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THE UNIVERSITY of press NORTH CAROLINA PRESS

unc

Fall | Winter 2017-2018


supporting publishing excellence

expanding publishing excellence

You can be a part of publishing excellence by making a gift to the UNC Press Club annual fund, by creating a new endowment fund or supporting an existing one, or by supporting a special project. For more information, please visit our website, or contact our director of development, Joanna Ruth Marsland, at 919-962-0924 or Joanna_Ruth_Marsland@uncpress.org.

The Office of Scholarly Publishing Services

subject index African American History 2, 3, 4, 15, 19, 25, 30, 33, 43, 48, 50, 58 American History 5, 18, 21, 34, 38, 46, 47, 49, 57, 58 American Studies 27, 54, 55, 57, 60 Ancient History 56 Architecture 65 Asian American Studies 14 British History 13, 61 Civil War 8, 9, 22, 23, 25, 66 Cookbooks / Cooking / Foodways 10, 11 Early American History 12, 62 Environmental History 6, 52, 53, 59, 60 Fine Arts / Performing Arts / Photography 63, 64 Gender and Sexuality 20 Health / Medicine 36 Latin American & Caribbean Studies 35, 39, 42 Latino Studies 32, 51 Literature 9, 67 Native American / Indigenous Studies 28, 29, 59 North Carolina 45, 44, 62, 65, 66 Political Science 37 Religion 7, 16, 17,26, 31, 40, 41 Women's History 24 Young Adult 64

The mission of The Office of Scholarly Publishing Services (OSPS) is to serve the University of North Carolina System by providing access to a range of sustainable, mission-driven publishing models and solutions. Leveraging the expertise of UNC Press and its nonprofit subsidiary, Longleaf Services, we collaborate with libraries, research centers and institutes, departments, and individual faculty and staff to lower the cost of producing and disseminating quality educational and scholarly publications. We also work with other public institutions seeking to publish scholarly material or general-interest works that will benefit the people of North Carolina. If you would like to discuss a book or journal proposal please complete an evaluation form and submit it to John McLeod, Director of the Office of Scholarly Publishing Services, at john_mcleod@ uncpress.org. If you have other questions feel free to contact John directly by email or by phone at (919) 962-8419. UNC Press is pleased to announce a new distribution partnership with the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. The Historical Publications Section of the Office of Archives and History offers more than 160 titles reflecting the rich variety of North Carolina history and culture, including books for general readers, students, scholars, and genealogists. See page 65. For more information, visit www.ncdcr.gov/about/history/historical-publications

features Recent and Recommended 68 Award-Winning Books 69 UNC Press Journals 70-71 Sales Information 72 Author/Title Index inside back cover

Cover illustration by Sally Fry Scruggs. From CHOCOLATE CITY, see page 2

UNC Press Congratulates

Nancy Tomes, winner of the 2017

Bancroft Prize! unc

press

THE UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA PRESS

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Goat Castle A True Story of Murder, Race, and the Gothic South KAREN L. COX The haunting tale of a Mississippi murder that captivated America In 1932, the city of Natchez, Mississippi, reckoned with an unexpected influx of journalists and tourists as the lurid story of a local murder was splashed across headlines nationwide. Two eccentrics, Richard Dana and Octavia Dockery—known in the press as the “Wild Man” and the “Goat Woman”—enlisted an African American man named George Pearls to rob their reclusive neighbor, Jennie Merrill, at her estate. During the attempted robbery, Merrill was shot and killed. The crime drew national coverage when it came to light that Dana and Dockery, the alleged murderers, shared their huge, decaying antebellum mansion with their goats and other livestock, which prompted journalists to call the estate “Goat Castle.” Pearls was killed by an Arkansas policeman in an unrelated incident before he could face trial. However, as was all too typical in the Jim Crow South, the white community demanded “justice,” and an innocent black woman named Emily Burns was ultimately sent to prison for the murder of Merrill. Dana and Dockery not only avoided punishment but also lived to profit from the notoriety of the murder. In telling this strange, fascinating story, Karen Cox highlights the larger ideas that made the tale so irresistible to the popular press and provides a unique lens through which to view the transformation of the plantation South into the fallen, gothic South.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3503-3 $26.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3504-0 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 240 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 24 halftones, notes, bibl., index

KAREN L. COX is professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and author of Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture.

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“Karen Cox masterfully demonstrates through a close look at the murder of Jennie Merrill how the sentimental rewriting of Civil War–era history did far more than engulf southern white culture in a romantic haze of ancestor worship; it was used as justification for racial segregation, lynching, and a legal system that routinely denied people of color justice under the law. This story will enrage readers while bringing tears to their eyes.”

• • • • • •

—Victoria E. Bynum, author of The Free State of Jones

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AMERICAN HISTORY


Chocolate City A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation's Capital CHRIS MYERS ASCH AND GEORGE DEREK MUSGROVE America's first majority-black city from slavery to gentrification Monumental in scope and vividly detailed, Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race and democracy in our nation’s capital. Emblematic of the ongoing tensions between America’s expansive democratic promises and its enduring racial realities, Washington often has served as a national battleground for contentious issues, including slavery, segregation, civil rights, the drug war, and gentrification. But D.C. is more than just a seat of government, and authors Chris Myers Asch and George Derek Musgrove also highlight the city’s rich history of local activism as Washingtonians of all races have struggled to make their voices heard in an undemocratic city where residents lack full political rights. Tracing D.C.’s massive transformations—from a sparsely inhabited plantation society into a diverse metropolis, from a center of the slave trade to the nation’s first black-majority city, from “Chocolate City” to “Latte City”—Asch and Musgrove offer an engaging narrative peppered with unforgettable characters, a history of deep racial division but also one of hope, resilience, and interracial cooperation.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3586-6 $35.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3587-3 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 512 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 25 halftones, 1 map, 7 tables, notes, bibl., index

CHRIS MEYERS ASCH is editor of Washington History and teaches history at Colby

College.

GEORGE DEREK MUSGROVE is associate professor of history at the University of

Maryland, Baltimore County.

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Published with the assistance of the John Hope Franklin Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

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“Asch and Musgrove view the history of the District of Columbia from the eighteenth century to the present through the eyes of its African American residents. Each crisply written paragraph bursts with fascinating insights, and each page brings to life the people and social movements that made Washington a proper place to live and not just the seat of government of the United States. With a rare combination of interpretive substance and accessible style, Chocolate City will quickly take its place among the classic studies of the nation's capital.”

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—Joseph P. Reidy, Howard University

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Game of Privilege An African American History of Golf LANE DEMAS African Americans and golf, from caddies to Tiger Woods This groundbreaking history of African Americans and golf explores the role of race, class, and public space in golf course development, the stories of individual black golfers during the age of segregation, the legal battle to integrate public golf courses, and the little-known history of the United Golfers Association (UGA)—a black golf tour that operated from 1925 to 1975. Lane Demas charts how African Americans nationwide organized social campaigns, filed lawsuits, and went to jail in order to desegregate courses; he also provides little-known, dramatic stories of golfers who boldly confronted wider segregation more broadly in their local communities. As national civil rights organizations debated golf’s symbolism and whether or not to pursue the game’s integration, black players and caddies took matters into their own hands and helped shape its subculture, while UGA participants forged one of the most durable black sporting organizations in American history as they fought to join the white Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA). From George F. Grant’s invention of the golf tee in 1899 to the dominance of superstar Tiger Woods in the 1990s, this accessible and comprehensive work challenges stereotypes and indeed the fundamental story of race and golf in American culture.

September 2017

978-1-4696-3422-7 $30.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3423-4 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 51 halftones, 4 tables, notes, bibl., index

LANE DEMAS is associate professor of history at Central Michigan University.

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“Demas takes his readers on a fascinating golf outing, along the way introducing his audience to a wide range of compelling stories that not only describe the history of African American participation in a game that, as his title states, has strong associations with white privilege in American society but also shows how those who fought to integrate golf courses engaged in actions that proved to be important to the civil rights movement.” —John Bloom, author of There You Have It

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Color and Character West Charlotte High and the American Struggle over Educational Equality PAMELA GRUNDY The story of one community's experience with segregation, desegregation, and resegregation At a time when race and inequality dominate national debates, the story of West Charlotte High School illuminates the possibilities and challenges of using racial and economic desegregation to foster educational equality. West Charlotte opened in 1938 as a segregated school that embodied the aspirations of the growing African American population of Charlotte, North Carolina. In the 1970s, when Charlotte began court-ordered busing, black and white families made West Charlotte the celebrated flagship of the most integrated major school system in the nation. But as the twentieth century neared its close and a new court order eliminated race-based busing, Charlotte schools resegregated along lines of class as well as race. West Charlotte became the city’s poorest, lowest-performing high school—a striking reminder of the people and places that Charlotte’s rapid growth had left behind. While dedicated teachers continue to educate children, the school’s challenges underscore the painful consequences of resegregation.  Drawing on nearly two decades of interviews with students, educators, and alumni, Pamela Grundy uses the history of a community’s beloved school to tell a broader American story of education, community, democracy, and race—all while raising questions about present-day strategies for school reform. Historian, author, and activist PAMELA GRUNDY lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, where she pursues a variety of writing, teaching, and museum projects. Her previous books include the award-winning Learning to Win: Sports, Education, and Social Change in Twentieth-Century North Carolina.

Published with the assistance of the Z. Smith Reynolds Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“In this remarkably moving book, Pamela Grundy uses vivid accounts from West Charlotte High students, teachers, parents, and community members as a sophisticated lens through which to understand major changes in national educational policy over the past fifty years.”

September 2017

978-1-4696-3607-8 $26.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3608-5 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 240 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 43 halftones, 4 maps, notes, bibl., index

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—John Charles Boger, University of North Carolina School of Law

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


The Three Graces of Val-Kill Eleanor Roosevelt, Marion Dickerman, and Nancy Cook in the Place They Made Their Own EMILY HERRING WILSON The untold story of a pivotal time and place in Eleanor Roosevelt's life, and the friends who helped shape it The Three Graces of Val-Kill changes the way we think about Eleanor Roosevelt. Emily Wilson examines what she calls the most formative period in Roosevelt's life, from 1922 to 1936, when she cultivated an intimate friendship with Marion Dickerman and Nancy Cook, who helped her build a cottage on the Val-Kill Creek in Hyde Park on the Roosevelt family land. In the early years, the three women—the “three graces,” as Franklin Delano Roosevelt called them—were nearly inseparable and forged a female-centered community for each other, for family, and for New York’s progressive women. Examining this network of close female friends gives readers a more comprehensive picture of the Roosevelts and Eleanor's burgeoning independence in the years that marked Franklin's rise to power in politics. Wilson takes care to show all the nuances and complexities of the women's relationship, which blended the political with the personal. Val-Kill was not only home to Eleanor Roosevelt but also a crucial part of how she became one of the most admired American political figures of the twentieth century. In Wilson's telling, she emerges out of the shadows of monumental histories and documentaries as a woman in search of herself. EMILY HERRING WILSON resides in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She is author

of No One Gardens Alone: A Life of Elizabeth Lawrence and coauthor of North Carolina Women: Making History.

Published with the assistance of the William Rand Kenan Jr. Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

September 2017

978-1-4696-3583-5 $25.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3584-2 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 224 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, 30 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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“The Three Graces of Val-Kill is a welcome addition to the books and memoirs about the Roosevelt family, providing a fresh look at Eleanor through the home she shared with Nan Cook and Marion Dickerman.”

—Susan Ware, author of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women's Sports

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AMERICAN HISTORY


Runaway Gregory Bateson, the Double Bind, and the Rise of Ecological Consciousness ANTHONY CHANEY An intellectual odyssey from schizophrenia to climate crisis The anthropologist Gregory Bateson has been called a lost giant of twentieth-century thought. In the years following World War II, Bateson was among the group of mathematicians, engineers, and social scientists who laid the theoretical foundations of the information age. In Palo Alto in 1956, he introduced the double-bind theory of schizophrenia. By the sixties, he was in Hawaii studying dolphin intelligence. Bateson’s discipline hopping made established experts wary, but he found an audience open to his ideas in a generation of rebellious youth. To a gathering of counterculturalists and revolutionaries in 1967 London, Bateson was the first to warn of a “greenhouse effect” that could lead to runaway climate change. Blending intellectual biography with an ambitious reappraisal of the 1960s, Anthony Chaney uses Bateson’s life and work to explore the idea that a postmodern ecological consciousness is the true legacy of the decade. Surrounded by voices calling for liberation of all kinds, Bateson spoke of limitation and dependence. But he also offered an affirming new picture of human beings and their place in the world—as ecologies knit together in a fabric of meaning that Bateson said “we might as well call Mind.” ANTHONY CHANEY teaches history and writing at the University of North Texas

at Dallas.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3173-8 $32.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3174-5 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 17 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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Published with the assistance of the Anniversary Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“This is a fascinating and ambitious study dealing with the cultural history of a concept—Gregory Bateson's double bind—as it emerged and wove its way through twentieth-century thought. In the process of narrating this complex intellectual and cultural history, Chaney draws upon not only Bateson's archive but a host of literary and scientific sources, demonstrating the shared influences and overlap between bodies of thought that to my knowledge have never been explored so deeply or with as much skill.”

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American and Environmental history

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—Frank Zelko, University of Vermont

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ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY


Religious Freedom The Contested History of an American Ideal TISA WENGER How a diverse array of Americans reinvented the freedom of religion Religious freedom is so often presented as a timeless American ideal and an inalienable right, appearing fully formed at the founding of the United States. That is simply not so, Tisa Wenger contends in this sweeping and brilliantly argued book. Instead, American ideas about religious freedom were continually reinvented through a vibrant national discourse—Wenger calls it “religious freedom talk”—that cannot possibly be separated from the evolving politics of race and empire. More often than not, Wenger demonstrates, religious freedom talk worked to privilege the dominant white Christian population. At the same time, a diverse array of minority groups at home and colonized people abroad invoked and reinterpreted this ideal to defend themselves and their ways of life. In so doing they posed sharp challenges to the racial and religious exclusions of American life. People of almost every religious stripe have argued, debated, negotiated, and brought into being an ideal called American religious freedom, subtly transforming their own identities and traditions in the process. In a post-9/11 world, Wenger reflects, public attention to religious freedom and its implications is as consequential as it has ever been.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3462-3 $34.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3463-0 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, notes, bibl., index

TISA WENGER, associate professor of American religious history at Yale University,

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Published with the assistance of the Thornton H. Brooks Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

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is the author of We Have a Religion: The 1920s Pueblo Indian Dance Controversy and American Religious Freedom.

“Theoretically informed, brilliantly argued, clearly organized, carefully evidenced, beautifully written, and wonderfully textured, Religious Freedom is an important book. Exploring the triangulation of religion, race, and empire— and how they are mutually shaped—Tisa Wenger has advanced our understanding of the dilemma of religious freedom.”

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—David Chidester, author of Empire of Religion: Imperialism and Comparative Religion

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RELIGION


The Battle of Peach Tree Creek Hood's First Effort to Save Atlanta EARL J. HESS The definitive tactical history of a key battle in the Atlanta campaign On July 20, 1864, the Civil War struggle for Atlanta reached a pivotal moment. As William T. Sherman’s Union forces came ever nearer the city, the defending Confederate Army of Tennessee replaced its commanding general, removing Joseph E. Johnston and elevating John Bell Hood. This decision stunned and demoralized Confederate troops just when Hood was compelled to take the offensive against the approaching Federals. Attacking northward from Atlanta’s defenses, Hood’s men struck George H. Thomas’s Army of the Cumberland just after it crossed Peach Tree Creek on July 20. Initially taken by surprise, the Federals fought back with spirit and nullified all the advantages the Confederates first enjoyed. As a result, the Federals achieved a remarkable defensive victory. Offering new and definitive interpretations of the battle’s place within the Atlanta campaign, Earl J. Hess describes how several Confederate regiments and brigades made a pretense of advancing but then stopped partway to the objective and took cover for the rest of the afternoon on July 20. Hess shows that morale played an unusually important role in determining the outcome at Peach Tree Creek—a soured mood among the Confederates and overwhelming confidence among the Federals spelled disaster for one side and victory for the other. Award-winning historian EARL J. HESS is author of many books on Civil War history, including Braxton Bragg: The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy.

Civil War America Published with the assistance of the Fred W. Morrison Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“Earl Hess is one of our finest Civil War military historians, and he's done another masterful job in The Battle of Peach Tree Creek. Through impeccable scholarship, Hess not only clearly describes the battle's tactical history but also places the fight into the larger context of the Atlanta campaign and the Civil War.”

September 2017

978-1-4696-3419-7 $37.50t Cloth 978-1-4696-3420-3 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 336 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 19 halftones, 20 maps, notes, bibl., index

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—A. Wilson Greene, author of The Final Battles of the Petersburg Campaign: Breaking the Backbone of the Rebellion

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8

CIVIL WAR


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Lincoln's Autocrat

Jack London

The Life of Edwin Stanton

A Writer's Fight for a Better America

WILLIAM MARVEL

CECELIA TICHI

A Civil War Monitor Best Book of 2015

Jack London as political and social activist

Rethinking Stanton and his place in American history

Jack London (1876–1916) found fame with his wolf-dog tales and sagas of the frozen North, but Cecelia Tichi challenges the long-standing view of London as merely a mass-market producer of potboilers. A onetime child laborer, London led a life of poverty in the Gilded Age before rising to worldwide acclaim for stories, novels, and essays designed to hasten the social, economic, and political advance of America. In this major reinterpretation of London’s career, Tichi examines how the beloved writer leveraged his written words as a force for the future.

