its share of challenges. “There is an old saying in the oil business that the best place to find oil is where it has already been found,” says Ryan. “Geologists have known that the Bakken Formation in North Dakota contains huge amounts of oil since the 1950s but it was not economic to drill for it until recently. The Bakken is known as a ‘resource play’, meaning geologists know the resource is there – figuring out how to get it out of  the ground economically is the challenge.” Ron Ness, president of  the North Dakota Petroleum Council, also referrenced the Bakken’s main hurdle. “Certainly the Bakken has a lot of  challenges because it’s a very difficult resource to produce oil,” he said. “It requires a high oil price to make production economical but we are doing groundbreaking


work every day to deal with this.” Booms and busts are part of  the industry’s history, but new technologies have made this era of oil drilling much more sustainable. Advances in drilling operations are one example. Says Ryan Kopseng, “The advent of   horizontal drilling and fracture stimulation have unlocked the vast potential of  the Bakken. Horizontal wells capable of  initially producing over 1,000 barrels of oil per day are now very common in North Dakota.” He said, “The most prolific wells discovered to‐date are in Mountrail County, near Stanley and Parshall. Some of the wells in Mountrail County initially will produce as much as 3,500 barrels of oil per day and will ultimately produce more than a million barrels per well. These wells cost between $4 million and $6 million to drill and complete.” Horizontal drilling is where the technology advances prove huge dividends. A directional driller is able to drill vertically for many thousand feet into the earth’s surface and then drill sideways into a pocket of oil. Horizontal drilling increases oil production because these types of wells can expose more oil for recovery. So much so that the added cost in drilling horizontally is easily made up for by the increase volume of recovered oil. Harms comments, “We can go out to an oil rig, meet a directional driller sitting at his own office, managing three to four computers monitoring the drill string/drilling pipe. In the meantime, he’s in consultation with a drilling company in Dickinson or a geologist in Denver or an engineer in Houston online. It’s exciting to see all that happen – it’s phenomenal the kind of  technology being applied to the industry today.” He explains there are still “rough necks” working on the oil rigs as he had done while in college, but the person who is doing the actual drilling is the directional driller using computerized methods and controlling the drill bit with what looks like a video game joystick. Hydraulic fracturing is another method used in production. The Bakken Formation is a shale configuration that spans approximately 200,000 square miles. According to the Energy Information Administration, hydraulic fracturing has been used in oil fields since the 1920s, but in the Bakken, the shale has not been conducive. The process in general is defined as “pumping a fracturing fluid into the well bore at a rate sufficient to increase the pressure down hole to a value in excess of the fracture gradient of the formation rock. The pressure then causes the formation to crack which allows the fracturing fluid to enter and extend the crack further into

the formation. In order to keep this fracture open after the injection stops, a solid proppant is added to the fracture fluid. The proppant, which is commonly sieved round sand, is carried into the fracture.” Shale can expand when exposed through fracturing a vertical well bore, therefore sealing off an oil pathway. Whereas with horizontal drilling, as detailed above, the fracturing process is now better suited for the Bakken environment. North Dakota’s oil industry prospects are estimated as some the best in the country, if not the world, since they are American‐owned and now more easily accessible. Ryan Kopseng said, “It has been said that Bakken play in North Dakota and Montana is the biggest on‐shore oil discovery since Prudhoe Bay on the Alaskan North Slope. The huge size and potential of the resources has caused oil companies to invest billions of dollars in North Dakota. Millions of acres of   land in Western North Dakota remain untested and prospective.” One of  the biggest benefits of  the oil industry to North Dakota has been the generated tax revenue. In 1997, under then‐Governor Ed Schafer, ’69, the state approved a permanent oil trust fund, which takes a portion of the oil and gas tax and puts it in the Bank of   North Dakota. This trust fund has grown over the last decade or more to be roughly half the $1 billion surplus North Dakota enjoys while many other states are facing deficits. “The Bakken is really a game‐changer for North Dakota,” said Ness regarding its economic impact. “If  we can advance the technology to improve the productivity of    The Bakken in other counties like we have in Mountrail County, it has potential to change our state’s financial resources forever. Look at schools in western North Dakota that have been losing students for decades. They are growing. It’s because the wages are high for these jobs, averaging nearly $80,000. And, these are long‐term jobs. Once you drill a well, it’s like putting up a business with a $6 million storefront. It has to be developed and maintained.” Bringing the benefits of  the industry full circle, Harms pointed out that not only is the oil tax revenue driving our economy, but that revenue stream should be sustainable based on oil use. Nation‐wide oil continues to be the most economic fuel for our energy needs. “We have an entire energy structure based on economics – oil is the most economic,” Harms said. “We have a

growing renewable industry but it’s never been above eight to 10 percent of  the industry. That’s why as a state and country, oil will continue to be a significant part of the energy mix for the foreseeable future. For North Dakota, we are blessed to have that here to provide enormous benefits long term.” This sentiment is echoed by the Department of  Commerce. Ryan Rauschenberger, ’06, is deputy tax commissioner and former manager of energy development for the Department of Commerce. “The Commerce department and the Governor’s Office highly value the energy industry. It has played a huge part of North Dakota economy for a long time particularly in terms of the traditional forms of energy. We expect it to go for long time into the future,” he said. What’s especially exciting is that UND graduates, including those referenced within this article, are dominating this industry, locally and otherwise. Said Ryan Kopseng, “Hundreds if not thousands of   UND grads are directly and indirectly employed by the oil business in North Dakota. Most of  the oil and gas attorneys in the state are UND grads. A large number are employed as oil and gas landmen, engineers, and geologists. We are everywhere in the oil patch.” A UND degree carries a lot of weight within the industry, particularly as the demand for more and more employees in and around the industry increases. “UND graduates virtually dominate the landscape of  the industry in the state,” said Ness. “It really is remarkable how many people who work in this industry have received their degrees at UND. We hope that the University continues to educate these kinds of  people because we need them all.” Investments by the University’s School of Engineering and Mines to this regard include a new undergraduate concentration on sustainable energy, with the potential for a master’s program in the future. For more information on this topic, see page 40. Energetics, engineering entrepreneurship, and petroleum engineering are also critical areas of emphasis to develop the best and brightest in the industry. ■

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left: Looking up through an oil rig. right: A well site on the Bakken in North Dakota.

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“It’s windy at our place. Can we put up a wind farm?”

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A simple, logical question that comes from many North Dakotans. Dubbed the “Saudi Arabia of wind,” Nodaks are used to windy days, especially in the Red River Valley, which the U.S. Geological Survey indicates as having 10‐20 percent higher wind speeds than the rest of the state. National Wind Assessments is a regional company that specializes in meteorological (met) tower installations, wind data collection and assessment. They are often asked this simple, logical question about putting up wind farms. Debbie Jacklitch‐Kuiken, ’05, is a meteorologist and mechanical engineer serving as a project manager for wind resource assessment with the company. On the technical side of such a simple question she responds, “We need a lot of data to use wind energy well, at least a year, and more than five years is great.” The finer details, she points out, are efficiency, typography, roads for getting equipment to a wind farm, environmental issues such as migratory bird paths, wildlife refuges, water protection areas, potential issues with noise pollution from turbines, flicker or the shadow cast from turbine blades, distance of turbine sites to roads and residences or occupied and unoccupied buildings. The list goes on. As with anything the devil is in the details. The time it takes for a wind energy project to go from concept to production can average at least five years. Once a site is proposed and data is gathered, estimates of annual energy production are made down to monthly and even hourly numbers. The layout of the wind farm is designed by engineers and then the approval process begins. Jacklitch‐Kuiken noted Public Service Commission, Fish and Wildlife Services and the community‐at‐large have to sign off on the project, land agreements need to be made, and turbine manufacturers get

involved to make sure the land and the design work with their turbines. “Everything is double and triple checked,” she said. Crossing all the Ts and dotting the Is can be daunting. Yet, according to Lauris Molbert, ’79, ’83, executive vice president and chief operating officer of  Otter Tail Corporation, a leader in local energy market, “We tip our hats to public policy in North Dakota because they’ve made it very business friendly. There’s a lot to get through but North Dakota is very embracing of getting it done. There are many other political environments where it isn’t nearly as friendly.” Otter Tail’s reach spans both the electric and manufacturing aspects of the energy industry. Specifically for wind, its operating company, DMI Industries, is recognized as a leader in wind energy tower production; and its operating company, Otter Tail Power Company, is believed to have the highest percentage of owned wind generation by a regulated utility in the nation. In the case of   North Dakota, perception is reality when it comes to being windy. North Dakota is the leading state for wind energy potential in the nation. In fact, according to American Wind Energy Assessment, Germany is the world leader in terms of installed wind power with over 22,000 megawatts (MW),


the area residents to manage the wind farm’s potential and economic benefit. It is the largest community‐owned wind energy development project in North Dakota. The first phase of the project could provide enough electricity to power nearly 44,000 homes. In 2008 Otter Tail Power Company purchased a site from M‐Power and began construction on a wind farm in May. It’s expected to be part of  the Luverne Wind Farm, a larger project built by NextEra Energy Resources with the ability to produce 169.5 MW. A leader in ownership of  wind energy by integrated utilities, Otter Tail partners with other energy companies in order to diversify its business and capitalize on opportunities. Molbert pointed out that while the company is large in the region, it is small nationally and internationally. To do big things, it needs to partner with others who can bring other expertise or resources to the table. “We’ve made a substantial investment in wind,” Molbert said. “We’re continuing to look at ways to leverage that.” He went on to say, “North Dakota is very fortunate because it has so much energy diversity between fossil fuels like oil and coal, and wind. And, it’s populated by hard workers and entrepreneurial thinkers. It’s a very big deal and North Dakota comes out well no matter which way energy policy goes – whether it’s greener or more carbon‐based energy.” The biggest hold up in the wind power business is storage. There aren’t any viable options for storing wind energy at this point, so what is produced needs to be used immediately. And, since wind varies from day to day, it’s difficult to rely on a set level of wind power. On any given day, there may not be enough wind to power what’s needed. On another, there may be more than enough. Without a way to store it the extra energy is wasted. Still, wind is one of   North Dakota’s growing industries with much potential yet to be opened. The strides that have been made have grown the industry from its research stage, much of which was done at UND’s Energy and Environmental Research Center, to its development stage. That shift has created jobs, and opened up opportunities for smaller communities, both economically and environmentally. According to Wind Power Monthly in January 2009, wind power shows as a strong global competitor to other energy sources such as coal, nuclear and gas. That case is well evidenced across our state. ■

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enough to power more than five million homes, yet it has only a fraction of the wind energy potential that North Dakota has. Turning opportunity into action, turbines have been installed over the last number of  years adding wind to the state’s energy production portfolio. North Dakota is currently the 13th largest producer in the U.S. According to a June 2009 Grand Forks Herald article there are 488 wind turbines operating in the state, producing roughly 715 MW of  electricity. That level of energy can power more than 205,000 homes. It was also noted that the Public Service Commission estimates output will increase to nearly 1,000 MW, or enough to power about 290,000 homes. State incentives have helped that capitalization. Ryan Rauschenberger, ’06, is deputy tax commissioner and former manager of energy development for the Department of Commerce. He has worked with energy companies, both generation and manufacturing, to lay out how the state is an attractive place to do business. Bridging both economic development and finance, Rauschenberger has been able to talk financing, tax incentives, workforce development, and regulatory information. Pointing out specific tax advantages, he said, “For wind and renewable energy generation, there is a three‐pronged tax approach: Sales tax exemption on any equipment used, an 85 percent reduction in property tax, enhanced income tax incentives and a 15 percent state income tax credit.” The credits were also expanded in North Dakota’s 2009 legislative session to span longer periods of time. “Developers say we are competitive,” he added, “because our state income tax isn’t high to begin with. We have an all‐inclusive approach where other states may rely on one tax arm, not all three.” In addition to projects currently online across the state, there are another 149.1 MW under construction. Companies that have developed wind farms in‐state include NextEra Energy Resources, Otter Tail Power Co., Acciona Energy, Distributed Generation Systems, and Global Renewable Energy Partners. And, one of the newer projects is a community‐owned wind farm partnership between Griggs and Steele Counties. Jacklitch‐Kuiken explains the idea came forth in the late 1990s. The counties put up a met tower to collect data and were designated a federal “empowerment zone.” M‐Power LLC was formed in 2006 by

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above: Close-up of  lignite coal right: Example of the land after strip-mining

