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ABOUT THE UMUC COLLECTIONS Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists a few miles from the nation’s capital, at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland and, more recently, at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo in Largo, Maryland. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists. UMUC’s Maryland Artists Collections include more than 1,500 artworks and constitute a comprehensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of more than 280 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Sung Dynasty (960–1279 a.d.) through the 19th century, a historical reach of 10 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks from the UMUC Maryland Artists Collections and Asian Collections are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center, which is open to the public seven days a week and is visited by more than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors each year. UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art. ABOUT UMUC UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degreegranting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to 90,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 27 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

rudimentary A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals

Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011


Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011 March 21–June 29, 2011 Arts Program University of Maryland University College


Message from the President

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

Dear Patrons of the Arts, Thank you for joining us for the annual University of Maryland University College (UMUC) faculty art invitational. At this year’s exhibition, Rudimentary: A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals: Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011, we welcome 24 teaching artists from throughout the state of Maryland. Each of the artists whose work is included in this exhibition teaches his or her craft to aspiring artists in Maryland. UMUC is proud to offer its exhibit space to Maryland’s teaching artists. No matter what subject they teach, teachers pass information, perspective, appreciation, critique, and criticism to their students, and students pass their insights back to their teachers. This exchange gradually shapes the future of the subject. By viewing these teaching artists’ works and digesting their visual messages, we have the chance to reflect on their valuable relationships with their students. While these artists each teach their craft in Maryland, they nevertheless channel a wide range of unique experiences into painting, drawing, sculpture, and other mediums. I am pleased that our community members have the opportunity to enrich their lives by witnessing this wide range of experiences through art. Sincerely,

Susan C. Aldridge, PhD President University of Maryland University College

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Rudimentary: A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011 Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Just as museums and galleries at other institutions of higher learning have done, the Arts Program at UMUC has extended its walls to practicing artists who teach within the University System of Maryland (USM) and at other institutions of higher education in Maryland. Through the annual faculty art invitational exhibition, members of the UMUC community have the opportunity to immerse themselves in works of art by professional artists of diverse backgrounds who happen to share the common experience of teaching their passion to students at universities in Maryland. Today’s teaching artists serve several important functions: They preserve, promote, and develop art; they communicate the importance of art to peers to ensure the continuation of art programs; and they battle budget cuts that not only affect art supplies but also staff. They also serve as the first point of contact for many students who are majoring in art or who simply wish to explore their creative talents. They encourage, nurture, and evaluate these students in all mediums and in various styles and techniques. They give these students the guidance they need to become art practitioners no matter their artistic ambitions. They challenge students to think, evolve, stretch their imaginations, and incorporate new ways, new techniques, and new methods into their work. They help students reach their fullest potential while synthesizing new modes of thoughts and methods in the art field. As a result, new mediums emerge for the next generation to view, digest, discuss, and evaluate. In recent years, technology and video art have contributed greatly to the evolution of art, which was apparent at the 17th Biennale of Sydney (held May– August 2010), where approximately 25 percent of the exhibition space was dedicated to video art. That number does not include the large number of photographs, enlarged pigment and digital prints, and other printed materials. Indeed, technology has had an effect on the art world, and teaching artists will continue to play a pivotal role in shaping perceptions of what constitutes art.

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The artists who teach at universities throughout Maryland have a direct influence on art appreciation and presentation in their communities, in Maryland, and throughout the world. But, more importantly, they are artists! They are exploring and developing alongside their students. While many may view them as art historians or art professors, they are in fact practicing, working, and striving artists. Many balance teaching a full load of courses and holding office hours for students with spending time with their families and finding time for their art. To recognize Maryland’s teaching artists’ commitment to art, their students, and their profession, UMUC is proud to exhibit their artworks at Rudimentary: A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals: Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011. The concept for expanding the exhibit grew out of discussions with the artists on staff at UMUC a few years ago. It grew out of a need to understand what these artists were doing personally and professionally, as teachers, and to support them and invited guest artists. The annual exhibition explores the variety of perspectives in Maryland’s teaching institutions and serves as a resource to promote and celebrate the works of teaching artists within USM. Rudimentary: A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals: Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011 presents the creative expressions of 24 Maryland artists. It is a broad representation encompassing a diversity of styles, mediums, and theoretical approaches to the production of art. The exhibition showcases the artists’ work in various media, including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, computer-generated and conceptual art, and more. As the exhibition title suggests, artists who teach often take an elementary or back-to-basics approach to teaching art. Students must learn the basic principles before they can achieve artistic excellence. The artists in this exhibit have mastered the many approaches to creating art and now work to help others understand them. Each artist presents a unique dialog. As you view the works in the exhibit, take the time to communicate with each work and find the voice of the artist.

