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Amanda Burnham Sold, 2010, watercolor and gouache on paper, 17½ x 17½ in.

FEATURED ARTISTS PATRICK CRAIG TRACE MILLER

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JOAN BEVELAQUA • EDWARD BROWN • AMANDA BURNHAM • EMILY CONOVER CHRISTINA P. DAY

JAMES PLUMB

BRADLEY P. HUDSON

NARE RATNAPALA

MARK KARNES

BROOKE ROGERS

MATT KLOS

JAMES VON MINOR

DRAWINGS FACULTY ART INVITATIONAL 2012 University of Maryland University College


April 22–June 22, 2012 Arts Program University of Maryland University College


Welcome

Katherine Lambert

Dear Patrons of the Arts, Thank you for joining us for the Faculty Art Invitational 2012 at University of Maryland University College (UMUC). For the first time, the exhibition will have a unifying theme: drawings. This year, we welcome 14 esteemed art instructors who are part of the University System of Maryland or are guest artists. Some of the artists, such as James von Minor, whose works were in our recent Biennial Maryland Regional Juried Art Exhibition, and Edward Brown, whose works have been seen in past faculty art exhibitions, may be familiar to you. Others, such as Mark Karnes and Christina P. Day, have not exhibited at UMUC before, and we look forward to presenting their artwork to our students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Each of these artists was selected by our Arts Program curator for his or her ability to create art and inspire students. Whether in charcoal, graphite, or watercolor, drawing is a fundamental part of the creative process and is integral to the instruction of developing inspiring artists. UMUC is proud to extend its gallery space to those who refine this craft and share their knowledge with others. We are thrilled to celebrate the creativity of these artists and hope that our visitors will appreciate the vibrancy and range of expression that they offer. Sincerely,

Javier Miyares Acting President University of Maryland University College

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Art—A Means to an End Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

Most artists create works of art to express themselves and their experiences, to document events, and/or to reflect their heritage. They incorporate a moment of time onto a tangible surface of canvas, paper, metal, film, sculpture, etc. The “end” is a work of art that tells a story, fascinates the viewer, or heals the body. In any case, art will cause a response from the viewer. I once had a conversation about collecting art with a young couple. They agreed that they needed more art—some color on their walls—and began a quest to add quality works to their home. In installing the works, they saw a distinct change in the overall atmosphere of their home. With just a few works, they said, their home became more inviting, reflective of their lifestyle, and representative of the America in which they live. Prior to hanging some art, they were content with living in a space with walls that were void of art and color. The husband said that he was not an art person but has noticed how art has changed the environment of his home. Now he is working with his staff to get works of art throughout the blank, white walls of his office—a space that has been void of art for the past several years—and will continue to visit museums and galleries to learn more about art and artists. Our conversation reminded me that art is a powerful tool—art is a means to an end. In one sense art is created for a specific purpose, and, on the other hand, it often has a meaning that is far beyond the intent of the creator. Today, we are learning more about the healing power of art as it is used in hospitals as therapy for patients. Tomorrow, the power of art is unlimited. Just a few pieces of art changed the aesthetics of that couple’s home and changed the mind of the husband about the power of art to transform spaces. On a wider plane, art is a means to an end. Art instructors play a key role in the preservation, promotion, and development of art forms for and among the next generation. They work to articulate concerns to peers to ensure the continuation of their art programs. They battle the challenge of budget cuts that can affect art supplies and staff. Art teachers are an important resource for students majoring in art or exploring their creative talents. They encourage, nurture, and evaluate students in all mediums and various styles and techniques. They mold students to become art practitioners. They challenge students to think, evolve, stretch their imaginations, and incorporate new techniques and

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methods into their work. They help students reach their maximum potential and synthesize new modes of thought and methods in the art field. They are instructors, and, yet, at the same time, they are artists. Thanks to them, new mediums emerge for the next generation to view, digest, discuss, and evaluate. For example, with the evolution of technology in recent years, video art has had an increasing impact on the art world. Faculty Art Invitational 2012 is the latest in a series of annual exhibitions to showcase works of art by artists who are a part of the University System of Maryland, to provide a professional environment for these artists to showcase their works, and to provide the public with a better understanding of the challenges working professional artists face. This exhibition also includes works by guest artists who have worked in or mastered the medium of drawing. This year, Brian Young, UMUC’s curator, decided to focus the exhibition on the theme of drawing. This theme allows us to explore the use of paper in the creation of works of art. When an artist uses paper as the backdrop on which to affix a chosen medium (watercolor, pastel, charcoal, graphite, oil stick, etc.), the end result—ranging from simple line drawings to realistic depictions—is fascinating, sophisticated, and creative. It is a powerful interpretation of American life and experience. UMUC is delighted to present the Faculty Art Invitational 2012.