Edwin M. Stanton (1814– 1869), one of the nineteenth century’s most impressive legal and political minds, wielded enormous influence and power as Lincoln’s secretary of war during most of the Civil War and under Johnson during the early years of Reconstruction. In the first full biography of Stanton in more than fifty years, William Marvel offers a detailed reexamination of Stanton’s life, career, and legacy. Marvel argues that while Stanton was a formidable advocate and politician, his character was hardly benign. Climbing from a difficult youth to the pinnacle of power, Stanton used his authority—and the public coffers—to pursue political vendettas, and he exercised sweeping wartime powers with a cavalier disregard for civil liberties..

CECELIA TICHI is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of English and professor of American studies at Vanderbilt University. She is author of Civic Passions, Exposés and Excess, and Embodiment of a Nation.

“Strongly recommended for London devotees and for anyone with an interest in the evolution of social reforms in America.” —Library Journal

WILLIAM MARVEL's many books include A Place Called Appomattox, Andersonville: The Last Depot, Lincoln's Darkest Year, and Tarnished Victory.

“Tichi's reframing of London offers a significant rethinking of early twentieth-century America.” —American Historical Review

Civil War America

“The tremendous research, clarity, and Marvel's narrative style make [this book] a joy to read. . . . Should enjoy a unique longevity unparalleled by its predecessors.” —The Journal of America's Military Past

August 2017

978-1-4696-3605-4 $22.00t Paper

296 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 33 halftones, notes, bibl., index

August 2017

978-1-4696-3615-3 $25.00t Paper 978-1-4696-2250-7 $19.99 BOOK

632 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 22 halftones, 3 maps, appends., notes, bibl., index

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CIVIL WAR / LITERATURE


Ham DAMON LEE FOWLER Pork, salt, and Damon Lee While the hindquarters of swine have been preserved in salt the world over for thousands of years, there are only a few places on earth where ham is as celebrated or integral to the cuisine as it is in the American South. To begin to understand the place that this iconic food holds in the hearts of southerners, Damon Lee Fowler writes, one has only to step into the historic smokehouse of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello and take a deep breath. More than a century after the last hams were hung to smoke in that chamber, the aroma of salt, smoke, and air-dried pork still permeates the rough masonry walls and clay floor, filling the air with its earthy perfume. Even after centuries of culinary transformations throughout the South, that fragrance lingers in kitchens throughout the region. Ham’s 55 recipes bring home the love in just about every way—brine- or drycured, smoked or not, boiled, baked, glazed, honey-baked and spiral cut, thin-sliced and piled into biscuits and sandwiches, fried up with eggs, with grits, with redeye gravy, added for savor to soups, casseroles, poultry, seafood, and, yes, the vegetable pot. Fowler also includes recipes inspired by Chinese, French, Italian, and Spanish dishes, and provides a guide to basic terminology and cooking methods. DAMON LEE FOWLER is the author of nine cookbooks, including Essentials of Southern Cooking, Classical Southern Cooking, and Beans, Greens, & Sweet Georgia Peaches. He also is the editor and recipe developer of Dining at Monticello. He resides in Savannah, Georgia. Savor the South Cookbooks

“For the ham-handed beginner and the ham connoisseur alike, Ham finally gives this delicious meat its due. With his peppery style and friendly, knowledgeable tone, Damon Lee Fowler has made a great addition to the Savor the South cookbook collection—it is HIGH TIME for a book dedicated to this adored southern food.” —Martha Foose, author of Screen Doors and Sweet Tea

September 2017

978-1-4696-3589-7 $20.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3590-3 $14.99 BOOK

Approx. 128 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, index

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10

COOKBOOKS / COOKING / FOODWAYS


The Farmhouse Chef Recipes and Stories from My Carolina Farm JAMIE DEMENT Food photography by Felicia Perry Trujillo

Cook fresh and flavorful through the North Carolina seasons— wherever you live In this richly illustrated cookbook, Jamie DeMent opens a bright kitchen window onto the newest kind of North Carolina farming life. On fifty-five acres of beautiful Piedmont farmland in Hillsborough, North Carolina, DeMent and her family raise sustainably nurtured and sought-after heirloom varieties of produce and livestock. Every day on Coon Rock Farm, DeMent is in the kitchen serving robust, flavorful, satisfying meals for family, crew, and farm interns—and now you are invited to share the bounty. The Farmhouse Chef offers 150 recipes for every occasion, from down home to downright elegant, inspired by the farm’s yield through the four seasons. From fall’s Sage- and Sausage-Stuffed Acorn Squash to Pear and Bacon Salad, to summer’s Sugarcane Barbecue Chicken and Watermelon Mojitos, DeMent’s cooking style highlights no-nonsense approaches using great ingredients combined with easy preparations for supercharged flavor. Accompanying the recipes are DeMent’s deliciously observant stories that illuminate what life is really like on a working farm. A native North Carolinian who decided to commit her energies to the development of sustainable farming in her state, DeMent will inspire those of us who may not have a lot of time to cook, let alone farm, but who care about seasonal, healthfully grown food. JAMIE DEMENT farms and cooks on Coon Rock Farm in Hillsborough, North Carolina. A well-known cooking teacher, she also owns, with her partner, Richard Holcomb, Piedmont Restaurant in Durham, North Carolina, and Bella Bean Organics.

“Jamie has a way of sweeping everyone within earshot into her sunny, spunky approach to life, agriculture, family, and food. The tantalizing array of recipes in The Farmhouse Chef—and the clear, gently encouraging way they are rendered—will attract readers and home cooks into her food world, one that is seasonal, sensual, and damn tasty! Her stories and recipes are so engaging, you won't even realize how much you're learning about southern food traditions along the way. Lookout, Pioneer Woman—the East Coast now has its own rural role model in Jamie DeMent!”

September 2017

978-1-4696-3506-4 $35.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3507-1 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 8 x 9.25, 100 color plates

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—Matt Lee and Ted Lee, authors of The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen

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11

COOKBOOKS / COOKING / FOODWAYS


The Social Life of Maps in America, 1750-1860 MARTIN BRÜCKNER The creation of American cartographic literacy In the age of MapQuest and GPS, we take cartographic literacy for granted. We should not; the ability to find meaning in maps is the fruit of a long process of exposure and instruction. A “cartocoded” America—a nation in which maps are pervasive and meaningful—had to be created. The Social Life of Maps in America, 1750-1860 tracks American cartography’s spectacular rise to its unprecedented cultural influence. Between 1750 and 1860, maps did more than communicate geographic information and political pretensions. They became affordable and intelligible to ordinary American men and women looking for their place in the world. School maps quickly entered classrooms, where they shaped reading and other cognitive exercises; giant maps drew attention in public spaces; miniature maps helped Americans chart personal experiences. In short, maps were uniquely social objects whose visual and material expressions affected commercial practices and graphic arts, theatrical performances and the communication of emotions. This lavishly illustrated study follows popular maps from their points of creation to shops and galleries, schoolrooms and coat pockets, parlors and bookbindings. Between the decades leading up to the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, early Americans bonded with maps; Martin Brückner’s comprehensive history of quotidian cartographic encounters is the first to show us how. MARTIN BRÜCKNER is a professor of English at the University of Delaware. Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia

November 2017

978-1-4696-3260-5 $49.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3261-2 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 424 pp., 8.5 x 9, est 8 pp color plates., 146 halftones, notes, index

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“Zooming in and out, charting the careers of mapmakers, map users, and maps themselves, The Social Life of Maps in America sketches a stunning bird's-eye view of an important medium as well as an intimate geography of commercial society between the Revolution and the Civil War. In Martin Brückner's skillful hands, ephemeral cultural objects come alive again and help narrate a completely new history of cartography in early America.” —Eric Slauter, University of Chicago

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12

EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY


Children of Uncertain Fortune Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833 DANIEL LIVESAY How mixed-race relatives became strangers By tracing the largely forgotten eighteenth-century migration of elite mixed-race individuals from Jamaica to Great Britain, Children of Uncertain Fortune reinterprets the evolution of British racial ideologies as a matter of negotiating family membership. Using wills, legal petitions, family correspondences, and inheritance lawsuits, Daniel Livesay is the first scholar to follow the hundreds of children born to white planters and Caribbean women of color who crossed the ocean for educational opportunities, professional apprenticeships, marriage prospects, or refuge from colonial prejudices. The presence of these elite children of color in Britain pushed popular opinion in the British Atlantic world toward narrower conceptions of race and kinship. Members of Parliament, colonial assemblymen, merchant kings, and cultural arbiters—the very people who decided Britain’s colonial policies, debated abolition, passed marital laws, and arbitrated inheritance disputes—rubbed shoulders with these mixed-race Caribbean migrants in parlors and sitting rooms. Upper-class Britons also resented colonial transplants and coveted their inheritances; family intimacy gave way to racial exclusion. By the early nineteenth century, relatives had become strangers.

January 2018

978-1-4696-3443-2 $45.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3444-9 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 448 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 24 halftones, notes, index

DANIEL LIVESAY is assistant professor of history at Claremont McKenna College.

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Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia

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“In this brilliant model of Atlantic history, Daniel Livesay gracefully brings to life the extraordinary, sometimes heartbreaking stories of mixed-race Caribbean people in Great Britain, revealing the long, complicated lines of family and belonging, race and alienation. This lucid and deeply researched book compellingly illuminates slavery, empire, and colonialism and their enduring impact on individuals, families, and nations.”

and Early American history

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—Sarah M. S. Pearsall, University of Cambridge

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13

BRITISH HISTORY


A Different Shade of Justice Asian American Civil Rights in the South STEPHANIE HINNERSHITZ The southern struggle for rights beyond black and white In the Jim Crow South, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and, later, Vietnamese and Indian Americans faced obstacles similar to those experienced by African Americans in their fight for civil and human rights. Although they were not black, Asian Americans generally were not considered white and thus were subject to school segregation, antimiscegenation laws, and discriminatory business practices. As Asian Americans attempted to establish themselves in the South, they found that institutionalized racism thwarted their efforts time and again. However, this book tells the story of their resistance and documents how Asian American political actors and civil rights activists challenged existing definitions of rights and justice in the South. From the formation of Chinese and Japanese communities in the early twentieth century through Indian hotel owners’ battles against business discrimination in the 1980s and ’90s, Stephanie Hinnershitz shows how Asian Americans organized carefully constructed legal battles that often traveled to the state and federal supreme courts. Drawing from legislative and legal records as well as oral histories, memoirs, and newspapers, Hinnershitz describes a movement that ran alongside and at times intersected with the African American fight for justice, and she restores Asian Americans to the fraught legacy of civil rights in the South. STEPHANIE HINNERSHITZ is assistant professor of history at Cleveland State

University.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3369-5 $39.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3370-1 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 10 halftones, 1 map, notes, bibl., index

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“A Different Shade of Justice is a marvelous accomplishment of shaping a mountain of archival work into a set of narratives that help depict Asian American struggles for civil rights in the South, stories that have, until now, been largely invisible in civil rights history.”

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—Daryl Joji Maeda, author of Chains of Babylon

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14

ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES


The Legend of the Black Mecca Politics and Class in the Making of Modern Atlanta MAURICE J. HOBSON From Maynard Jackson to Dirty South Hip-Hop For more than a century, the city of Atlanta has been associated with black achievement in education, business, politics, media, and music, earning it the nickname “the black Mecca.” Atlanta’s long tradition of black education dates back to Reconstruction, and produced an elite that flourished in spite of Jim Crow, rose to leadership during the civil rights movement, and then took power in the 1970s by building a coalition between white progressives, business interests, and black Atlantans. But as Maurice J. Hobson demonstrates, Atlanta’s political leadership—from the election of Maynard Jackson, Atlanta’s first black mayor, through the city’s hosting of the 1996 Olympic Games—has consistently mishandled the black poor. Drawn from vivid primary sources and unnerving oral histories of working-class city-dwellers and hip-hop artists from Atlanta’s underbelly, Hobson argues that Atlanta’s political leadership has governed by bargaining with white business interests to the detriment of ordinary black Atlantans. In telling this history through the prism of the black New South and Atlanta politics, policy, and pop culture, Hobson portrays a striking schism between the black political elite and poor city-dwellers, complicating the long-held view of Atlanta as a mecca for black people. MAURICE J. HOBSON is assistant professor of African American studies and history at Georgia State University.

“Maurice Hobson keeps it real in this post–civil rights history of black Atlanta. He excavates the political contradictions in the city's politics by revealing what Atlanta's hip-hop community dubbed the Dirty South. Here's a history where Outkast and Goodie Mob meets Atlanta's black mayors. The ironies are deliciously delectable and debatable. Hobson's history of Atlanta is not simply regional; it is a national story of neoliberal politics at the expense of the poor.”

November 2017

978-1-4696-3535-4 $29.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3536-1 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, appends., notes, bibl., index

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15

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


The Promise of Patriarchy Women and the Nation of Islam ULA YVETTE TAYLOR Putting women at the center of the Nation of Islam The patriarchal structure of the Nation of Islam (NOI) promised black women the prospect of finding a provider and a protector among the organization’s men, who were fiercely committed to these masculine roles. Black women’s experience in the NOI, however, has largely remained on the periphery of scholarship. Here, Ula Taylor documents their struggle to escape the devaluation of black womanhood while also clinging to the empowering promises of patriarchy. Taylor shows how, despite being relegated to a lifestyle that did not encourage working outside of the home, NOI women found freedom in being able to bypass the degrading experiences connected to labor performed largely by working-class black women and in raising and educating their children in racially affirming environments. Telling the stories of women like Clara Poole (wife of Elijah Muhammad) and Burnsteen Sharrieff (secretary to W. D. Fard, founder of the Allah Temple of Islam), Taylor offers a compelling narrative that explains how their decision to join a homegrown, male-controlled Islamic movement was a complicated act of self-preservation and selflove in Jim Crow America.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3392-3 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3393-0 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3394-7 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 13 halftones, notes, bibl., index

ULA YVETTE TAYLOR is professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley and also author of The Veiled Garvey: The Life and Times of Amy Jacques Garvey.

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“Until now, histories of the NOI have not given women their due, and none have had this kind of archival breadth and reach. This is superb scholarship.”

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16

RELIGION


Religion as Critique Islamic Critical Thinking from Mecca to the Marketplace IRFAN AHMAD Consequential critical thinking from within religious traditions Irfan Ahmad makes the far-reaching argument that potent systems and modes for self-critique as well as critique of others are inherent in Islam—indeed, critique is integral to its fundamental tenets and practices. Challenging common views of Islam as hostile to critical thinking, Ahmad delineates thriving traditions of critique in Islamic culture, focusing in large part on South Asian traditions. Ahmad contemplates and interrogates Greek and Enlightenment notions of reason and critique, and he notes how they are invoked in relation to “others,” including Muslims. Drafting an alternative genealogy of critique in Islam, Ahmad reads religious teachings and texts, drawing on sources in Hindi, Urdu, Farsi, and English, and demonstrates how they serve as expressions of critique. Throughout, he depicts Islam as an agent, not an object, of critique. On a broader level, Ahmad expands the idea of critique itself. Drawing on his fieldwork among marketplace hawkers in Delhi and Aligarh, he construes critique anthropologically as a sociocultural activity in the everyday lives of ordinary Muslims, beyond the world of intellectuals. Religion as Critique allows space for new theoretical considerations of modernity and change, taking on such salient issues as nationhood, women’s equality, the state, culture, democracy, and secularism.

December 2017

978-1-4696-3508-8 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3509-5 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3510-1 $24.99 BOOK

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IRFAN AHMAD, an anthropologist and senior research fellow at the Max Planck

Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Studies in Göttingen, Germany, is the author of Islamism and Democracy in India: The Transformation of Jamaat-e-Islami.

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RELIGION


Knocking on Labor's Door Union Organizing in the 1970s and the Roots of a New Economic Divide LANE WINDHAM The unfulfilled working-class promise of a pivotal decade The power of unions in workers’ lives and in the American political system has declined dramatically since the 1970s. In recent years, many have argued that the crisis took root when unions stopped reaching out to workers and workers turned away from unions. But here Lane Windham tells a different story. Highlighting the integral, oftenoverlooked contributions of women, people of color, young workers, and southerners, Windham reveals how in the 1970s workers combined old working-class tools—like unions and labor law—with legislative gains from the civil and women’s rights movements to help shore up their prospects. Through close-up studies of workers’ campaigns in shipbuilding, textiles, retail, and service, Windham overturns widely held myths about labor’s decline, showing instead how employers united to manipulate weak labor law and quash a new wave of worker organizing. Recounting how employees attempted to unionize against overwhelming opposition from bosses and corporations, Knocking on Labor’s Door dramatically refashions the narrative of labor and politics during a crucial decade and remaps the recent history of the American workplace. Windham’s story inspires both hope and indignation, and will become a must-read in labor, civil rights, and women’s history. LANE WINDHAM is a fellow with Georgetown University's Kalmanovitz Initiative

for Labor and the Working Poor.

Published with the assistance of the Authors Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

October 2017

978-1-4696-3207-0 $32.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3208-7 $31.99 BOOK

Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 14 halftones, 7 figs., 1 table, appends., notes, bibl., index

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“Lane Windham takes a fresh look at phenomenon that many of us thought we understood—the decline of U.S. trade unionism. With meticulous research and graceful prose, she challenges our outworn preconceptions. Her narrative of labor's recent past deepens our understanding of its present challenges and helps us imagine its future. Rarely have I felt as great an urge to stand up and cheer when reading a work of history as I did while reading this one.”

