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ARTS PROGRAM

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


Lisa, 1986, oil on board, 24 x 20 in. Courtesy of the artist

April 1, 2013–March 30, 2014 Dorothy L. and Henry A. Rosenberg Jr. Painting Gallery

The Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard


Katherine Lambert

Dear Patrons of the Arts,

Welcome to Joseph Sheppard: The Art of Portraiture. This exhibition is the fourth in a series that features works by Joseph Sheppard on display at the center that bears his name—the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard. These new works will be located in the Dorothy L. and Henry A. Rosenberg Jr. Painting Gallery. University of Maryland University College (UMUC) is proud to showcase works by an artist of Sheppard’s stature—a Maryland native who continues to contribute to the region’s vibrant art community. This exhibition includes pieces from a broad spectrum of Sheppard’s portraiture work and offers viewers an overview of his talent for capturing his subject’s form and essence. Many noteworthy Maryland residents to call upon him to craft their own portraits—including U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski, Cardinal Edwin F. O’Brien, and Leroy Merritt, the benefactor for whom this center is named. I do hope you will take the opportunity to explore this exhibition and Sheppard’s unique talents as well as to enjoy all of the works on display at the Leroy Merritt Center. Thank you for joining us. Sincerely,

Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College

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The Portraitures of Joseph Sheppard

Sheppard traveled to Europe on a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1957, and has received numerous other prizes and awards in both painting and sculpture. His works are in public and private collections in the United States and abroad.

Artist Joseph Sheppard is no stranger to the Maryland community or to University of Maryland University College (UMUC). For more than 50 years, Joseph Sheppard has paid homage to the past with paintings, drawings, sculptures, and other artworks that honor the present. No matter where his career has taken him—from Maryland to New York to Italy—he has held fast to his commitment to the sanctity of real formations and their expert execution. In the art world, this artistic style is called Realism—a style of the mid-19th century in which the artistic goal is to create the form in a highly representational manner. Realism also embodies a painting technique called “trompe l’oeil,” which is a French term that means to fool or deceive the eye. Using this process, the artist tricks the viewer into thinking that the object of the painting is real and not merely a representation of the object. The illusional effect of trompe l’oeil creates depth or dimension in a work of art. In short, the viewer’s eye stops at the flat surface of the work while the object seems to protrude from the work. It is with this prodigious talent that Sheppard draws the figure and paints the essence of a person in his portraitures.

Presently, Sheppard divides his time between Pietrasanta, Italy, and Baltimore, Maryland. He is represented in major collections and museums throughout the world, including the Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown, Ohio; the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa; the University of Arizona Museum of Art in Tuscon, Arizona; the Westmoreland Museum of American Art in Greensburg, Pennsylvania; the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia; the Baltimore Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland; Brookgreen Gardens in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina; the New Britain Museum of American Art in New Britain, Connecticut; the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and the Museo dei Bozzetti in Pietrasanta, Italy. In addition, the Arts Program at UMUC is proud to include a large collection of Sheppard’s works in its growing Maryland Artist Collection. Always painting, always looking for the next subject matter, Joseph Sheppard is truly one of Maryland’s most celebrated artists, and the university is proud to call him a friend.

Eric Key, Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College Steven Halperson

Sheppard was born in Owings Mills, Maryland, in 1930. From 1948 to 1952, he attended the Maryland Institute of Art (now the Maryland Institute College of Art) on a four-year scholarship. He studied with Jacques Maroger, the former technical director of the Louvre, who is credited with the rediscovery of the old master painting mediums. He was artist-in-residence at Dickinson College from 1956 to 1957, and, until 1975, taught drawing, anatomy, and painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

The Arts Program at UMUC would like to thank all those who have invested in the creation of the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, including the late Leroy Merritt and the Merritt family, Dorothy L. and Henry A. Rosenberg Jr., Michael J. and Patricia K. Batza Jr., and Betsy and George M. Sherman, whose generous contributions made the creation of the center possible. Additionally, the Arts Program extends a warm word of gratitude to those who have loaned works to this exhibition. It is through their generosity that a wider audience can enjoy Sheppard’s artwork.