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DRAWINGS: Faculty Art Invitational 2012 Brian Young Curator, Arts Program University of Maryland University College

My tenure as the curator of the UMUC Arts Program began in May 2011 while last year’s Faculty Art Invitational was taking place, and I am so pleased to continue this tradition. The Faculty Art Invitational 2012 showcases the work of artists who are also instructors or professors within the University System of Maryland and works by select artists from other universities. This year those select artists include Christina Day and Mark Karnes, instructors at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, and James Plumb, an instructor at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills. The theme of this year’s invitational is Drawings. For me, the term drawing is broad and fluid; it encompasses many forms. During the Renaissance in Italy, drawings might be considered primi pensieri or first thoughts while in the 18th century in France, pastellists were in high demand. In the 20th century, Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso introduced collage into the lexicon of artistic terms. My definition of drawing, which has shifted over the years, largely includes the above terms and more. Essentially, drawings are unique works on paper that are not prints or photographs. Drawing can refer to works executed in ink, charcoal, silverpoint, crayon, pastel, watercolor, wash, collage, etc. It can include studies, sketches, finished works, works mounted on canvas, and so on. I have also broadened my definition to allow for rubbings, three-dimensional works, works executed with tape, and pieces where the pigment was blown rather than drawn on to the paper. In this invitational, James von Minor, for example, has expanded drawing’s range to allow for the inclusion of found objects such as pencils and small planks of wood. Matt Klos has lent a watercolor created with the monotype process. Amanda Burnham was responsible for the prominent installation piece. Yet, I did not set out with broadening the definition as a goal. Rather, I wanted to explore the rich variety of drawing executed by full-time artists who use it as part of the fundamental creative process. The works by Day best embody the concept of pensieri from earlier centuries. Her work reflects an immediate interpretation of her ideas into tangible form. In other words, these drawings serve a functional role to aid the artist in planning the spatial complexities of her larger, three-dimensional works. Observed without that context,

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they could be seen as economical or lacking the richness of other works in this show. This would be a misreading; they are rich because of their purpose. Even with their functionality, they reveal underlying aesthetic traits such as balance and harmony. In the drawings of von Minor, Nare Ratnapala, and Patrick Craig, viewers get the chance to see the creative process stripped of the complexities celebrated in their better-known works. In von Minor’s works on paper, we see the genesis of his ideas, as if he is gathering the building blocks of line, texture, and color. The physical tensions of his larger, finished works have their origins here in the tautness of string or in the choice of understated colors. Ratnapala’s numeric studies are reminiscent of the previous century’s exercises in automatism. At the same time, this series shows a remarkable control and consistency. Ratnapala’s drawings are simultaneously infused with energy and structural stability. Despite their beauty, the artist admits they are starting points for paintings, rendering the drawings expendable. Through the years, one of Craig’s principal pursuits is the arrangement of color within immeasurable spatial complexity. In the two pastels, that search is evident and stands in opposition to the more finished drawings such as Gum Brain. His contrasting approaches to drawing seen here serve as a reminder that individual artists often have a range of expression all within one artistic category. To emphasize this point across media and time, I have included his collage Trawler from 1984. Karnes, Plumb, and Klos demonstrate that draftsmanship can be an indispensable part of preparing to create two-dimensional works. Collectively, their drawings are exquisite, but they represent just part of the artists’ output. Karnes works in a modest scale, but the detail, both present and implied, gives rich insight into his direct surroundings. While his subjects are frozen capsules of the ordinary, his command of watercolor is extraordinary. Klos evokes the spirit of the French Barbizon painters of the 19th century. His work originates from direct observation and is made timeless through the atmospheric qualities prized among early tonalists such as James A.M. Whistler and John Twachtman. Plumb’s lineage is traceable to the old masters of the 17th century, who looked to still lifes, animals, and the mirror for their subjects. Like Plumb, they captured the essence of those things observed in nature. Plumb’s line is precise and confident and effortlessly gives volume to pieces such as Ostrich Egg and Reilly. Bradley Hudson’s drawings are preparatory as well, but for a different medium: illustration. He publishes comics through Coldstream Studios, and his drawings reveal the linear qualities so valued in that genre. Drawings are also crucial to mapping out the different vignettes arranged on each page. The end result can be compacted action, exaggerated drama, and interwoven narrative. Adding the color will come in a later stage.