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—Joseph A. McCartin, author of Collision Course

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18

AMERICAN HISTORY


Black Firefighters and the FDNY The Struggle for Jobs, Justice, and Equity in New York City DAVID GOLDBERG A century of courage under fire For many African Americans, getting a public sector job has historically been one of the few paths to the financial stability of the middle class, and in New York City, few such jobs were as sought-after as positions in the fire department (FDNY). For over a century, generations of Black New Yorkers have fought to gain access to and equal opportunity within the FDNY. Tracing this struggle for jobs and justice from 1914 to the present, David Goldberg details the ways each generation of firefighters confronted overt and institutionalized racism. An important chapter in the histories of both Black social movements and independent workplace organizing, this book demonstrates how Black firefighters in New York helped to create affirmative action from the “bottom up,” while simultaneously revealing how white resistance to these efforts shaped white working-class conservatism and myths of American meritocracy. Full of colorful characters and rousing stories drawn from oral histories, discrimination suits, and the archives of the Vulcan Society (the fraternal society of Black firefighters in New York), this book sheds new light on the impact of Black firefighters in the fight for civil rights.

December 2017

978-1-4696-3362-6 $34.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3363-3 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 400 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 27 halftones, notes, index

DAVID GOLDBERG is assistant professor of African American studies at Wayne

State University.

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“That we can know so much about Black firefighters in one locale—even during early years in which they constituted a literal handful of workers—is both a pleasant surprise and a tribute to the assiduous research of Goldberg in archives and in the mining of oral histories. The textured evidence, in terms of both policy decisions and personal experiences, is deeply impressive and persuasive. The characters that emerge here are compelling in a way all too rare in labor history.”

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—David Roediger, author of Seizing Freedom

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19

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Welcome to Fairyland Queer Miami before 1940 JULIO CAPÓ JR. The historical roots of today's queer Miami Poised on the edge of the United States and at the center of a wider Caribbean world, today’s Miami is marketed as an international tourist hub that embraces gender and sexual difference. As Julio Capó Jr. shows in this fascinating history, Miami’s transnational connections reveal that the city has been a queer borderland for over a century. In chronicling Miami’s queer past from its 1896 founding through World War II, Capó shows the multifaceted ways gender and sexual renegades made the city their own. Drawing from a multilingual archive, Capó unearths the forgotten history of “fairyland,” a marketing term crafted by boosters that held multiple meanings for different groups of people. In viewing Miami as a contested colonial space, he turns our attention to migrants and immigrants, tourism, and trade to and from the Caribbean—particularly the Bahamas, Cuba, and Haiti—to expand the geographic and methodological parameters of urban and queer history. Recovering the world of Miami’s old saloons, brothels, immigration checkpoints, borders, nightclubs, bars, and cruising sites, Capó makes clear how critical gender and sexual transgression is to understanding the city and the broader region in all its fullness.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3519-4 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3520-0 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3521-7 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 400 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 26 halftones, 2 maps, 1 table, notes, bibl., index

JULIO CAPÓ JR. is assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts,

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Amherst.

“Eloquently written, exquisitely analyzed, and impeccably researched, this is one of the best works of scholarship I have read in a long time. Julio Capó Jr. gives voice to whole communities of people whose lived experiences have largely been rendered invisible. The result is a work of national significance.” —Melanie Shell-Weiss, Grand Valley State University

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20

GENDER AND SEXUALITY


Raising Government Children A History of Foster Care and the American Welfare State CATHERINE E. RYMPH The roots of our troubled foster care system In the 1930s, buoyed by the potential of the New Deal, child welfare reformers hoped to formalize and modernize their methods, partly through professional casework but more importantly through the loving care of temporary, substitute families. Today, however, the foster care system is widely criticized for failing the children and families it is intended to help. How did a vision of dignified services become virtually synonymous with the breakup of poor families and a disparaged form of “welfare” that stigmatizes the women who provide it, the children who receive it, and their families? Tracing the evolution of the modern American foster care system from its inception in the 1930s through the 1970s, Catherine Rymph argues that deeply gendered, domestic ideals, implicit assumptions about the relative value of poor children, and the complex public/private nature of American welfare provision fueled the cultural resistance to funding maternal and parental care. What emerged was a system of public social provision that was actually subsidized by foster families themselves, most of whom were concentrated toward the socioeconomic lower half, much like the children they served. Analyzing the ideas, debates, and policies surrounding foster care and foster parents’ relationship to public welfare, Rymph reveals the framework for the building of the foster care system and draws out its implications for today’s child support networks. CATHERINE E. RYMPH is associate professor of history at the University of Missouri and also author of Republican Women: Feminism and Conservatism from Suffrage through the Rise of the New Right. Published with the assistance of the Anniversary Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“Full of powerful vignettes of actual people and their various paths to foster care, this is policy history with an all too human face. Refreshingly, Rymph refuses to be judgmental when it comes to those who give up children and those who take them in, which is a welcome approach to a topic too often presented through lenses of morality.”

October 2017

978-1-4696-3563-7 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3564-4 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3565-1 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 272 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 8 halftones, append., notes, bibl., index

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21

AMERICAN HISTORY


A Union Indivisible Secession and the Politics of Slavery in the Border South MICHAEL D. ROBINSON A new political history of the secession crisis in the Border South Many accounts of the secession crisis overlook the sharp political conflict that took place in the Border South states of Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, and Missouri. Michael D. Robinson expands the scope of this crisis to show how the fate of the Border South, and with it the Union, desperately hung in the balance during the fateful months surrounding the clash at Fort Sumter. During this period, Border South politicians revealed the region’s deep commitment to slavery, disputed whether or not to leave the Union, and schemed to win enough support to carry the day. Although these border states contained fewer enslaved people than the eleven states that seceded, white border Southerners chose to remain in the Union because they felt the decision best protected their peculiar institution. Robinson reveals anew how the choice for union was fraught with anguish and uncertainty, dividing families and producing years of bitter internecine violence. Letters, diaries, newspapers, and quantitative evidence illuminate how, in the absence of a compromise settlement, proslavery Unionists managed to defeat secession in the Border South.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3378-7 $34.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3379-4 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 3 halftones, 1 map, 19 tables, appends., notes, bibl., index

MICHAEL D. ROBINSON is assistant professor of history at the University of

Mobile.

Civil War America Published with the assistance of the Fred W. Morrison Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“A Union Indivisible enhances our understanding of the complicated politics—and the even more complicated issues of secession and union—in the fragile slave states later known as the ‘Border South.’ This book offers illuminating insights into individuals’ and states’ complex political beliefs and behaviors during the turbulence of the Civil War's onset.”

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—Christopher Phillips, University of Cincinnati

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22

CIVIL WAR


The Stormy Present Conservatism and the Problem of Slavery in Northern Politics, 1846–1865 ADAM I. P. SMITH A new history of conservatism in the Civil War North In this engaging and nuanced political history of Northern communities in the Civil War era, Adam I. P. Smith offers a new interpretation of the familiar story of the path to war and ultimate victory. Smith looks beyond the political divisions between abolitionist Republicans and Copperhead Democrats to consider the everyday conservatism that characterized the majority of Northern voters. A sense of ongoing crisis in these Northern states created anxiety and instability, which manifested in a range of social and political tensions in individual communities. In the face of such realities, Smith argues that a conservative impulse was more than just a historical or nostalgic tendency; it was fundamental to charting a path to the future. At stake for Northerners was their conception of the Union as the vanguard in a global struggle between democracy and despotism, and their ability to navigate their freedoms through the stormy waters of modernity. As a result, the language of conservatism was peculiarly, and revealingly, prominent in Northern politics during these years. The story this book tells is of conservative people coming, in the end, to accept radical change. ADAM I. P. SMITH is senior lecturer in U.S. history at the University College of

London.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3389-3 $39.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3390-9 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, notes, bibl., index

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“This brilliant, timely, and original book is a must-read for specialists and scholars of nineteenth-century U.S. History and American politics. Among his many contributions, Smith finds the sensible middle ground between conflicting interpretations of whether the Civil War was a war for abolition or for Union.”

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—Elizabeth R. Varon, University of Virginia

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23

CIVIL WAR


Funding Feminism Monied Women, Philanthropy, and the Women's Movement, 1870–1967 JOAN MARIE JOHNSON Female philanthropists, wealth, power, and elitism in the early American women's movement Joan Marie Johnson examines an understudied dimension of women’s history in the United States: how a group of affluent white women from the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth centuries advanced the status of all women through acts of philanthropy. This cadre of activists included Phoebe Hearst, the mother of William Randolph Hearst; Grace Dodge, granddaughter of Wall Street “Merchant Prince” William Earle Dodge; and Ava Belmont, who married into the Vanderbilt family fortune. Motivated by their own experiences with sexism, and focusing on women’s need for economic independence, these benefactors sought to expand women’s access to higher education, promote suffrage, and champion reproductive rights, as well as to provide assistance to working-class women. In a time when women still wielded limited political power, philanthropy was perhaps the most potent tool they had. But even as these wealthy women exercised considerable influence, their activism had significant limits. As Johnson argues, restrictions tied to their giving engendered resentment and jeopardized efforts to establish coalitions across racial and class lines. As the struggle for full economic and political power and self-determination for women continues today, this history reveals how generous women helped shape the movement. And Johnson shows us that tensions over wealth and power that persist in the modern movement have deep historical roots. JOAN MARIE JOHNSON is a historian and faculty program coordinator for the

Office of the Provost at Northwestern University.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3469-2 $39.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3470-8 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 17 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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Gender and American Culture Published with the assistance of the Greensboro Women's Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

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“Funding Feminism is a brilliantly conceived work that enriches our understanding and probes the complexities of feminism in the United States by demonstrating the ways that wealthy women both advanced feminist causes and—despite their commitment to a sisterhood of all women—sometimes exacerbated divisions among women based on class, race, and ethnicity.” —Anya Jabour, University of Montana

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24

WOMEN'S HISTORY


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Tales from the Haunted South

Making Freedom The Underground Railroad and the Politics of Slavery

Dark Tourism and Memories of Slavery from the Civil War Era

R. J. M. BLACKETT

TIYA MILES

The work of self-emancipation

A new look at how we choose to remember slavery and the Civil War

The 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, which mandated action to aid in the recovery of runaway slaves and denied fugitives legal rights if they were apprehended, quickly became a focal point in the debate over the future of slavery and the nature of the union. In Making Freedom, R. J. M. Blackett uses the experiences of escaped slaves and those who aided them to explore the inner workings of the Underground Railroad and the enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Law, while shedding light on the political effects of slave escape in southern states, border states, and the North.

In this book Tiya Miles explores the popular yet troubling phenomenon of “ghost tours,” frequently promoted and experienced at plantations, urban manor homes, and cemeteries throughout the South. As a staple of the tours, guides entertain paying customers by routinely relying on stories of enslaved black specters. But who are these ghosts? Examining popular sites and stories from these tours, Miles shows that haunted tales routinely appropriate and skew African American history to produce representations of slavery for commercial gain. In an incisive and engaging work, Miles uses these troubling cases to shine light on how we feel about the Civil War and race, and how the ghosts of the past are still with us.

R. J. M. BLACKETT is Andrew Jackson Professor of History at Vanderbilt University and author of Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War, among other books. The Steven and Janice Brose Lectures in the Civil War Era

“The clarity of Blackett's vision make[s] this book suitable for a variety of audiences, including undergraduates, graduate students, and professional historians. Blackett's storytelling makes for compelling writing, while the implications of those stories stimulate thinking.” —Journal of the Civil War Era

August 2017

TIYA MILES is Elsa Barkley Brown Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan. The Steven and Janice Brose Lectures in the Civil War Era

“Imagery portrayed within each story . . . will keep readers on the edge of their seats in anticipation of the next sentence, waiting to hear how each narrative plays out.” —Choice

978-1-4696-3610-8 $20.00s Paper 978-1-4696-0878-5 $15.99 BOOK

August 2017

978-1-4696-3614-6 $20.00s Paper 978-1-4696-2634-5 $15.99 BOOK

136 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, notes, index

176 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 11 halftones, notes, index

www.uncpress.org

25

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY / CIVIL WAR


Hard, Hard Religion Interracial Faith in the Poor South JOHN HAYES How faith crossed the color line among the poor In his captivating study of faith and class, John Hayes examines the ways folk religion in the early twentieth century allowed the South’s poor—both white and black—to listen, borrow, and learn from each other about what it meant to live as Christians in a world of severe struggle. Beneath the well-documented religious forms of the New South, people caught in the region’s poverty crafted a distinct folk Christianity that spoke from the margins of capitalist development, giving voice to modern phenomena like alienation and disenchantment. Through haunting songs of death, mystical tales of conversion, grassroots sacramental displays, and an ethic of neighborliness, impoverished folk Christians looked for the sacred in their midst and affirmed the value of this life in this world. From Tom Watson and W. E. B. Du Bois over a century ago to political commentators today, many have ruminated on how, despite material commonalities, the poor of the South have been perennially divided by racism. Through his excavation of a folk Christianity of the poor, which fused strands of African and European tradition into a new synthesis, John Hayes recovers a historically contingent moment of interracial exchange generated in hardship.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3531-6 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3532-3 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3533-0 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 256 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 22 halftones, notes, bibl., index

JOHN HAYES is associate professor of history at Augusta University.

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New Directions in Southern Studies Published with the assistance of the Fred W. Morrison Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“Offering much-needed insight into social class and poverty in the religious world of the early twentieth-century South, John Hayes's fine study of folk religion reveals the rich emotional and aesthetic lives of its subjects. A fascinating book.” —Fred Hobson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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26

RELIGION


Beyond the Crossroads The Devil and the Blues Tradition ADAM GUSSOW Getting beyond the clichés about Robert Johnson and the devil's music The devil is the most charismatic and important figure in the blues tradition. He’s not just the music’s namesake (“the devil’s music”), but a shadowy presence who haunts an imagined Mississippi crossroads where, it is claimed, Delta bluesman Robert Johnson traded away his soul in exchange for extraordinary prowess on the guitar. Yet, as scholar and musician Adam Gussow argues, there is much more to the story of the devil and the blues than these clichéd understandings. In this groundbreaking study, Gussow takes the full measure of the devil’s presence. Working from original transcriptions of more than 125 recordings released during the past ninety years, Gussow explores the varied uses to which black southern blues people have put this trouble-sowing, love-wrecking, but also empowering figure. The book culminates with a bold reinterpretation of Johnson’s music and a provocative investigation of the way in which the citizens of Clarksdale, Mississippi, managed to rebrand a commercial hub as “the crossroads” in 1999, claiming Johnson and the devil as their own. ADAM GUSSOW is associate professor of English and southern studies at the University of Mississippi and author of Mister Satan's Apprentice: A Blues Memoir.

October 2017

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Approx. 416 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 6 halftones, 2 maps, append., notes, bibl., index

New Directions in Southern Studies

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“At once affable and frightening, the devil is forever partnered with the blues. Beyond the Crossroads is a beautifully written exploration of what Adam Gussow calls the blues most malleable, dynamic, and important personage. This is a work of exquisite detail.” —William Ferris, author of The South in Color

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27

AMERICAN STUDIES


The Place of Stone Dighton Rock and the Erasure of America's Indigenous Past DOUGLAS HUNTER Colonization and the many competing histories of an ancient artifact Claimed by many to be the most frequently documented artifact in American archeology, Dighton Rock is a forty-ton boulder covered in petroglyphs in southern Massachusetts. First noted by New England colonists in 1680, the rock’s markings have been debated endlessly by scholars and everyday people alike on both sides of the Atlantic. The glyphs have been erroneously assigned to an array of non-Indigenous cultures: Norsemen, Egyptians, Lost Tribes of Israel, vanished Portuguese explorers, and even a prince from Atlantis. In this fascinating story rich in personalities and memorable characters, Douglas Hunter uses Dighton Rock to reveal the long, complex history of colonization, American archaeology, and the conceptualization of Indigenous people. Hunter argues that misinterpretations of the rock’s markings share common motivations and have erased Indigenous people not only from their own history but from the landscape. He shows how Dighton Rock for centuries drove ideas about the original peopling of the Americas, including Bering Strait migration scenarios and the identity of the "Mound Builders." He argues the debates over Dighton Rock have served to answer two questions: Who belongs in America, and to whom does America belong? An award-winning journalist and historian, DOUGLAS HUNTER's previous books include Half Moon and God's Mercies. He lives in Port McNicoll, ON, Canada.

Publication supported by Figure Foundation

October 2017

978-1-4696-3440-1 $34.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3441-8 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, 1 map, notes, bibl., index

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“A fascinating study that intertwines Indigenous history with colonial narcissism, told in an accomplished and engaging voice. A rich and deep story with lessons that still resonate.”

in American and Native • Publications American history

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—James Taylor Carson, Queen's University

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28

NATIVE AMERICAN / INDIGENOUS STUDIES


Claiming Turtle Mountain's Constitution The History, Legacy, and Future of a Tribal Nation's Founding Documents KEITH RICHOTTE JR. How studying the “founding fathers” of one Indigenous nation explains tribal governance today In an auditorium in Belcourt, North Dakota, on a chilly October day in 1932, Robert Bruce and his fellow tribal citizens held the political fate of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians in their hands. Bruce, and the others, had been asked to adopt a tribal constitution, but he was unhappy with the document, as it limited tribal governmental authority. However, white authorities told the tribal nation that the proposed constitution was a necessary step in bringing a lawsuit against the federal government over a long-standing land dispute. Bruce’s choice, and the choice of his fellow citizens, has shaped tribal governance on the reservation ever since that fateful day. In this book, Keith Richotte Jr. offers a critical examination of one tribal nation’s decision to adopt a constitution. By asking why the citizens of Turtle Mountain voted to adopt the document despite perceived flaws, he confronts assumptions about how tribal constitutions came to be, reexamines the status of tribal governments in the present, and offers a fresh set of questions as we look to the future of governance in Native America and beyond.