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Plates James Adkins Dustin Davis Christopher

Joan Bevelaqua

Edward Brown

Michel S. Demanche Harrington

Bradley P. Hudson L. Claire Kincannon Anne MCLaughlin Nare Ratnapala

Carol Grant

Peter

Margo

Herzfeld

Humphrey

richard klank

David Medwith

PATRICK CRAIg Tonya Gregg Richard

Solomon

Holt

Isekeije

Matt Klos

Clayton Lang

Trace Miller

Karen Norman

James von Minor

Edward Brown, Spiderweb Light, 2010, charcoal drawing on paper, 26½ x 38½"


L. Claire Kincannon University of Maryland, College Park

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“After my 50-year hiatus from painting, my lifelong fascination with news, politics, and world events has provided a treasure trove of material for my paintings, which I call narrative landscapes. I’ve worn numerous “hats” over the years, but my career as a teacher and interior designer inspires me to play with texture and color, and, being an old pack rat, I have saved numerous objects that find their way into my artwork, such as cork, barbed-wire, sand, leaves, et cetera.” Speak of Evil, 2010, mixed media, 34 x 34"

Eggplants, 2010, watercolor, 14 x 21"

Joan Bevelaqua University of Maryland University College “My drawings and oil paintings are based on observation. I have always enjoyed looking carefully and challenging myself to create an illusion of the real. I use images that explore my personal history and story. I also am a reader of contemporary fiction and include found imagery from literature.” 6


Matt Klos Anne Arundel Community College

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“My recent works have focused on the cluttered, somewhat claustrophobic, spaces in my suburban home. While recording thousands of momentary painted moments I hope to make paintings that create a palpable, experiential whole.”

Looking Back, 2009–10, oil on linen, 46 x 36"

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Trace Miller Towson University “Narrative flashpoints and the unruly undercurrents of abstract expressionism are what propel my work. To harness and “still” these opposing energies in a more focused and contemplative way are insights less understood than felt.”

Narrowing Horizons, 2010, mixed media collage on panel, 36 x 26"

Building and Loan, 2009, watercolor, 28 x 36"

Karen Norman University of Maryland, College Park “My work expresses the inherent beauty of creation in color, form, and pattern. As an artist, I believe my work is a reflective medium conveying my particular interpretation of the subject matter to the viewer through the medium of watercolor.” 8


James Adkins Howard Community College “My paintings reflect my interest in the teaching of art. I teach drawing and color and feel that students should learn the fundamental principles and skills that will enable them to develop their own approach to painting.”

Contemplation, 2007, oil on canvas, 28 x 28"

David Medwith Invited Guest “I am interested in the look of nature— in its shape, line, and color. By these observations of nature I express in the digital media my interpretations.”

Water, 2011, photograph, 12 x 9"

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Patrick Craig University of Maryland, College Park The paintings in this show reflect a fascination with active visual puzzles. They present organic or geometric combinations along with spatial and illusionist effects designed to attract and invite speculation.

Grind, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 34 x 34"

Dustin P. Davis Frostburg State University “My work is created employing the same technique one would use to stack coffee cups on a kitchen shelf. Three or more ordinary found objects are selected and arranged into an interesting physical and visual arrangement. Their ancestral base is Marcel and Mutt.�

Lost Time, 2009, mixed media, 12 x 12 x 3"

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Richard Holt “I have always been one to try to see all sides to a story. It often leads me to have conflict within myself. I am often torn in two about situations and have a hard time choosing a path without worrying about the consequences and how it will affect a second or third party. Frustration, fickleness, and a sense of weariness find a way of becoming my subject matter when I sit down to sculpt these small monuments. These figures allow me to express the feelings I have at any given moment.”