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Joseph Sheppard: The Art of Portraiture

Brian Young Curator, Arts Program University of Maryland University College Joseph Sheppard is renowned for his work with the figure. During his 50-plus-year career, he has produced countless figural works, including work commissioned by business leaders, public figures, and collectors, among others. This exhibition has two components. The main portion consists of about two dozen paintings concerning portraiture and the figure. The second, which is the smaller component, consists of one drawing and three progressive paintings and provides insight into Sheppard’s traditional method of applying pigment to its support. In his approach to the figure, Sheppard sees his work as a continuation of centuries of historical tradition. A discovery made in 2006 traces the history of the portrait back 27,000 years.1 In a grotto in Angoulême, France, a drawing on a rock wall approximates the basic features of the human face. The Faiyum Basin, west of Cairo, contains hundreds of examples of painted mummy portraits over wrapped corpses from the first century BCE, which were meant to preserve the likeness of the deceased. In the medieval period, individualized likenesses began to appear in the secondary parts of religious altarpieces alongside traditional Christian imagery. Many art historians believe that painted portraits, exemplified most famously by Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, Mona Lisa (circa 1501), reached a then-unprecedented level of sophistication in the Renaissance and Baroque periods, circa 1400–1650. Along with Leonardo, several other European artists have influenced and inspired generations of followers: Dürer, Titian, Caravaggio, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. To state that an artist is influenced by previous generations of artists is ambiguous. In the case of Sheppard, one might consider whether he is borrowing compositional conventions, the color choices (or palette), or something as com-

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plicated as the actual technique and application of pigment to the canvas. In other words, is he emulating the creativity or the technique?2 He would proudly declare a debt to both. In this exhibition, Sheppard’s understanding of Western conventions reveals itself in the portraits of Richard Norman Stauffer and U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski. In both, Sheppard included textbooks in the reach of the sitters, a well-understood convention suggesting that the individuals are modern day men (and women) of letters. Hans Holbein, the 15th century Northern Renaissance artist, portrayed his now-famous sitter, Erasmus of Rotterdam, presumably editing his Commentaries on the Gospel of Saint Mark. Holbein’s work provides the perfect setting for a noted writer and humanist. The tradition continues as a welcome inclusion to the modern portrait of a highly educated physician or seasoned politician. For Sheppard, though, an early interest in the centuries-old craft of painting led him beyond the visual devices, including an orderly composition, symbolism when appropriate, a mastery of anatomy, the implementation of one-point perspective, atmospheric perspective, and the visual vocabulary used to identify the sitters’ standing in their social milieu. To enrich his studies, Sheppard pursued the formulas and techniques of the Renaissance and Baroque giants. The technical aspect of Joseph Sheppard’s career begins with Jacques Maroger (1884–1962), a restorer, author, and eventual teacher of Sheppard. When he was a young man in Paris, France, Maroger studied with the well-known portraitist Jacques-Émile Blanche (1861–1942), an artist who executed portraits of John Singer Sargent, Marcel Proust, and Aubrey Beardsley, among others. Underlining Blanche’s stature in the artist community were his acquaintanceship with Henry James and his mention in The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein. When Maroger completed his studies with Blanche, he entered the studio of Louis Anquetin (1861–1932). Sheppard, his teacher, and their artistic lineage share a common trait: the mastery of the studio techniques of painting, especially as it concerned the figure. These artists understood anatomy, shading, and composition.