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Emily Conover has submitted a modest group in size and number, but together they remind us that small-scale drawings can possess untold tension and energy normally displayed in much larger installations. Even their titles, such as Roll and Remnants, underscore a restless quality matched by the rawness of the charcoal and pastel. These works have the drama of a Baroque painting without the fussiness of a recognizable subject. Works by Joan Bevelaqua, Brooke Rogers, and Trace Miller share enigmatic yet narrative qualities. Bevelaqua’s pieces, individually, appear as a small tableau. The implied presence of the human figure (even in Hornet Nest 1) mixes with the seeds of an unfolding story. The works evoke memory, absence, and tension. In Rogers’s work, the silhouettes are based on drawings of his wife set among corn plants. As the two elements are compared, the corn becomes a metaphor for the universality or oneness of forms in nature. While the scale is considerable and the colors are vibrant, the execution on paper lends a sense of fragility. Miller’s Boneyard and Cast No Shadows also allude to the fragility of life. The fragmented quality of the former collage is especially poignant for an image that freezes the moment of death. Miller’s earlier artwork, Mobius Strip II, has an organic quality with its rich, warm pigment over rag paper. Like Rogers, Edward Brown works in series based on the outdoor environment. For Brown, the emphasis is on the brooding quality of nature, with its dark shadows, anthropomorphic trees, and enormous scale. The visible strokes of charcoal heighten the sense of mystery and drama. This body of work reminds us why suspenseful tales are set in the forest. Burnham takes the exhibition in a relatively new direction for drawing as evidenced by her site-specific work (in addition to the traditional pieces). As she toured the UMUC space, Burnham deliberately carved out a transitional or secondary space. As such, she reminds audiences that drawing can be large-scale, three-dimensional, evolving, assembled, and irregular. In short, the possibilities are nearly endless. I hope that this exhibition offers the opportunity to explore the rich variety that can be found within the slice of contemporary draftsmanship these teaching artists provide.

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featured artists JOAN BEVELAQUA EDWARD BROWN AMANDA BURNHAM EMILY CONOVER PATRICK CRAIG CHRISTINA P. DAY BRADLEY P. HUDSON MARK KARNES MATT KLOS TRACE MILLER JAMES PLUMB NARE RATNAPALA BROOKE ROGERS Mark Karnes, Chair with Easel, 2009, black watercolor on paper, 6 x 9 in.

JAMES VON MINOR


JOAN BEVELAQUA UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

Study for Lament 2004 graphite on paper 29 x 22 in. 10


EDWARD BROWN SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Centennial I 2000 charcoal on paper 27 x 38 in.

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AMANDA BURNHAM TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Quik 2010 watercolor, gouache, and acrylic on paper 33 x 30 in.

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EMILY CONOVER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

Barb 2012 mixed media on paper, mounted on panel 9 x 13 in. 13


PATRICK CRAIG UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

Hive 2012 pastel and ink on paper 30 x 22 in. 14


CHRISTINA P. DAY MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

Jig Drawings F and B 2011 graphite, sketchbook paper, tracing paper, and tape 10 x 6他 in. each 15


BRADLEY P. HUDSON UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

Draxx 2, pages 14 & 15 2011 graphite, pen, and ink on paper 17 x 21 in. 16


MARK KARNES MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART

Self Portrait 2009 black watercolor on paper 6 x 4 in. 17


MATT KLOS ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Pantry 2007 graphite and white charcoal on paper 18 x 12½ in. 18


TRACE MILLER TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Cast No Shadows 2012 mixed media collage on paper 36 x 60 in. 19


JAMES PLUMB CHESAPEAKE COLLEGE

3 Mango c. 2000 graphite on paper 15 x 13¼ in.

% Reilly c. 2004 graphite on paper 20 x 31½ in.