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

Towson University

Peace, 2010, soda-fired stoneware, 16 x 6"

Frustration, 2010, soda-fired stoneware, 16 x 6"

Dance of the Red Moon, 2010, metal foil relief, 24 x 33"

Solomon Isekeije University of Maryland Eastern Shore “My mixed media artworks are contemporary interpretations of traditional African artistic imagery and experiences. The concept of continuity in some traditional African sculptures recognizes the transition of power from one object to another. I hope to maintain this relevance through my artworks.” 11


Michel S. Demanche University of Maryland Eastern Shore “Looking into the sun is one of the many things we have all been told to never do. They always said it will burn your eyes and you will go blind. Does pointing a camera toward the sun burn its eye? Does it go blind? These images are the result.”

CJH, 2010, silver gelatin print, state 1, 26 x 28"

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

Violin and Cello (diptych), 2010, oil and acrylic on canvas, 40 x 60"

Richard Klank University of Maryland, College Park “Several years ago, violinist Daniel Heifetz and soprano Carmen Balthrop played Rachmaninoff’s Vocalise in my studio while I painted. The paintings, the wood floor acoustics, together with the audience as participants in this salon experience helped to create a series of opportunities that were the genesis of my works. The expression of space formed with music found completion with the application of fine surface over-layers with the abundant palette of Gelman’s paint. These are my works.” 12


Clayton Lang Bowie State University

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“I work in leather because it allows me to pursue my dual interests in painting (color) and sculpture (form). In addition, the organic nature of leather seems appropriate in my quest to describe the spirit or life force embodied in all living things.”

Reds III, Dialogue in Red, 2008, leather collage, 33¼ x 40¼ x 3"

Peter Herzfeld Frostburg State University “The reader can have a very close relationship with a book.”

Such Scenic White Lies Invent Melee Unseen Victims Whine Within, 2010, 10 altered books, 11 x 14" each

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Sea Turtles, 2008, color lithograph, 30 x 18"

Bradley P. Hudson University of Maryland Eastern Shore University of Maryland Eastern Shore “A practicing commercial illustrator and printmaker, I explore the imagery and concepts of popular culture and commercial media.�

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Margo Humphrey University of Maryland, College Park

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“This work is mainly about specific issues, experiences, and circumstances that have affected or made a lasting impression on me. The work is colorful, and it is the intensity of this color that represents the pageantry and excitement of the places I have lived, such as Samoa, Africa, the Fiji Islands, Jamaica, and my hometown.”

The Bottle Tree, 2011, color lithograph, 28 x 22"

Linear Vortex III, 2008, mixed media (pumice, pigment, and resin), 24 x 34"

Christopher Harrington University of Maryland Eastern Shore “My objects blur the line between painting and sculpture. By using iridescent pigments, pumice, acrylic polymers, and resins, I attempt to create works that are dynamic from a distance but that also have many secrets that are revealed only upon close inspection.” 15


Edward Brown Salisbury University “My interests in beginning a drawing or painting are formal, but I hope the end results are expressive of an emotional or spiritual state. My drawings begin as an exploration of line, value, and space. I am drawn to line. When I first look at a work of art, I look more at the lines on the surface than at the overall form.”

As Above x 1, 2010, charcoal drawing on paper, 37¾ x 26¾"

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

Untitled, 2011, oil on canvas, 48 x 72"

Nare Ratnapala University of Maryland, College Park “To paint is to visualize thoughts and ideas . . . It is that process that I am interested in and not so much the end product. The physical involvement, such as simply applying the paint, scraping, wiping, and brushing, becomes the means to develop and refine the expressions. In simple terms, it is similar to talking to oneself, and, when it’s all done, it lingers as a visual expression of a dialog frozen in time.” 16


James von Minor Towson University

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“Ultimately I began to discover that my rationalizations and misinterpretations of ideas had become a subject of my work.”

Simple Mechanism, 2010, oil on wood with objects, 48 x 32 x 2"

Carol Grant Coppin State University

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“I create sculptures that invite meditation through exploration. Open spaces are intended to become the focal point where one can rest both eye and mind.”