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coal creek station, 50 miles north of Bismarck, is a nationally top‐performing power plant in terms of  reliability and cost‐efficiency. These are two characteristics by which, arguably, North Dakota is known as a whole. North Dakota’s reliability and frugal nature can be attributed to its low‐profile, hard‐working, sometimes underestimated residents. The state’s largest power plant, Coal Creek Station, is certainly not underestimated but its power source, lignite coal, just may be. Lignite, typically known as a brown coal, is considered the lowest rank of  coal, and is also a geologically younger coal. However, it is easier to convert into gas and liquid petroleum products than higher ranking coals. With recoverable reserves estimated at 25 billion tons, North Dakota has the single largest deposit of lignite in the world, according to the Lignite Energy Council. The North Dakota Geological Survey estimates that the state’s lignite reserves will last more than 800 years at current rates of consumption. This can mean great things for Coal Creek Station and for its owner and operating company, Great River Energy. “It provides our member cooperatives and their consumers with a huge advantage,” said Dave Saggau, ’86, ’89, president of  Great River Energy. “The plant is very large and very efficient, and the energy it produces comes to us at a fraction of  the cost of   building a new facility. And, it’s not by accident. We spend a tremendous amount of effort and money maintaining Coal Creek Station. That particular plant is our bread and butter, no question about it. I hope that facility runs for another 100 years.” The energy value of   North Dakota’s

tremendous lignite reserves is equal to almost three times the entire proved reserve of oil in the U.S. That says a lot for the state’s lignite industry, which mostly operates on the western half. The National Lignite Energy Council is based in North Dakota with the purpose of maintaining a viable lignite coal industry and to enhance the development of  the region’s lignite reserves to generate electricity, synthetic natural gas and valuable byproducts. “I’m guardedly optimistic,” said John Dwyer, ’73, president of the Lignite Energy Council, in terms of  the outlook for lignite in the state. “We have an affordable product and we are well‐positioned with expertise, production and manpower.” As the demand for more domestically produced energy increases, says Dwyer, the industry is working to attract companies to build coal‐conversion plants in the state using advanced technology. The Lignite Vision 21 partnership between the state of   North Dakota and the lignite industry is a method to accomplish this. Its premise is to encourage base‐load power plants and coal gasification projects that can produce synthetic natural gas and liquid fuels. Saggau commented, “Vision 21 will invest state dollars to improve energy resources in North Dakota. It is designed to help lessen the pain of studying or researching if a plant should be built and where, which is an expensive project to undertake. “North Dakota is so smart – it targets resources where they should be targeted. North Dakota helps companies get seed money to find out where the best investments are.” According to the industry, environmental concerns are at the forefront and new


an important role in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and combating climate change,” he said. To date, no field studies have been conducted on the ability of   lignite coal seams to store CO2. The field‐based investigations conducted will provide previously unavailable insight regarding the sequestration of CO2 in low‐rank coals. This insight can be broadly applied both within the region and more broadly, as low‐rank coal seams are known to occur throughout western North America. The Lignite Field Validation Test is one of four tests the partnership is conducting under the validation phase of the regional partnerships program. These four tests, plus two large‐volume sequestration tests that the PCOR Partnership is planning as part of the development phase of the partnerships program, have created more than 400 jobs that will continue through 2017. The PCOR Partnership is managed by the EERC and includes more than 90 public and private partners in all or part of nine states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Wyoming, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin) as well as four Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba). The Partnership is part of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Program. This type of responsible partnership between the energy industry and those monitoring the state of our environment is critical. In North Dakota, the Great Plains Synfuels Plant converts approximately 18,000

tons of   lignite into an average of  145 million cubic feet of synthetic natural gas each day. Competition between lignite and other sources of energy is another driving factor of the industry. In fact, Dwyer lists it as one of the industry’s main challenges in the future, saying, “We have to be competitive.” One of the ways to capitalize on opportunity against the competition is to be as efficient as possible through partnerships. Dwyer says that, “Utilities and mining companies in North Dakota are all integrated – they operate together. We can’t transport lignite so we have to use it here. We are best served by developing it in state and then shipping the energy out.” As a whole, the process is working well and the industry is growing. It has been tagged as the state’s fourth‐largest industry, employing 4,300 workers directly and nearly 24,000 indirectly. Some of the residual benefits of  this have played out financially, such as an estimated $100 million in total annual taxes in 2009 paid to the state. This type of  sustainable revenue has helped North Dakota remain economically strong. “North Dakota is very good to work with,” noted Saggau. “They really understand what we’re trying to accomplish – we need to build more resources to meet the demands. The state is very welcoming and fair with the way they deal with us [energy companies]. They try to understand our business as best they can and are generally supportive. The business climate is good for a company like us that invests hundreds of millions of dollars. This makes it an attractive place for us to build our large facilities. Plus, I’m from there!” ■

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technologies, such as ways to increase efficiencies and control emissions, are applied to all Lignite Vision 21 participants. Dwyer said, “The primary challenges are environmental; however, we’ve solved a lot of  the problems so far which makes me confident we can solve the carbon challenges we face, as well.” Lignite production in North Dakota has remained steady over the past 20 years, mining approximately 30 million tons annually. Lignite is produced via surface mining in North Dakota using processes approved by the Public Service Commission to ensure environmental and safety concerns. The opposite of tunnel mining, overlying soil and rock (commonly referred to as overburden) is removed, unearthing the coal. This type of mining is used for a number of reasons, which may include the coal being relatively close to the surface of the earth, or the earth around the coal being structurally unsuitable for tunneling. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of  1977 requires that reclamation of such mines occur in order to protect and rebuild the environment during and post production. Additionally, the North Dakota lignite industry is recognized as an industry leader for installing and operating emissions control technologies including electrostatic precipitators (air cleaner), scrubbers, spray dryers and baghouses (air pollution control equipment) to reduce particles and other emissions. Approximately $2 billion has been recently spent on environmental controls for existing plants. Looking to future coos, carbon sequestration is the buzz word of the industry. North Dakota’s Great Plains Synfuels Plant is a partner with Canadian oil companies in the world’s largest carbon capture and sequestration project. “The EERC’s Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership is a leader in assessing the northern Great Plains region for potential geological storage opportunities of carbon dioxide,” said EERC Senior Research Advisor Ed Steadman. “In 2007 the PCOR Partnership initiated a field‐based test in Burke County in northwestern North Dakota to evaluate the potential to simultaneously store CO2 and enhance natural gas from a lignite coal seam to demonstrate the economic and environmental viability of geologic CO2 storage in the U.S. Great Plains region. Ultimately, geologic carbon sequestration is expected to play

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North Dakota Energy Statistics As reported by Energy Information Administration, the Lignite Energy Council, American Wind Energy Association

ND Quick Facts

· Energy industry accounts for nearly one half of  the state’s total energy consumption. · Lignite is the state’s fourth largest industry behind agriculture, tourism and manufacturing. Oil/natural gas is ranked fifth.

Petroleum

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North Dakota oil output accounts for about two percent of the total U.S. crude oil production. North Dakota is an entrance point for Canadian crude oil transported via pipeline to Midwest refining markets. Oil is extracted from the Williston Basin, which covers eastern Montana, the western Dakotas and into Canada. A new refinery is proposed on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. If constructed, it would be the first new crude oil refinery in the U.S. in decades. Ethanol is produced at four ethanol plants with a fifth under construction.

Natural Gas

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North Dakota typically produces one percent of the nation’s natural gas production. North Dakota has the distinction of being one of the only two states that produce synthetic natural gas. The Great Plains Synfuels Plant in Beulah is the single largest source of  synthetic gas is the U.S. Over two-fifths of   North Dakota homes use natural gas as their primary source for home heating.

Coal, Electricity and Renewables

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Nearly all of  the electricity generated in North Dakota is produced by coal-fired power plants. Hydroelectric dams account for most of  North Dakota’s non-coal-generated electricity. North Dakota has the highest level of wind energy potential in the U.S. Nearly three-tenths of  North Dakota households use electricity as their primary source for home heating.


NEW FACES

dear alumni & friends, I have had a rare opportunity as a new president this past year: building an almost brand new, completely reconstituted leadership team for the University of   North Dakota. When I came on board in July, many in the key leadership positions were nearing retirement and others were looking for new opportunities. Since then, we have made a number of  adjustments, including conducting national searches for two vice presidential positions. In both cases, we had excellent candidate pools. And, in both cases, I am happy to announce I appointed UND graduates. Alice Brekke, ’79, ’87, is vice president for finance and operations. Brekke served as interim since Nov. 1, 2008. She has served as assistant to the President since 1998 and budget director since 1992. She was director of   budget and grants administration, 1993-1999, and director of grants and contracts, 1988‐1993. Prior to that, she was with the School of Engineering and Mines, 1983‐1988, where she served as an accountant, director of accounting, and assistant to the dean and director of  support services. She also served as an accountant for the UND Engineering Experiment Station, 1979‐1983. Brekke earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1979 and a Master of Accountancy in 1987. Both degrees are from UND. Her husband, David Brekke, earned his M.A. in geology from UND. Dr. Phyllis Johnson, ’71, ’76, is joining the team as vice president for research and economic development on Aug. 1. Johnson currently serves as a research associate with the Smithsonian Institute. Before that, she was the director of the Beltsville (Maryland) Area USDA Agricultural Research Service. She managed a broad range of research from entomology to genomics to remote sensing. She was responsible for a $135 million budget and a staff of 1,200, including more than 300 doctoral‐level scientists. Johnson is a Grafton, N.D., native who grew up in Grand Forks. She earned her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from UND in 1971, her 18

doctorate in physical chemistry from UND in 1976, and did postdoctoral work at the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. Her late husband, Robert S. T. Johnson, was also a UND alum. I will look to these two individuals, as well as the rest of  the leadership team, to help the University continue to refine its focus, particularly in the area of research. The University has a strong School of   Medicine and Health Sciences, especially in the areas of  neurosciences and family medicine, where our program routinely ranks as one of  the best in the nation. This issue of  the Alumni Review, with its focus on energy in North Dakota, illustrates why our internationally recognized Energy & Environmental Research Center will continue to do well. And, while we take great pride in our 15‐time championship flight team – which took top honors this May with a record score – we see enormous opportunities in the area of unmanned aerial systems. In short, the future of our University of   North Dakota continues to look bright. I encourage you to keep tabs on your alma mater. Check out our web site at www.und.edu, become a fan of  our Facebook page or our Twitter site. Marcia and I continue to be excited about the opportunities and even the challenges ahead. We are grateful to be part of  the University of  North Dakota. Best wishes,

Robert O. Kelley President


What’s New News from ARO

Vast Energy Runs Deep

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Campus

A Partnership with University Relations

UND researchers expand knowledge of state’s oil resource coal‐burning power plants and sequestering it below the earth’s surface. In the Bakken Formation, crude oil doesn’t exist in pools that gush to the surface when drilled into. Instead, the resource lies trapped in the pores of sedimentary rock. The ease with which the oil is brought to the surface depends largely on the depth and viscosity (stickiness) of the oil and the permeability of  the rock. Injecting CO2 into a well can extract oil that might otherwise be unrecoverable. “The mechanism for CO2 to produce oil has three different parts,” Zeng explains. “One is that just like water, it will increase the pressure. The second is that it will react with the sticky oil. Only a certain type of oil will work best. CO2 will dissolve part of the oil so it becomes less viscous. The third part is that because of  this reaction, the volume expands and increases pressure.” CO2 injection offers an attractive option for cont. on page 20

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capacity to run experiments for oil companies magine being in total darkness and trying to so that they don’t have to send samples out assemble an enormous jigsaw puzzle of state,” Zeng says. “We can also do our own containing thousands of  pieces while using research using these facilities and have a better nothing but a tiny flashlight for illumination. understanding of oil, gas and the geological In a way, that’s what Zhengwen (Zane) conditions in North Dakota.” Zeng, assistant professor in UND’s department An accurate 3D model of the Bakken of geology and geological engineering, and Formation, which covers western North his colleagues are doing. They’re creating a Dakota, northeastern Montana and southern three‐dimensional geologic model of the Saskatchewan, will not only enable drillers to oil‐bearing Bakken Formation of  the Williston increase their success rates in discovering oil, but Basin in western North Dakota. also provide answers about the best technologies It’s a daunting – but important – task to and methods to extract the oil in an efficient, construct a 3D picture of a geologic structure economical manner. that averages 80‐feet in thickness and is up to two For example, part of   Zeng’s research is miles beneath the earth’s surface last year. The studying the use of carbon dioxide (CO2) to U.S. Geological Survey estimated that the Bakken enhance oil recovery from the Bakken Formation. Formation holds as much as 4.3 billion barrels Because CO2, a greenhouse gas, is suspected of recoverable petroleum reserves, making it the of contributing to global climate change, there largest reserve in the lower 48 states. is interest in capturing the gas produced by “Sure! Sure!” Zeng enthusiastically responds when asked if North Dakota has more undiscovered oil reserves. “Some people say that we’re going to run out of oil,” “Some people say that we’re going to he continues. “That could be run out of oil ... with the development a concern after many years, of new technologies, previously but we still have a lot of  places that haven’t been explored unattractive reserves become attractive. ” yet. With the development of new technologies, previously unattractive reserves become attractive.” Renewed interest in North Dakota’s reserves has made it the fifth highest oil producing state in the nation. To help meet the increased demand for petroleum engineers, UND in 2006 started to establish a petroleum engineering program and later created a Center of Excellence for Petroleum Research, Education and Entrepreneurship “We’re building laboratory

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enhancing oil production while keeping the greenhouse gas locked underground where it can’t impact the earth’s climate. However, there are limitations on where the technique can be used. “The rock needs to have a certain level of permeability,” Zeng notes. “If it’s too low, you have to use some other type of technology. “If you use CO2 where the formation is too shallow, it will come back out,” he continues. “If it’s too deep, it will consume a lot of energy to inject the CO2, which means you’ll spend more money to recover a certain amount of oil. That’s why this method needs to be studied and investigated.” Without an adequate understanding of what lies beneath the surface, finding and extracting oil is largely a trial‐and‐error endeavor. A 3D model not only takes some of the guesswork out of the exploration process, but could also be used to run computer simulations that provide answers about the best extraction methods. So how does one go about creating a three‐dimensional picture of a geologic formation thousands of feet below ground that covers a 200,000‐square‐mile area? “Drilling is one technology that’s most direct, but it’s limited because you can see only a certain number of wells at a very high cost,” Zeng says. “We have seismic exploration that can help us to build an image of  the structure. There are some other tools we can use, such as well logging. This allows us to understand the structure around the well to a certain depth. “For our study, we have the North Dakota Geological Survey Core and Sample Library at UND,” he notes. “We look at the core samples, and we know the location of the well where it was drilled. We can use that to build our three‐dimensional model of  the structure. You have different points and then you connect them.” Zeng emphasizes that the 3D model could also be useful in helping North Dakota develop such “green” energy sources as geothermal. But, for the near future, the focus will be on helping North Dakota make the best use of a natural resource that’s made it the economic envy of the nation.    PATRICK C. MILLER 20