September 2017

978-1-4696-3450-0 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3451-7 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3452-4 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 3 halftones, 1 map, appends., notes, bibl., index

KEITH RICHOTTE JR. (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) is assistant professor of American studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also proudly serves as an associate justice of the Turtle Mountain Tribal Court of Appeals.

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Published with the assistance of the Authors Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“An important contribution not only to Native American law and legal history but also to American legal history—a well-written, well-researched story that engages the reader.” —Sidney L. Harring, CUNY School of Law

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29

NATIVE AMERICAN / INDIGENOUS STUDIES


Remaking Black Power How Black Women Transformed an Era ASHLEY D. FARMER The intellectuals and activists who revolutionized the movement In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women’s political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that race and gender constraints relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created—the “Militant Black Domestic,” the “Revolutionary Black Woman,” and the “Third World Woman,” for instance—spurred debate among activists over the centrality of gender to Black Power ideologies, ultimately causing many of the era’s organizations and collectives to adopt a more radical critique of patriarchy. Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women’s artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life. ASHLEY D. FARMER is assistant professor of history at Boston University. Justice, Power, and Politics Published with the assistance of the Authors Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“This is one of the most sophisticated, nuanced, and analytically rigorous explorations of Black Power that I have had the pleasure to read. No other study on the subject is this substantively focused and theoretically sharp.” —Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar, University of Connecticut

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30

November 2017

978-1-4696-3437-1 $29.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3438-8 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 272 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 13 halftones

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Ambivalent Embrace Jewish Upward Mobility in Postwar America RACHEL KRANSON Jewish authenticity in the land of plenty This new cultural history of Jewish life and identity in the United States after World War II focuses on the process of upward mobility. Rachel Kranson challenges the common notion that most American Jews unambivalently celebrated their generally strong growth in economic status and social acceptance during the booming postwar era. In fact, a significant number of Jewish religious, artistic, and intellectual leaders worried about the ascent of large numbers of Jews into the American middle class. Kranson reveals that many Jews were deeply concerned that their lives—affected by rapidly changing political pressures, gender roles, and religious practices—were becoming dangerously disconnected from authentic Jewish values. She uncovers how Jewish leaders delivered jeremiads that warned affluent Jews of hypocrisy and associated “good” Jews with poverty, even at times romanticizing life in America’s immigrant slums and Europe’s impoverished shtetls. Jewish leaders, while not trying to hinder economic development, thus cemented an ongoing identification with the Jewish heritage of poverty and marginality as a crucial element in an American Jewish ethos.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3542-2 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3543-9 $27.50s Paper 978-1-4696-3544-6 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 264 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 6 halftones, notes, bibl., index

RACHEL KRANSON is assistant professor of religious studies at the University of

Pittsburgh.

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Published with the assistance of the Anniversary Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“One of the most significant books on the question of Jewish American identity in the postwar period, Ambivalent Embrace will become my go-to history of American Jews of the second half of the century. The study accounts for so many unique patterns seen in twentieth-century Jewish life, from political liberalism and race relations to economics, demography —and, of course, Jewish identity.” —Michael Alexander, author of Jazz Age Jews

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31

RELIGION


Raza Sí, Migra No Chicano Movement Struggles for Immigrant Rights in San Diego JIMMY PATIÑO The making of a movement defying the Border Patrol and deportation As immigration from Mexico to the United States grew through the 1970s and 1980s, the Border Patrol, police, and other state agents exerted increasing violence against ethnic Mexicans in San Diego’s volatile border region. In response, many San Diego activists rallied around the leadership of the small-scale print shop owner Herman Baca in the Chicano movement to empower Mexican Americans through Chicano self-determination. The combination of increasing repression and Chicano activism gradually produced a new conception of ethnic and racial community that included both established Mexican Americans and new Mexican immigrants. Here, Jimmy Patiño narrates the rise of this Chicano/Mexicano consciousness and the dawning awareness that Mexican Americans and Mexicans would have to work together to fight border enforcement policies that subjected Latinos of all statuses to legal violence. By placing the Chicano and Latino civil rights struggle on explicitly transnational terrain, Patiño fundamentally reorients the understanding of the Chicano movement. Ultimately, Patiño tells the story of how Chicano/Mexicano politics articulated an “abolitionist” position on immigration—going beyond the agreed upon assumptions shared by liberals and conservatives alike that deportations are inherent to any solutions to the still burgeoning immigration debate. JIMMY PATIÑO is assistant professor of Chicano and Latino studies at the University of Minnesota.

“This fine work of history exemplifies strong archival and oral historical research, clear writing, and sound argumentation about topics of pressing importance. Patiño provides a new foundation for future academic research, and his book will sharpen, frame, and animate conversations about the United States and Mexico in classrooms, living rooms, and think tanks in both countries.”

November 2017

978-1-4696-3555-2 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3556-9 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3557-6 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 6 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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—Stephen Pitti, Yale University

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32

LATINO STUDIES


Radical Intellect Liberator Magazine and Black Activism in the 1960s CHRISTOPHER M. TINSON The cutting edge of the African American left The rise of black radicalism in the 1960s was a result of both the successes and the failures of the civil rights movement. The movement’s victories were inspirational, but its failures to bring about structural political and economic change pushed many to look elsewhere for new strategies. During this era of intellectual ferment, the writers, editors, and activists behind the monthly magazine Liberator (1960–71) were essential contributors to the debate. In the first full-length history of the organization that produced the magazine, Christopher M. Tinson locates the Liberator as a touchstone of U.S.-based black radical thought and organizing in the 1960s. Combining radical journalism with on-the-ground activism, the magazine was dedicated to the dissemination of a range of cultural criticism aimed at spurring political activism, and became the publishing home to many notable radical intellectual-activists of the period, such as Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Harold Cruse, and Askia Touré. By mapping the history and intellectual trajectory of the Liberator and its thinkers, Tinson traces black intellectual history beyond black power and black nationalism into an internationalism that would shape radical thought for decades to come.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3454-8 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3455-5 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3456-2 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 9 halftones

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CHRISTOPHER M. TINSON is associate professor of Africana studies and history

at Hampshire College.

PAPER

“An illuminating, nuanced, and beautifully written history that explores community-based print culture as a critical nexus for black radicalism in the 1960s and 1970s. This brilliant book brings into focus a world of political and cultural work that was local and transnational, Pan-African, black nationalist, feminist, and rooted in a tradition of labor radicalism. A core text for those studying histories of freedom struggle.” —Jennifer Guglielmo, author of Living the Revolution

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33

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Cuban Revolution in America Havana and the Making of a United States Left, 1968–1992 TEISHAN A. LATNER The Revolution on America's doorstep When a popular revolution prevailed on America’s doorstep in 1959, it provoked the wrath of the American political establishment but fueled intense interest within the multiracial American Left. In this groundbreaking book, historian Teishan Latner contends that as Americans studied Cuba’s achievements in universal education, health care, economic redistribution, and racial and gender equality and embraced Cuban revolutionary theory, Havana in turn looked to the U.S. Left as a collaborator in the global battle against inequality and imperialism and an ally in its Cold War struggle with Washington. By supporting black radical organizations such as the Black Panther Party, New Left groups such as the Venceremos Brigade, and the Cuban American students of the Antonio Maceo Brigade, as well as by granting political asylum to activists such as Assata Shakur, Cuba became a durable global influence on U.S. radicalism for the modern era. Drawing from extensive archival and oral history research and declassified FBI and CIA documents, this is the first multidecade examination of the encounter between the American Left and the Cuban revolution. By analyzing Cuba’s social, cultural, and political impact on U.S. radicalism, Latner contributes to a growing body of scholarship that has globalized the study of U.S. social movements and expands our understanding of the transnational history of the U.S. Left. TEISHAN A. LATNER is assistant professor of history at Philadelphia University.

December 2017

978-1-4696-3546-0 $29.99s Cloth 978-1-4696-3547-7 $37.50 BOOK

Approx. 336 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, 1 map, notes, bibl., index

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“Latner's account of a critical aspect of Cuban-American relations and of the history of the American Left is a remarkable scholarly achievement. Scholars of the international Left will read this book with great interest. At the same time, I would expect that this well-written and compelling book would find an audience with the thousands of activists who participated in the Venceremos Brigade and related pro-Cuban projects. Latner has written an engaging, pathbreaking work of international history.”

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34

AMERICAN HISTORY


Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil EVE E. BUCKLEY Brazilian scientists and engineers forced to the front lines of social reform Eve E. Buckley’s study of twentieth-century Brazil examines the nation’s hard social realities through the history of science, focusing on the use of technology and engineering as vexed instruments of reform and economic development. Nowhere was the tension between technocratic optimism and entrenched inequality more evident than in the drought-ridden Northeast sertão, plagued by chronic poverty, recurrent famine, and mass migrations. Buckley reveals how the physicians, engineers, agronomists, and mid-level technocrats working for federal agencies to combat drought were pressured by politicians to seek out a technological magic bullet that would both end poverty and obviate the need for land redistribution to redress long-standing injustices. Scientists planned and oversaw huge projects including dam construction, irrigation for small farmers, and public health initiatives. They were, Buckley shows, sincerely determined to solve the drought crisis and improve the lot of poor people in the sertão. Over time, however, they came to the frustrating realization that, despite technology’s tantalizing promise of an apolitical means to end poverty, political collisions among competing stakeholders were inevitable. Buckley’s revelations about technocratic hubris, the unexpected consequences of environmental engineering, and constraints on scientists as agents of social change resonate with today’s hopes that science and technology can solve society’s most pressing dilemmas, including climate change. EVE E. BUCKLEY is associate professor of history at the University of Delaware.

“Eve Buckley's innovative and eloquent book is a model study of how several generations of Brazilian experts sought, with only limited success, to solve a chronic problem of development. Buckley weaves a nuanced picture of how the problems of development in Brazil's Northeast were understood in different ways by the administrators in Rio de Janeiro, in the provincial capitals in the Northeast, and especially by the experts on the ground. The book also offers a vivid portrait of what ordinary Brazilians made of the development schemes supposedly designed for their benefit.”

September 2017

978-1-4696-3429-6 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3430-2 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3431-9 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 10 halftones, 2 maps, 1 table, notes, bibl., index

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—Stuart McCook, University of Guelph

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35

LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN STUDIES


Old and Sick in America The Journey through the Health Care System MURIEL R. GILLICK, M.D. Navigating the complexities of elder care in the United States Since the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965, the American health care system has steadily grown in size and complexity. Muriel R. Gillick takes readers on a narrative tour of American health care, incorporating the stories of older patients as they travel from the office to the hospital to the skilled nursing facility, and examining the influence of forces as diverse as pharmaceutical corporations, device manufacturers, and health insurance companies on their experience. A scholar who has practiced medicine for over thirty years, Gillick offers readers an informed and straightforward view of health care from the ground up, revealing that many crucial medical decisions are based not on what is best for the patient but rather on outside forces, sometimes to the detriment of patient health and quality of life. Gillick suggests a broadly imagined patient-centered reform of the health care system with Medicare as the engine of change, a transformation that would be mediated through accountability, cost-effectiveness, and culture change. MURIEL R. GILLICK, M.D., is a member of the Division of Aging at the Brigham

October 2017

978-1-4696-3523-1 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3524-8 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3525-5 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, notes, bibl., index

and Women's Hospital and professor of population medicine at Harvard Medical School.

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Studies in Social Medicine

“Old and Sick in America is timely, highly original, and critically important. Everyone who goes to a doctor or hospital will want to know what is in this book.” —Sharon Kaufman, University of California, San Francisco

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36

HEALTH / MEDICINE


The Virtues of Exit On Resistance and Quitting Politics JENNET KIRKPATRICK Putting nonparticipation at the center of political protest Successful democracies rely on an active citizenry. They require citizens to participate by voting, serving on juries, and running for office. But what happens when those citizens purposefully opt out of politics? Exit—the act of leaving—is often thought of as purely instinctual, a part of the human “fight or flight” response, or, alternatively, motivated by an antiparticipatory, self-centered impulse. However, in this eye-opening book, Jennet Kirkpatrick argues that the concept of exit deserves closer scrutiny. She names and examines several examples of political withdrawal, from Thoreau decamping to Walden to slaves fleeing to the North during the Civil War. In doing so, Kirkpatrick not only explores what happens when people make the decision to remove themselves but also expands our understanding of exit as a political act, illustrating how political systems change in the aftermath of actual or threatened departure. Moreover, she reframes the decision to refuse to play along —whether as a fugitive slave, a dissident who is exiled but whose influence remains, or a government in exile—as one that shapes political discourse, historically and today.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3538-5 $85.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3539-2 $24.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3540-8 $19.99 BOOK

200 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, notes, bibl., index

JENNET KIRKPATRICK is associate professor in the School of Politics and Global Studies at Arizona State University. CLOTH

“From Plato to African American political history, from Thoreau to multiculturalism, Jennet Kirkpatrick's masterful book blends careful scholarship with contemporary concerns and manages a rare achievement: the introduction of a new political category. This is what all political theory should be: powerful, urgent, and important.” —James Morone, Brown University

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37

POLITICAL SCIENCE


Porous Borders Multiracial Migrations and the Law in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands JULIAN LIM A social and legal history of immigration and race along the border With the railroad’s arrival in the late nineteenth century, immigrants of all colors rushed to the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, transforming the region into a booming international hub of economic and human activity. Following the stream of Mexican, Chinese, and African American migration, Julian Lim presents a fresh study of the multiracial intersections of the borderlands, where diverse peoples crossed multiple boundaries in search of new economic opportunities and social relations. However, as these migrants came together in ways that blurred and confounded elite expectations of racial order, both the United States and Mexico resorted to increasingly exclusionary immigration policies in order to make the multiracial populations of the borderlands less visible within the body politic, and to remove them from the boundaries of national identity altogether. Using a variety of English- and Spanish-language primary sources from both sides of the border, Lim reveals how a borderlands region that has traditionally been defined by Mexican-Anglo relations was in fact shaped by a diverse population that came together dynamically through work and play, in the streets and in homes, through war and marriage, and in the very act of crossing the border.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3549-1 $32.50s Cloth 978-1-4696-3550-7 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 7 halftones, 1 map, 3 tables, notes, bibl., index

JULIAN LIM is assistant professor of history at Arizona State University.

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“With lucid prose and binational archival depth, Julian Lim illuminates a key era and location in borderlands history. Starting with the cartographic expedition of 1848, Lim traces the construction of the El Paso–Juarez area as a political and economic engine of empire and border control and the ways that its multiracial, mixed-race denizens contested this process. Full of previously untold stories, this book stands to remap our understanding of the border.”

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38

AMERICAN HISTORY


They Should Stay There The Story of Mexican Migration and Repatriation during the Great Depression FERNANDO SAÚL ALANÍS ENCISO Translated by Russ Davidson, with a new foreword by Mark Overmyer-Velázquez

Migration lessons from the 1930s Here, for the first time in English—and from the Mexican perspective—is the story of Mexican migration to the United States and the astonishing forced repatriation of hundreds of thousands of people to Mexico during the worldwide economic crisis of the Great Depression. While Mexicans were hopeful for economic reform following the Mexican revolution, by the 1930s, large numbers of Mexican nationals had already moved north and were living in the United States in one of the twentieth century’s most massive movements of migratory workers. Fernando Saúl Alanís Enciso provides an illuminating backstory that demonstrates how fluid and controversial the immigration and labor situation between Mexico and the United States was in the twentieth century and continues to be in the twenty-first. When the Great Depression took hold, the United States stepped up its enforcement of immigration laws and forced more than 350,000 Mexicans, including their U.S.-born children, to return to their home country. While the Mexican government was fearful of the resulting economic implications, President Lázaro Cárdenas fostered the repatriation effort for mostly symbolic reasons relating to domestic politics. In clarifying the repatriation episode through the larger history of Mexican domestic and foreign policy, Alanís connects the dots between the aftermath of the Mexican revolution and the relentless political tumult surrounding today’s borderlands immigration issues. FERNANDO SAÚL ALANÍS ENCISO is professor of history at El Colegio de San Luis in Mexico. Russ Davidson is curator emeritus of Latin American and Iberian Collections and translator of many books. Mark Overmyer-Velázquez is associate professor of history at University of Connecticut. Latin America in Translation/en Traducción/em Tradução

September 2017

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Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 8 tables, notes, bibl., index

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“The history examined by Fernando Alanís Encisco, the foremost scholar of Mexican emigration history, in They Should Stay There is very much alive today. This is a history of the assertion, development, and refinement of centralized, well-focused, and often quite harsh government power subject to minimal judicial oversight.”

in American and Latin • Publications American history

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—From the foreword by Mark Overmyer-Velázquez, University of Connecticut

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39

LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN STUDIES


Race and the Making of the Mormon People MAX PERRY MUELLER Competing Mormon visions of race The nineteenth-century history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Max Perry Mueller argues, illuminates the role that religion played in forming the notion of three “original” American races—red, black, and white—for Mormons and others in the early American Republic. Recovering the voices of a handful of black and Native American Mormons who resolutely wrote themselves into the Mormon archive, Mueller threads together historical experience and Mormon scriptural interpretations. He finds that the Book of Mormon is key to understanding how early followers reflected but also departed from antebellum conceptions of race as biblically and biologically predetermined. Mormon theology and policy both challenged and reaffirmed the essentialist nature of the racialized American experience. The Book of Mormon presented its believers with a radical worldview, proclaiming that all schisms within the human family were anathematic to God’s design. That said, church founders were not racial egalitarians. They promoted whiteness as an aspirational racial identity that nonwhites could achieve through conversion to Mormonism. Mueller also shows how, on a broader level, scripture and history may become mutually constituted. For the Mormons, that process shaped a religious movement in perpetual tension between its racialist and universalist impulses during an era before the concept of race was secularized.