Jacques Maroger would go on to record his understanding of the earlier techniques in The Secret Formulas and Techniques of the Masters (1948), a text that uncovered and then amalgamated the recipes of those towering artists from centuries past. In 1940, Maroger began as an instructor at the Maryland Institute (now Maryland Institute College of Art), where he would stay for 19 years. Just after World War II, Sheppard enrolled in the class and over the next 15 years learned to master and refine the Maroger method, as it is commonly called. Maroger’s legacy is carried on today at MICA in the Schuler School of Fine Art. In 1960, Sheppard was invited to teach at MICA and ultimately spent 15 years teaching painting, anatomy, figure drawing, and painting techniques. Counted among his students are wellknown realists Douglas Hofmann, Michael Molnar, James Earl Reid, and Evan Wilson. Viewing Study #1, Study #2, Study #3, and Study #4, together provides insight into the process of creating a painting. Sheppard, like so many academically trained painters, often begins with a study on paper. These drawings are typically quicker, more direct, and closer to the artist’s hand. In Study #1, the viewer can see the use of black charcoal, red conté (a type of crayon), and white conté. Generally speaking, the black is used for the outline and dark shadows. The white is used primarily for the highlights and the red to fill in the body of the image. It is the latter color that approximates the flesh tones. Study #2 illustrates the next stage used to approximate the general characteristics of the drawing for the permanent medium of oil on canvas. It is a translation of sorts. Study #3 employs an additional gray layer often referenced by its French equivalent, grisaille. This is a neutral tone used for modeling, a technique to create an illusion of three-dimensional form on a two-dimensional surface. Study #4 is essentially a finished work. The works in this exhibition range from the informal, perhaps intended to be retained by the artist, to the more formal, exemplified by Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien, commissioned by the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Sheppard depicts now-Cardinal O’Brien half-length in a three-quarter pose. If he were seated, one might easily make a comparison to the pose of the Mona Lisa. To reinforce the archbishop’s identity, Sheppard has integrated the episcopal symbols

of his office with the Basilica of the Assumption as the backdrop. To avoid creating visual tension between sitter and backdrop, Sheppard uses the three-quarter pose to allow a seamless transition from the foreground to the background. In effect, this leads the viewer’s eye gently past the columns, marble, and gardens. On one level, Sheppard has created a rich, impressive environment of fine drapery, gold, limestone, and verdant landscaping. On another, he has captured the likeness of Cardinal O’Brien, including his humanity. He is both the leader of the flock and part of it. The portrait of U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski is less imposing but visually as impressive. This work was executed in 1995, eight years after she transitioned from the House of Representatives to the U.S. Senate. By 1995, she was a powerful figure both in Maryland and national politics. Yet Sheppard has kept her surroundings sparse and the color palette limited. One could speculate that such economy is visually fitting for a woman who is an advocate for the middle class. Her demeanor and dress are professional and understated. The pearls and stem-length flower, typically feminine symbols, may be a nod to the rarity of women in Congress, even in 1995. Her raised right arm and books to the other side, however, suggest action borne from understanding.

U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski, 1995, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., On loan from Goucher College, gift of Henry A. Rosenberg Jr.

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The portraits of Henry A. Rosenberg, Jr. and Dorothy L. Rosenberg can stand independent of each other but are complementary in pose. This is a well-understood metaphor of marriage that dates back most famously to Rembrandt and his 17th-century peers. Mr. Rosenberg is shown in a dark suit and neutral background with just a hint of color centrally placed, emanating from his white dress shirt. His pose is assured, timeless, and a bit relaxed. Mrs. Rosenberg is awash in peach and rose set against an airy neutral background. In this depiction, her setting and dress suggest vitality and confidence. Viewed side-by-side with Mr. Rosenberg on the left, the compositional line starts at Mr. Rosenberg’s right hand and travels from his torso down to his left side and appears ready to meet his wife’s hand on the bannister. His tie is now a complement to her dress, as is his background to her railing. The paintings succeed individually and as a pair. Like the Rosenberg portraits, the portraits of Martha Ellison, Leon Fleisher, George Young, Sigmund Hyman, William Pitcher, Mrs. William M. Pitcher, and Richard Norman Stauffer share characteristics consistent in Sheppard’s commissions. The artist has several goals: capture the sitters’ likenesses; employ the traditional technique; and make choices on setting, clothing, and pose. Most importantly for his reputation and the satisfaction of the client, Sheppard wants to capture the spirit of his subject. In this exhibition, the portraits of the younger members of the Merritt family, Steven Haigley and Remy Merritt, convey that Steven was lively and curious at that age while Remy was shy at times but wellliked. A good portrait artist will draw out the personality of his sitter and then capture that essence. In this essay, my remarks have focused on finished portraits and preliminary studies. These pieces constitute the bulk of the show. Yet, a smaller, loosely knit category is worth our examination. These are images of individuals whose portraits were not commissioned. They differ from