Energy Research: SUNRISE Exploring Practical Solutions

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or most of  the first part of   his career, Wayne Seames worked as a chemical engineer in Saudi Arabia for one of  the world’s biggest oil companies at the world’s largest crude oil refinery, ARAMCO’s Ras Tanura Refinery. “I sold my soul to ‘big oil’,” he jokes. These days, Seames spends much of his time in the lab at UND’s department of chemical engineering working in concert with other researchers from around the state to find practical ways of replacing oil with renewable fuels. A professor in chemical engineering and director of the Sustainable Energy Research Initiative and Supporting Education (SUNRISE) program, Seames’ combination of experience in industry, research and education provide a unique insight on energy issues. When it comes to solving the nation’s energy problems, he says, “There’s no magic bullet.” Although much of  Seames’ research focuses on finding a replacement for oil, he’s also studying how to use coal in a sustainable manner. “SUNRISE has three primary focus areas, and one of  the largest is working to make coal a long‐term, viable energy source by making it more environmentally acceptable,” Seames notes. “The second area,” he says, “is to take renewable sources – in our case, primarily oil seed crops and similar things like algae, waste and animal fats – and turn those into fuels, chemicals and polymers that replace products currently produced from petroleum.” While there have been many technologies developed to remove pollutants from coal – America’s most abundant fossil energy resource – to date, cost‐effective removal of all important pollutants has not been achieved, says Seames. One important barrier is the impact of trace metals and similar contaminants in coal on both the power generation equipment as well as major pollutant control systems. Seames and his coworkers are working on ways to better predict how these trace pollutants behave when coal is burned so that better controls can be developed. Recently they began studying how trace metals affect the capture and processing of  the carbon

dioxide coal emits when it is burned. Replacing Petroleum is a Top Priority

Finding a replacement for oil is a serious

challenge for a number of reasons. “If we don’t get on it right away, eventually we’re going to run out,” says Seames. “In the meantime, as we begin facing shortages, the price of anything that’s made from crude oil will make our recent price shock (when oil prices soared above $140 per barrel) look like nothing. That price shock was at least a contributor to our current recession.” The consequences of ever‐increasing oil prices will be felt around the world. “For those of  us living in the U.S., that’s going to mean making choices between things we have to have and some of  the discretionary things that we buy,” Seames says. “But in the third world, it’s going to lead to choices between people starving or freezing. When those things happen, environmental damage accelerates as people will collect anything that burns to provide heat. If you give somebody the choice between eating and polluting or not eating and not polluting, they’ll pollute every time. It will also likely lead to civil unrest,” he adds. There’s also the problem of  global climate change caused by the CO2 released from fossil fuels. “North Dakotans, in particular, need to come to grips with the fact that it is their best interest to mitigate global warming,” Seames believes. When it comes to national energy policy, there are positives and negatives. “The most exciting part about the stimulus package to me was the provision to upgrade the nation’s electrical infrastructure grid. That’s probably the single most important thing we can do,” Seames says. “Not only can we now put more energy generators in – with renewable ones such as wind – but we can also use the energy more efficiently,” he continues. “With the smart grid, they estimate that you can get 30 percent more energy from the existing system today with the way we’re generating it now. That’s huge.”


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On the negative side, Seames thinks that federal energy policy puts too much emphasis on finding a substitute for gasoline and not enough on replacing the other two major transportation fuels – diesel and jet fuel. “If we only reduced the amount of gasoline we need from crude oil, it wouldn’t matter very much,” he says. “We’d still use almost the same amount of crude oil. Because of  the basic chemical makeup of crude oil coming from the ground, all refineries must make a suite of products. The four basic products are chemicals that go into gasoline, kerosene, diesel, and fuel oil. What changes with different refinery configurations and different crude oil sources is the ratio of  the four basic products, but all are produced. So, if we only reduce gasoline, we’d still have to process almost as much crude oil because we have to make diesel. Our economy runs primarily on diesel. Similarly, if we only displaced diesel, we still couldn’t reduce oil use because there would be lines at the gas station. So you have to do all of  them,” says Seames. “What I’m most worried about is kerosene. I can see techologies being developed that can produce gasoline with electric vehicles or fuel equivalents (such as ethanol) from cellulosic plant material (like switchgrass or wood). I can also see the conversion of  a lot of  diesel power plants to other sources,” says Seames. “But most kerosene is used for jet fuel, which is the most challenging transportation fuel to make.  Jet fuel must have a very low freeze point and very high energy density. This is a difficult combination. To date, the only viable technologies are the conversion of  crop oils (and similar feedstocks like animal fats and algal‐based oils) or the conversion of coal (via a coals to liquids technology process). ” In addition, there are many chemicals

well‐positioned to help the U.S. and the world meet the challenge of producing energy in a sustainable, environmentally responsible manner. “We live in a state that’s blessed with a lot of  the answers,” Seames says. “There are areas of   North Dakota where geothermal energy is extremely attractive. We have the largest oil find in the last 40 or 50 years in the continental U.S. We have lots of  wind and we have abundant coal resources. For renewable fuels, we also have a lot of agricultural production capability that’s underutilized.” Through SUNRISE and other research occurring in the state, opportunities exist to produced by refineries from crude oil that must make an impact on how energy is produced and be taken into account. used. “We extract from crude almost all of  the “For the University of   North Dakota, one building blocks of  the polymers we use, tons of  the nice things is that we’ve been working in of commodity chemicals that go into virtually energy research almost as long as we’ve had an everything we do,” Seames says. “So it’s not just a engineering school here,” he notes. “It’s a strength matter of  replacing the fuel. We have to replace for us. We have a big role to play.” all those things. ” Seames believes that science will eventually Seames is realistic about the ability provide a solution that makes energy affordable of  renewable fuels to replace oil. for all and far less “The gap is so big that harmful to the we can’t possibly overcome environment. “We live in a state that’s blessed it with renewables,” he explains. “To do that, it with a lot of the answers,” Seames The third main focus area would require a major says. “There are areas of North for SUNRISE future transformation in Dakota where geothermal energy is harvesting how we do transportation.” energy from is extremely attractive. We have “In the meantime,” diffuse sources he says, “we can mitigate the largest oil find in the last 40 such as solar, those effects over the next or 50 years in the continental wind, and sound. 30 to 50 years until that U.S. We have lots of wind and we “The next magic transformation occurs with bullet, to me, renewables. We can ease the have abundant coal resources. pain. We can make it more For renewable fuels, we also have will come when somebody breaks of a gentle transformation. a lot of agricultural production the paradigm on As crude oil screams capability that’s underutilized.” solar energy and past $100 a barrel and figures out a way incentives grow again, these to concentrate it alternative technologies extremely efficiently,” he explains. will be commercially competitive. They, in turn, will help to alleviate the crude shortage and keep “We need to keep pressing forward. We have short‐term solutions and we have longer‐term the price of oil at most reasonable levels. But it is solutions,” Seames says. “Until we get all the important that these technologies be developed longer term solutions to where we can take now and be in place as the world’s economy energy from the sun and with some technology begins to recover and expand.” we can’t dream of  today, make that into a cheap, reliable energy source for everyone, we’re not North Dakota and UND Set to Be Energy there. In the meantime, we’ll need to keep Leaders developing new, innovative technologies for In terms of  research and energy resources, energy.”    Patrick C. Miller the good news for North Dakota is that it’s

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pictured, left to right: Autumn Dockter, Dr. Wayne Seames, and Swapnilkumar Gandhi examine biofuel samples.

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Tapping Mother Nature’s Warmth in North Dakota’s Oil Fields Geothermal promises lean, cheaper sustainable energy

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t’s relatively inexpensive, incredibly clean and leaves a minimal carbon footprint. And, did we tell you that this energy source is just about boundless? The really good news is that North Dakota’s geological setting makes it a good place to tap this source of energy with technologies being developed by a team of  researchers at UND. “Geothermal is one of the most efficient sources of  heating and cooling power available today, and it’s a very good way to generate electricity,” said Michael Mann, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of  Chemical Engineering and one of  the lead investigators in UND’s geothermal research. “The engineering here comes in because we’re taking hot water out of  the ground, extracting heat from it, and turning that energy into electricity.” Mann has spent his career developing cleaner, more efficient energy systems. He holds three patents on methods to minimize the environmental impacts of  burning coal. His latest efforts have focused on producing hydrogen from wind, and more recently, on producing electricity from geothermal energy. Mann is applying his experience in developing energy systems to help identify and deploy a geothermal system that is both reliable and economical. Basically, Mann said, geothermal‐based power generation works like a giant air conditioner in reverse: instead of cooling air, you’re using the geothermal energy to “boil” a fluid which turns into a high‐pressure vapor that turns a turbine. What you get at the other end is energy that flows into electrical outlets to power households, businesses, and

factories. According to Mann, one challenge for North Dakota geothermal is that the water in a few areas of  the Williston Basin comes up at temperatures that don’t quite reach the boiling point of 212 degrees Fahrenheit. “However, temperatures of  180 degrees Celsius (356 degrees Fahrenheit) can be found in the deeper regions of  the Williston Basin and temperatures greater than 90 degrees C (194 degrees F) occur widely in the basin,” said Will Gosnold, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor who chairs the department of geology and geological engineering. “The amount of  geothermal energy contained in oil‐ and gas‐producing sedimentary basins—such as the Williston Basin in North Dakota—is several orders of magnitude greater than the energy requirements of the U.S., but it is largely untapped,” said Gosnold, principal investigator and director of the UND Petroleum Research, Education and Entrepreneurship Center (PREEC). “One of  the key missions of  the Center is to bring about


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Geothermal Lessons in Your Morning Cup

commercial development of oil field geothermal energy,” Gosnold said. “And, that’s important because North Dakota is potentially a huge and very reliable source of  geothermal energy.” That doesn’t mean there aren’t other challenges. In the summertime in the Badlands, for example, air temperatures often reach the low 100s. “With geothermal energy, the bigger the temperature difference between the hot water and the fluid you’re using to capture the heat, the more efficient the system is,” Mann said. If  you’re using western North Dakota’s hot air as the medium to cool down your exchanger fluid, that poses a challenge—but not, Mann pointed out, an insurmountable one. “It’s going to take a little research.” Another potential problem is that often the water that comes up from North Dakota’s oil wells contains a lot of dissolved minerals and other substances that could gum up the heat exchanger, Mann said. “These dissolved solids produce corrosion and scale and shorten the lifetime of your system.” UND researchers are figuring out ways to work with new technology that makes the lower temperature water work more efficiently as an energy source, Mann said. “And we’re working to produce heat exchangers with enhanced metallurgy that will withstand corrosion and be much easier to service and maintain,” he said. The UND geothermal team also is looking at other challenges that have little to do with engineering. “We have to effectively understand all of  the costs and predict the financial benefits, and we need to understand the regulatory environment, which in some ways hasn’t caught up to what we’re doing,” Mann said. “That all takes very specialized expertise,

which we also have right on campus,” Mann said. A student intern from the Dakota Venture Fund—based at the UND Center for Innovation—is creating a financial model for geothermal energy power production. An energy and environmental expert from the UND School of   Law is working on the regulatory side of  the geothermal equation. Right now, UND’s geothermal team is assessing commercially available turbines, looking at optimum installation design for oil wells in western North Dakota and working to set up demonstration plants out there, Mann said. The actual turbines for these systems could fit on the back of a pickup truck. “There’s nothing fancy in a heat exchanger unit, other than size—they can be pretty big,” Mann said. Oil well‐based geothermal power generators could output 250 KW to 1 MW or more. The average U.S. household consumes close to 9,000 KW hours per year. “We’re basically setting up some tires to kick,” Mann said. “Ultimately, it all boils down to economics—can we make this profitable under current market conditions, and can we anticipate future power needs and future economic conditions. We’re looking to determine which equipment will do the best job in the most economical way.” Gosnold concludes that North Dakota geothermal is a potentially superb energy resource. “All alternatives (to fossil fuels) should be explored, but my favorite is geothermal,” Gosnold said. “We have an enormous untapped resource that could replace much of the fossil fuel that we use. Generation of electrical power using co‐produced fluids from oil wells has great potential to be a significant, sustainable, and environmentally green energy resource. ”      juan pedraza

UND President Robert Kelley Appointed to National Energy Panel UND President Robert O. Kelley has been appointed to a prestigious 15-person Energy Initiative Advisory Committee by the Washington, D.C.based Association of Public and Landgrant Universities (APLU). “Clearly, this appointment underscores our stated commitment to maximize and advance the contributions of UND as a public research university to the country's energy independence effort,” said Kelley. “UND also has pledged to do its part to curb global warming by committing to the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment,’” Kelley said. “And we are already in the active process of finding ways to dramatically reduce our own contributions to greenhouse gases.” You can find out about some of the things UND is already doing at www. und.edu/greenandclean/. By signing the President’s Climate Commitment, UND set in motion the process for achieving climate neutrality over the next several years, Kelley said. For UND, there’s a secondary, but likewise vital, consequence of reducing the University's energy usage, Kelley said. “We want to reduce energy costs and thus operating costs,” he said. As part of its long-term energy efficiency strategy, UND is committed to establishing a policy by which all new campus construction will be built at least to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEEDs silver standard or its equivalent, Kelley said.    23

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Consider a cup of hot coffee: it’s hot one minute, not so hot the next. What’s going on? The heat in the coffee is transferring to the cooler surrounding air (or to your hand, which also is cooler than hot coffee, if you’re holding the cup). Why? Because the basic physics of the universe tells us that heat always goes from a hotter zone to a cooler zone; and the bigger the difference in temperature between the two, the faster the heat “exchange.” For example, when it’s zero degrees outside, toss the hot coffee into the air: the heat in that coffee will almost instantly move to the surrounding air, and the sudden loss of heat from the liquid coffee transforms it into a mini-snow storm of frozen coffee droplets! That’s the process UND researchers are trying to capture—in a contained, controlled fashion—from the Earth’s own heat blanket in the form of geothermal energy, fueled by a multi-billion year old process deep within the Earth’s core.


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EERC Commercializing Cutting-Edge Technologies

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he International Center for Applied Energy Technology at UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center is commercializing several groundbreaking EERC‐developed technologies with a strong focus on furthering economic development in North Dakota and the region. The EERC is committed to moving technologies out of the laboratory and into the commercial marketplace, said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. “We are internationally recognized for our applied energy and environmental research programs, which translate to a never‐ending stream of commercialization opportunities,” said Groenewold. “We do not do fundamental research. Every program, and every contract, is derived with the intent of answering critical questions and/or developing technology that has economical, practical applications in the marketplace.” The following is a selection of current commercial opportunities from the EERC’s numerous applied research programs.