September 2017

978-1-4696-3375-6 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3616-0 $32.50s Paper 978-1-4696-3376-3 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 17 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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MAX PERRY MUELLER is assistant professor of religious studies at the University

of Nebraska.

PAPER

“Max Perry Mueller's brilliant analysis substantively enriches a growing body of excellent work on Mormonism and race. His reading of the complicated texts and histories of the Latter-day Saints offers profound insight into both the tradition's American sojourn and the nation's wrenching engagement with race, writ large.” — J. Spencer Fluhman, author of A Peculiar People

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40

RELIGION


A Communion of Shadows Religion and Photography in Nineteenth-Century America RACHEL MCBRIDE LINDSEY Vernacular photography and lived religion When the revolutionary technology of photography erupted in American culture in 1839, it swiftly became, in the day’s parlance, a “mania.” This richly illustrated book positions vernacular photography at the center of the study of nineteenth-century American religious life. As an empirical tool, photography captured many of the signal scenes of American life, from the gold rush to the bloody battlefields of the Civil War. But photographs did not simply display neutral records of people, places, and things; rather, commonplace photographs became inscribed with spiritual meaning, disclosing, not merely signifying, a power that lay beyond. Rachel McBride Lindsey demonstrates that what people beheld when they looked at a photograph had as much to do with what lay outside the frame—theological expectations, for example—as with what the camera had recorded. Whether studio portraits tucked into Bibles, postmortem portraits with locks of hair attached, “spirit” photography, stereographs of the Holy Land, or magic lanterns used in biblical instruction, photographs were curated, beheld, displayed, and valued as physical artifacts that functioned both as relics and as icons of religious practice. Lindsey’s interpretation of “vernacular” as an analytic introduces a way to consider anew the cultural, social, and material reach of religion.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3648-1 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3372-5 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3373-2 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 54 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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RACHEL MCBRIDE LINDSEY is assistant professor of American religious history

and culture in the Department of Theological Studies at Saint Louis University.

PAPER

“A Communion of Shadows charts a strong new direction in our historical understanding of religious history. Rachel Lindsey reveals how photography altered and remade religious life in the nineteenth century, becoming intertwined with the depths of human relations and people's memories, persuasions, and sensual connections. This thoroughly researched and smartly executed study will have a long-standing impact on the study of religion.” —S. Brent Plate, author of A History of Religion in 5 1/2 Objects

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RELIGION


The Power and Politics of Art in Postrevolutionary Mexico STEPHANIE J. SMITH How politics mattered for artists and how art mattered for the state Stephanie J. Smith brings Mexican politics and art together, chronicling the turbulent relations between radical artists and the postrevolutionary Mexican state. The revolution opened space for new political ideas, but by the late 1920s many government officials argued that consolidating the nation required coercive measures toward dissenters. While artists and intellectuals, some of them professed Communists, sought free expression in matters both artistic and political, Smith reveals how they simultaneously learned the fine art of negotiation with the increasingly authoritarian government in order to secure clout and financial patronage. But the government, Smith shows, also had reason to accommodate artists, and a surprising and volatile interdependence grew between the artists and the politicians. Involving well-known artists such as Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros, as well as some less well known, including Tina Modotti, Leopoldo Méndez, and Aurora Reyes, politicians began to appropriate the artists’ nationalistic visual images as weapons in a national propaganda war. High-stakes negotiating and co-opting took place between the two camps as they sparred over the production of generally accepted notions and representations of the revolution’s legacy—and what it meant to be authentically Mexican.

December 2017

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Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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STEPHANIE J. SMITH, associate professor of Latin American and Mexican history at The Ohio State University, is the author of Gender and the Mexican Revolution: Yucatán Women and the Realities of Patriarchy. Published with the assistance of the Anniversary Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

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“Far reaching, pathbreaking, and ambitious, Stephanie Smith's book is the first to fully recognize the many contributions of numerous women in the intellectual, artistic, and political circles of 1920s and ’30s Mexico City—revealing their marginalization by both the right and the left. Perhaps most important, she productively expands the concept of culture in postrevolutionary Mexico. Required reading.”

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—Ben Fallaw, Colby College

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42

LATIN AMERICAN & CARIBBEAN STUDIES


Medicalizing Blackness Making Racial Difference in the Atlantic World, 1780–1840 RANA A. HOGARTH How being black became a medical condition In 1748, as yellow fever raged in Charleston, South Carolina, doctor John Lining remarked, “There is something very singular in the constitution of the Negroes, which renders them not liable to this fever.” Lining’s comments presaged ideas about blackness that would endure in medical discourses and beyond. In this fascinating medical history, Rana A. Hogarth examines the creation and circulation of medical ideas about blackness in the Atlantic World during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. She shows how white physicians deployed blackness as a medically significant marker of difference and used medical knowledge to improve plantation labor efficiency, safeguard colonial and civic interests, and enhance control over black bodies during the era of slavery. Hogarth refigures Atlantic slave societies as medical frontiers of knowledge production on the topic of racial difference. Rather than looking to their counterparts in Europe who collected and dissected bodies to gain knowledge about race, white physicians in Atlantic slaveholding regions created and tested ideas about race based on the contexts in which they lived and practiced. What emerges in sharp relief is the ways in which blackness was reified in medical discourses and used to perpetuate notions of white supremacy.

October 2017

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Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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RANA A. HOGARTH is assistant professor of history at the University of Illinois,

Urbana-Champaign.

PAPER

Published with the assistance of the Lilian R. Furst Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“Rana Hogarth offers an original and distinctive perspective on the formation of race in the Atlantic World, exploring how medical discourse served to propagate ideas of innate racial difference. Medicalizing Blackness is a welcome addition to studies of medicine and slavery in the Greater Caribbean.” —Sharla M. Fett, author of Working Cures: Healing, Health, and Power on Southern Slave Plantations

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


New Voyages to Carolina Reinterpreting North Carolina History EDITED BY LARRY E. TISE AND JEFFREY J. CROW Charting a new course for North Carolina history New Voyages to Carolina offers a bold new approach for understanding and telling North Carolina’s history. Recognizing the need for such a fresh approach and reflecting a generation of recent scholarship, eighteen distinguished authors have sculpted a broad, inclusive narrative of the state’s evolution over more than four centuries. The volume provides new lenses and provocative possibilities for reimagining the state’s past. Transcending traditional markers of wars and elections, the contributors map out a new chronology encompassing geological realities; the unappreciated presence of Indians, blacks, and women; religious and cultural influences; and abiding preferences for industrial development within the limits of “progressive” politics. While challenging traditional story lines, the authors frame a candid tale of the state’s development. CONTRIBUTORS: Dorothea V. Ames, East Carolina University Karl E. Campbell, Appalachian State University James C. Cobb, University of Georgia Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Stephen Feeley, McDaniel College Jerry Gershenhorn, North Carolina Central University Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore, Yale University Patrick Huber, Missouri University of Science and Technology Charles F. Irons, Elon University David Moore, Warren Wilson College Michael Leroy Oberg, State University of New York, College at Geneseo Stanley R. Riggs, East Carolina University Richard D. Starnes, Western Carolina University Carole Watterson Troxler, Elon University Bradford J. Wood, Eastern Kentucky University Karin Zipf,East Carolina University

LARRY E. TISE is former director of North Carolina's Division of Archives and History, distinguished history professor at East Carolina University, and private-practice historian. JEFFREY J. CROW is former director of North Carolina's Division of Archives and History and deputy secretary of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

October 2017

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Approx. 416 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 30 figures, 5 tables, notes, index

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Published with the assistance of the Blythe Family Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“An important contribution to how we write and understand North Carolina history, one that will help us to reassess how the narrative of the state should be constructed as we move into the twenty-first century.” —William Link, author of North Carolina: Change and Tradition in a Southern State www.uncpress.org

44

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY


North Carolina beyond the Connected Age The Tar Heel State in 2050 MICHAEL L. WALDEN Predicting the possibilities and challenges in the Old North State's future For years, North Carolina has been one of the nation’s fastest-growing states, bringing tremendous change to the state’s people, industries, jobs, places, environment, and government. Much of this change resulted from the information and technology revolution, which connected the state more fully to the country and the world. But we are now moving beyond the connected age, argues Michael L. Walden, to a new era of living, production, and work, and North Carolina faces not only unanswered questions about the past but also new challenges and opportunities visible on the horizon. What will these new transformations mean for the state’s people, places, and prosperity? In this book, Walden lays out these looming economic issues and offers predictions of future trends as well as multiple policy options for taxation, infrastructure, and environmental issues. While the future cannot be perfectly predicted, Walden’s expert analysis is mandatory reading for policy makers, business leaders, and everyday people seeking to prepare for upcoming changes in North Carolina’s economy.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3571-2 $85.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3572-9 $24.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3573-6 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 208 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 22 figs., 5 maps, 16 tables, notes, index

MICHAEL L. WALDEN is the William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at North Carolina State University.

“Michael L. Walden offers a smart and eminently readable primer to the economic challenges and opportunities North Carolina will face over the next two generations. Replete with fresh ideas and insights, North Carolina beyond the Connected Age will make navigating the state's economic future a little less frightening.” —Peter A. Coclanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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NORTH CAROLINA


The F Street Mess How Southern Senators Rewrote the Kansas-Nebraska Act ALICE ELIZABETH MALAVASIC Senators who live together, conspire together Pushing back against the idea that the Slave Power conspiracy was merely an ideological construction, Alice Elizabeth Malavasic argues that some southern politicians in the 1850s did indeed hold an inordinate amount of power in the antebellum Congress and used it to foster the interests of slavery. Malavasic focuses her argument on Senators David Rice Atchison of Missouri, Andrew Pickens Butler of South Carolina, and Robert M. T. Hunter and James Murray Mason of Virginia, known by their contemporaries as the “F Street Mess” for the location of the house they shared. Unlike the earlier and better-known triumvirate of John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, and Daniel Webster, the F Street Mess was a functioning oligarchy within the U.S. Senate whose power was based on shared ideology, institutional seniority, and personal friendship. By centering on their most significant achievement—forcing a rewrite of the Nebraska bill that repealed the restriction against slavery above the 36° 30’ parallel—Malavasic demonstrates how the F Street Mess’s mastery of the legislative process led to one of most destructive pieces of legislation in United States history and helped pave the way to secession.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3647-4 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3552-1 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3553-8 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 272 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 8 halftones, notes, bibl., index

ALICE ELIZABETH MALAVASIC is assistant professor of history at Hudson Valley

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Community College.

Civil War America

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“The argument and research here are first-rate. Malavasic brings to this topic keen knowledge and a skill set that few historians have.” —Leonard L. Richards, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

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AMERICAN HISTORY


This Grand Experiment When Women Entered the Federal Workforce in Civil War–Era Washington, D.C. JESSICA ZIPARO How women asserted themselves as workers in the nation's capital In the volatility of the Civil War, the federal government opened its payrolls to women. Although the press and government officials considered the federal employment of women to be an innocuous wartime aberration, women immediately saw the new development for what it was: a rare chance to obtain well-paid, intellectually challenging work in a country and time that typically excluded females from such channels of labor. Thousands of female applicants from across the country flooded Washington with applications. Here, Jessica Ziparo traces the struggles and triumphs of early female federal employees, who were caught between traditional, cultural notions of female dependence and an evolving movement of female autonomy in a new economic reality. In doing so, Ziparo demonstrates how these women challenged societal gender norms, carved out a place for independent women in the streets of Washington, and sometimes clashed with the female suffrage movement. Examining the advent of female federal employment, Ziparo finds a lost opportunity for wage equality in the federal government and shows how despite discrimination, prejudice, and harassment, women persisted, succeeding in making their presence in the federal workforce permanent. JESSICA ZIPARO is assistant professor of history at Salem State University. She lives

in Chicago, IL.

Civil War America Published with the assistance of the Thornton H. Brooks Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“This Grand Experiment offers a fresh look at Civil War Washington by examining the experience of the thousands of women who flocked to federal agencies to help administer the war. Although female federal employees endured salacious rumors and generally were ‘underpaid, underutilized, and underappreciated,’ Jessica Ziparo shows how their struggles both challenged and reinforced contemporary notions of female inferiority. With careful research and thoughtful analysis, Ziparo tells a compelling story of a remarkable group of women who helped America fight the Civil War and rebuild the nation afterward.”

November 2017

978-1-4696-3597-2 $39.95s Cloth 978-1-4696-3598-9 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 6 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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—Chris Myers Asch, coauthor of Chocolate City

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47

AMERICAN HISTORY


Winning Our Freedoms Together African Americans and Apartheid, 1945–1960 NICHOLAS GRANT The intertwined stories of anti-racist activism in South Africa and the United States In this transnational account of black protest, Nicholas Grant examines how African Americans engaged with, supported, and were inspired by the South African anti-apartheid movement. Bringing black activism into conversation with the foreign policy of both the U.S. and South African governments, this study questions the dominant perception that U.S.-centered anticommunism decimated black international activism. Instead, by tracing the considerable amount of time, money, and effort the state invested into responding to black international criticism, Grant outlines the extent to which the U.S. and South African governments were forced to reshape and occasionally reconsider their racial policies in the Cold War world. This study shows how African Americans and black South Africans navigated transnationally organized state repression in ways that challenged white supremacy on both sides of the Atlantic. The political and cultural ties that they forged during the 1940s and 1950s are testament to the insistence of black activists in both countries that the struggle against apartheid and Jim Crow were intimately interconnected.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3527-9 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3528-6 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3529-3 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, notes, bibl., index

NICHOLAS GRANT is a lecturer in American studies at the University of East Anglia. Justice, Power, and Politics

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“In this solid transnational history, Grant not only demonstrates the connections between the freedom struggles of African Americans and black South Africans, but also illuminates how and why these transnational linkages formed. Conceptually innovative and deeply grounded in archival work across multiple continents, this study weaves a fascinating story that will be a valuable resource for present and future scholars.” —Robert Trent Vinson, author of The Americans Are Coming!

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48

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Searching for Subversives The Story of Italian Internment in Wartime America MARY ELIZABETH BASILE CHOPAS The first social profile of Italian civilian internees When the United States entered World War II, Italian nationals living in this country were declared enemy aliens and faced with legal restrictions. Several thousand aliens and a few U.S. citizens were arrested and underwent flawed hearings, and hundreds were interned. Shedding new light on an injustice often overshadowed by the mass confinement of Japanese Americans, Mary Elizabeth Basile Chopas traces how government and military leaders constructed wartime policies affecting Italian residents. Based on new archival research into the alien enemy hearings, this in-depth legal analysis illuminates a process not widely understood. From presumptive guilt in the arrest and internment based on membership in social and political organizations, to hurdles in attaining American citizenship, Chopas uncovers many layers of repression not heretofore revealed in scholarship about the World War II home front. In telling the stories of former internees and persons excluded from military zones as they attempted to resume their lives after the war, Chopas demonstrates the lasting social and cultural effects of government policies on the Italian American community, and addresses the modern problem of identifying threats in a largely loyal and peaceful population.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3433-3 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3434-0 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3435-7 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 256 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 7 halftones, 4 graphs, appends., notes, bibl., index

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MARY ELIZABETH BASILE CHOPAS is adjunct professor of law at the University

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

PAPER

Published with the assistance of the H. Eugene and Lillian Lehman Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“This is one of the most impressive studies of its kind. Chopas has produced a model study, one that mixes detailed research with carefully nuanced readings and thoughtful analysis. This is an original and valuable addition to the literature of American history.” —Greg Robinson, author of A Tragedy of Democracy

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AMERICAN HISTORY


Jah Kingdom Rastafarians, Tanzania, and Pan-Africanism in the Age of Decolonization MONIQUE A. BEDASSE How Rastafarians made the dream of repatriation to Africa a reality From its beginnings in 1930s Jamaica, the Rastafarian movement has become a global presence. While the existing studies of the Rastafarian movement have primarily focused on its cultural expression through reggae music, art, and iconography, Monique A. Bedasse argues that repatriation to Africa represents the most important vehicle of Rastafari’s international growth. Shifting the scholarship on repatriation from Ethiopia to Tanzania, Bedasse foregrounds Rastafari’s enduring connection to black radical politics and establishes Tanzania as a critical site to explore gender, religion, race, citizenship, socialism, and nation. Beyond her engagement with how the Rastafarian idea of Africa translated into a lived reality, she demonstrates how Tanzanian state and nonstate actors not only validated the Rastafarian idea of diaspora but were also crucial to defining the parameters of Pan-Africanism. Based on previously undiscovered oral and written sources from Tanzania, Jamaica, England, the United States, and Trinidad, Bedasse uncovers a vast and varied transnational network—including Julius Nyerere, Michael Manley, and C. L. R James—revealing Rastafari’s entrenchment in the making of Pan-Africanism in the postindependence period.

October 2017

978-1-4696-3358-9 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3359-6 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3360-2 $28.99 BOOK

Approx. 272 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 5 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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MONIQUE A. BEDASSE is assistant professor of history and African and African American studies at Washington University in St. Louis.