Potential (exposed egg), 2011, stoneware with underglazes, 24 x 12 x 12"

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Anne McLaughlin University of Maryland, College Park

Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“Regardless of the simplicity or complexity of my subject, the avenues available to create my images are limitless. Printmaking requires me to adhere to process while challenging my creative approaches—and my sense of humor.”

Really Cool Fan, Scarlett O’Hara, 2009, mixed media, 16 x 20"

Tonya Gregg Coppin State University

Tight Rope Daze/ Woman Applying Makeup, 2008, acrylic on linen, 46 x 40"

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Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography

“I depict personal and social narratives of women navigating the shifting cultural influences and paradoxical worlds of contemporary life in endeavors to embrace their own personhood. Broad themes that weave in and out of my work include women’s ideals of beauty and social perceptions of identity in public versus private spaces.”


Exhibition List James Adkins Contemplation, 2007, oil on canvas, 28 x 28"

Joan Bevelaqua Christening Dress, 2011, oil on canvas, 30 x 24"

Michel S. Demanche

Peter Herzfeld

CJH, 2010,

Such Scenic White Lies Invent

silver gelatin print, state 1,

Melee Unseen Victims Whine

26 x 28"

Within, 2010, 10 altered books, 11 x 14" each

Carol Grant Nurturing (nestled egg), 2011,

Richard Holt

stoneware with underglazes,

Frustration, 2010,

21 x 24 x 9"

soda-fired stoneware, 16 x 6"

Potential (exposed egg), 2011, Eggplants, 2010,

stoneware with underglazes,

Peace, 2010,

watercolor, 14 x 21"

24 x 12 x 12"

soda-fired stoneware,

Song Bird 1, 2008,

Why?, 2011,

oil on canvas, 12 x 9"

stoneware with underglazes,

Bradley P. Hudson

9 x 18 x 9"

Draxx, 2010,

Song Bird 2, 2008, oil on canvas, 12 x 9"

Edward Brown As Above x 1, 2010, charcoal drawing on paper, 37¾ x 26¾" Spiderweb Light, 2010, charcoal drawing on paper, 26½ x 38½"

Patrick Craig Atoll, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 34 x 34" Grind, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 34 x 34"

Dustin Davis Lost Time, 2009, mixed media, 12 x 12 x 3"

16 x 6"

Tonya Gregg

pen and ink with digital color, 36 x 24"

Surprise in the Garden/ Woman Looking Through

Sea Turtles, 2008,

Telescope, 2008,

color lithograph, 30 x 18"

acrylic on linen, 46 x 40"

Margo Humphrey Tight Rope Daze/Woman

The Bottle Tree, 2011,

Applying Makeup, 2008,

color lithograph,

acrylic on linen, 46 x 40"

28 x 22"

Christopher Harrington

Twins, 2009,

Linear Vortex III, 2008,

color lithograph,

mixed media (pumice,

20 x 26"

pigment, and resin), 24 x 34"

Solomon Isekeije Suspended Matter, 2010,

Benin Festac Head, 2010,

mixed media (pumice,

mixed media painting, 32 x 24"

pigment, and Lexan™), 72 x 36 x 1"

Dance of the Red Moon, 2010, metal foil relief, 24 x 33"

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L. Claire Kincannon

Anne McLaughlin

Karen Norman

“It’s Still the Economy, Stupid.”,

Lincoln: All Flavors

Bread, 2009,

2009, mixed media, 26 x 31"

Are Created Equal, 2009,

watercolor, 28 x 36"

etching with aquatint,

Building and Loan, 2009,

24 x 18"

watercolor, 28 x 36"

Really Cool Fan Feathers, 2009,

Nare Ratnapala

mixed media, 16 x 20"

Untitled, 2011,

One Night Stand, 2009, acrylic with bleeding tissue, 26 x 32" Speak of Evil, 2010, mixed media, 34 x 34"

Really Cool Fan,

oil on canvas, 48 x 72"

Scarlett O’Hara, 2009,

Untitled, 2011,

mixed media, 16 x 20"

oil on canvas, 48 x 72"

oil and acrylic on canvas,

David Medwith

James von Minor

40 x 60"