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their establishment counterparts by their pose, setting, and intention. They were created because their subject appealed to the painter. Examples include Girl with Potbelly Stove, Slow Dancing (aka Dantini the Magnificent), The Loser, and Woman with Flowers. Dantini, whose stage name derives from Dante and Houdini, was a vaudeville performer who returned to his native Baltimore to a bit of popularity, but never fame. The Loser reveals an emotional situation as much as it conveys the fighter’s appearance with verisimilitude. Woman with Flowers is a luscious still life wrapped with eroticism and concern. From Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien to the informal portrait of Lisa from 1986, Joseph Sheppard has demonstrated his ability to capture individuals through skill, knowledge, training, and empathy. The result is that Joseph Sheppard: The Art of Portraiture is an advance look at the extraordinary range of figural work by an artist rooted in Renaissance ideals. For those interested in learning more about Sheppard’s figurative work, the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard also features about a dozen of his drawings focused on his portrayals of faces. These can be seen in the Leroy Merritt Center’s Patricia K. and Michael J. Batza Jr. Study Center. Numerous examples of Sheppard’s sculptural works, including studies for two monuments, the Holocaust Memorial, and the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, are also on view.

Jonathan Jones, “Old Masters,” Guardian, June 6, 2006, accessed February 25, 2013, http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2006/jun/06/art. 1

Sheppard, Joseph, “Learning from the Old Masters,” p. 8, Watson-Guptill, New York, 1979. 2


Joseph Sheppard Born 1930, Owings Mills, Maryland Resides, Baltimore, Maryland

Selected Commissions and Installations

Education

Government House, Annapolis, Maryland, 1989

Maryland Institute of Art (now Maryland Institute College of Art), 1948–1952

St. Francis of Assisi Chapel, St. Joseph Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, 1992

Teaching

George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, College Station, Texas, 1998

Artist-in-Residence, Dickinson College, 1956–1957 Maryland Institute College of Art, 1960–1975

Selected Collections

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Figge Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa The Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard, University of Maryland University College, Adelphi, Maryland

Holocaust Memorial, Baltimore, Maryland, 1988 Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, 1989

Chiesa di San Michele Arcangelo, Buriano, Italy, 1999 Pope John Paul II Monument at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Baltimore, Maryland, 2008 Brooks Robinson Statue, Baltimore, Maryland, 2011

Selected Publications

Paul Chew, PhD, Joseph Sheppard: Portraits, Arti Grafiche Giorgi & Gambi, Florence, Italy, 2000 Sheppard, Joseph. Drawing the Female Figure, Watson-Guptill, New York, 1975

Museo dei Bozzetti, Pietrasanta, Italy

Drawing the Male Figure, Watson-Guptill, New York, 1976

National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC

Learning from the Old Masters, Watson-Guptill, New York, 1979

New Britain Museum of Art, New Britain, Connecticut University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland The Vatican Museums, Vatican City Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown, Maryland

Anatomy: A Complete Guide for Artists, Watson-Guptill, New York 1993 More Portraits, Grafiche Gelli, Florence, Italy, 2005 Legacy: A Tradition Lives On, Grafiche Gelli, Florence, Italy, 2005

Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania

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FIGURE BACKSTAGE 1952, OIL ON MASONITE, 11½ x 11¾ IN. UMUC Permanent Collection, Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, gift of Dr. Bernard Kleiman

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GIRL WITH POTBELLY STOVE 1955, OIL ON MASONITE, 12 x 12 IN. UMUC Permanent Collection, Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, gift of Dr. Bernard Kleiman

FEATURED ARTWORK

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HENRY A. ROSENBERG, JR. 1993, OIL ON CANVAS, 30 x 24 IN. On loan from Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Rosenberg Jr.