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NARE RATNAPALA UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK

Study 24-16 2011 watercolor, pencil, ink, wash, and graphite on paper 15 x 30 in.

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BROOKE ROGERS SALISBURY UNIVERSITY

Day Is Dying in the West 2011 acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, mounted on wood 36 x 48 in.

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JAMES VON MINOR TOWSON UNIVERSITY

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A Fixed Point, A Short Distance 2011 wood, graphite, shellac, paper, and objects 20 x 4½ x 1 in. Only a Part 2011 wood, graphite, shellac, paper, and paint stick with objects 64 x 6 x 5 in.

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Exhibition List

Sold, 2010, watercolor and gouache on paper, 17½ x 17½ in.

Joan Bevelaqua University of Maryland University College Dress Form, 2001, graphite on paper, 17 x 7 in. Hornet Nest 1, c. 2006, watercolor on paper, 40 x 32 in., UMUC Maryland Artists Collections

Study for Christening Dress, 2011, graphite on paper, 20 x 15 in. Study for Lament, 2004, graphite on paper, 29 x 22 in.

Edward Brown Salisbury University Centennial I, 2000, charcoal on paper, 27 x 38 in. Clouds, 2005, charcoal on paper, 35 x 38 in. Return, 2012, charcoal on paper, 25 x 37 in.

Amanda Burnham Towson University Crawl Space, 2012, mixed-media installation, approx. 140 x 68 x 90 in. Quik, 2010, watercolor, gouache, and acrylic on paper, 33 x 30 in.

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Trawler, 1984, mixed media on paper, 37½ x 57½ in., UMUC Maryland Artists Collections

Emily Conover University of Maryland, College Park Barb, 2012, mixed media on paper, mounted on panel, 9 x 13 in. Remnants, 2003, charcoal, pastel, and paint on paper, mounted on panel, 50 x 48 in. Remnants #3, 2012, mixed media on paper, mounted on panel, 15 x 9½ in. Roll, 2012, mixed media on paper, mounted on panel, 9½ x 15 in.

Christina P. Day Maryland Institute College of Art Jig Drawings A and C, 2011, graphite, sketchbook paper, tracing paper, and tape, 10 x 6¾ in. each Jig Drawings F and B, 2011, graphite, sketchbook paper, tracing paper, and tape, 10 x 6¾ in. each Polaroid (latitude view), 2012, graphite transfer drawing on paper, 11 x 11 in. Polaroid (longitude view), 2012, graphite transfer drawing on paper, 11 x 11 in.

Bradley P. Hudson Patrick Craig University of Maryland, College Park

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Gum Brain, 2012, acrylic on paper, 22 x 15 in.

Dinos, Mercurys and Private Dicks, 2011, graphite, pen, and ink on paper, 19 x 24 in.

Hive, 2012, pastel and ink on paper, 30 x 22 in.

Draxx 2, pages 14 & 15, 2011, graphite, pen, and ink on paper, 17 x 21 in.

Maze, 2011, acrylic on paper, 22 x 15 in.

Tales from the OEP, 2011, graphite, pen, and ink on paper, 11 x 17 in.

Swing, 2012, pastel and ink on paper, 30 x 22 in.

Mark Karnes Maryland Institute College of Art Buildings, 2010, watercolor on paper, 8 x 10 in.


Chair with Easel, 2009, black watercolor on paper, 6 x 9 in.

Cast No Shadows, 2012, mixed media collage on paper, 36 x 60 in.

Gate, St. Mary’s Seminary, 2008, watercolor on paper, 6 x 6¾ in.

Mobius Strip II, 1995, oil on rag paper, 39 x 22 in.,

Living Room with Sunlight, 2010, black watercolor on paper, 8 x 8 in.

James Plumb

UMUC Maryland Artists Collections

Chesapeake College

Self Portrait, 2009, black watercolor on paper, 6 x 4 in.

Garlic and Pear with Pottery, 2011, graphite and white charcoal on colored paper, 8½ x 14½ in.

Sheppard Pratt, 2009, black watercolor on paper, 4 x 6 in.

Mango, c. 2000, graphite on paper, 15 x 13¼ in.

Matt Klos Anne Arundel Community College

Ostrich Egg, 2012, graphite on paper, 8 x 14 in.