Renewable Jet Fuel and Diesel

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The EERC is the first enterprise in the world to produce 100 percent renewable jet fuel and diesel from crop oils through its Advanced Tactical Fuels Program, with support from several government and private entities. The fuels are essentially identical to their petroleum‐derived counterparts, providing a pathway to energy security for the U.S. military and the entire nation. The EERC is working with Tesoro Companies, Inc., of San Antonio, Texas , on a $1 million project to evaluate renewable oil‐refining technologies for commercial production of diesel, jet, and other fuels and chemicals from North Dakota oilseed crops, such as crambe, at Tesoro’s Mandan, N.D. , oil refinery. Crambe is a drought‐tolerant oilseed crop with demonstrated viability throughout western North Dakota and the surrounding region. Unlike soybeans, canola and other oilseeds, crambe produces an industrial (non‐food‐grade) oil and costs less to plant, fertilize and grow. Unlike biodiesel and ethanol, the EERC technologies convert crop oils to renewable fuels that are essentially indistinguishable from their petroleum‐derived counterparts and may be commingled directly with refinery production and transported to consumers through the existing pipeline system. The project is made possible by the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC), with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Tesoro Vice President of Refining and Mandan Refinery Manager John Berger said, “We are proud to be directly involved in partnering with the EERC in this promising project, which has the potential to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from transportation fuels while supporting the local economy and providing an opportunity for North

Dakota farmers to produce crops that can be processed into renewable fuels,” said Berger. “We appreciate the fact that our partners at NDIC see the value of this project and have pledged their support,” said Groenewold. “The people at Tesoro are also great partners because, like us, they want to see renewable fuels (that are compatible with the existing transportation fuel infrastructure) move out of the laboratory and into the commercial marketplace, and they are willing to leverage their resources to help make it happen.” According to Rick Weyen, Tesoro vice president, development‐North America, Tesoro is interested in commercial production of renewable fuels that work with existing Tesoro products and distribution networks, do not increase food prices, and are environmentally benign. “Our role in the project is to provide technical support to the EERC in evaluating technologies and designing a process demonstration facility that would be fully integrated with our existing production capabilities,” Weyen said. Hydrogen On-Demand Fueling System

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued the EERC Foundation an allowance for a patent application on a system that produces high‐pressure hydrogen on demand. The final patent will be approved in the very near future. The EERC technology converts alcohols and liquid fuels, such as ethanol, methanol, and gasoline, to high‐pressure hydrogen at the time of fueling. Utilizing this state‐of‐the‐art process, the prohibitive costs of nationwide hydrogen transportation and storage will be eliminated so hydrogen refueling will be accessible and affordable. The hydrogen is produced on‐site, on‐demand at the fuel pump, rather than at a separate location. “Through the hydrogen programs at the EERC, we are breaking down barriers, bringing down the costs and shortening the timetable to the point where hydrogen will be a major component of our national energy future,” Groenewold said. “The high‐pressure hydrogen production technology is a


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Tesoro Companies, Inc., refinery in Mandan, N.D.

cornerstone technology for achieving those goals.” This technology is a cornerstone for the EERC’s proposed U.S.–Israel Hydrogen Fueling and Fleet Demonstration, which intends to demonstrate hydrogen as a fuel for transit buses in North Dakota and Tel Aviv, Israel. The EERC is currently seeking federal co-funding for that project. Tom Bechtel, EERC Foundation Board President and the Principal at TFB Consulting Services in New Bern , N.C. , said, “The EERC Foundation board of directors is extremely proud of this milestone. It is a marvelous example of the ever‐increasing portfolio of EERC technologies the Foundation is bringing to commercial deployment.” The technology is being commercialized for both civilian and military applications. Industrial applications will provide near‐term commercial opportunities for North Dakota in manufacturing and cold‐weather testing. Ongoing research in the EERC’s National Center for Hydrogen Technology, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and over 85 corporate partners, has proved the conversion of liquid fuels into hydrogen is technically, logistically, and economically possible for use within the world’s transportation industry. Distributed Biomass Energy Systems

Many agricultural and other biomass residues have a high energy value; however, this value is lost as they are transported off‐site at a disposal cost. The EERC is working with Aboriginal Cogeneration Corporation (ACC), based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, to commercialize an EERC‐developed system to convert used railroad ties to heat and power in environmentally friendly ways. ACC is working to install two 1‐megawatt commercial clean power systems at its demonstration site northeast of Vancouver at Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada. “This is a real breakthrough in technology,” said Nikhil Patel, project manager and research scientist at the EERC. “Railroad ties treated with

creosote are some of the most difficult biomass feedstocks to process safely because they contain significant amounts of coal tar. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has placed severe restrictions on the disposal of the railroad ties because the tar can be harmful to humans,” he said. The EERC, in conjunction with ACC, has reached a major milestone in generating power from waste ties via a proprietary EERC process that meets the stringent environmental regulations of British Columbia. The EERC process also reduces emissions to well below U.S. federal regulations. “With 25 million used railway ties a year being disposed of in North America, an environmentally challenged material can now be converted into clean green energy,” said Maurice Hladik, CEO of ACC. “Another priority opportunity exists for the 100‐plus native communities on diesel‐powered generators. Sustainable quantities of locally harvested wood can be utilized to replace the very costly diesel at a substantial savings in energy costs, plus provide meaningful employment opportunities. In addition, the heat generated could be used in a variety of value‐added commercial applications.” Groenewold says the potential applications for this technology are endless. “This is going to open a lot of doors for the clean utilization of many other renewable fuels and waste products for the production of heat and power throughout the world,” he said. The EERC’s power system, which has been under construction for about two months, can process about 35‐40 pounds of fuel an hour. The railroad ties are chipped before being fed into the system. The system operates at a much lower pressure and flow rate compared to other systems of this type, making it much easier to operate and integrate with other commercially available technologies for generating heat and power. This same technology can be applied to numerous biomass feedstocks, such as agricultural residues and wood wastes and, as such, has a very large global market. As local communities, corporations, and farmers seek to lower operational costs and revenues, utilization of biomass residues provides an economically attractive solution for producing on‐site heat and power. The first commercial demonstration of this technology is planned for next year in British Columbia. Mercury Control Solutions

In addition to commercializing renewable energy technologies, the EERC is also working on a wide variety of technologies in advanced power systems and emission control. The EERC is working with RLP Energy, Inc. (Grand Forks), the latest company to collocate its corporate offices at the EERC, to provide customized mercury control solutions to electric utilities. RLP is a U.S. energy technology firm with offices in Canada and the United States that brings emission‐related products to the commercial marketplace. RLP is working with the EERC to commercialize a patented mercury control technology that is held by the EERC Foundation. “Mercury control is one of the major global challenges associated with the development of clean coal technologies,” said EERC Associate Director for Research Tom Erickson. “The EERC has more than 15 years of expertise in capture and control of mercury from coal‐fired power plants, and this partnership is a culmination of several state‐of‐the art mercury control technologies we are commercializing,” he said. The technology that is being evaluated has shown great promise in meeting mercury removal challenges with better economy, leading to cleaner air for future generations.    DEREK WALTERS

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Nikhil Patel, research scientist, is the project manager and developer of the system that produces electricity from scrap railroad ties, one of several cuttingedge technologies being commercialized by the EERC.

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UND Medical School Ranks #1 for Grads Choosing Family Medicine The UND School of  Medicine and Health Sciences is the top medical school in the country for producing family medicine physicians, according to rankings released by the American Academy of  Family Physicians (AAFP). Ranking first among the country’s 126 accredited medical schools, UND earned the Achievement Award from the AAFP, which recognizes outstanding efforts to foster student interest in family medicine and produce graduates who enter the specialty. Based on a three‐year average, for the period ending October 2007, more than 20 percent of   UND’s graduates have entered an accredited family medicine residency program. The overall U.S. match rate for family medicine this year is 7.4  percent, according to the AAFP. “We are very pleased to be recognized as the nation’s most effective medical school in encouraging students to pursue the specialty of  family medicine,” said Joshua Wynne, MD, MBA, MPH, senior executive vice president for health affairs and interim dean of the UND medical school. “We are working hard to address North Dakota’s need for physicians and other health care workers, especially those in the field

of  family medicine.” The UND medical school has several unique programs designed to educate students about the benefits of  family medicine. The nationally recognized Rural Opportunities in Medical Education (ROME) program places third‐year medical students in several rural communities in North Dakota for a seven‐month rotation. Over 60 percent of  ROME students select primary care residency training after earning their medical degree, compared to 36 percent of students in the traditional program. For more than 15 years, the Students/ Resident Experiences and Rotations in Community Health (SEARCH) program has provided health profession students an opportunity to spend a month working in interdisciplinary teams in rural North Dakota communities. The AAFP Top Ten Achievement Awards recognize medical schools for the exceptional role in advocating for the specialty of family medicine. These awards were created to promote the goal of having more U.S. medical school graduates enter family medicine each year.   

UND to Offer In-state Tuition to all Qualified U.S. Armed Forces Veterans Beginning this summer, the University of North Dakota will offer U.S. Armed Forces veterans a University education at a cost equivalent to the tuition charged to in-state residents. President Kelley approved the tuition-waiver program for all UND students and prospective students who have earned veteran status as defined by the North Dakota Century Code. The action allows student veterans to attend classes and be billed the same tuition as North Dakota residents, regardless of state of residency. “I can’t think of many things more selfless and deserving of our gratitude than asking someone to serve their country,” said Kelley. “The University of North Dakota’s new Veteran Tuition Waiver program is our way of saying ‘Thank you!’ to these men and women who put personal pursuits on hold and put themselves on the line for the entire nation.”   

Dean’s Corner

Odegard School Flying High

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The year 2009 has been another year of successes for the Odegard School. It began with the award of our first National Championship for our Aerobatic Flying Team. This was followed by our Flying Team winning its 15th NIFA National Championship in the past 25 years. This was followed by a major contract award from the Kingdom of  Saudi Arabia, expansion of  the international programs, and the return of  the Norwegian Air Traffic Control training. Our core focus, as always, is on the undergraduate student population across the entire Odegard School, which continues to grow. As we do this, we continue to strengthen our academic reputation. Over the course of  the past nine years we have gone from four academic departments with three offering master’s degrees to five departments all offering master’s degrees and four offering Ph.D.s. We now offer a Bachelor of Science with a major in unmanned aerial systems and are building an undergraduate degree program in environmental studies. Our grants and contracts for research have grown to more than $10 million each year and lead

all academic colleges at UND. To top it off, we have three standing Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors–Leon Osborne, Mike Poellot and Mike Gaffey–the highest academic honor the University bestows on its faculty members. Additionally, the flight line continues to flourish. The U.S. Military Academy cadets from West Point were here this summer along with a national contingent of Army ROTC cadets; the first of  three classes of  26 helicopter pilots from the Kingdom of  Saudi Arabia are enrolled in language courses here at UND as a lead‐in to their flight training. And, our air traffic control program remains number one of all collegiate training as rated by the FAA. Please plan to visit. There is a lot to see. Sincerely,

Bruce A. Smith, Ph.D. Dean, John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences


Statement Regarding Settlement with the NCAA Over Use Of UND’s Nickname, Logo

dear alumni community: On, Thursday, May 14, the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education passed the following unanimous motion: “Consistent with the terms and conditions of the October 26, 2007 Settlement Agreement entered into with the NCAA, the Board directs UND officials to retire the ‘Sioux’ nickname and logo, effective October 1, 2009. Full retirement of the nickname and logo shall be completed no later than August 1, 2010. In the event a new nickname and logo is adopted by UND, they shall not violate the NCAA policy regarding Native American nicknames, mascots and imagery. UND is further directed to undertake actions consistent with the Settlement Agreement to protect its intellectual property rights in the ‘Fighting Sioux’ nickname and mark. UND is further directed to address the imagery at Ralph Engelstad Arena and other venues pursuant to the terms, conditions and timelines set forth in the Settlement Agreement. This directive shall be suspended, if, prior to October 1, 2009 the following should happen: 1. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe and the Spirit Lake Sioux tribe give namesake approval consistent with the terms of the Settlement Agreement; and 2. The namesake approval be binding upon the tribes for a period not less than thirty (30) years.”

student‐athletes as scholars. I want to be clear that I believe our athletes and our athletic teams – athletic directors, coaches and related staff – have used the nickname and logo with great honor and respect, and with a tremendous sense of pride. Many alumni and fans have been staunch supporters of our athletic programs, and many have been proud of the nickname and logo. Among those was Ralph Engelstad, a former UND hockey goalie, who, with his wife, Betty, made many gifts to UND and built a magnificent arena that bears his name. We appreciate their legacy of generous support, which continues through The Engelstad Family Foundation and the management team of the Ralph Engelstad Arena. Now is the time for all of us – no matter what our previous or current position – to come together for the benefit of the University, for our students, and for our student athletes. If an agreement is not reached with the Standing Rock Sioux and the Spirit Lake Sioux Tribes prior to Oct. 1, I will call on ALL members of the University community – both on and off campus – to work with me, administrators, faculty, staff and students, to create new traditions based on our continued and shared vision of academic and athletic excellence and success. Sincerely,

Robert O. Kelley President

for updates on this and all und news, visit www.und.edu

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We are mindful that there is a nearly 80‐year tradition with our nickname and related logos. We honor that tradition, which has brought us national honor and distinction, as well as national championships and an outstanding record of

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Donors Positioning Students for Energy Leadership Ἅ l u m n i R e v i e w  w w w . u n d a l u m n i . o r g

by Wendy Honrath

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When you first step onto UND’s campus you can feel a buzz of excitement in the air. It might be from the energetic voices of returning students and faculty, from the nervous anticipation felt by freshmen taking their first steps into a collegiate way of   life or from some of  the new programs being developed. This year the buzz is radiating from the new cooperative programs dealing with energy the School of  Engineering and Mines is developing in conjunction with other departments and schools around campus. This buzz wouldn’t be felt if  it weren’t for generous donations made by friends and graduates of  the University. This fall the School of  Engineering and Mines (SEM) is offering undergraduate students a new concentration in sustainable energy, and, if everything goes as planned, UND will be launching its sustainable energy