“Monique Bedasse has done an amazing thing: she has taken what is presumed to be primarily a cultural phenomenon and shown its real-world, trans-spatial dimensions. Beautifully and movingly written, this is a refreshingly candid appraisal of the relationship between Jamaica and Tanzania through Rastafarian ideology, and the ways in which diasporic and continental African actors come together in a context of anticolonial struggle.” —Michael A. Gomez, New York University

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AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


Archives of Dispossession Recovering the Testimonios of Mexican American Herederas, 1848–1960 KAREN R. ROYBAL Women's testimonios and the foundation of Chicanx history and literature One method of American territory expansion in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands was the denial of property rights to Mexican landowners, which led to dispossession. Many historical accounts overlook this colonial impact on Indigenous and Mexican peoples, and existing studies that do tackle this subject tend to privilege the male experience. Here, Karen R. Roybal recenters the focus of dispossession on women, arguing that gender, sometimes more than race, dictated legal concepts of property ownership and individual autonomy. Drawing on a diverse source base—legal land records, personal letters, and literature—Roybal locates voices of Mexican American women in the Southwest to show how they fought against the erasure of their rights, both as women and as landowners. Woven throughout Roybal’s analysis are these women’s testimonios—their stories focusing on inheritance, property rights, and shifts in power. Roybal positions these testimonios as an alternate archive that illustrates the myriad ways in which multiple layers of dispossession—and the changes of property ownership in Mexican law—affected the formation of Mexicana identity.

September 2017

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Approx. 192 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, notes, bibl., index

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KAREN R. ROYBAL is assistant professor of Southwest studies at Colorado College. Gender and American Culture

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“A much-needed reexamination of Latino/a literary history, Archives of Dispossession offers fresh insights into the literary imaginary of early Chicana/Mexican authors.” —Maria E. Cotera, University of Michigan

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51

LATINO STUDIES


American Tropics The Caribbean Roots of Biodiversity Science MEGAN RABY How scientists discovered tropical biodiversity Biodiversity has been a key concept in international conservation since the 1980s, yet historians have paid little attention to its origins. Uncovering its roots in tropical fieldwork and the southward expansion of U.S. empire at the turn of the twentieth century, Megan Raby details how ecologists took advantage of growing U.S. landholdings in the circum-Caribbean by establishing permanent field stations for long-term, basic tropical research. From these outposts of U.S. science, a growing community of American "tropical biologists" developed both the key scientific concepts and the values embedded in the modern discourse of biodiversity. Considering U.S. biological fieldwork from the era of the SpanishAmerican War through the anticolonial movements of the 1960s and 1970s, this study combines the history of science, environmental history, and the history of U.S.–Caribbean and Latin American relations. In doing so, Raby sheds new light on the origins of contemporary scientific and environmentalist thought and brings to the forefront a surprisingly neglected history of twentieth-century U.S. science and empire. MEGAN RABY is assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3559-0 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3560-6 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3561-3 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 336 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 29 halftones, 2 maps, 1 table, notes, bibl., index

Flows, Migrations, and Exchanges CLOTH

Published with the assistance of the Wells Fargo Fund for Excellence of the University of North Carolina Press

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“The first book to situate the rise of the scientific concept of biodiversity within its larger circum-Caribbean context, American Tropics is a sophisticated and compelling journey through the research practices at field stations outside the U.S. mainland in Cuba, Jamaica, Guyana, and Panama. Using these stations as launching points, Raby skillfully shows the strategic and serendipitous ways these encounters mapped onto political and economic imperial pursuits. Such insights will echo through our understandings of tropical life as a resource for generations to come.” —Emily Wakild, author of Revolutionary Parks

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52

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ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY


The Herds Shot Round the World Native Breeds and the British Empire, 1800–1900 REBECCA J. H. WOODS How British livestock conquered the world As Britain industrialized in the early nineteenth century, animal breeders faced the need to convert livestock into products while maintaining the distinctive character of their breeds. Thus they transformed cattle and sheep adapted to regional environments into bulky, quick-fattening beasts. Exploring the environmental and economic ramifications of imperial expansion on colonial environments and production practices, Rebecca J. H. Woods traces how global physiological and ecological diversity eroded under the technological, economic, and cultural system that grew up around the production of livestock by the British Empire. Attending to the relationship between type and place and what it means to call a particular breed of livestock “native,” Woods highlights the inherent tension between consumer expectations in the metropole and the ecological reality at the periphery. Based on extensive archival work in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Australia, this study illuminates the connections between the biological consequences and the politics of imperialism. In tracing both the national origins and imperial expansion of British breeds, Woods uncovers the processes that laid the foundation for our livestock industry today.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3465-4 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3466-1 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3467-8 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 240 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 22 halftones, 2 tables, notes, bibl., index

REBECCA J. H. WOODS is assistant professor of history at the University of Toronto.

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Flows, Migrations, and Exchanges Publication of this book was supported in part by a generous gift from Cyndy and John O'Hara

“Combining careful exposition with lively anecdotes, Woods has given us a fascinating and sustained discussion of the ideas surrounding livestock breeding as herds and flocks proliferated around the British Empire and became the base for major settler enterprises. Her approach is instructive for understanding imperial networks and their implications for today's globalized world.” —William Beinart, University of Oxford

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53

ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY


History Comes Alive Public History and Popular Culture in the 1970s M. J. RYMSZA-PAWLOWSKA A new feeling for history in the 1970s During the 1976 Bicentennial celebration, millions of Americans engaged with the past in brand-new ways. They became absorbed by historical miniseries like Roots, visited museums with new exhibits that immersed them in the past, propelled works of historical fiction onto the bestseller list, and participated in living history events across the nation. While many of these activities were sparked by the Bicentennial, M. J. Rymsza-Pawlowska shows that, in fact, they were symptomatic of a fundamental shift in Americans’ relationship to history during the 1960s and 1970s. For the majority of the twentieth century, Americans thought of the past as foundational to, but separate from, the present, and they learned and thought about history in informational terms. But RymszaPawlowska argues that the popular culture of the 1970s reflected an emerging desire to engage and enact the past on a more emotional level: to consider the feelings and motivations of historic individuals and, most importantly, to use this in reevaluating both the past and the present. This thought-provoking book charts the era’s shifting feeling for history, and explores how it serves as a foundation for the experience and practice of history making today.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3385-5 $90.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3386-2 $29.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3387-9 $19.99 BOOK

Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 15 halftones, notes, bibl., index

M. J. RYMSZA-PAWLOWSKA is assistant professor of history and associate director of the graduate program in public history at American University.

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Studies in United States Culture

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Published with the assistance of the Authors Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“History Comes Alive is an original and thought-provoking exploration of popular historical consciousness in 1970s America. Through deft readings of TV mini-series, reenactments, museum exhibits, and multimedia installations, Rymsza-Pawlowska shows powerfully how Americans embraced a new relationship with the past.” —Benjamin Filene, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

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American history and American Studies

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54

AMERICAN STUDIES


Consuming Japan Popular Culture and the Globalizing of 1980s America ANDREW C. MCKEVITT A history of America's fascination with—and fear of—Japanese consumer goods in the 1980s This insightful book explores the intense and ultimately fleeting moment in 1980s America when the future looked Japanese. Would Japan’s remarkable post–World War II economic success enable the East Asian nation to overtake the United States? Or could Japan’s globe-trotting corporations serve as a model for battered U.S. industries, pointing the way to a future of globalized commerce and culture? While popular films and literature recycled old anti-Asian imagery and crafted new ways of imagining the “yellow peril,” and formal U.S.-Japan relations remained locked in a holding pattern of Cold War complacency, a remarkable shift was happening in countless local places throughout the United States: Japanese goods were remaking American consumer life and injecting contemporary globalization into U.S. commerce and culture. What impact did the flood of billions of Japanese things have on the ways Americans produced, consumed, and thought about their place in the world? From autoworkers to anime fans, Consuming Japan introduces new unorthodox actors into foreign-relations history, demonstrating how the flow of all things Japanese contributed to the globalizing of America in the late twentieth century.

October 2017

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Approx. 288 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 16 halftones, notes, bibl., index

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ANDREW C. MCKEVITT is assistant professor of history at Louisiana Tech

University.

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Studies in United States Culture Published with the assistance of the Authors Fund of the University of North Carolina Press

“This provocative, timely, and well-written book offers abundant insights and is sophisticated in its own right. Consuming Japan truly merits a wide audience—one that is both scholarly and public.” —Thomas W. Zeiler, University of Colorado

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55

AMERICAN STUDIES


Virtus Romana Politics and Morality in the Roman Historians CATALINA BALMACEDA How Roman historians constructed politics and society The political transformation that took place at the end of the Roman Republic was a particularly rich area for analysis by the era’s historians. Major narrators chronicled the crisis that saw the end of the Roman Republic and the changes that gave birth to a new political system. These writers drew significantly on the Roman idea of virtus as a way of interpreting and understanding their past. Tracing how virtus informed Roman thought over time, Catalina Balmaceda explores the concept and its manifestations in the narratives of four successive Latin historians who span the late Republic and early Principate: Sallust, Livy, Velleius, and Tacitus. Balmaceda demonstrates that virtus in these historical narratives served as a form of selfdefinition that fostered and propagated a new model of the ideal Roman more fitting to imperial times. As a crucial moral and political concept, virtus worked as a key idea in the complex system of Roman sociocultural values and norms that underpinned Roman attitudes about both present and past. This book offers a reappraisal of the historians as promoters of change and continuity in the political culture of both the Republic and the Empire.

November 2017

978-1-4696-3512-5 $45.00s Cloth 978-1-4696-3513-2 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 304 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 3 halftones, notes, bibl., index

CATALINA BALMACEDA is associate professor of ancient history at Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.

Marketing Campaign

Studies in the History of Greece and Rome

“Clearly written and effectively presented, Virtus Romana stands out among other studies of virtus. By tracing the concept through the context of historiographical narratives, this book will be useful to scholars in multiple fields.” —Christina Kraus, Yale University

www.uncpress.org

Publicity Major print reviews and features Online publicity campaign

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National Advertising

York Review of Books and • New publications in ancient history

Co-op Available

56

ANCIENT HISTORY


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

The New York Intellectuals

Common Sense and a Little Fire Women and Working-Class Politics in the United States, 1900–1965

The Rise and Decline of the Anti-Stalinist Left from the 1930s to the 1980s

ANNELISE ORLECK

ALAN M. WALD

Second Edition

Thirtieth Anniversary Edition

With a new preface by the author

With a new preface by the author

The definitive history of women and the early labor movement

The classic literary history is back For a generation, Alan M. Wald’s The New York Intellectuals has stood as the authoritative account of an often misunderstood chapter in the history of a celebrated tradition among literary radicals in the United States. His commanding biographical portraits of rebel outsiders who mostly became insiders retains its resonance today and includes commentary on Max Eastman, Elliot Cohen, Lionel Trilling, Sidney Hook, Tess Slesinger, Philip Rahv, Mary McCarthy, James T. Farrell, Irving Kristol, Irving Howe, Hannah Arendt, and more. With a new preface by the author that tracks the rebounding influence of these intellectuals in the era of Occupy and Bernie Sanders, this anniversary edition shows that the trajectory and ideological ordeals of the New York intellectual Left still matters today.

Twenty years after its initial publication, Annelise Orleck’s Common Sense and a Little Fire continues to resonate with its harrowing story of activism, labor, and women’s history. Orleck traces the personal and public lives of four immigrant women activists who left a lasting imprint on American politics. Though they have rarely made more than cameo appearances in previous histories, Rose Schneiderman, Fannia Cohn, Clara Lemlich Shavelson, and Pauline Newman played important roles in the emergence of organized labor, the New Deal welfare state, adult education, and the modern women’s movement. Featuring a new preface by the author, this new edition reasserts itself as a pivotal text in twentieth-century labor history. ANNELISE ORLECK is professor of history at Dartmouth

ALAN M. WALD is Emeritus H. Chandler Davis Collegiate Professor of English at the University of Michigan.

College.

Gender and American Culture

“Wald's grasp of the ideological twists and turns of his protagonists is first-rate. . . . His story has an epic sweep.” —The Village Voice

“A major contribution to twentieth-century labor history. . . . Orleck's book is rich in detail and comprehensive in analysis.” —Reviews in American History

October 2017

978-1-4696-3594-1 $34.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3595-8 $24.99 BOOK

October 2017

978-1-4696-3591-0 $32.95s Paper 978-1-4696-3592-7 $24.99 BOOK

Approx. 504 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 31 halftones, notes, bibl., index

Approx. 416 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 41 halftones, notes, bibl., index

www.uncpress.org

57

AMERICAN HISTORY / AMERICAN STUDIES


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Abortion after Roe

Liberated Threads

JOHANNA SCHOEN

Black Women, Style, and the Global Politics of Soul

The turbulent history of abortion in the past four decades

TANISHA C. FORD 2016 Liberty Legacy Foundation Award, Organization of American Historians

Abortion is—and always has been—an arena for contesting power relations between women and men. When in 1973 the Supreme Court made the procedure legal throughout the United States, it seemed that women were at last able to make decisions about their own bodies. In the four decades that followed, however, abortion became ever more politicized and stigmatized. Abortion after Roe chronicles and analyzes what the new legal status and changing political environment have meant for abortion providers and their patients.

The everyday act of dressing becomes a political act From the civil rights and Black Power era of the 1960s through antiapartheid activism in the 1980s and beyond, black women have used their clothing, hair, and style not simply as a fashion statement but as a powerful tool of resistance. Whether using stiletto heels as weapons to protect against police attacks or incorporating Africanthemed designs into everyday wear, these fashion-forward women celebrated their identities and pushed for equality. In this thought-provoking book, Tanisha C. Ford explores how and why black women in places as far-flung as New York City, Atlanta, London, and Johannesburg incorporated style and beauty culture into their activism.

JOHANNA SCHOEN is professor of history at Rutgers University and author of Choice and Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization, and Abortion in Public Health and Welfare. Studies in Social Medicine

“Spells out the necessity and moral good of providing abortion care.” —Ms. Magazine

TANISHA C. FORD is associate professor of Black American studies and history at the University of Delaware.

“A clear-eyed history . . . well written and historically rich: a deeply interesting account of the post-Roe era focused on the lived experience of giving and getting reproductive health services.” —Women's Review of Books

Gender and American Culture

“The moving testimonies Ford presents of the black women who lived through soul style's heyday are proof that activist scholarship motivated by personal experience provides powerful contributions to the field of history.” —Journal of Southern History

August 2017

978-1-4696-3601-6 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-2119-7 $19.99 BOOK

352 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 12 halftones, notes, bibl., index

August 2017

978-1-4696-3613-9 $22.95s Paper 978-1-4696-2516-4 $17.99 BOOK

272 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 26 halftones, notes, bibl., index

www.uncpress.org

58

AMERICAN HISTORY / AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Cattle Colonialism

Native American Whalemen and the World

An Environmental History of the Conquest of California and Hawai'i

Indigenous Encounters and the Contingency of Race

JOHN RYAN FISCHER

NANCY SHOEMAKER

The origins of the cattle market in the California and Hawai'i colonies

A groundbreaking look at Native American whalemen in New England

Environmental historians have too often overlooked California and Hawai′i, despite the roles the regions played in the colonial ranching frontiers of the Pacific World. In Cattle Colonialism, John Ryan Fischer significantly enlarges the scope of the American West by examining the transpacific transformations these animals wrought on local landscapes and native economies.

In the nineteenth century, nearly all Native American men living along the southern New England coast made their living traveling the world’s oceans on whaleships. Many were career whalemen, spending twenty years or more at sea. Highlighting the shifting racial ideologies that shaped the lives of these whalemen, Nancy Shoemaker shows how the category of “Indian” was as fluid as the whalemen were mobile.

JOHN RYAN FISCHER is visiting assistant professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–River Falls. Flows, Migrations, and Exchanges

NANCY SHOEMAKER is professor of history at the University

of Connecticut.

“Aficionados of western history will be drawn to Fischer's stories of indigenous cowboys as well as his discussion of the hide and tallow trade.” —Western Historical Quarterly

“[An] outstanding and wide-ranging work that should offer a lot to geographers interested in how cultural encounters and the contingencies of race played out in one of the world's first truly globalized and mobile industries.” —Journal of Historical Geography

“Cattle Colonialism will certainly influence the next generation of scholars interested in more carefully delineating the intersection of ecological forces and local human actions, both of which shape our increasingly globalized history. As Fischer argues, it is not an ‘either/or’ narrative. Rather, the best environmental histories are ‘both.’ This is one of them.” —American Historical Review

“Immeasurably improve[s] our knowledge of Native American whalers, their lives, and their work. No doubt [this book] will become [a] historical classic.” —Journal of Pacific History

August 2017

August 2017

978-1-4696-3612-2 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-2258-3 $19.99 BOOK

978-1-4696-3606-1 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-2513-3 $19.99 BOOK

320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 11 halftones, 3 maps, 4 tables, appends., notes, bibl., index

280 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 6 halftones, 1 table, notes, bibl., index

www.uncpress.org

59

ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY / NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Hotel Life

Southern Water, Southern Power

The Story of a Place Where Anything Can Happen

How the Politics of Cheap Energy and Water Scarcity Shaped a Region

CAROLINE FIELD LEVANDER AND MATTHEW PRATT GUTERL

CHRISTOPHER J. MANGANIELLO Rachel Carson Prize, American Society for Environmental History

Much more than just a place to lay our heads

2015 GHRAC Award for Excellence, Georgia Historical Records Advisory Council

What is a hotel? As Caroline Field Levander and Matthew Pratt Guterl show us in this thought-provoking book, even though hotels are everywhere around us, we rarely consider their essential role in our modern existence and how they help frame our sense of who and what we are. They are, in fact, as centrally important as other powerful places like prisons, hospitals, or universities. Guiding readers through the story of hotels as places of troublesome possibility, as mazelike physical buildings, as inspirational touchstones for art and literature, and as unsettling, even disturbing, backdrops for the drama of everyday life, Levander and Guterl ensure that we will never think about this seemingly ordinary place in the same way again. CAROLINE FIELD LEVANDER is the Carlson Professor in the Humanities and professor of English at Rice University. MATTHEW PRATT GUTERL is professor of Africana Studies and American Studies at Brown University.