Colander, 2007, graphite on paper, 14 x 14 in.

Reilly, c. 2004, graphite on paper, 20 x 31½ in.

Daisies, 2007, watercolor on paper, 9 x 10 in.

Self Portrait, c. 1975, graphite on paper, 21¾ x 17¼ in.

Lone Birch, 2009, watercolor monotype, 10 x 10 in.

Nare Ratnapala

Pantry, 2007, graphite and white charcoal on paper, 18 x 12½ in.

Study 24-16, 2011, watercolor, pencil, ink, wash, and graphite on paper, 15 x 30 in.

Wharf Maine, 2009, watercolor monotype, 10 x 10 in.

Trace Miller

University of Maryland, College Park

Study 24-18, 2012, watercolor, pencil, ink, wash, and graphite on paper, 15 x 30 in.

Towson University Bone Yard, 2011, mixed media collage on panel, 48 x 48 in.

Study 31-11, 2012, watercolor, pencil, ink, wash, and graphite on paper, 15 x 30 in.

Study 31-12, 2011, watercolor, pencil, ink, wash, and graphite on paper, 15 x 30 in.

Brooke Rogers Salisbury University Day Is Dying in the West, 2011, acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, mounted on wood, 36 x 48 in. Hail to the Brightness, 2011, acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, mounted on wood, 48 x 36 in. Her Hymn, 2011, acrylic on paper mounted on canvas, mounted on wood, 48 x 36 in.

James von Minor Towson University A Fixed Point, A Short Distance, 2011, wood, graphite, shellac, paper, and objects, 20 x 4½ x 1 in. Only a Part, 2011, wood, graphite, shellac, paper, and paint stick with objects, 64 x 6 x 5 in. Stripe/Dot #1, 2007, charcoal on paper, 30 x 22 in. Stripe/Dot #3, 2008, charcoal and gouache on paper, 30 x 22 in. Unless otherwise noted, all works have been provided courtesy of the artist.

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ABOUT UMUC UMUC is the largest public university in the United States. As one of the 11 degreegranting institutions of the University System of Maryland, this global university specializes in high-quality academic programs tailored to working adults. UMUC has earned a worldwide reputation for excellence as a comprehensive virtual university and, through a combination of classroom and distance-learning formats, provides educational opportunities to more than 92,000 students. The university is proud to offer highly acclaimed faculty and world-class student services to educate students online, throughout Maryland, across the United States, and in 28 countries and territories around the world. UMUC serves its students through undergraduate and graduate programs, noncredit leadership development, and customized programs. For more information regarding UMUC and its programs, visit www.umuc.edu. ABOUT THE ARTS AT UMUC Since 1978, University of Maryland University College (UMUC) has proudly shown works from a large collection of international and Maryland artists at the UMUC Inn and Conference Center in Adelphi, Maryland, a few miles from the nation’s capital. Through its Arts Program, the university provides a prestigious and wide-ranging forum for emerging and established artists and brings art to the community through its own collections, which have grown to include more than 1,900 pieces of art, and special exhibitions. UMUC’s collections focus on both art by Maryland artists and art from around the world. They include the Maryland Artist Collection, the Doris Patz Collection of Maryland Artists, the Asian Collections, the Education Collection, and the International Collection. The university’s collection of Maryland art includes approximately 1,400 works and provides a comprehensive survey of 20th- and 21st-century Maryland art. The university’s Asian Collections consist of nearly 420 pieces of Chinese art, Japanese prints, and Balinese folk art, dating from the Tang Dynasty (618–907 a.d.) through the 19th century—a historical reach of 13 centuries. The UMUC collection of Japanese prints includes more than 120 prints by 35 artists. Artworks are on display throughout the UMUC Inn and Conference Center and the Administration Building in Adelphi as well as at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo. The Adelphi facilities are open to the public seven days a week and are visited by more than 100,000 students, scholars, and visitors each year. Exhibitions at the UMUC Academic Center at Largo are open to visitors 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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UMUC ARTS PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT The Arts Program at UMUC creates an environment in which its diverse constituents, including members of the university community and the general public, can study and learn about art by directly experiencing it. The Arts Program seeks to promote the university’s core values and to provide educational opportunities for lifelong learning. From the research and study of works of art to the teaching applications of each of our exhibitions, the Arts Program will play an increasing role in academic life at the university. With a regional and national focus, the Arts Program is dedicated to the acquisition, preservation, study, exhibition, and interpretation of works of art of the highest quality in a variety of media that represent its constituents and to continuing its historic dedication to Maryland and Asian art.