Fou n dation Ne ws

engineering master’s program as early as spring 2010. In the forefront of  everyone’s thoughts is what is best for the students and Chemical Engineering Chair Michael Mann, Ph.D., ’88, ’97, believes this program is a huge potential for undergrads. He knows this concentration will open up doors for students as jobs specifically geared toward energy are beginning to emerge in all fields of  industry. You don’t have to be an engineering student to receive a concentration in sustainable energy; students studying fields in political science, social sciences, economics, business, and law are encouraged to learn more about energy if  they feel it will help them in their future careers. Along with the new sustainable energy concentration and the sustainable energy engineering master’s program, UND is planning to add a doctoral program in engineering with an energy track. The program will develop professional and personal skills through multidisciplinary activities, allowing students to understand the ethical, political and economical impacts of  their research developments and policies, and improve their abilities to communicate about complex technical subjects in both professional and general settings. Last year UND added the Jodsaas Center, adjacent to Harrington Hall. The Jodsaas Center was funded from a generous donation made by Larry Jodsaas, ’62, and is used to link the SEM and College of  Business and Public Administration. Mann says, “It is more than just a building; it’s a concept.” The link between these two areas of campus is just a start and with this concept in mind, Mann is trying to maximize the amount of exposure energy can get through different programs around campus. The SEM recently received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy.  A portion of  the grant money was used to purchase two new labs, and $70,000 was spent on new equipment to give students and researchers the best and most up‐to‐date technologies and to improve the learning environment. Edward Dillman, a current student in mechanical engineering, is excited about the new equipment. “One machine for the over‐the‐head mill table is worn out and not accurate,” he said. “New tools allow you to be more accurate on making parts and help you to be more efficient. It really makes a difference when you are out in the field. It has really helped me out at Dakota Gasification Company.” [see photo] Dillman has received three scholarships through the engineering school: the Ulteig Engineers Scholarship, John F. Dillon III Mechanical Engineering Award, and the William F. and Inez L. McDonald Endowment. He is grateful for these scholarships. Without them, he says he would have had to take out more student loans and had the additional pressure of 

worrying about how to pay them back. Dillman is currently doing his cooperative education project over the summer in Beulah, N.D., at the Dakota Gasification Company, an energy company that produces natural gas. Previously, he was a student worker within the engineering department. “I don’t have time for another job. So, the scholarships helped me out and cut down on my stress levels. College is hard enough without having to worry about money.” Programs and scholarships wouldn’t be available without grants and generous donations made through the UND Foundation by friends and graduates. People like Sidney Bjorlie, ’73, who makes donations through the UND Foundation because he has good memories of   his time on campus, specifically of  geology field trips he went on during the spring. Bjorlie was able to go to places like Utah, Wyoming and, according to Bjorlie, “wherever the snow wasn’t.” Bjorlie says, “It is critical to get hands‐on training. Getting to see structures and sites up close is important. You can only do so much from an arm chair.” In the past fiscal year, 715 people donated over $293,000 to the SEM. For the 2009-10 school year the UND Foundation was able to authorize over $178,000 for engineering scholarships. Jedidiah Lee Johnson, a freshman going into chemical engineering, is also receiving a scholarship this year from donations made through the UND Foundation.  Johnson had looked at many other places before settling on UND. Not only was he impressed by the beauty of  campus but was grateful that a faculty member took him through the buildings dedicated to the School. Throughout his time at UND, Johnson will be taking several classes relating to energy and is excited about the idea of  working not only with the SEM, but also with other departments around campus. Johnson, like Dillman, is also appreciative for the scholarship money he was given. When asked about receiving his scholarship Johnson states, “This scholarship is helping me achieve my dream of chemical engineering. I can’t express enough how much it means to me. Thank you again for your generosity and believing in students like me.” Yes, energy education has come to campus and with it a buzz of excitement is in the air. New programs and concentrations are vital to keeping UND at the top of its game and making sure it is competitive with other colleges. None of  this would be possible without the generous donations made by friends and graduates. Donations impact students while they are on campus and also help students become high caliber graduates who are well versed in their knowledge of energy. Without donor support, the University of   North Dakota wouldn’t be poised to be a leader in energy research and education like it is today. ■

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Current UND student Edward Dillman works on a steam turbine during his cooperative education project at Dakota Gasification Company in Beulah, N.D.

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Ἅ l u m n i R e v i e w  w w w . u n d a l u m n i . o r g

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How secure is your nest egg? With a gift annuity, you can support UND and receive fixed income for life. • Payouts based on age • Tax-free income portion • Partial charitable deduction • UND students benefit with more scholarships awarded and enhanced academic and extracurricular programs For more information on creating a charitable gift annuity, please visit www.undfoundation.org or call Dave today at 1-800-543-8764..


Ἅ l u m n i N e ws

Alumni Class News

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Find out what your classmates are doing now!

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Photo courtesy of Elwyn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections/Chester Fritz Library.

School spirit for the Nickel Trophy has run deep throughout the years as a source of great pride for the football team and the student body. Members of the team hoisted a co-ed, showing off their enthusiasm for winning the big game. Are you in this photo or do you recognize anyone who is? If so, we’d love to hear from you. Send an e-mail to alumnireview@undalumni.net, or call 800 . 543 . 8764.


Ἅ l u m n i N e ws

Remember when, in 1950, the first ID cards were issued on campus? Today ID cards provide access to library resource materials, entrance to athletic events and dining services, and can be used as debit cards to make purchases on campus.

This photo was featured in the Summer Alumni Review. Sorority sisters Mary Lou (Anderson) Markham-Coulter, ..’66, and Vicky Streu, ’68, hang around outside their Tri‐Delta house at UND with Beta Theta Pi fraternity member Don McKenzie, ’69. Many Tri-Delta women wrote in fondly remembering their sisters including Mary herself !

Jim Carrigan, ’53, HON ’97, was honored with the Pursuit of Justice Award by the American Bar Association Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section. The award recognizes lawyers and judges who have shown outstanding merit and who excel in providing access to justice for all. Jim currently serves as an elected fellow of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers, is an advocate of the American Board of Trial Advocates and is on the board of the Metropolitan Football Stadium Commission. He and his wife, Beverly, live in Boulder, Colo.

··························· 1960s Remember when, in 1967, canoe racing was added as a new and popular division of the Greek Games?

Tim Gust, ’60, ’62, ’64, delivered a presentation at the Skalicky Tech Incubator at the UND campus. He is a clinical psychologist and rehab counselor with the County of Los Angeles. Tim and his wife, Alice, reside in Los Angeles.

Victor Hruby, ’60, ’62, was named to the New England Peptide Scientific Advisory Board. He previously served as president of the American Peptide Society. Victor and his wife, Patricia, reside in Tucson, Ariz.

··································· 1964

Donald Cameron, ..’64, has retired from his work as an information technology consultant in California. He and his wife, Joan, have retired to Lake Metigoshe, N.D.

··································· 1966

Gordon Henry, ’66, ’70, received the Alumni Achievement Award from UND’s College of Education and Human Development. He served UND for 14 years as vice president of student affairs until his retirement in 1998. Gordon and his wife, Patricia (O’Brien), ’67, ’68, live in Grand Forks.

··································· 1968

John Gasparini, ’68, ’71, is an arena consultant for JLG Architects, in Grand Forks, where he and his wife,  Kathleen (Nelson) ’70, live.

··························· 1970s Remember when, in 1972, the Chester Fritz Auditorium was formally

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1950s

Please send your news to alumnireview@undalumni.net

Greek life at UND celebrates 100 years in 2009. Since the first days of Sigma Chi back in 1909, fraternities and sororities have been a vibrant part of our campus and home to nearly 10 percent of the student body. In that time, Greek life members have served on Student Government, research projects, athletic teams, service groups, and more. We proudly salute UND’s six sorority and 12 fraternity chapters in this milestone anniversary year. Each Greek life member in this section is denoted with this column.

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dedicated? The ‘Fritz’ is still the largest and finest facility of its kind between the Twin Cities and Seattle. Lynn Coles, ’70, left the consulting engineering business and returned to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as a senior engineer to assist in integration of wind and other renewable technologies into power transmission networks. He and his wife, Elizabeth, reside in Longmont, Colo.

··································· 1971

Larry Klundt, ’71, ’80, ’94, received the Alumni Achievement Award from the UND College of Education and Human Development. He is an educational consultant, providing services in

conflict resolution and strategic planning. Larry and his wife, Patricia, live in Bismarck. John Mohn, ’71, was named executive vice president at Ideal Aerosmith. He will lead the senior management team and continue to oversee financial and human resource functions. John and his wife, Kathleen, live in Grand Forks.

··································· 1972

Rick Wilson, ’72, received the Alumni Achievement Award from UND’s College of Education and Human Development. He is associate coach with the National Hockey League’s Dallas Stars. Rick and his wife, Carol, reside in Coppell, Texas.

···································

1973

Sharon (Porter) Ericson, ’73, ’80, received the 2009 Outstanding Rural Health Professional Award at the Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health. She is the chief executive officer of Valley Community Health Centers. Sharon resides in Northwood, N.D. Dennis Hoffer, ’73, has retired after 34 years of teaching at Williston High School. He has also coached the high school’s football and basketball teams. Dennis and his wife, Laurey (Huenink), ..’73, live in Williston, N.D. Gregory Page, ’73, was named Big Brothers Big Sisters of America Board Chair. He has been a Big Brother to two “Littles,” and joined the national board in 2005. Greg is chairman and chief executive officer of Cargill. He and his wife,

Cynthia (Chally), ’75, live in Wayzata, Minn. Jerry Rose, ’73, was named by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce to chair the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award. Jerry is corporate vice president of Cargill and serves on Cargill’s internal Business Excellence Committee. He and his wife, Gloria (Lemon) ..’73, live in Eden Prairie, Minn.

··································· 1974

Dale Erickson, ’74, ’75, ’78, was promoted to vice president tax, downstream for Royal Dutch Shell plc. He and his wife, Joanne, live in London.

··································· 1975

Bruce Haskins, ’75, has been inducted into the North Dakota Amateur Basketball Hall of Fame. He has played in 30 state amateur tournaments and named to the All‐State team five times. Bruce and his wife, Margo, live in Minot, N.D.

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Dorie (Benesh) Refling, ’75, formed the Refling Law Group PLLC. She specializes in construction law and related litigation. Dorie and her husband, Paul, ’74, reside in Bozeman, Mont.

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···································

snapshot Rosalie (Foogman) Schmitz, class of 1935, cheered with fellow Fighting Sioux fans in Williston, N.D., this summer. Area residents got their chance to meet Head Coaches Mussman, Roebuck and Hakstol, and Athletic Director Brian Faison at the Williston Elks Club. Pictured from left, Football Head Coach Chris Mussman, Women’s Basketball Head Coach Gene Roebuck, Rosalie (Foogman) Schmitz, ’35; and Men’s Hockey Head Coach Dave Hakstol.

1976

Danette (Braun) Coles, ’76, is a customer service representative at Alerus Financial. She and her husband,  Kevin, ’79, live in Northwood, N.D. James Ormand, ’76, is executive director of The Rescue Connection,


Ἅ l u m n i N e ws Please send your news to alumnireview@undalumni.net

a community‐based nonprofit organization. He and his wife, Julie, reside in Medord, Ore.

··································· 1977

Mark Lambrecht, ’77, is senior project manager with Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services. Mark and his wife, Vickie, ’03, ’04, ’05, live in Grand Forks.

··································· 1978

Hal Adams, ’78, is chief operating officer at Accord Technology LLC. Adams has over 35 years of civil and military aerospace and avionics experience. He and his wife, Cathleen, reside in Phoenix, Ariz.

Sioux vs. Bison: A global connection

··························· 1980s

David, ’70, and Gay (Shemorry) Williamson, ’69, and family were in Ecuador this summer. They happened to bump into a young man in a Bison shirt, whose brother had attended NDSU. All the while their son, Peter, was proudly donning his Fighting Sioux hockey shirt. The ties that run deep in the Red River Valley formed a fun global connection.

Daryl Evavold, ’80, was named investment representative of Investment Centers of America. He and his wife, Cindy (Schroeder), ’87, reside in East Grand Forks, Minn. Ron Palczewski, ’80, was promoted to bank president at Dakota Western Bank. He currently serves on Dakota Western Bank’s board of directors and has an active membership in the Bowman Chamber of Commerce, Bowman Boosters, Ducks Unlimited, and Pheasants Forever. He and his wife, Sheila, reside in Bowman, N.D.

Robert Sannerud, ’80, was elected to serve on the Minnesota Society of Certified Public Accountants board of directors. He is the chief financial officer of LifeLink III in Minneapolis. He and his wife, Kim ( Janke), ’81, reside in Edina, Minn.

··································· 1983

Kevin Lorenz, ’83, was named a Top 50 Surgeon for 2008 by Sightpath Medical. He serves as an eye surgeon at The Eye Clinic of North Dakota. Kevin and his wife, Teresa, reside in Bismarck. Selma (Tveit) Sticha, ’83, earned the designation Certified Nurse Educator after completing a certification examination administered by the National

League for Nursing. She and her husband, Monte, reside in Dickinson, N.D. Steven Synhorst, ’83, was hired by Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson as the senior engineer in the company’s airports group in Fargo, where he resides.

Dakota Mental Health Counselors Association with the Outstanding Mental Health Counselor Award. She is currently the director of counseling and human resources/ Title IX officer at Valley City State University. Erin and her husband, Melvin, ..’84, reside in Valley City, N.D.

··································· ··································· 1985

Joseph Bialke, ’85, ’87, ’91, was promoted to the rank of colonel with the United States Air Force. He is the deputy judge advocate for United Nations Command and United States Forces Korea. He and his wife, Kathryn (Berge), ’87, reside in O’Fallon, Ill. Erin (Elsperger) Klingenberg, ’85, was recognized by the North

1986

Lunette Lipp Sando, …’86, is a sales associate at NorthWest Realty Group LLC. She and her husband, Todd, ’84, live in Mandan, N.D.

··································· 1987

Gregory Bowen, ’87, ’04, is commander of the 100th Missile Defense Brigade, a ground‐based

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Remember when, in 1983, Gillette Hall, a dormitory, was renamed Noren Hall after Ruth A. Noren, former chief nurse at UND’s Student Health Service?