“A clever take on hotel life . . . the book presents hotels as powerful social institutions, not unlike universities, hospitals and even prisons, that embrace all walks of life and offer insights into who and what we are.” —Overnight New York

The water wars of the South Why has the American South—a place with abundant rainfall—become embroiled in intrastate wars over water? Why did unpredictable flooding come to characterize southern waterways, and how did a region that seemed so rich in this all-important resource become derailed by drought and the regional squabbling that has tormented the arid American West? To answer these questions, policy expert and historian Christopher J. Manganiello moves beyond the well-known accounts of flooding in the Mississippi valley and irrigation in the West to reveal the contested history of southern water. CHRISTOPHER J. MANGANIELLO is an environmental historian and the water policy director at Chattahoochee Riverkeeper.

“A fascinating and well-wrought examination of the relationship between water resources and electricity, drought, state versus private control of water, and even race. . . . Well worth your time.” —AAG Review of Books

August 2017

978-1-4696-3602-3 $27.95s Paper 978-1-4696-2006-0 $19.99 BOOK

August 2017

320 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 5 halftones, 4 maps, notes, bibl., index

978-1-4696-3611-5 $20.00s Paper 978-1-4696-2113-5 $15.99 BOOK

224 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 31 halftones, notes, index

www.uncpress.org

60

AMERICAN STUDIES / ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY


NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Selling Empire

Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570–1740

India in the Making of Britain and America, 1600–1830

MARK G. HANNA

JONATHAN EACOTT

2016 Frederick Jackson Turner Award, Organization of American Historians

Consumer goods connected India, Britain, and America

Honorable Mention, 2015 John Lyman Book Award, North American Society for Oceanic History

Linking four continents over three centuries, Selling Empire demonstrates the centrality of India—as both an idea and a place—to the making of a global British imperial system. In the seventeenth century, Britain was economically, politically, and militarily weaker than India, but Britons increasingly made use of India’s strengths to build their own empire in both America and Asia. Early English colonial promoters first envisioned America as a potential India, hoping that the nascent Atlantic colonies could produce Asian raw materials. When this vision failed to materialize, Britain’s circulation of Indian manufactured goods—from umbrellas to cottons—to Africa, Europe, and America then established an empire of goods and the supposed good of empire.

2016 John Ben Snow Book Prize, North American Conference on British Studies

Pirates built the British Empire Analyzing the rise and subsequent fall of international piracy from the perspective of colonial hinterlands, Mark G. Hanna explores the often overt support of sea marauders in maritime communities from the inception of England’s burgeoning empire in the 1570s to its administrative consolidation by the 1740s. Although traditionally depicted as swashbuckling adventurers on the high seas, pirates played a crucial role on land. Far from a hindrance to trade, their enterprises contributed to commercial development and to the economic infrastructure of port towns.

JONATHAN EACOTT is associate professor of history at the University of California, Riverside.

MARK G. HANNA is associate professor of history at the University of California, San Diego.

Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia

Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia

Not for sale in South Asia

“Hanna's well-argued and exhaustively researched book will stand as the critical work on early modern British piracy for some time, but it is also essential reading for anyone interested in the development of the empire.” —William and Mary Quarterly

“Selling Empire will come to stand as one of the most articulate arguments about the integrated nature of Britain's global empire in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” —Tillman Nechtman, Skidmore College

April 2017

April 2017

978-1-4696-3604-7 $30.00s Paper 978-1-4696-1795-4 $19.99 BOOK

978-1-4696-3617-7 $30.00s Paper 978-1-4696-2231-6 $19.99 BOOK

464 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 22 halftones, 6 maps, notes, index

www.uncpress.org

472 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 25 halftones, 7 figs., notes, index

61

BRITISH HISTORY


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Adventurism and Empire

Redemption

The Struggle for Mastery in the LouisianaFlorida Borderlands, 1762–1803

Carolina Basketball's 2017 Journey from Heartbreak to History

DAVID NARRETT

ADAM LUCAS, STEVE KIRSCHNER, AND MATT BOWERS

Roving adventurists help steer the rise of American colonial power

This is the story of a national championship that was a year in the making. Redemption: Carolina Basketball’s Journey from Heartbreak to History is a behind-the-scenes look at the Tar Heels’ ride to the 2017 national title. Featuring some never before published, exclusive photographs that will take readers from the practice court to the team bus to the locker room, this book is the most complete chronicle of a UNC national championship ever made available. In addition to the full-color images, the book also includes interviews with the players and coaches that can only be found here, a foreword from head coach Roy Williams, and all-new stories from Adam Lucas, Steve Kirschner, and Matt Bowers, who accompanied the team every step of the way. Much more than a story of Carolina’s 33 victories, Redemption describes the complete journey of one of Carolina’s most unique championships, from heartbreak in Houston to the storybook finish in Phoenix.

Narrett shows how the United States emerged as a successor empire to Great Britain through rivalry with Spain in the Mississippi valley and Gulf Coast. As he traces currents of peace and war over four critical decades—from the close of the Seven Years War through the Louisiana Purchase— Narrett sheds new light on individual colonial adventurers and schemers who shaped history through cross-border trade, settlement projects involving slave and free labor, and military incursions into Spanish and Indian territories. DAVID NARRETT is professor of history at the University of

Texas at Arlington.

Sponsored by the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas

“Well researched, clearly argued, crisply written, and, in addition, entertaining.” —American Historical Review

ADAM LUCAS is a featured columnist at GoHeels.com, the official website of Carolina Athletics, and the author of Carolina Basketball: A Century of Excellence. STEVE KIRSCHNER is senior associate athletic director for communications at the University of North Carolina. MATT BOWERS is associate director of athletic communications at UNC.

“[A] thoughtful and meticulous book. . . . Required reading for scholars of eighteenth-century North American history.” —Journal of American History

Distributed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Athletics

August 2017

October 2017

978-1-4696-3603-0 $30.00s Paper 978-1-4696-1834-0 $19.99 BOOK

978-1-4696-3211-7 $35.00t Cloth 978-1-4696-3212-4 $27.99 BOOK

392 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 18 halftones, notes, bibl., index

www.uncpress.org

Approx. 224 pp., 7.9375 x 10, 200 color plates, appends.

62

EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY / NORTH CAROLINA


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

Dream of a House

Reynolda

The Passions and Preoccupations of Reynolds Price

Her Muses, Her Stories DAVID PARK CURRY AND MARTHA R. SEVERNS

EDITED BY ALEX HARRIS AND MARGARET SARTOR

With a foreword by Allison Perkins

Reynolds Price (1933–2011) was one of America’s most notable writers of the past half-century. Confined to a wheelchair for the last twenty-four years of his life, Price surrounded himself with art and objects that he loved. His eclectic and expansive collection— from the etchings of Picasso to photographs of James Dean, from Greek sculpture to religious icons, from busts of his literary heroes to African masks—created a salon like refuge in which every wall, bookshelf, and piece of furniture signaled some aspect of his essential self. After Price died, Alex Harris was asked by the family and Duke University to document the house before it was sold. In this creative work, carefully selected excerpts are interwoven with exquisite, meticulous photographs. As we turn each page, it is as if Price himself is taking us on a guided tour of his home. This is a remarkable book and a surprising tribute to an uncommonly gifted writer.

Reynolda is your invitation to explore Reynolda House Museum of American Art, North Carolina’s nationally acclaimed art museum showcasing paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts in the restored 1917 home of tobacco magnate R. J. Reynolds and his wife, Katharine. Their sixty-four-room bungalow sits at the center of an estate that beckons thousands of visitors each year to its formal gardens, meadows, woodlands, shops, and restaurants. David Park Curry has captured the essence of Reynolda House through a lavishly illustrated essay that blends Reynolda’s fifty years as a beloved family home with her second life as a museum of American art. Using the lenses of time, landscape, home, social context, history, and memory, Curry connects you to the remarkable place called Reynolda. Highlighting the fascinating—and often surprising—stories of the myriad ways signature works of art came into this stellar collection, Martha R. Severns offers insights about the artists, writers, donors, and, most importantly, the museum’s founder, Barbara Babcock Millhouse.

ALEX HARRIS, a photographer and writer, is Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Documentary Studies at Duke University. MARGARET SARTOR is a writer, photographer, and editor who teaches at Duke University.

DAVID PARK CURRY is the former senior curator of Decorative Arts, American Painting & Sculpture at the Baltimore Museum of Art. MARTHA R. SEVERNS has served as curator at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, South Carolina; the Portland Museum of Art in Maine; and the Greenville County Museum of Art in South Carolina.

Distributed for George F. Thompson Publishing

“A gorgeous, fascinating, and inspiring look into the life, mind, and heart of beloved writer Reynolds Price.” —Lee Smith

Distributed for the Reynolda House Museum of American Art

August 2017

October 2017

978-1-9380-8649-6 $40.00t Cloth

978-0-9986-8172-6 $60.00t Cloth

Approx. 152 pp., 10 x 9, 61 color plates, 1 halftone

www.uncpress.org

Approx. 240 pp., 9.5 x 10, 130 color plates, notes, index

63

PHOTOGRAPHY / FINE ARTS


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

Twenty-Five Short Plays

We Who Believe in Freedom

Selected Works from the University of North Carolina Long Story Shorts Festival, 2011–2015

The Life and Times of Ella Baker

EDITED BY DANA COEN

The second volume in the True Tales for Young Readers series, this short biography of the civil rights leader is intended for middle school and high school readers. Ella Baker, who grew up in Littleton, North Carolina, is best remembered for the role she played in facilitating in April 1960 the organizational meeting of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee at Shaw University, her alma mater. With passion and clear understanding, Lea E. Williams outlines the life that brought Baker to this crucial point in U.S. history.

LEA E. WILLIAMS

In the fall of 2011, The Long Story Shorts One Act Festival was launched featuring performances of short plays written by undergraduate students in the Writing for the Screen and Stage minor, an interdisciplinary, dramatic writing program housed in the Department of Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Marking the first five years of the festival, this anthology showcases works written to be performed in ten minutes with a small production budget. The festival gives students a unique opportunity to participate in a collaborative, developmental environment led by experienced faculty and professional actors and directors, and the plays included here rise to the occasion. Whether they are humorous, poignant, surreal, or provocative, they demonstrate why the short play form has become so popular, why this event has become one the highlights of the university’s cultural scene, and why the Writing for the Screen and Stage program has thrived.

LEA E. WILLIAMS is an independent scholar in Greensboro and former administrator at Bennett College and North Carolina A&T State University, teaches English at Guilford Technical Community College. Williams is the author of Servants of the People: The 1960s Legacy of African American Leadership (1996) in which she profiles eight leaders in the civil rights movement. Distributed for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History

October 2017

978-0-8652-6488-5 $17.00t Paper 978-0-8652-6475-5 $12.99 BOOK

Approx. 114 pp., 5.25 x 8, 15 color plates, 20 halftones, index

DANA COEN is the creator/producer of Long Story Shorts One

Act Festival and the director of the Writing for the Screen and Stage program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Distributed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Writing for the Screen and Stage Program

September 2017

978-1-4696-3575-0 $20.00t Paper 978-1-4696-3576-7 $14.99 BOOK

Approx. 288 pp., 5.5 x 8.5, 1 halftone

www.uncpress.org

64

PERFORMING ARTS / YOUNG ADULT


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

A Time to Serve

Grand Illusions

Bertie County during World War I

Painted Interiors and North Carolina Architecture

GERALD W. THOMAS

LAURA A. W. PHILLIPS

In a remarkable feat, Gerald W. Thomas completes his study of Bertie County and the impact upon its people of successive wars with this volume on the northeastern North Carolina county during World War I. Its publication timed to coincide with the war’s centennial, this localized study depicts a mostly rural county confronted with a challenge not of its making but one to which citizens responded with resourcefulness and patriotic fervor.

With Grand Illusions, Laura Phillips brings to readers her findings after decades of study of decorative interior painting. The chief focus is on the walls of North Carolina residences in the nineteenth century with nods to examples in nonresidential and out-of-state structures. Types studied include wood-grained painting; marbled, stone-blocked; and smoked painting; stenciled painting; and trompe-l’oeil and scenic paintings. The volume includes an extended essay on the topic accompanied by a photographic catalog of the properties and examples.

GERALD W. THOMAS, a native of Bertie County, is a former congressional auditor and retired federal executive. He is the author of Divided Allegiances: Bertie County during the Civil War (1996), Destitute Patriots: Bertie County in the War of 1812 (2012), and Rebels and King's Men: Bertie County in the Revolutionary War (2013).

LAURA A. W. PHILLIPS, architectural historian in WinstonSalem, is the author of Legacy of Faith: Rural Methodist Churches in North Carolina (2010), Transylvania: The Architectural History of a Mountain County (1998), and Simple Treasures: The Architectural Legacy of Surry County (1987), as well as local studies of architecture in Hickory, Reidsville, and Cashiers.

Distributed for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History

October 2017

978-0-8652-6490-8 $15.00t Paper 978-0-8652-6476-2 $11.99 BOOK

Approx. 232 pp., 6 x 9, 27 halftones, 10 tables

Distributed for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History

November 2017

978-0-8652-6491-5 $40.00t Cloth

Approx. 140 pp., 11 x 8.5, 60 color plates, 50 halftones, bibl., list of painters

www.uncpress.org

65

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY / ARCHITECTURE


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

This Day in North Carolina History

Civil War Witness

ANSLEY HERRING WEGNER WITH JEFF MILES

MICHAEL T. SOUTHERN

Matching up history with the calendar, Ansley Wegner shares with readers a dayby-day chronicle highlighting topics of importance to North Carolina history, from sensational crimes to top-selling records to homegrown businesses. This keepsake illustrated volume, fun and informative for all ages, had its genesis as a blog, issued daily for four years on the web and on broadcast outlets.

In a creative, placebased approach to telling the story of the Civil War, architectural historian Michael Southern surveys the historic fabric of North Carolina and identifies those extant structures that were in place during the period 1861–1865 whose stories contribute to our understanding of the war. Lavishly illustrated with newly commissioned photographs and historic images, the book is a musthave for students of the war as well as readers with an interest in architectural history.

North Carolina Places Then and Now

ANSLEY HERRING WEGNER, a native of Wilson, has worked in the North Carolina Office of Archives and History since 1994 and has been the administrator of the Highway Historical Marker Program since 2014. She is the author of History for All the People: One Hundred Years of Public History in North Carolina (2003) and Phantom Pain: North Carolina's Artificial-Limbs Program for Confederate Veterans (2004).

MICHAEL T. SOUTHERN is senior architectural historian with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office, where he has been employed since 1974. He is the coauthor of the threevolume series A Guide to the Historic Architecture of North Carolina. Distributed for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History

Distributed for the North Carolina Office of Archives and History

November 2017

November 2017

978-0-8652-6489-2 $45.00t Cloth

978-0-8652-6472-4 $30.00t Paper

Approx. 320 pp., 8.5 x 11, 400 color plates, 10 maps

Approx. 200 pp., 12 x 9, index, 375 color and halftones photos

www.uncpress.org

66

NORTH CAROLINA HISTORY / CIVIL WAR


DISTRIBUTED TITLES FROM THE OFFICE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING SERVICES

Mujeres en tránsito

Fashioned Texts and Painted Books

Viaje, identidad y escritura en Sudamérica (1830–1910)

Nineteenth-Century French Fan Poetry

VANESA MISERES

ERIN E. EDGINGTON

Mujeres en tránsito examines in detail the insightful accounts of four prominent female writers who traveled to and from Latin America in the nineteenth century: the French Peruvian socialist and activist Flora Tristan (1803–1844), the Argentines Juana Manuela Gorriti (1819–1892), Eduarda Mansilla (1838–1892), and the Peruvian Clorinda Matto de Turner (1852–1909). Each author traveled and wrote in different and significant moments in the history of the Latin American nations, and their texts touch upon the nature of hemispheric and European cross-cultural relations. Mujeres en tránsito revises the limited consideration that women’s travelogues have received within the Latin American literary tradition. It demonstrates how women’s commentaries on their own and other nations speak to their own engagement in the project of modern citizenship. More importantly, the act of traveling often helps female authors challenge the strictly political, legal, and geographic conceptions of nationhood and national identity articulated in canonical texts.

Fashioned Texts and Painted Books examines the folding fan’s multiple roles in fin-de-siècle and early twentieth-century French literature. Focusing on the fan’s identity as a symbol of feminine sexuality, as a collectible art object, and, especially, as an alternative book form well suited to the preservation of poetic texts, the study highlights the fan’s suitability as a substrate for verse, deriving from its myriad associations with coquetry and sex, flight, air, and breath. Close readings of Stéphane Mallarmé’s éventails of the 1880s and 1890s and Paul Claudel’s Cent phrases pour éventails (1927) consider both text and paratext as they underscore the significant visual interest of this poetry. Works in prose and in verse by Octave Uzanne, Guy de Maupassant, and Marcel Proust, along with fan leaves by Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, and Paul Gauguin, serve as points of comparison that deepen our understanding of the complex interplay of text and image that characterizes this occasional subgenre.

VANESA MISERES is assistant professor of Latin American lit-

Michigan.

ERIN E. EDGINGTON is lecturer at the University of

erature at the University of Notre Dame.