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UMUC ART ADVISORY BOARD Javier Miyares Acting President University of Maryland University College Michèle E. Jacobs, Chair Managing Director Special Events at Union Station Anne V. Maher, Esq., Vice Chair Attorney at Law Kleinfeld, Kaplan & Becker, LLP Eva J. Allen, PhD Art Historian I-Ling Chow, honorary member Regional President and Managing Director, Ret. Asia Bank, N.A. Paula Cleggett Associate Director for Policy, The Curb Center Vanderbilt University Linda Derrick Collector and Patron of the Arts Patricia Dubroof Artist/Consultant IONA Senior Services Karin Goldstein, honorary member Art Collector Juanita Boyd Hardy Director, Millennium Arts Salon Managing Principal Tiger Management Consulting Group, LLC Sharon Smith Holston, Past Chair Artist’s Representative and Co-owner Holston Originals Pamela Holt Consultant Public Affairs Administration Eric Key Director, Arts Program University of Maryland University College Philip Koch Maryland Artist Professor, Maryland Institute College of Art

Thomas Li, honorary member Chairman and CEO, Ret. Biotech Research Labs, Inc.

Michèle E. Jacobs Managing Director Special Events at Union Station

David Maril, honorary member Journalist President, Herman Maril Foundation

Donald S. Orkand, PhD, Former Chair Founding Partner DC Ventures and Associates, LLC

Barbara Stephanic, PhD, Past Vice Chair, honorary member Professor of Art History College of Southern Maryland

Lt. Gen. Emmett Paige Jr., Ret. Vice President of Operations, Ret. Department of Defense and Intelligence Systems, Lockheed Martin Information Technology

Brian Young, staff Curator, Arts Program University of Maryland University College UMUC BOARD OF VISITORS Mark J. Gerencser, Chair Executive Vice President Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc. Evelyn J. Bata, PhD Collegiate Professor University of Maryland University College Richard F. Blewitt President and Chief Executive Officer The Blewitt Foundation Joseph V. Bowen Jr. Vice President of Administration McKissack & McKissack David W. Bower President and Chief Executive Officer Data Computer Corporation of America Stephen A. Burch, JD Chairman of the Board of Directors University of Maryland Medical System John M. Derrick Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Israel Feldman President Feldman & Associates

Charles E. (Ted) Peck Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ret. The Ryland Group, Inc. Sharon Pinder Founder and Chief Executive Officer The Pinder Group Brig. Gen. Velma Richardson, Ret. Vice President, DoD IT Programs and Special Projects IS&GS Lockheed Martin Corporation Gen. John (Jack) Vessey Jr., Ret., Member Emeritus Former Chairman U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff William T. (Bill) Wood, JD Wood Law Offices, LLC Joyce M. Wright Chief Claims Officer, People’s Trust Homeowners Insurance CONTRIBUTORS Project Manager: Donna Grove Curator: Brian Young Editor: Kate McLoughlin Designer: Jennifer Norris Production Manager: Scott Eury Fine Arts Technician: René A. Sanjines Administrative Assistant: Denise Melvin

Karl R. Gumtow Founder and Chief Executive Officer CyberPoint International

Cover artwork: Patrick Craig, Maze (detail), 2011, acrylic on paper photograph by Uphoto 12-ARTS-040

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Amanda Burnham Sold, 2010, watercolor and gouache on paper, 17½ x 17½ in.

FEATURED ARTISTS PATRICK CRAIG TRACE MILLER

• •

JOAN BEVELAQUA • EDWARD BROWN • AMANDA BURNHAM • EMILY CONOVER CHRISTINA P. DAY

JAMES PLUMB

BRADLEY P. HUDSON

NARE RATNAPALA

MARK KARNES

BROOKE ROGERS

MATT KLOS

JAMES VON MINOR

DRAWINGS FACULTY ART INVITATIONAL 2012 University of Maryland University College

UMUC Faculty Art Invitational Exhibition, 2012  

Learn about the exhibition "Drawings" at University of Maryland University College.

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