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DOROTHY L. ROSENBERG 1993, OIL ON CANVAS, 36 x 28 IN. On loan from Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Rosenberg Jr.

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MANNY JURGENSEN 1995, OIL ON CANVAS, 40 x 30 IN. Courtesy of the artist

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DIANE ST. CLAIR 2000, OIL ON PANEL, 36 x 30 IN. Courtesy of the artist

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SIGMUND HYMAN 2001, OIL ON PANEL, 30 x 36 IN. On loan from Mrs. Mary Hyman

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THE BATZA FAMILY GIRLS 2002, OIL ON PANEL, 36 x 30 IN. On loan from Patricia K. and Michael J. Batza Jr.

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GEORGE YOUNG CIRCA 2005, OIL ON PANEL, 40 x 36 IN. On loan from the collection of Calvert Hall College High School, gift of the family of George Young

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Steven Halperson

SLOW DANCING (AKA DANTINI THE MAGNIFICENT) 2009, OIL ON CANVAS, 39 x 39 IN. Courtesy of the artist

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Figure Backstage, 1952, oil on masonite, 11½ x 11¾ in., UMUC Permanent Collection, Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, gift of Dr. Bernard Kleiman Girl with Potbelly Stove, 1955, oil on masonite, 12 x 12 in., UMUC Permanent Collection, Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, gift of Dr. Bernard Kleiman

Sigmund Hyman, 2001, oil on panel, 30 x 36 in., On loan from Mrs. Mary Hyman The Batza Family Girls, 2002, oil on panel, 36 x 30 in., On loan from Patricia K. and Michael J. Batza Jr.

Lisa, 1986, oil on board, 24 x 20 in., Courtesy of the artist

George Young, circa 2005, oil on panel, 40 x 36 in., On loan from the collection of Calvert Hall College High School, gift of the family of George Young

Henry A. Rosenberg, Jr., 1993, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., On loan from Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Rosenberg Jr.

The Loser, 2005, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in., Courtesy of the artist

Dorothy L. Rosenberg, 1993, oil on canvas, 36 x 28 in., On loan from Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Rosenberg Jr.

Archbishop Edwin F. O’Brien, 2008, oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in., On loan with the permission of Most Rev. William E. Lori, Archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore

U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski, 1995, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., On loan from Goucher College, gift of Henry A. Rosenberg Jr. Leon Fleisher, 1995, oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in., Courtesy of the artist Manny Jurgensen, 1995, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in., Courtesy of the artist Paula Childress, 1995, oil on panel, 30 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist Martha Ellison, 1998, oil on canvas, 72 x 36 in., On loan from Richard and Martha Ellison Mrs. William M. Pitcher, 1998, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., On loan from Mrs. Constance Pitcher

Woman with Flowers, 2008, oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in., Courtesy of the artist Slow Dancing (aka Dantini the Magnificent), 2009, oil on canvas, 39 x 39 in., Courtesy of the artist Steven Haigley, not dated, oil on panel, 36 x 30 in., On loan from the Merritt family Remy Merritt, not dated, oil on panel, 36 x 30 in., On loan from the Merritt family Girl in a White Suit, not dated, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., Courtesy of the artist Self-Portrait, not dated, 48 x 72 in., Courtesy of the artist

William Pitcher, 1999, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 in., On loan from Mrs. Constance Pitcher

Study #1, Chris Merritt, 2013, charcoal, red conté, and white conté on paper, 20 x 16 in., Courtesy of the artist

Richard Norman Stauffer, 1999, oil on canvas, 36 x 30 in., Courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