North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures

North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures

Distributed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Romance Studies 312

Distributed for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Romance Studies 311

September 2017

September 2017

978-1-4696-3577-4 $65.00s Paper 978-1-4696-3578-1 $29.99 BOOK

978-1-4696-3580-4 $65.00s Paper 978-1-4696-3581-1 $29.99 BOOK

Approx. 204 pp., 6 x 9, notes, index

Approx. 232 pp., 6 x 9, notes, index

www.uncpress.org

67

LITERATURE


recent and recommended

Braxton Bragg

The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy

Earl J. Hess

978-1-4696-2875-2 $35.00t cloth 978-1-4696-2876-9 $19.99s BOOK

A Field Guide to Antietam

Experiencing the Battlefield through Its History, Places, and People

Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler

978-1-4696-3020-5 $23.00t paper 978-1-4696-3021-2 $17.99s BOOK

Learn to Cook 25 Southern Classics 3 Ways

Game Changers

Jennifer Brulé

Art Chansky

Traditional, Contemporary, International

Dean Smith, Charlie Scott, and the Era That Transformed a Southern College Town

978-1-4696-2912-4 $30.00t cloth 978-1-4696-2913-1 $19.99s BOOK

978-1-4696-3038-0 $26.00t cloth 978-1-4696-3039-7 $19.99s BOOK

All the Agents and Saints

North Carolina's Barrier Islands

The President’s Kitchen Cabinet The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the

washingtons to the

obamas

Adrian Miller Author of the James Beard Award–winning Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time

North Carolina's Roadside Eateries

A Traveler's Guide to Local Restaurants, Diners, and Barbecue Joints

D. G. Martin

978-1-4696-3014-4 $16.00t paper 978-1-4696-3015-1 $9.99s BOOK

The President's Kitchen Cabinet

The Story of the African Americans Who Have Fed Our First Families, from the Washingtons to the Obamas

Adrian Miller

Dispatches from the U.S. Borderlands

Stephanie Elizondo Griest 978-1-4696-3159-2 $30.00t cloth 978-1-4696-3160-8 $19.99s BOOK

978-1-4696-3253-7 $30.00t cloth 978-1-4696-3254-4 $19.99s BOOK

Wonders of Sand, Sea, and Sky

David Blevins

978-1-4696-3249-0 $35.00t cloth 978-1-4696-3250-6 $19.99s BOOK

A S O U T H E R N G AT E WAY S G U I D E

Barbara Garrity-Blake & Karen Willis Amspacher

Living at the Water’s Edge A Heritage Guide to the Outer Banks Byway

Living at the Water's Edge

A Heritage Guide to the Outer Banks Byway

Barbara Garrity-Blake and Karen Willis Amspacher Southern Gateways Guides 978-1-4696-2816-5 $22.00t paper 978-1-4696-2817-2 $14.99s BOOK

www.uncpress.org

Corn

A SAVOR THE SOUTH® cookbook

A Field Guide to Gettysburg

Lessons from the Sand

Carol Reardon and Tom Vossler

Charles O. Pilkey and Orrin H. Pilkey

Experiencing the Battlefield through Its History, Places, and People

Tema Flanagan

978-1-4696-3162-2 $20.00t cloth 978-1-4696-3163-9 $14.99s BOOK

Second Edition 978-1-4696-3336-7 $24.00t paper 978-1-4696-3335-0 $23.99s BOOK

68

Family-Friendly Science Activities You Can Do on a Carolina Beach 978-1-4696-2737-3 $19.00t paper 978-1-4696-2738-0 $14.99s BOOK


award-winning books

Rethinking Slave Rebellion in Cuba

La Escalera and the Insurgencies of 1841-1844

Aisha K. Finch 2016 Harriet Tubman Prize, Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery Finalist, 2016 Frederick Douglass Book Prize, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition

To see all our award winners, visit our website.

No Mercy Here

Braxton Bragg

Blue Texas

Sarah Haley 2016 Sara A. Whaley Prize, National Women's Studies Association 2016 Letitia Woods Brown Book Award, Association of Black Women Historians

Earl J. Hess 2016 Richard Barksdale Harwell Award, Civil War Round Table of Atlanta

Max Krochmal 2017 Frederick Jackson Turner Award, Organization of American Historians 2016 National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies Tejas Foco Non-Fiction Book Award 2016 Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize, Texas State Historical Association

The Most Hated Man of the Confederacy

Gender, Punishment, and the Making of Jim Crow Modernity

The Making of a Multiracial Democratic Coalition in the Civil Rights Era

Defiant Braceros

Not Straight, Not White

The Common Cause

Ku-Klux

Mireya Loza 2016 Theodore Saloutos Book Award, Immigration and Ethnic History Society

Kevin Mumford A Stonewall Honor Book in Nonfiction, American Library Association Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Round Table

Robert G. Parkinson

Elaine Frantz Parsons 2016 Willie Lee Rose Prize, Southern Association for Women Historians

How Migrant Workers Fought for Racial, Sexual, and Political Freedom

Black Gay Men from the March on Washington to the AIDS Crisis

The Transnational Mosque

Crescent City Girls

Kishwar Rizvi 2016 Charles Rufus Morey Book Award, College Art Association

LaKisha Michelle Simmons 2016 Julia Cherry Spruill Prize, Southern Association of Women Historians

Architecture and Historical Memory in the Contemporary Middle East

www.uncpress.org

Creating Race and Nation in the American Revolution Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia

2017 James A. Rawley Prize, Organization of American Historians

Remaking the American Patient

How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers

The Lives of Young Black Women in Segregated New Orleans

Nancy Tomes Bancroft Prize, Columbia University

69

The Birth of the Klan during Reconstruction

Kika Kila

How the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Changed the Sound of Modern Music

John W. Troutman 2017 Lawrence W. Levine Award, Organization of American Historians


journals UNC Press works with scholars, research centers, and scholarly societies to publish journals that explore a range of fields primarily in the humanities and social sciences. Our journal partners produce quality research which is both original and peer reviewed. We also work with Appalachian Heritage and the North Carolina Literary Review, literary journals that publish original fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction in addition to scholarly articles. U.S.A.

Foreign

U.S.A.

Appalachian Heritage

The High School Journal

Jason K. Howard, Editor Quarterly: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall ISSN 0363-2318 (2017-Volume 45) Institutions $60.00 $92.00 Individuals $30.00 $62.00

Sarah Bausell, Managing Editor Quarterly: Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer ISSN 0018-1498 (2017/2018-Volume 101) Institutions $80.00 $112.00 Individuals $45.00 $77.00

The High School Journal publishes research, scholarship, essays, and reviews that critically examine the broad and complex field of secondary education. Founded in 1918, it is one of the oldest peer-reviewed academic journals in education.

In this age of information overload, Appalachian Heritage strives to be a literary sanctuary for the finest contemporary writing and visual art that we can find. Each quarterly issue showcases the work of emerging and established writers throughout Appalachia and beyond, offering readers literature that is thoughtful, innovative, and revelatory. The Comparatist Zahi Zalloua, Editor Annually: October ISSN 0195-7678 (2017-Volume 41) Institutions Individuals (SCLA membership dues)

The Journal of the Civil War Era

$70.00

$78.00

please call for prices

Early American Literature Sandra M. Gustafson, Editor Triannually: Spring, Fall, Winter ISSN 0012-8163 (2017-Volume 52) Institutions $85.00 Individuals $46.00

Judith Giesberg Editor Quarterly: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ISSN 2154-4727 (2017-Volume 7) Institutions $90.00 $122.00 Individuals $61.50 $93.50

The Journal of the Civil War Era publishes the most creative new work on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the country’s signal conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century. The journal is published in association with the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center at Pennsylvania State University. Members of the Society of Civil War Historians receive the journal as a benefit of membership.

The Comparatist is a dynamic, well-established journal of comparative literature that has appeared annually since 1977. Its areas of focus include the comparative study of literature, cultural movements, and the arts; and literary and cultural theory.

$109.00 $70.00

JOURNAL ORDERS Orders for subscriptions may be placed directly with the Journals Department, the University of North Carolina Press, or through a subscription agency. All direct orders must be prepaid with a check drawn on a U.S. bank or an international money order payable to the appropriate journal(s). Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express orders are also accepted.

Founded in 1965, Early American Literature is the journal of the Division on American Literature to 1800 of the Modern Language Association. It is the only journal that focuses on the scholarship and criticism of American literature through the early national period. Early American Literature has been adopted as the official publication of the Society of Early Americanists. www.uncpress.org

Foreign

For additional information contact Suzi Waters at: Journals Department, University of North Carolina Press 116 S. Boundary St., Chapel Hill, NC 27514-3808 Telephone: 919-962-4201 Fax: 919-843-7595 or 1-800-205-5425 E-mail: journals@uncpress.org

70


journals U.S.A.

Foreign

U.S.A.

Southern Cultures

Studies in Philology

Harry L. Watson and Marcia Cohen Ferris, Editors Quarterly: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ISSN 1068-8218 (2017-Volume 23) Institutions $75.00 $107.00 Individuals $40.00 $72.00

Reid Barbour, Editor Quarterly: Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall ISSN 0039-3738 (2017-Volume 114) Institutions $85.00 $117.00 Individuals $47.50 $79.50

Grounded in a long history of scholarly excellence as one of the first journals of literary criticism in the United States, Studies in Philology publishes articles on all aspects of British literature from the Middle Ages through Romanticism and articles on relations between British literature and works in the classical, Romance, and Germanic languages.

Southern Cultures is published by the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This award-winning journal explores the history, politics, folklore, literature, and art of the South. Each issue includes articles and essays; reviews of books, museum exhibitions, films, and sound recordings; and regular features, such as “South Polls,” which present public opinion polls on topics of regional interest.

Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity: Research, Education and Policy

Southern Geographer

Peggy Valentine, Editor Semiannually: Spring, Fall ISSN 2475-2843 (2017-Volume 10) Institutions Individuals Students

Hilda Kurtz and Deepak Mishra, Editors Quarterly: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter ISSN 0038-366X (2017-Volume 57) Institutions $90.00 $122.00 Individuals (SEDAAG membership dues) $50.00 $82.00

south: a scholarly journal (Formerly Southern Literary Journal) Sharon Holland, Editor Semiannually: Fall, Spring ISSN 2470-9506 (2017/2018-Volume 50) Institutions $70.00 Individuals $40.00

$99.00 $79.00 $35.00

$99.00 $79.00 $35.00

The Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity is a publication from the School of Health Sciences at WinstonSalem State University. Its mission is to provide a forum for the discussion of factors that promote or constrain the development and sustainability of a diverse health professions workforce. The journal is directed toward educators, policy makers and the health community. The journal is sponsored by the National Association of Medical Minority Educators and the North Carolina Alliance for Health Professions Diversity.

A quarterly publication of the Southeastern Division of the Association of American Geographers, Southeastern Geographer has published the academic work of geographers and other social and physical scientists since 1961. Building on its history as a regional publication, the journal publishes geographic research that engages with conditions and events in “the south,” broadly construed, as they relate to conditions and events that extend over broader geographical reaches.

North Carolina Literary Review Margaret Bauer, Editor Annually: July ISSN 1063-0724 (2017-Volume 26) Institutions Individuals

$86.00 $56.00

$25.00 $15.00

$35.00 $25.00

The North Carolina Literary Review publishes poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by North Carolina writers, as well as interviews, articles, and essays about the state’s authors, literary history, and writing culture. A cross between a scholarly journal and a literary magazine, the NCLR is given as a member benefit for the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association.

The first issue of south: a scholarly journal was published in 2016 featuring global and hemispheric comparative scholarship linking the American South to other Souths. South grew out of the Southern Literary Journal, which moved its editorial home in 2015 and took on a more interdisciplinary focus. Issues feature essays, interviews, and other eclectic scholarly work. www.uncpress.org

Foreign

71


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New titles announced in this catalog are scheduled for publication from August 2017 through January 2018 and will be shipped as published. Prices are subject to change without notice. All prices are U.S. list only and may be higher in the rest of the world.

ORDERS Longleaf Services, Inc. 116 S. Boundary St. Chapel Hill, NC 27514-3808 www.longleafservices.org Phone 800-848-6224 Fax 800-272-6817 customerservice@ longleafservices.org PUBNET: Longleaf's SAN is 2033151. Please confirm your account information with us (800-848-6224) before submitting your first PUBNET order. All books published or distributed by UNC Press are available through bookstores or directly from Longleaf Services, Inc.

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title and author index for fall | winter 2017-2018 58 62 17 39 31 52 51 2 56 8 50 27 19 25 12 35 20 59 6 13 2 49 66 29 64 4 57 41 55 1 34 63 3 11 14 63 61 67 46 30 11 67 59 58 10 24 3 36 1 19 65 48 4 27 10

Abortion after Roe Adventurism and Empire Ahmad, Irfan Alanís Enciso, Fernando Saúl, Russ Davidson, and Mark Overmyer-Velazquez Ambivalent Embrace American Tropics Archives of Dispossession Asch, Chris Myers, and George Derek Musgrove Balmaceda, Catalina Battle of Peach Tree Creek, The Bedasse, Monique A. Beyond the Crossroads Black Firefighters and the FDNY Blackett, R. J. M. Brückner, Martin Buckley, Eve Capó Jr., Julio Cattle Colonialism Chaney, Anthony Children of Uncertain Fortune Chocolate City Chopas, Mary Elizabeth Basile Civil War Witness Claiming Turtle Mountain's Constitution Coen, Dana Color and Character Common Sense and a Little Fire Communion of Shadows, A Consuming Japan Cox, Karen L. Cuban Revolution in America Curry, David Park, Martha R. Severns, and Allison Perkins Demas, Lane DeMent, Jamie Different Shade of Justice, A Dream of a House Eacott, Jonathan Edgington, Erin F Street Mess, The Farmer, Ashley D. Farmhouse Chef, The Fashioned Texts and Painted Books Fischer, John Ryan Ford, Tanisha C. Fowler, Damon Lee Funding Feminism Game of Privilege Gillick M.D., Muriel R. Goat Castle Goldberg, David Grand Illusions Grant, Nicholas Grundy, Pamela Gussow, Adam Ham

61 26 26 53 8 14 54 15 43 60 28 9 50 24 37 18 31 34 15 60 58 38 9 41 13 13 25 46 60 9 55 43 25 67 40 67 62 59 44 57 45 36 57 32 65 61 28 38 42 63 16

Hanna, Mark G. Hard, Hard Religion Hayes, John Herds Shot Round the World, The Hess, Earl J. Hinnershitz, Stephanie History Comes Alive Hobson, Maurice J. Hogarth, Rana A. Hotel Life Hunter, Douglas Jack London Jah Kingdom Johnson, Joan Marie Kirkpatrick, Jennet Knocking on Labor's Door Kranson, Rachel Latner, Teishan A. Legend of the Black Mecca, The Levander, Caroline Field, and Matthew Pratt Guterl Liberated Threads Lim, Julian Lincoln's Autocrat Lindsey, Rachel McBride Livesay, Daniel Lucas, Adam, Steve Kirschner, and Matt Bowers Making Freedom Malavasic, Alice Elizabeth Manganiello, Christopher J. Marvel, William McKevitt, Andrew C. Medicalizing Blackness Miles, Tiya Miseres, Vanesa Mueller, Max Perry Mujeres en tránsito Narrett, David Native American Whalemen and the World New Voyages to Carolina New York Intellectuals, The North Carolina beyond the Connected Age Old and Sick in America Orleck, Annelise Patiño, Jimmy Phillips, Laura A. W. Pirate Nests and the Rise of the British Empire, 1570-1740 Place of Stone, The Porous Borders Power and Politics of Art in Postrevolutionary Mexico, The Price, Reynolds, Margaret Sartor, and Alex Harris Promise of Patriarchy, The

52 40 33 21 32 62 17 7 30 63 29 22 51 6 21 54 58 49 61 59 23 42 12 60 66 23 25 16 35 39 66 47 65 5 9 65 33 44 64 22 37 56 57 45 64 66 20 7 64 5 18 48 53 47

Raby, Megan Race and the Making of the Mormon People Radical Intellect Raising Government Children Raza Sí, Migra No Redemption Religion as Critique Religious Freedom Remaking Black Power Reynolda Richotte Jr., Keith Robinson, Michael D. Roybal, Karen R. Runaway Rymph, Catherine E. Rymsza-Pawlowska, M. J. Schoen, Johanna Searching for Subversives Selling Empire Shoemaker, Nancy Smith, Adam I. P. Smith, Stephanie Jo Social Life of Maps in America, 1750-1860, The Southern Water, Southern Power Southern, Michael T. Stormy Present, The Tales from the Haunted South Taylor, Ula Yvette Technocrats and the Politics of Drought and Development in Twentieth-Century Brazil They Should Stay There This Day in North Carolina History This Grand Experiment Thomas, Gerald W. Three Graces of Val-Kill, The Tichi, Cecelia Time to Serve, A Tinson, Christopher M. Tise, Larry E., and Jeffrey J. Crow Twenty-Five Short Plays Union Indivisible, A Virtues of Exit, The Virtus Romana Wald, Alan M. Walden, Michael L. We Who Believe in Freedom Wegner, Ansley Herring, and Jeff Miles Welcome to Fairyland Wenger, Tisa Williams, Lea E. Wilson, Emily Herring Windham, Anna Lane Winning Our Freedoms Together Woods, Rebecca J. H. Ziparo, Jessica


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press

THE UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA PRESS 116 South Boundary Street, Chapel Hill NC 27514-3808 www.uncpress.org

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UNC Press Fall/Winter 2017-2018 Catalog  

Catalog of new books to be published and distributed by the University of North Carolina Press in Fall 2017.

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