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bishop loves und

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by Amanda Hvidsten

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Lieutenant Colonel Lewis Bishop, ’86, is serving his first deployment to Iraq. On June 4, he called in to the Alumni Association to talk about his experiences thus far. “It is what I expected it to be. There are long days working in an office environment,” he said. “I have not yet had any cultural experiences because of where I’m located. I don’t have a lot of interaction with the local community yet. I hope to get to Baghdad in the next month or so and interact with the Iraqis themselves.” In total his deployment should last 12 months – he spent an initial three months at Fort Lewis in Washington and will be in Iraq for nine months. “My role in Iraq right now is to help long-range aviation planning,” Bishop said. “Aircraft numbers, what types of missions we’ll be doing, and how we’re going to support the areas we’re in.” Jokingly he mentioned the one similarity of Iraq and North Dakota: wind. “It’s a North Dakota-like wind … but instead of wind chill, it’s wind heat – and it doesn’t bother to go around you, it goes right through you.” When not deployed, Bishop works for Wells Fargo’s 401K operations in the Twin Cities. He balances his flying obligations for the National Guard with his day-to-day life between work and family. He came to UND from Minneapolis-Southwest High School in 1982. Bishop’s first foray into military service was as a participant in the Reserve Officer Training Corps while he majored in aircraft systems management. In ROTC, he was able to participate in special training. “I took part in ‘Raider Training,’” Bishop said. “We learned about mountaineering, repelling, bridging, and helicopter repelling. It made qualifying in air assault at Fort Rucker much easier because of that.” He chose UND based on the Odegard School’s reputation of excellence, “I wanted to fly and UND was the best place to learn how to fly. It still is,” he said. And, while he hasn’t been back to campus since 1991, his connection to UND is still strong. “The biggest thing about my memories is Grand Forks itself. I really enjoyed my four years there,” he said. “I got a scholarship and I needed to stay year-round to complete my work. I always enjoyed the area and the people. I always felt welcome there.” Bishop mentioned that the mess hall where he is stationed hosts a number of Midwestern college and professional sports banners – and there’s no UND flag. We were sure to take care of that and can proudly say UND is now well represented.

National Guard unit, at Peterson Air Force Base in Colorado. He and his wife, Kristin, reside in Colorado Springs, Colo.

··································· 1988

Susan Galloway, ’88, is a family caregiver coordinator in the aging services unit at South Central Human Service Center. She and her husband, Todd, live in Jamestown, N.D. Greg Hammes, ’88, ’92, was promoted to senior vice president/ legal counsel at State Bank and Trust. He and his wife, Stephanie, live in Fargo. Ginger Johnson, ’88, ’97, joined AgCountry Farm Credit Services as vice president of operations in Fargo, where she lives. Gail (Kummer) Wold, ’88, was named the National Distinguished Principal for North Dakota for 2009. She was also the recipient of the Region 7 Principal of the Year award. Gail and her husband, Bruce, ’89, reside in Beulah, N.D., where she is the middle school principal.

··································· 1989

Kimberly Anvinson, ’89, is associate director of the North Dakota State University Bookstore. She and her husband, Chad Stevermer, live in West Fargo, N.D. Sophia (Swedberg) Swanson, ’89, joined Lifetime Vision Center in Grand Forks. She and her husband, Bart, live in Hoople, N.D.

··························· 1990s Remember when, in 1991,

a pep flag “stolen” by St. Cloud’s Center Ice Club, was returned to the Sioux-Per Hockey Fans Club? The flag completed a 13-month journey to about 25 destinations, including Tijuana, Mexico. Shawn Ackre, ’90, ’94, retired as a Lieutenant Colonel from the National Guard after 26 years of service including his last assignment as branch chief of mobilization and readiness for the North Dakota Army National Guard. Shawn and his wife, Natalie, live in Colorado Springs, Colo. Steve Burian, ’90, ’92, was selected for honorary membership in the American Water Works Association. He is chief executive officer of Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services. Steve and his wife, Barbara (Bergantine), ’90, ’95, live in Grand Forks.

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Sharon (Olson) Etemad, ’91, retired as president of Lake Region State College. She joined the staff of the North Dakota Museum of Art as senior development director. Sharon lives in Devils Lake, N.D. Darren Evavold, ’91, was named investment representative of Investment Centers of America. He and his wife, Monica (Ovnan), ’95, reside in East Grand Forks, Minn. Kam Gunther, ’91, has deployed to Iraq with the U.S. Army. She is stationed at Ft. Lewis, Wash. Loretta Heuer, ’91, ’95, was selected to participate in the 2009 Rural Health Fellows Program through the National Rural Health


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Tim Lykken, ’91, was promoted to the rank of corporal with the patrol division of the Wenatchee Police Department. He and his wife, Linda (Hoesl), ’91, ’98, reside in Wenatchee, Wash. Shannon (Herda) Teigen, ’91, is human resources director of   Western State Bank. She was previously marketing supervisor at North Dakota Telephone Company. Shannon and her husband, Curtis, live in Devils Lake, N.D.

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Dan Borgen, ’92, ’94, was named principal of Middle School No. 8 in north Indio, Calif. He is currently serving as the principal at Amelia Earhart Elementary School. He and his wife, Angela, reside in La Quinta, Calif.

··································· 1993

Julie Henderson, ’93, was selected to serve a two‐year term as national adviser for Public Relations Student Society of America. She currently is a journalism professor at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. Julie lives in Oshkosh, Wis. Roxanne Jonas, ’93, ’95, ’00, received UND’s TRIO Award. She is a staff member at Valley Community Health Centers of

Sara Jumping Eagle, ’93, is a physician at Mid Dakota Clinic PrimeCare in the pediatric & adolescent medicine department. Sara and her husband, Chase Iron Eyes, ’00, live in Mandan, N.D. Karen Ryba, ’93, ’05, is the executive director of Valley Health in Grand Forks, where she lives. Kurt Zellers, ’93, is the Republican leader in the Minnesota House of Representatives. He and his wife, Kimberly (Rydell) ’95, ’98, live in Maple Grove, Minn.

··································· 1994

Chad Wocken, ’94, is a senior research manager at UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center. He and his wife, Sarah (Hergert), ’94, reside in Grand Forks.

Annie Paruccini, ’94, is director of the Minnesota state federal affairs office in Washington, D.C. She resides in Minneapolis.

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Paul Moen, ’95, is an information technology specialist with the North Dakota State Water Commission and received the North Dakota State Engineer’s Professionalism Award. He and his wife, Dawn, reside in Bismarck. Jason Sanden, ’95, is an instrumentation and controls engineer with Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services in Moorhead, Minn. Jason and his wife, Carla (Murphy), ’94, reside in Fargo.

Jared Bruggeman, ’94, ’00, is the athletic director at Missouri Southern State University. He and his wife, Maria (Oistad), ’93, ‘04, live in Joplin, Miss. Amy Everhart, ’94, has opened a new law practice focusing on trademark, copyright, entertainment, and internet law. She is currently chair of the Tennessee Bar Association Entertainment and Sports Law Section. Amy resides in Nashville, Tenn.

Gregory Wald, ’95, was named web manager at North Dakota State College of Science. Gregory resides in West Fargo, N.D.

Please send your news to alumnireview@undalumni.net

Mike Holmes, ’91, is a safety representative in the industrial group at Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson. He and his wife, Jodi, reside in Grand Forks.

Northwood and Larimore, N.D. Roxanne and her husband, Chad Grigoire, reside in Hatton, N.D.

Laura Bisenius, ’96, was promoted to manager at the Grand Forks accounting firm of Drees, Riskey & Vallager Ltd. She serves on the Greater Grand Forks Symphony Orchestra board of directors. Laura and her husband, Michael, ’89, ’99, live in Grand Forks. Jason Ortmeier, ’96, was promoted to director of coaching services with MDA Leadership Consulting. He and his wife, Jaki (Weleski), ’95, live in Minneapolis.

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purple pride UND alums (from left) Steve Brekke, ’84; Scott Brekke, ’88; Jimmy Kleinsasser, ..’99; Chad Brekke, ’97; and Ben Brickson, ’98, hung out after a Vikings game during the 2008-09 season. Jim, a Carrington, N.D., native, is heading into his 11th season with the Vikings since leaving UND. The tight end is the longest-tenured Vikings player and has been key to the team’s success in rushing and offense.

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Association. She is currently a professor of nursing at UND. Loretta and her husband, Dwight, live in Fargo.

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Aug. 29 UND Day at the Dome Minnesota Twins vs. Texas Rangers 3 p.m. Pregame Picnic outside the Metrodome 6:10 p.m. Game Time $15 per person or $24

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Sarah Shimek, ’97, ’99, is a customer service representative with Choice Financial in Grand Forks, where she lives.

··································· 1998

Brandon Helbling, ’98, ’03, joined Mid Dakota Clinic in Minot, N.D., as a surgeon specializing in general surgery, vascular surgery and weight loss surgery. He and his wife, Julie (Bender), ’00, reside in Bismarck, N.D.

Oct. 4 -10 Potato Bowl week Oct. 17 Satellite Parties Across the U.S. Fighting Sioux Men’s Hockey vs. Minnesota Gophers

Lori (Rouse) Laturnus, ’98, was promoted to deposit platform manager at Alerus Financial. She and her husband, Dennis, live in Grand Forks. Jason Laumb, ’98, ’00, is a senior research manager and leads the energy conservation systems group at UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center. He and his wife, Margaret (Henriksen), ’98, ’00, live in Grand Forks. Jodi (Patrick) Maker, ’98, received the Alumni Achievement

Shara (Thompson) Fischer, ’99, is a personal banker with Alerus Financial. Shara and her husband, Aaron, ’99, live in Fargo. Kris Jorgenson, ’99, is a research engineer at UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center. He lives in Red Lake Falls, Minn. Michelle (Midstokke) Walters, ’99, joined Vessel Christian Foundation as executive director in Grand Forks where she and her husband, Derek, ’99, live.

Sept. 28 – Oct. 3 Homecoming 2009: Scream Green!

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Tommy Brosseau, ’99, released his third full‐length record, Posthumous Success, under the FatCat recording label this past summer. He resides in Santa Monica, Calif.

Oct. 31 UND Letterwinners Association Athletic Hall of Fame

Award from the UND College of Education and Human Development. She is a teacher at Niceville High School in Niceville, Fla., where Jodi and her husband, Shannon, reside.

··································· 1999

Brad Brackel, ’99, is vice president of business development and a board member with Pikes Peak Cargo Secure. He and his wife, Judy, reside in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Rachel (Hille) Ness, ’99, ’03, is a dermatologist with Dermatology Associates. She and her husband, Matthew, reside in Fargo.

··························· 2000s Remember when, in 2004, UND was awarded a contract to manage the operations of NASA’s premier DC-8 research jet? Danielle (Bohlman) Conrad, ’00, ’02, joined the staff at Altru Home Services providing therapy services at the Altru Grief Center. She and her husband, Scott, ’00, reside in Thompson, N.D. Brenda Jobe, ’00, ’03, was promoted to manager at the Grand Forks accounting firm of Drees, Riskey & Vallager Ltd. She is active in the annual American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life fundraising event. Brenda lives in Grand Forks.


Josh Stanislowski, ’00, is a research manager with UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center. He and his wife, Teresa, reside in Grand Forks.

an opportune investment by Doris Cooper

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Rod Burwell, ’61, ’62, wanted to become a salesperson selling big equipment. It was something

2001

his father had always talked about wanting to do. “I

Brian Doty, ’01, joined EAPC as a mechanical engineer. He resides in Euclid, Minn.

guess that wore off on me,” Rod said. So he came to UND, close to his Grafton, N.D., home, to pursue an engineering degree, quickly deciding to get a business degree too.

Ronald Ferguson, ’01, ’04, received the Alumni Achievement Award from the UND College of Education and Human Development. He is a professor of sociology at Ridgewater College in Willmar, Minn. Ronald resides in Waite Park, Minn.

Kallie (Wamstad) Naastad, ’01, has joined Choice Financial in Fargo as a customer service representative, credit analyst and loan assistant. She and her husband, Benjamin, live in West Fargo, N.D.

While he never sold big equipment, today he is a part owner of a John Deere dealership company. And, he is (or has been) an investor in a few other enterprises – a bottled water company, environmental laboratory, ski resort, an underground Rod & Barbara Burwell

John Wetsch, ’01, was selected as one of Computerworld’s 2009 IT Premier 100 Leaders. John is program director for the North Carolina Window of Information on Student Education with the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. He and his wife, Laura ( Johnson), ’82, ’85, live in Raleigh, N.C.

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an indoor aquarium attraction at Mall of America in Minnesota, to name a few.

It was an invention just a few years after his stint in the Army, he says, that opened

doors for him. Rod was working at a fiberglass company in 1969 when Cargill (whose current CEO is fellow UND alumnus Greg Page) was looking for a way to make a barge cover out of fiberglass. Burwell answered the call, invented the cover and formed the company Proform, which he sold in 1984.

Recently, this innovative entrepreneur, along with his wife, Barbara, partnered in

another venture with the UND College of Business and Public Administration with a $2 million investment to fund the Rod Burwell Endowed Chair in Entrepreneurship.

The Burwells, who have previously funded scholarships at UND, were looking for a

new opportunity. Rod says he was pleased when the chair opportunity came along. “I thought, ‘this is right up my alley.’ It fits a lot of what I’ve done.”

Todd Stewart, ’01, is group safety manager with Wanzek Construction in Fargo. He and his wife, Melissa, reside in West Fargo, N.D.

storage tank manufacturer, and Underwater World,

The department of entrepreneurship is the newest in the College, established in

2008. It builds upon an entrepreneurship major that was first offered in 2001 and has become one of the fastest growing majors on campus.

Because of the Burwells’ commitment, the College was able to quickly hire a

champion for the department when Larry Pate, Ph.D., filled the chair position in January.

“I am incredibly honored and grateful to the Burwells for investing in the

entrepreneurial vision at UND. Their generosity not only drives me to make UND a leader in the field of entrepreneur education, but it also inspires me to reach out to all entrepreneurs and find a way to make a difference in their lives,” Pate said.

Rod, who wrestled at UND and was an ROTC commander, has stayed involved with

his alma mater in many ways over the years, including three terms on the UND Alumni Association board. He is excited about its growth. “UND is unique. It’s like a private school under a public banner.” There are, he says, outstanding programs initiated and the vast success of its alumni is exceptional.