Sun, 2011,

Inconsistent Memory, 2009–10,

photograph, 12¼ x 9"

oil on wood with objects,

Richard Klank Violin and Cello (diptych), 2010,

Matt Klos Looking Back, 2009–10,

Water, 2011,

oil on linen, 46 x 36"

photograph, 12 x 9"

Clayton Lang

Trace Miller

Change Agent II (for Obama),

Canary in the Well, 2010,

2009, leather collage,

oil on canvas, 48 x 48"

29¼ x 34¼ x 3" Reds III, Dialogue in Red, 2008, leather collage, 33¼ x 40¼ x 3"

Canopy I, n.d., monotype, 40 x 30" Narrowing Horizons, 2010, mixed media collage on panel, 36 x 26"

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48 x 32 x 2" Simple Mechanism, 2010, oil on wood with objects, 48 x 32 x 2"


UMUC ART ADVISORY BOARD Michèle E. Jacobs, Chair Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Anne V. Maher, Esq., Vice Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College I-Ling Chow, honorary member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Paula Cleggett Associate Director for Policy The Curb Center, Vanderbilt University Linda Derrick Collector and Patron of the Arts Patricia Dubroof Artist/Consultant IONA Senior Services Karen Goldstein, honorary member Art Collector Juanita Boyd Hardy Director, Millennium Arts Salon Managing Principal Tiger Management Consulting Group, LLC Sharon Smith Holston, Past Chair Artist’s Representative and Co-owner Holston Originals Pamela Holt Consultant Public Affairs Administration John K. Jacobs President Artex Fine Art Services Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College Philip Koch Maryland Artist Professor Maryland Institute College of Art

Thomas Li, honorary member Chairman and CEO, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

Michèle E. Jacobs Managing Director Special Events at Union Station

David Maril, honorary member News Copy Editor Brockton Enterprise Newspaper

Leronia A. Josey, Esq. Attorney at Law Law Office of Leronia Josey

Harriet E. McNamee Art Historian University of Maryland University College

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense and Intelligence Systems Lockheed Martin Information Technology

Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Past Vice Chair Professor of Art History College of Southern Maryland

UMUC BOARD OF VISITORS Donald S. Orkand, PhD, Chair Founding Partner DC Ventures and Associates, LLC Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt President and Chief Executive Officer The Blewitt Foundation Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Vice President of Administration McKissack & McKissack David W. Bower President and Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America Stephen A. Burch, JD Chairman of the Board of Directors University of Maryland Medical System John M. Derrick Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Israel Feldman President Feldman & Associates Mark J. Gerencser Executive Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.

Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc. Sharon Pinder Founder and Chief Executive Officer The Pinder Group Brig. Gen. Velma Richardson, Ret. Vice President, DoD IT Programs and Special Projects IS&GS Lockheed Martin Corporation Donald Shepard Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. AEGON N.V. Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., Ret. Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Attorney at Law Wood Law Offices, LLC

Contributors Project Manager: Donna Grove Editor: Kate McLoughlin Designer: Jennifer Norris Production Manager: Scott Eury

Cover artwork: James von Minor, Inconsistent Memory, 2009–10, oil on wood with objects, 48 x 32 x 2" Cover photograph by Steven Halperson, Tisara Photography 11-ARTS-015


ABOUT THE UMUC COLLECTIONS Since 1978, UMUC has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists a few miles from the nation’s capital, at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland and, more recently, at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo in Largo, Maryland. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists. UMUC’s Maryland Artists Collections include more than 1,500 artworks and constitute a comprehensive collection of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of more than 280 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Sung Dynasty (960–1279 a.d.) through the 19th century, a historical reach of 10 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks from the UMUC Maryland Artists Collections and Asian Collections are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center, which is open to the public seven days a week and is visited by more than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors each year. UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art. ABOUT UMUC UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degreegranting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to 90,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 27 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate degree and certificate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu.

rudimentary A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals

Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition 2011

UMUC Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition, 2011  

Learn about the exhibition "Rudimentary: A Post-Mastery Return to Fundamentals" at University of Maryland University College.

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