Study #2, 2013, oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in., Courtesy of the artist

Diane St. Clair, 2000, oil on panel, 36 x 30 in., Courtesy of the artist

Study #3, 2013, oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in., Courtesy of the artist Study #4, 2013, oil on canvas, 20 x 16 in., Courtesy of the artist

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About the Arts at UMUC

Since 1978, University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists and brings art to the community through its own collections, which have grown to include more than 1,900 pieces of art, and special exhibitions. UMUC’s collections focus on both art by Maryland artists and art from around the world. They include the Maryland Artist Collection, the Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, the Asian Collections, the Education Collection, and the International Collection. The university’s collection of Maryland art includes approximately 1,400 works and provides a comprehensive survey of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of nearly 420 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Tang Dynasty (618–907 ad) through the 19th century—a historical reach of 13 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The main, lower-level gallery in Adelphi is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week, and the Leroy Merritt Center for the Art of Joseph Sheppard is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week. More than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors come to the Adelphi facilities each year. Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo are open to visitors from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

About UMUC

UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degree-granting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 92,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in more than 25 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

UMUC Arts Program Mission Statement

The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

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UMUC Art Advisory Board

Javier Miyares President University of Maryland University College Michèle E. Jacobs, Chair Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Anne V. Maher, Esq., Vice Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, PhD Art Historian Myrtis Bedolla Owner and Founding Director Galerie Myrtis

Juanita Boyd Hardy Director, Millennium Arts Salon Managing Principal Tiger Management Consulting Group, LLC Sharon Smith Holston, Past Chair Artist’s Representative and Co-owner Holston Originals Pamela Holt Consultant Public Affairs Administration Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

I-Ling Chow, honorary member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A.

Philip Koch Maryland Artist Professor, Maryland Institute College of Art

Linda Derrick Collector and Patron of the Arts

Thomas Li, honorary member Chairman and CEO, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

Patricia Dubroof Artist/Consultant IONA Senior Services Nina C. Dwyer Artist, Adjunct Professor of Art, Montgomery College Jeannette Glover Artist, Program Manager, Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

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Karin Goldstein, honorary member Art Collector

David Maril, honorary member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Past Vice Chair, honorary member Professor of Art History, Ret. College of Southern Maryland Dianne A. Whitfield-Locke, DDS Collector and Patron of the Arts Owner, Dianne Whitfield-Locke Dentistry


UMUC Board of Visitors Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Executive Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt Member Emeritus President and Chief Executive Officer The Blewitt Foundation Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Senior Vice President, Operations, and Managing Principal, Ret. McKissack & McKissack David W. Bower President and Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America John M. Derrick Jr. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Karl R. Gumtow Founder and Chief Executive Officer CyberPoint International Michèle E. Jacobs Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Donald S. Orkand, PhD (Former Chair) Member Emeritus Founding Partner DC Ventures and Associates, LLC

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., U.S. Army Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense/Intelligence Services Lockheed Martin Information Technology Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc. Sharon Pinder Founder and Chief Executive Officer The Pinder Group Brig. Gen. Velma Richardson, U.S. Army, Ret. Vice President, DoD IT Programs and Special Projects IS&GS Lockheed Martin Corporation Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., U.S. Army, Ret. Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Attorney at Law Wood Law Offices, LLC Joyce M. Wright Chief Claims Officer, People’s Trust Homeowners Insurance

Contributors

Project Manager: Nichelle Lenhardt Curator: Brian Young Editors: Kate Thornton and Beth Butler Designer: Jennifer Norris Production Manager: Scott Eury Fine Arts Technician: René A. Sanjines Administrative Assistant: Denise Melvin © 2013 University of Maryland University College. All rights reserved. Copyright credits and attribution for certain illustrations are cited internally proximate to the illustrations. All rights reserved.

13-ARTS-045 (03/13)


UMUC Joseph Sheppard Exhibition, 2013  

Learn about the exhibition "Joseph Sheppard: The Art of Portraiture" at University of Maryland University College.

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