There are so many programs and places at UND that wouldn’t be here without

private giving, Rod says. That’s just one of the reasons this Sioux Award recipient chooses to give back. “If you care about it, [giving it back] makes a lot of sense. This benefits a lot of people who will make a lot of difference in the world.”

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Craig Hashbarger, ’01, is a senior staff accountant in the audit department with Widmer Roel. He and his wife, Sherri (Richards), ’02, live in Fargo.

Please send your news to alumnireview@undalumni.net

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Katie Richards Judisch, ’02, ’03, is the boys basketball coach at Mayville‐Portland‐CliffordGalesburg. She and her husband, Scott, reside in Clifford, N.D. Mark Kelly, ’02, and other members of the Minneapolis-based band Catchpenny, received the first Armed Forces Entertainment Entertainer of the Year award. The band went to Iraq to entertain military troops. Mark lives in Saint Paul, Minn.

Service Commission. She was the first woman to serve on the Public Service Commission. Her husband, Robert, ’64, is a North Dakota state district court judge in Bismarck, where they reside.

··································· 2003

Tera Bahl, ’03, ’05, joined the staff at Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy Inc. as a physical therapist. She lives in Hankinson, N.D., and also serves as a volleyball coach.

Natasha Maier, ’02, is vice president of human resources at Eventide Senior Living Communities of Moorhead, Minn. She lives in West Fargo, N.D.

Bret Danielson, ’03, ’06, joined RiverView Urology Clinic as a physician assistant. He and his wife, Sarah, live in Grand Forks.

Susan Wefald, ’02, completed 16 years on the North Dakota Public

Jon Jelinek, ’03, opened Grafton Chiropractic Clinic in Grafton,

We ar a pie ce of

hom e with you .

N.D., where he and his wife, Kristy, live. Rachel Kmecik, ’03, joined Grafton Equipment Co. as director of human resources. She resides in Warren, Minn. Joe Storbakken, ’03, was promoted to manager with Eide Bailly. He is a certified public accountant specializing in tax and consulting services. Joe, and his wife, Dawn, reside in Abercrombie, N.D.

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Kristin Jones, ’04, graduated from the University of Colorado’s dental school and is lead dentist for Monarch Dental in Schertz, Texas. Kristin lives in San Antonio, Texas. Brad Loiland, ’04, joined Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services as an information technology technician. He lives in Grand Forks.

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Natalie Newman Muth, ’04, opened Plains Chiropractic & Acupuncture with her husband, Carson, in Grand Forks, where they live.

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Jason Oberg, ’04, is an engineer for Blattner Energy, Inc, in Avon, Minn., where he performs project management and AutoCAD Civil 3D 2010 software development support for a heavy construction company specializing in wind farms nationwide. He is licensed as a professional land surveyor in six states and resides in Albany, Minn.

··································· w w w.shopcam pus gear.com Hooded sweatshirts only $17.99!

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Tara (Remund) Bjugstad, ’05, is a certified occupational therapist and lymphedema therapist with

Altru Health System’s Rehab Outpatient Therapy Services. She and her husband, Aaron, ’08, reside in Grand Forks. Will Kusler, ’05, ’07, has been promoted to chief financial officer at Ntractive. He serves on the board of trustees for the Dakota Venture Group. Will and his wife, Stacy (Britz), ’05, reside in Grand Forks. Jessie Veeder Scofield, ’05, was hired as assistant director of alumni and annual giving at the Dickinson State University Alumni Association and Foundation. She and her husband, Chad, reside in Dickinson, N.D. Marlena (Frey) Zaun, ’05, is a personal banker for Wells Fargo. She and her husband, Darren, live in Bismarck.

··································· 2006

Derek Aslakson, ’06, ’07, is a program manager with Appareo Systems of Fargo, where he resides. Diane Hill, ’06, joined the medical staff as a physician assistant with the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium Alicia Roberts Medical Center and Thorne Bay Health Center. She lives in Klawock, Alaska. Elaine Larson, ’06, received the Minot State University (N.D.) Board of Regents Achievement Award. She is director of advising and field placement, and a faculty member within the department of teacher education and human performance at MSU. She resides in Minot, N.D. Kadie Paton, ’06, is assistant customer service manager with Bank of the West’s main office in


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Ben Williams, ’06, was promoted to engineer in training 2 by Webster, Foster & Weston Consulting Engineers in Grand Forks. He lives in Larimore, N.D.

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Mark Bernstrom, ’07, was promoted by Tim Shea Nursery to head foreman as well as overseer of all landscape crew personnel and quality control. He lives in Grand Forks. Adam Fleischman, ’07, was hired as an attorney with the Elizabeth Pendlay law firm in Crosby, N.D., where he resides. Desiree Mostad, ’07, is a production/graphic designer for Ralph Engelstad Arena and Fighting Sioux Sports Properties. She lives in Grand Forks. David Rasmussen, ’07, was promoted to personal banker at Alerus Financial. He and his wife, Jessica (Kuster), ’07, reside in Grand Forks. Carmen Schempp, ’07, is an occupational therapist with Applied Medical Inc. serving accounts in eastern North Dakota. She lives in Bismarck. Sarah Walker, ’07, is a reference specialist for the State Archives Division of the State Historical Society of North Dakota. She lives in Bismarck.

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Collette Anderson, ’08, is an agent for the New York Life Insurance Company. She lives in Grand Forks.

Please send your news to alumnireview@undalumni.net

Brandon Pavlish, ’06, is a research manager at UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center. He lives in East Grand Forks, Minn.

2008

Jenna Charbonneau, ’08, is serving with the Minnesota Reading Corps, a service‐based program comprised of AmeriCorps members that provides literacy tutoring to children. She lives in Minneapolis. Elizabeth Hagen, ’08, joined the staff of the Center for Rural Health at UND’s School of Medicine and Health Sciences as a project assistant. She resides in Aneta, N.D. Ben Johnson, ’08, is the Burke County (N.D.) state’s attorney. He and his wife, Melissa, reside in Tioga, N.D. Chelsea Johnson, ’08, is a human resources assistant at Advanced Engineering and Environmental Services. She lives in Grand Forks. Erica (Misson) Kalis, ’08, is a trust operations specialist at Alerus Financial in Grand Forks where she and her husband, Trevor, live. Tara Keshavarz, ’08, joined MeritCare as a physician assistant in the Neuroscience Center. She lives in West Fargo, N.D. Stacy McGill, ’08, is a customer service representative with Alerus Financial in Grand Forks where she lives.

Find the exclusive T.J. Oshie bobblehead and all your favorite Fighting Sioux gear and gifts at siouxshop.com.

Jessica Peterson, ’08, joined UND’s Office of  University Relations as a graphic and Web designer. She lives in Grand Forks. Adam Sinks, ’08, is a mechanical designer for Obermiller Nelson Engineering in Fargo. He lives in Crookston, Minn. ■

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Fargo, where she resides.

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by Christy Kramer, UND Athletics In 2008 the University of North Dakota football team made its debut as a Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) program and came away with its sixth‐consecutive winning season, finishing with an overall 6‐4 record. Remaining at the helm for Fighting Sioux football is second‐year Head Coach Chris Mussman, who is no stranger to the UND gridiron. Mussman has been with the Sioux coaching staff since he was named offensive line coach in 1999. Late last season, he signed a two‐year contract extension that will bring him through the 2012 season. On the return: On one hand, the Fighting Sioux will return a total of 30 Letterwinners from the 2008 squad. On the other hand, they will have to work hard to fill the gaps left by the 22 players no longer on the roster. Of those 22 players lost, 19 were seniors. Of those 19 seniors, 15 were starters. Of those 15 senior starters, three were listed top‐10 in both the UND single‐season and career record books.

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Offense: The success of the UND offense will rest on the experience of those returning just as much as it will rely on the hard work and determination of the younger players. Returning to the offensive line will be seniors Kyle Bondy, Zach Keller and David Koelln, and juniors Matt Bakke, Keith Queoff and Creighton Schroyer. Back to make more plays for the Sioux are seniors Ryan Konrath (WR) and Kellen Leupp (WR), and juniors Steven Battle (RB) and Matt Cole (WR). Marked for starting positions are senior Marcus Tibesar (FB), junior Jake Landry (QB), and sophomore Catlin Solum (RB). Last season the Sioux offense landed 1,458 yards on foot, 2,456 yards in the air, and a combined 1,239 yards on punt and kick returns. With an average of 523 all‐purpose yards, UND put up just over 32 points per contest.

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Defense: North Dakota will no longer have three of its top five defensive players, but it will have 11 of its top 15. Senior Andrew Miller (LB), juniors Joel Schwenfeier (SS) and Kris Ankenbauer (FS), and sophomore Dominique Hawkins (CB) top the return list. Combined, they produced 150 tackles (109 solo), 12 pass breakups, six interceptions, and five quarterback hurries during UND’s DI debut. Also back to defend the North Dakota end zone are seniors Nick Farstveet (DL), Link Gottbeheat (DL), Tyson Heiser (DB), Clayton Leith (LB), Nick Nolte (DL), Ryan Pollow (LB), Jeff Tescher (LB), and Nathan Wayne (DL), juniors Ty Boyle (DL), Ross Cochran (LB), Paul German (LB), Carl Hanson (DB), and Ryan Kasowski (LB), and sophomores Broc Bellmore (DL), Dan


Hendrickson (LB), Delano Saporu (DB), and Kenny Watkins (DB). Special Teams: Returning for his final season is senior kicker Brandon Hellevang, UND’s all‐time single‐season PAT leader, and a top‐10 field goal and PAT record‐holder in every single‐season and career category. Last season he finished second on the team with 61 points, thanks to a PAT percentage of 98 and seven field goals including the overtime game winner at South Dakota (Nov. 22). UND’s kick return team will remain intact for the most part, as only one player will not return. Hawkins led the squad last season with 592 yards on 24 returns, including a 50‐yard run. He is joined by Bamba and Cole. Cole is the lone member to return from the punt return team. Last season, he took four punts a total of 20 yards. For the third consecutive season, Tescher will serve as UND’s long snapper on punts. Freshman Brett Cameron is listed as the starting punter for the 2009 season. Cameron is one of only three freshmen listed as starters on the 2009 depth chart. In sum, UND’s 89‐man roster will be comprised of 18 seniors, 15 juniors, 19 sophomores, 15 freshmen, and 22 new signees. The bulk of the group comes from the three northernmost states in the Midwest. Minnesota and North Dakota boast 23 players each, with 20 coming from Wisconsin. The remaining 23 roster spaces are filled with players from all over the country, including California, Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, and Texas. Three players join the team from Canada. The Schedule: While last year’s schedule was dotted with some tough competition – including FCS then‐10th‐ranked Cal Poly – the docket for UND’s 2009 season is even fiercer. The Fighting Sioux will kick off the season with a trio of Southern road games against first‐time opponents, starting with Big 12 power Texas Tech in Lubbock on Sept. 5. The only Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) opponent on UND’s 2009 schedule, the Red Raiders finished last season with a school‐record 11 regular‐season wins and their fourth Cotton Bowl appearance. In April, Texas Tech celebrated its most successful NFL Draft in school history as four players – Michael Crabtree (San Francisco), Darcel McBath (Denver), Louis Vasquez (San Diego), and Brandon Williams (Dallas) – were selected during the first four rounds. Only twice before (1980 and 1986) have multiple Red Raider picks been selected in the opening four rounds of the draft. After a week off, North Dakota will travel to Natchitoches, La., to face the Demons of Northwestern State. The following weekend, the Sioux will return to the Lone Star State to take on Stephen F. Austin of the Southland Conference. The Fighting Sioux will open the home slate on Oct. 3 with a Homecoming game against South Dakota. Ninety‐three years ago, UND began the annual Homecoming tradition with a 20‐0 victory over the Coyotes. Since then, the Sioux have attained a 9‐2 Homecoming record against the Coyotes and have out‐scored USD 215‐76, including four, 20‐plus point shutouts. North Dakota will remain in Grand Forks to celebrate the

43rd annual Potato Bowl USA with an afternoon contest against Stony Brook. The Sioux have faced 21 different adversaries in the Potato Bowl since 1966. They hold a 32‐11 record and an impressive 761‐200 scoring margin over the past 20 games. On Oct. 17, the Fighting Sioux will take on 2008 NAIA National Champion Sioux Falls, which won its second championship in the last three seasons. The Cougars finished the season with a perfect 14‐0 record to give them the longest winning streak in the nation. They head into the 2009 season ranked No. 1 in the NAIA Football Coaches’ Top 25 Spring Poll. UND will take a quick break from the home crowd to seek revenge in Cedar City, Utah, and play its second conference game of the season when it faces Southern Utah. Last year, a 16‐yard Thunderbird touchdown catch ripped a home finale victory from the hands of UND with less than two minutes remaining. Back on their home turf, the Sioux will close out the home season as they entertain Cal Poly and Southern Oregon. Cal Poly, the 2008 Great West Conference champion, was ranked No. 12 in the FCS preseason poll. Though they will return 66 Letterwinners from its 2008 squad, a key loss for the Mustangs was the graduation of Ramses Barden, who was the leading receiver in the GWC and a 2009 New York Giants third‐round pick. With Barden on the roster, Cal Poly led the league last season in nearly every offensive category. The home schedule will come to an end on Nov. 7 when the Sioux host Southern Oregon, another first‐time opponent from the NAIA. The final weeks of the season will find UND on a pair of long road trips. On Nov. 14, the team will make its way to California, for another chance at UC Davis. Last October, Head Coach Bob Biggs and his Aggies captured their sixth‐consecutive home victory and first conference win with a 34‐21 triumph over the Sioux. The season will come to a close in Arkansas as UND faces DI Central Arkansas. The Bears are three‐time NAIA national champions and finished last season 10‐2, the best record in the Southland Conference. Another team with big shoes to fill, the Bears lost quarterback Nathan Brown, who became the most prolific passer in Arkansas collegiate history when he finished his career with 10,558 yards and 100 touchdowns. He recently signed a free‐agent contract with the Jacksonville Jaguars. ■

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i n m e m o ri a m 1930s

Dorothy M. (Dorris) Goethel, ..’30, Tempe, Ariz. Edward R. Stern, ..’32, Fargo Christine (Stefanson) Herzog, ’34, Grand Forks Harold C. Winslow, ’34, Cincinnati Richard M. Stern, ’35, Seattle Catherine M. (Neville) Gustafson, ..’34, Brainerd, Minn. F. Thomas Kieley, ..’36, Palm Springs, Calif. Capt. George Swiggum, USN (RET), ’36, Rockville, Md. Majel M. (McKinsey) Robinson, ..’37, Cloverdale, Calif. Florence L. (Goll) Anstett, ..’39, Fargo

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1940s

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William J. Hankins, ’55, Dickinson, N.D. Clifford M. Hestdalen, ’56, Longview, Wash. Francis R. Gibson, ’57, Bismarck Jake C. Hodny, ’57, ’60, Grafton, N.D. Clifford Bender, ’58, Bismarck Elmo R. Gullekson, ..’58, Grand Forks Ralph L. Jensen, ’58, Yuba City, Calif. Richard D. Johnson, ’58, Shelton, Wash. Pearl E. Jorgensen, ..’58, Warrensburg, Mo. Trygve R. (Eidbo) Lerwick, ..’55, Prescott Valley, Ariz. John A. Rex, ’58, Pendleton, Ore. George H. Schroedl, ’58, Grand Forks

1960s

Kenneth A. Enockson, ..’41, Washburn, N.D. Robert L. Hall, ..’41, Des Moines, Wash. Robert O. Brandenburg, M.D., ’42, Minneapolis Dr. Fred J. Payne, ..’42, Shreveport, La. Ruth L. (Wood) Vein, ..’42, Bellevue, Wash. Elizabeth E. (Evert) Bean, ’43, Spartanburg, S.C. Rev. John H. Bergeson, ’43, Roseville, Minn. Myron J. Talbert, M.D., ’43, ’44, Redlands, Calif. Ruth C. (Krueger) Sheldon, ’44, El Cajon, Calif. Margaret A. (Norman) Andrews, ..’45, Sacramento, Calif. Daniel D. Fandrich, ’45, Moorhead, Minn. Dean Winkjer, ’45, ’47, Williston, N.D. Alden K. Eiland, ’46, Spokane, Wash. Albert B. Johnson, ’48, ’49, Maple Plain, Minn. John H. Pifer, ..’48, Larimore, N.D. Joanne M. (Larkin) Anderson, ..’49, Moorhead, Minn. Gordon Hellekson, ’49, Edina, Minn. Walter M. Loomer Jr, ..’49, Bremerton, Wash. Lester R. Nyhus, ’49, ’57, Devils Lake, N.D. William E. Pond, ’49, Bemidji, Minn. Robert C. Rust, ’49, Park Rapids, Minn.

H. Howard Adams, ..’60, Sunrise Beach, Mo. Mack H. Graham, ..’60, Mesa, Ariz. Lorraine A. (Huus) Gunstenson, ..’61, Fargo Allen O. Klongerbo, ’60, Alexandria, Minn. Kenneth F. Knoke, ’60, Mesa, Ariz. Irene Westermoe, ..’61, Peoria, Ariz. Donald G. McConnachie, ’62, Grand Forks Reuben Neumann, ’62, Las Vegas, Nev. Wayne D. Davison, ’63, Grand Forks Louis C. Deere, ’63, Kennedy, Minn. Ray V. Smith, ’63, Leavenworth, Kan. George A. Wood, ’63, Missoula, Mont. Elizabeth C. (Daulton) Porter, ..’65 Elner C. Monson, ..’66, Hatton, N.D. Robert B. Bradley, ’67, ’72, Byron, Minn. Gerald J. Grasley, ’67, London, Ontario, Canada Donald R. Henry, ’67, Bottineau, N.D. C.L. Dill, ..’68, Greeley, Colo. Pete F. Peterson, ..’68, Conroe, Texas Louise E. (Myxter) Pennington, ’68, St. Cloud, Minn. Pete F. Peterson, ..’68, Conroe, Texas Richard E. Yonke, ’68, Burnsville, Minn. Bryce G. Fossum, ’69, Mesa, Ariz.

1950s

1970s

George W. Bale, ’50, ’53, Alexandria, Minn. John M. Gutenkunst, ’50, Green Valley, Ariz. Clara M. (Staus) Mahlum, ’50, Issaquah, Wash. Richard L. Noel, ’50, Roanoke, Texas Dr. Charles N. Glaab, ’51, ’52, Toledo, Ohio John P. Grosz, ’51, Fargo Frank J. Kosanda, ’51, ’52, Sun City, Ariz. Ervin O. Gandrud, ’52, Grand Forks Clarence W. Jordahl, M.D., ’52, Milwaukee Dr. Gordon B. Olson, ’52, ’53, Minot, N.D. John A. Swenson, M.D., ’52, Grand Forks Dr. Robert H. Cockle, ’53, ’74, Huntsville, Ala. Lt. Col. John K. Honnold (RET), ’53, University Place, Wash. Willard B. Laabs, ’53, Sun City West, Ariz. Dr. Roland A. Vandell, ’54, St. Cloud, Minn.

Rosalie Elliott, ..’70, Nerinx, Ky. Rachel E. Helland, ’70, New London, Minn. Neill M. Manning, ..’70, Rolla, N.D. Dr. James L. Toles, ’70, Fort Valley, Ga. Bruce K. Hartmann, ..’71, Winter Park, Fla. Beverly J. (Oliver) Brown, ’72, Alameda, Calif. Dee H. (Hylden) Gronhovd, ..’74, Grand Forks Katie (Hagan) Keogh, ’74, ’93, Williston, N.D. Art J. Raymond, ..’74, Grand Forks Kathleen C. Gillespie, ’76, Olympia, Wash. Cheryl A. (Vandagriff ) Tagoras, ’76, Bangs, Texas Chris A. Vann, ’76, Baker, Mont. Cindy S. Olson, ’78, ’87, Grand Forks Jeffrey A. Burke, ..’79, Crookston, Minn. Paul D. Ruud, ..’79, Northwood, N.D.


Jacqueline B. Schwab, ..’79 Devils Lake, N.D.

1980s

Rodney G. Gryskiewicz, ’80, Fargo Kathleen R.(Gilleshammer) Johnston, ’80, Scottsdale, Ariz. Craig H. Lahren, ’80, Center, N.D. Nancy L. Stenberg, ..’80, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Mary H. (McKinney) Ensrude, ’88, Pekin, N.D.

1990s

Steve J. Austreng, ’93, Buxton, N.D. Lois R. (Ringenberg) Jones, ’95, Fargo

2000s

Robert E. Hague, ’01, Idaho Falls, Idaho Joan Simonson, ’07, Dacula, Ga. Steve F. Werpy, ’04, Dickinson, N.D.

Retired Faculty/Staff

Robert A. Apostal, Thief River Falls, Minn. John C. Crawford, Grand Forks

Ruth M. Peterson, Grand Forks A. Luella (Blue) Storey, Grand Forks Howard Thoreson, Mayville, N.D.

Friends

Ella M. Amberson, Bemidji, Minn. Lucille (Westberg) Barry, Grand Forks Alan R. Bloom, M.D., Webster, S.D. Jane Bourassa, La Mirada, Calif. Wilford G. Dostal, Angus, Minn. Raymond Dunnigan, Walhalla, N.D. John Galegher, Thompson, N.D. Dorothy M. (Schmaltz) Johnson, Phoenix, Ariz. Richmond Lapp, Grafton, N.D. Ken M. Satrom, Grand Forks Cletus J. Schmidt, Bismarck Nancy (Degnan) Schumacher, Colorado Springs, Colo. Marlys D. Sell, Fargo Margaret L. Ude, Escondido, Calif.

et e rna l f l a m e s o ci et y cumulative giving

annual giving

Thomas Clifford Circle ($500,000)

Dacotah Circle ($5,000 +)

Ethel M. Stone Estate, Grand Forks

George Starcher Circle ($100,000)

Philip & Patricia Gisi, Grand Forks; Dennis and Carol Buck, Grand Forks

President’s Circle ($25,000)

Canad Inns Destination Center, Grand Forks; Dorothie O. Dekko, Excelsior, Minn.; Dr. Steve and Teri Lantz, Horace, N.D.; Francis and Edith Sears Estate, Mcville, N.D.; Michael J. Marcil, Fargo; Construction Engineers, LTD, Grand Forks; Amundson Family Funeral Home, Grand Forks; Peplawn Inc/Detroit Lakes, Detroit Lakes, Minn.; Martha M. Hoghaug Glasoe Estate, Eden Prairie, Minn.; Dr. John & Angeline Nord, Grand Forks; Gil Olson, Bismarck; Lowell J. Schweigert, Grand Forks; Lynus & Debbie Sevigny, Grand Forks; Manvel Sioux Boosters ‐ Devine’s, MacMillan’s, & Stadstad’s, Manvel, N.D.; Dr. Sandra L. Zahradka in memory of Buck Zahradka, M.D., Birmingham, Ala.

Sioux Crew, Grand Forks; Paul and Suzanne Bethke, Grand Forks; Charles L. Cavanagh, Perham, Minn.; Professor Fran Jabara, Wichita, Kan.; William R. Lundberg, Minneapolis; M. Marian Wasinger in Memory of Carl Wasinger, Grand Forks; Dr. Jon & Paula Bradbury, Grand Forks; Dr. Mike and Ronda Kincheloe, Green Bay, Wis.; Kurt & Tami Lamp, Bellevue, Wash.; Robert & Grayce Mitchell, Seattle; Col. Greg & Jey Stolt, Huntsville, Ala.; Altru Health System, Grand Forks; Dakota Medical Foundation, Fargo; Erwin & Colleen Martens, Sudbury, Mass.; Dr. Glenn & Harriet Brown, Moorhead, Minn.; Emerson, St. Louis, Mo.; MDU Resources Foundation, Bismarck; Border States Electric Supply, Grand Forks; Scott Farm, Gilby, N.D.; Residual Materials, Inc, Grand Forks; R J Zavoral & Sons, Inc, East Grand Forks, Minn.; First State Bank, Grand Forks; Gerrells Sports Center, Grand Forks; Donald B. Achttien, Sugar Land, Texas; Jack & Eileen Crystal, Fort Collins, Colo.; Edward Fogarty, M.D. and Carolyn

Fogarty, Bismarck; Jeff & Cathy Gendreau, Andover, Minn.; Philip & Patricia Gisi, Grand Forks; Norman G. Hepper, M.D., Rochester, Minn.; Dr. James O’Connell & Barbara Kramer, Grand Forks; Robert M. Olafson, St. Paul, Minn.; Don & Janene Oppegard, Park River, N.D.; Scott & Susan Sayer, Finley, N.D.; Mary E. Whalen, St. Paul, Minn.; Swingen Construction Company, Grand Forks; Patrick & Mary Dirk, Newport Beach, Calif.; S & S Transport, Inc, Grand Forks; Dr. Thomas and Mary Berquist, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.; Steve & Barbara Burian, Grand Forks; Robert H. Medhus, Fargo; John (dec.) and Diane Odegard, Grand Forks; Lynus & Debbie Sevigny, Grand Forks; Larry L. Suda, Washington, DC; Dan & Heidi Swingen, Grand Forks; Dr. Sandra L. Zahradka in memory of Buck Zahradka, M.D., Birmingham, Ala.; Betty Wold Johnson/The Wold Family in Honor & Memory of Karl Christian Wold, M.D., New York

fa l l 2 0 0 9

Listed are the dedicated alumni and friends of UND who became new UND Foundation Eternal Flame Society members from Apr. 1 – June 30. The Society recognizes those who, by reaching a level of giving, are showing their commitment to UND’s growth.

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2009

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

SIOUX PER SWINGS TOUR

More than 75 UND alumni, fans and friends played 18 holes at Hillcrest Country Club in Park River, N.D., for the first Sioux-Per Swing of the 2009 tour. below, back row, left to right: John Kelling, Rod Carey, Tim Hurtt, Steve Brekke, Chris Mussman front row, left to right: George Love, Dan Holt, Butch Leedahl, Steve Olson, Dale Lian, JR Hurtt,

Hoisting the MacNaughton Cup was part of the fun at the Fargo Sioux‐Per Swing at Oxbow Golf & Country Club. below, left to right: Lew Wilson, Frank Pearson, Mike Bindas, Tim O’Keefe right, left to right: Joe Turman, Clint Nelson, Paul Nelson, Mark Lundeen, Mike Adams

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altru.org/parkwoodplace

Whether you want complete independence or slight medical assistance, Parkwood Place is the community for you. Residents have complete control over their lifestyle and our staff is there to offer any conveniences necessary. • Basic care, assisted, or independent living options • Furnished or unfurnished apartments • Easy access to grocery, banking, shopping and healthcare services • Delicious meals and comfortable dining rooms • Convenient shuttle bus service Contact Jo- at (701)780-2612 or jhirsch@altru.org to schedule a tour or for more information.

749 S. 30th Street

Grand Forks, ND


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www.undalumni.org

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The University has recently adopted a records retention schedule that outlines the length of time certain records will be maintained before they are ultimately destroyed. Student Teacher Credential Files with no activity since June 30, 1984 will be destroyed beginning July 1, 2010 unless Career Services/Cooperative Education is contacted. “Activity” is defined as adding new letters of reference, adding unofficial transcripts, updating personal data, or having the file sent to a prospective employer or graduate school admissions committee. Requests to retain inactive files must be made in writing and must be received by March 2010. If requested, Career Services/Cooperative Education will return non‐confidential information from your file to you, via mail, at your own expense. Requests must contain your full name, any other names you have had, Student ID or SSN, year of graduation, college major(s), current address, and telephone number. The request must be signed and dated. Mail your request to Career Services/Cooperative Education; 2891 2nd Avenue North Stop 9014; Grand Forks, ND 58202‐9014. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Attention employers! Learn how you can find UND graduates to work for you! Post your job openings on our site, view online resumes and learn how we can help you find qualified people for your company. Attention job hunters! Check out the latest listings on the Career Center job board. Currently you’ll find listings in physical therapy, engineering, customer service, and more. Log on to www.undalumni.org today! ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

In June, UND Alumni Association staff and friends celebrated its 120th birthday with a champagne toast to the University’s first eight graduates who established the Association in 1889. Here’s to the next 120!

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